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ADAIR COUNTY GRAND JURY MET TUESDAY

The Adair County Grand Jury handed up several indictments on Tuesday, Mike Scales for WAVE NEWS has more... 

 

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AREA ARRESTS 12-2-20



Ryan Butrum, 39, of Russell Springs, KY was taken into custody by Officer Phillips with the Russell Springs Police Department on Tuesday afternoon. He was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance, 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth), Possession of Marijuana, Possession of a Firearm by a convicted Felon, Operating a Motor Vehicle under the Influence of a Controlled Substance 1st and issued a Citation for a Misdemeanor (for Failure to Appear). He was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

David Kingsley, 44, of Columbia, KY was arrested by Officer Foster with the Columbia Police Department last night on charges of Reckless Driving, Wanton Endangerment 2nd Degree, DUI, Possession of Open Alcohol Beverage in Vehicle, Possession of Controlled Substance, 2nd Degree – Drug Unspecified, and Prescription Controlled Substance not in Proper Container 1st Offense. He was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

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Local Coronavirus Update 12-2-20


Russell County - 48 new cases Tuesday. We had 2 deaths. We had 16 cases released from isolation today. We now have 107 active cases which 103 are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 3 at Russell County Hospital and 1 at Somerset.

 

Adair County - 12 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 17 cases. We have had 990 total cases with 856 of those released and 32 deaths. We have 102 active cases with 91 of those in home isolation and 11 in area hospitals.

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2 COVID-19 Deaths in Russell County

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.59%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 131 deaths resulting in a 1.53% mortality rate (about 1 in 65) among known cases. This compares with a 1.06% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.98% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 85 cases* in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. We have had a total of 543 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.33% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.56%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 8,584 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 4.11% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 182 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 17; Casey: 13; Clinton: 12; Cumberland: 6; Green: 4; McCreary: 22; Pulaski: 49; Russell: 16; Taylor: 31; and, Wayne: 12. In all, we have released 86.7% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 3 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1009 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/25/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1152.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Businesses, Family, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 187 today: Adair: 12; Casey: 13; Clinton: 11; Cumberland: 2; Green: 11; McCreary: 11; Pulaski: 45; Russell: 48; Taylor: 20; and, Wayne: 14. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.017. This means our total case count is projected to double every 41.94 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 273 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 61-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 79-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old male who is released, 11/30/20;
Clinton: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is released, 11/25/20;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: An 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: An 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 93-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 91-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: An 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: An 89-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: An 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: An 89-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: An 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: An 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: An 89-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: An 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: An 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the numbers may seem that the Pulaski and Wayne numbers are off tonight. That is because we removed a duplicate entry for Pulaski. Also, one case recorded to Wayne yesterday was moved to the appropriate address in Pulaski.

 

The deaths we report today are an 86-year-old female long-term care resident from Russell and an 84-year-old-male long-term care resident from Russell. For those who still think COVID-19 is no worse than the flu, as of today, the U.S. has experienced almost 270,000 COVID-19 deaths. If you add up all of the U.S. flu deaths per year, it takes the last 7 years’ worth of flu deaths to approach that number (https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/burden/past-seasons.html).

 

Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 8,584 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 185,110 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 183,168 statewide plus 1,942 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

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35 New COVID-19 Deaths; More Than 4,000 New Cases

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 1, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state’s worst ever COVID-19 report by virtually every measure. He reported more than 4,000 new cases and 35 new deaths. Nearly 250 Kentuckians are fighting for their lives on ventilators.

 

“There’s no way to sugarcoat it. Today is the very worst day we have had for reporting on the spread of the coronavirus and it is the deadliest day that we have had,” said Gov. Beshear. “This is exponential growth. If we don’t all do our part, if we try to be the exception, then slowing down this thing won’t work and we will lose a lot more Kentuckians we love and care about.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 1, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 4,151
  • New deaths today: 35
  • Positivity rate: 9.59%
  • Total deaths: 1,943
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,777
  • Currently in ICU: 441
  • Currently on ventilator: 241

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, McCracken, Warren, Kenton, Hardin, Daviess and Boone. Each county reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 700.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 70-year-old man from Boyd County; a 75-year-old man from Calloway County; an 82-year-old man from Christian County; a 96-year-old woman from Daviess County; a 95-year-old woman from Graves County; two women, ages 79 and 86, and two men, ages 57 and 66, from Grayson County; a 93-year-old woman from Henderson County; an 87-year-old man from Hopkins County; six women, ages 61, 64, 76, 77, 77 and 80, and seven men, ages 62, 64, 64, 66, 72, 73 and 94, from Jefferson County; a 62-year-old woman from Jessamine County; a 76-year-old man from Kenton County; a 79-year-old woman from Marshall County; a 66-year-old woman from Mason County; two men, ages 59 and 64, from McCracken County; an 88-year-old woman and a 64-year-old man from Monroe County; a 65-year-old man from Montgomery County; a 93-year-old woman from Robertson County; and an 82-year-old man from Union County.

 

Contact Tracing
Mark Carter, Cabinet for Health and Family Services policy advisor, also updated Kentuckians on contact tracing in Kentucky and how they can protect themselves, their families and their community.

 

Carter highlighted important successes: Over 1,600 contact tracing staff in the state have now completed 215,000 daily check-ins with COVID-19-positive Kentuckians to monitor symptoms and provide support.


They have also contacted more than 47,000 people identified as contacts potentially exposed to the virus. 


However, he also emphasized the need for greater public cooperation and renewed federal funding.

 

“The public health strategy for contact tracing depended on broad public participation – cooperating with the local health departments when a tracer calls, wearing masks, social distancing and testing,” Carter said. “We simply haven’t had enough participation from the public and the resulting surge has overwhelmed contact tracing capacity.

 

“Another challenge is that federal funds from the CARES Act have made the statewide contact tracing and tracking information management system and surge staffing possible, but Congress has not taken any action on additional stimulus legislation to date. Currently, Kentucky and all other states are required to use all CARES Act funding by Dec. 30, 2020.”

 

CARES Act Funding for Local Governments
The Governor announced that the Kentucky Department for Local Government is releasing an additional $50 million in CARES Act funding to reimburse city and county governments for expenses related to COVID-19. Approximately 200 cities and counties are eligible because they have already exhausted their original allotment and have remaining eligible reimbursements.

 

To apply, eligible local governments will follow the Department for Local Government’s original application process, which is outlined on its website.

 

“Our local governments have been lifelines in our communities during the pandemic,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

“When this $50 million is depleted, which we believe will be within the month, we will need more help from the federal government.”

 

Healthy at Home Utility Relief Fund Update
The Governor said there is about $11 million remaining in the Healthy at Home Utility Relief Fund and encouraged eligible Kentuckians to apply.

 

The fund provides relief to Kentuckians affected by COVID-19 who need assistance with their water, wastewater, electric or natural gas service. Kentucky’s Community Action Network is partnering with the Beshear administration to distribute these funds statewide.

 

“Eligible households can receive a one-time $500 benefit towards their water and or wastewater bills and $400 towards their natural gas or utility bills,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Households who have an income up to 200% of the Federal Poverty Line and have been economically impacted due to COVID-19 can apply.

 

Interested households should contact their local Community Action Outreach Office on how to apply. To locate your local office, please call 800-456-3452.

 

Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund
The Governor said that as of 3 p.m., the Public Protection Cabinet had received 2,650 applications for $25.6 million in assistance. The state has already approved applications for $1.7 million. To apply, click here.

 

Testing 
The Governor said Kentuckians can find more than 350 testing locations here.

 

To register for surge testing in Louisville (Kentucky Exposition Center) or Lexington (Keeneland Racecourse), visit DoINeedACOVID19Test.com. Both locations are open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

COVID-19 in Veterans Centers
The Governor said there is one deceased veteran at Thomson-Hood Veterans Center (THVC) in Wilmore who was previously listed as recovered, but has since died.

 

“That is a total of 31 veteran deaths from COVID-19 at THVC. It’s simply heartbreaking. We still have two active cases of COVID-19 in veterans at THVC,” said Gov. Beshear. “In addition, the veteran who became the first active case of COVID-19 at Western Kentucky Veterans Center in Hanson has since died. We must do more as a community to protect these heroes.”

 

Vaccine Distribution
Finally, the Governor updated Kentuckians on the state’s vaccine distribution process, discussed in detail at yesterday’s press conference. Kentuckians should visit KYCOVID19.ky.gov to view the latest information on the vaccine, including:

 

The Governor reminded Kentuckians that his administration is working on a public communication campaign that will launch this month to help families have even more information about the vaccine plan and process.

 

Memorial
Today, Gov. Beshear honored Bruce Gadansky, 76, who passed away after a long-fought battle with the virus. On Nov. 14, Bruce left his son, Chris, a voicemail – the last voicemail Chris would ever receive from his father.

 

“As Bruce passed on, his wife and son were left to say their goodbyes, urge him on to a better tomorrow, through a phone held to his ear by a nurse. That is what COVID does to our loved ones,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

“Bruce was a friend to everyone, a stranger to no one. He was a man of service – a U.S. Navy veteran, serving in Vietnam, who also served as deputy sheriff in Oldham County for 10 years. Bruce championed causes for the elderly during his time as vice president of operations for the Louisville Better Business Bureau, working with the FBI against consumer fraud. And he also spent his time volunteering for St. Matthews Baseball where he made friends young and old – something his son will miss seeing the most. Above everything else, Bruce was a loving husband to Mickey, a father to two sons and a grandfather to five grandchildren. He was a passionate fan of baseball, bourbon, cigars and a good joke.

 

“What we must stress here is Bruce and Mickey did it right. They barely left the house in nine months and always wore a mask. But that’s the thing about masks – it takes all of us wearing them correctly. If we do, we can prevent the loss of individuals like Bruce, and the heartbreak of his family now mourning his loss.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: BosnianChineseEnglishJapaneseKoreanSpanishand Russian.

 

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5 NEW COVID DEATHS IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.42%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 5 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 129 deaths resulting in a 1.54% mortality rate (about 1 in 65) among known cases. This compares with a 1.07% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.98% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 85 cases* in the hospital. This is 14 more than yesterday. We have had a total of 538 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.41% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.62%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 8,397 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 4.02% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 118 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 4; Casey: 7; Clinton: 11; Cumberland: 5; Green: 4; McCreary: 7; Pulaski: 26; Russell: 22; Taylor: 13; and, Wayne: 19. In all, we have released 86.5% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 9 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1006 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/25/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1153.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Businesses, Family, and Schools. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 132 today: Adair: 7; Casey: 8; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 1; Green: 9; McCreary: 14; Pulaski: 44; Russell: 7; Taylor: 22; and, Wayne: 13. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.018. This means our total case count is projected to double every 38.78 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 273 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old female who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Green: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 83-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 66-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is released, 11/29/20;
Wayne: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The 5 deaths are an 80-year-old female from Adair Vo. who had been hospitalized and who had been released from public health monitoring (meaning, she was no longer contagious) but later succumbed to lasting complications from the disease; a 47-year-old male from Casey Co. who had been hospitalized and who had been released from public health monitoring but later succumbed to lasting complications from the disease among other significant co-morbidities; a 69-year-old male from Casey Co. with other significant contributing co-morbidities; a 50-year-old female from Clinton Co. and an 81-year-old male from Pulaski Co. who had been hospitalized.

 

So far this week we have added 362 new cases compared with 402 last week. Also, we have 18 fewer active cases this week compared to this time last week. Even if this is beginning to suggest a new plateau, remember, deaths and hospitalizations will not likely start decreasing for about 3 to 4 weeks. So, it is not surprising our numbers of deaths and hospitalizations remain very high.

 

I know the restrictions are painful, but hopefully the slightly lower new and active cases compared to this time last week means that what we are doing now is beginning to work. This is not a time to let up. It is time for everyone in our communities to double-down on our efforts. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 8,397 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 180,940 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 179,041 statewide plus 1,899 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). 

 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

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ADAIR CO. MAN ARRESTED FOR ILLEGALLY POSSESSING A HANDGUN....

 

On Sunday, November 29, 2020 just after 10:00pmET, Campbellsville Police received a complaint of a suspicious vehicle in the area of Peterson Street. Officers Elliott Taylor and Paul Pinson responded and made contact with 30-year-old Timothy R. Jones of Columbia, KY.  After an investigation, Jones was arrested and charged with Possession of a Handgun by a Convicted Felon and lodged in the Taylor County Detention Center.

 

Location: Peterson Street, Campbellsville

 

Agency Involved: Campbellsville Police Department

 

Investigating Officers:  Officers Elliott Taylor and Paul Pinson

 

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RC CLERKS OFFICE CLOSING DUE TO POSITIVE COVID TEST

 

The Russell County Clerks Office will closed the remainder of today (Tuesday) and will remain closed on Wednesday due to an employee testing positive for the Coronavirus. 

 

 

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Informational HELP for Restaurants....

 

$40 Million in CARES Act Funding.....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, please visit teamkyfbrf.ky.gov/.

 

To access the application, please visit teamkyfbrf.ky.gov/Claim.aspx?CID.

 

For more information about COVID-19 response in Kentucky, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 12-1-20

 

Russell County - 7 new cases Monday. We had 22 cases released from isolation. We now have 77 active cases which 72 cases are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 3 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Somerset and 1 at UK.

 

Adair County - 7 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 4 cases. I'm also sad to report 1 death for today. We have had 978 total cases with 839 of those released and 32 deaths. We have 107 active cases with 96 of those in home isolation and 11 in area hospitals.

 

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R.C. Woman Arrested on Meth & Numerous Other Charges...

 

Nancy Hammons, 35, of Russell Springs, KY was arrested by KSP on Monday afternoon for Possession of Methamphetamine, DUI (4th or more offense), Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Driving Too Fast For Conditions, and Operating on a Suspended or Revoked License. She was lodged in the Russell Co. Detention Center.
 

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Gov. Beshear, Dr. Stack: First Vaccine Shipments Arriving Soon

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 30, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear and Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH), said the state is expecting to receive approximately 38,000 doses of the vaccine against the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) as early as mid-December.

 

“Those will be provided to 38,000 individuals. We can go ahead and provide the first of these shots, and then we will receive the booster shots about three weeks later,” said Gov. Beshear. “We will be ready on moment one that we’re able to provide these vaccines.”

 

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines both require an initial shot followed by a booster shot.

 

While the number of doses and allocation plan are subject to change, the Governor said as of today the majority of the state’s initial vaccine shipment will go to long-term care (LTC) facilities; about 12,000 doses will go to hospitals to help inoculate health care workers.

 

“Every week we do not vaccinate long-term care residents, we lose them. With vaccines, we can provide such better protection to these individuals,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’ve been taking aggressive steps since the beginning of this virus, committed to fighting back, not surrendering to it or accepting avoidable loss.”

 

The state’s immediate goal is reducing COVID-19 deaths. With 66% of the deaths coming from LTC facilities, vaccines could help significantly decrease Kentucky’s COVID-19 death toll beginning in January. Also, because LTC residents tend to require the most care, vaccinations in LTC facilities will help reduce COVID-19’s burden on Kentucky’s health care system.

 

This week, the state is participating in an end-to-end exercise with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Pfizer and McKesson to test one shipment of an empty thermal shipping container and a mock ancillary kit to one clinic site, the University of Kentucky Medical Center. This test run will help the state prepare for the initial vaccine distribution to LTC and health care facilities; the initial distribution will, in turn, prepare the commonwealth for even larger, more complex distributions in the months ahead.

 

“There is an extensive process in play here. First of all, these companies had to build these vaccines, they had to do the research, they had to demonstrate that they were safe,” said Dr. Stack. “Concurrently, we’ve had to consider how we will use these vaccines when very small quantities are available at the beginning, but there are many, many people who need the vaccine. The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) is going to have an emergency meeting tomorrow to further refine their recommendations.

 

“There is a bright light at the end of the tunnel, but we’re not out of the woods yet. If we all mask up and socially distance, we can buy our hospitals the time they need.”

 

Kentuckians can visit the KYCOVID-19 website for more information on the vaccines, including the state’s draft plan and FAQs. A public service communication campaign is also expected to launch in December.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Nov. 30, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,124
  • New deaths today: 12
  • Positivity rate: 9.42%
  • Total deaths: 1,908
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,741
  • Currently in ICU: 421
  • Currently on ventilator: 229

 

The Governor said this is the second highest Monday COVID-19 case report.

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Daviess and Warren.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two women, ages 74 and 86, from Caldwell County; a 50-year-old woman from Daviess County; a 90-year-old man from Fayette County; a 68-year-old man from Grayson County; a 56-year-old woman from Jefferson County; a 77-year-old man from Marshall County; a 75-year-old woman and two men, ages 67 and 75, from McCracken County; an 87-year-old woman from McLean County; and an 84-year-old man from Webster County.

 

Dr. Deborah Birx, coordinator of the White House coronavirus task force, said if you traveled or met with people outside of your household for Thanksgiving, you should “assume that you were exposed [to COVID-19] and you became infected and you really need to get tested in the next week.”

 

Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund
Today, Gov. Beshear updated Kentuckians on the $40 million Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund. The application opened today at 12 p.m. EST.

 

More than 2,000 applications have been submitted, requesting nearly $19 million in aid.

 

“Our team of application processors is working diligently on each claim. They have been training and preparing for weeks to make sure we can help as many people as possible, as quickly as possible,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The fund has been designed to provide one-time grant awards of up to $10,000 per restaurant or bar, with a maximum of $20,000 to a business entity that operates multiple restaurants and bars. These grants are to be used as a reimbursement for business expenses incurred between March 6 and Dec. 31, 2020.

 

Reimbursable expenses include items like: rent, employee salaries, health insurance costs, inventory and personal protective equipment. To check eligibility, or to apply, visit teamkyfbrf.ky.gov.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, new statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: Bosnian, Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

 

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R.C. MAN ARRESTED ON THEFT CHARGES

 

Russell County Sheriff Derek Polston reports the recovery of over $100,000 worth of stolen items recovered from a residence off Apple Lane in the Pleasant Hill area of Russell County. A Joint investigation by the Russell County Sheriffs Office and law enforcement agencies in Indiana and KSP recovered a travel trailer, John Deere Gators, zero turn mowers, ditch whitch, covered storage trailer and numerous other items which appear were stolen out of Indiana and taken to the Pleasant Hill area and used or sold.

 

Arrested was 50-year-old Anthony Cordell Ford of Apple Lane in the Pleasant Hill area. He was charged with Receiving Stolen Property over $10,000 and lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

The case remains under investigation by the Russell County Sheriffs Office and will be presented to a Russell County Grand Jury where more charges may be forthcoming. Also Indiana authorities will have charges as their investigation continues. 

 

 

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Taylor Co. Man Airlifted After Commercial Vehicle Collision...

 

On Saturday, November 28, 2020 at 7:17pmCT, the Adair County Sheriffs Office was dispatched to a reported vehicle vs semi collision 7.5 miles north of Columbia on KY-55. Upon arrival, Deputies found that a 2013 Ford Fiesta, being operated by 25 year old Paul Rafferty of Taylor County, KY had struck a 1989 Freight-liner being operated by 67 year old Darrell Sprowles of Taylor County. Deputies observed Rafferty was unresponsive and pinned in the vehicle. 


Preliminary investigation indicates that Rafferty was traveling at a high rate of speed heading north, when he came upon Mr. Sprowles who was operating at a lower speed due to being loaded with grain. Rafferty was unable to recognize that the semi was going at a slower speed and was unable to slow in time before striking it in the rear.    
     
Rafferty had to be extricated with mechanical means by the Columbia-Adair County Fire Department. He was treated by Adair County EMS and transported to TJ Health Columbia. Rafferty was then flown by Air Methods to the University of Louisville Hospital.   
 

The collision was investigated by Deputy Joey Keith who was assisted on scene by Deputy Josh Durbin and Kentucky State Troopers.

 

 

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Single Vehicle Collision Results in One Fatality


Burkesville, KY (November 30, 2020) The Kentucky State Police responded to a single vehicle injury collision on Wednesday, November 25th at approximately 12:13 PM 3.7 miles west of Burkesville on KY 90. Preliminary investigations indicate that 48 year old Angela Guerra of Burkesville, KY was operating a 1992 Chevrolet pickup east bound on Glasgow Rd. when she lost control of the vehicle and ran off the shoulder of the roadway. Guerra and her passenger Gerald Foster, age 62 of Burkesville were not wearing a seatbelt and transported to the Cumberland County hospital by EMS where they were later airlifted to UK hospital for serious injuries. On November 28th, 2020 KSP Post 15 was notified by the Fayette County coroner that Foster had succumbed to his injuries. KSP was assisted at the scene by the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Department, Burkesville Police Department, Burkesville and Marrowbone Fire Departments, Cumberland County Rescue Squad, Emergency Management, and Cumberland County EMS. This collision remains under investigation by Trooper Jason Warinner. 
 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 11-30-20

 

Russell County - 3 new cases Sunday. We had 12 cases released from isolation. We now have 92 active cases which 88 cases are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 2 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Somerset and 1 at UK. The new cases are males ages 17, 23, 35.

 

Adair County - 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 11 cases. We have had 971 total cases with 835 of those released and 31 deaths. We have 105 active cases with 96 of those in home isolation and 9 in area hospitals.

 

 

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Another COVID-19 Death & 107 New Cases in Lake Cumberland District....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.95%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 1 new death today. We have experienced a total of 124 deaths resulting in a 1.5% mortality rate (about 1 in 67) among known cases. This compares with a 1.08% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 71 cases* in the hospital. This is 6 more than yesterday. We have had a total of 520 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.29% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.73%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 8,265 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.96% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 132 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 11; Casey: 7; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 2; Green: 11; McCreary: 19; Pulaski: 41; Russell: 12; Taylor: 22; and, Wayne: 4. In all, we have released 86.4% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 26 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 997 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/25/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1150.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Businesses, Schools, and Family. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 107 today: Adair: 5; Casey: 10; Cumberland: 3; Green: 3; McCreary: 18; Pulaski: 51; Russell: 3; and, Taylor: 14. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.018. This means our total case count is projected to double every 38.76 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 273 cases.
 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 78-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22m -year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 64-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 86-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is released, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is released, unknown;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is released, unknown;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we announce today is an 81-year-old female from Wayne who had been released from public health monitoring (meaning she was no longer contagious), but later succumbed to lasting complications from the disease. Keep in mind that locally, approximately 1 in every 67 people who contract COVID-19 will die from it.

 

A close look at the data will appear that the McCreary numbers are off by 1 today. That is because we removed one duplicate entry from McCreary. This also caused our total case count increase to be one less than our new case count increase for the day.

 

We added 108 new cases today compared with 98 new cases last Sunday. However, we have 26 fewer active cases (997 vs 1,023). Our hospitalized cases remain at a record-high level.

 

We often get asked questions about how many of our cases have underlying health conditions or how many of our COVID-19 related deaths were due to COVID-19 only. These types of questions demonstrate a narrow and lacking understanding of morbidity and mortality. It should be noted that almost everyone in Kentucky, even those who aren’t presently “sick” from anything, has “underlying health conditions” such as diabetes, high-blood pressure, heart disease, etcetera. Also, no matter what someone dies from, COVID-19 or otherwise, there are almost always co-morbidities (other contributing factors) such as, again, diabetes, obesity, heart disease, etcetera). When a COVID-19 death is announced by us, we have every reason to believe that COVID-19 was either the primary cause of death or was a major contributor thereof.

 

People often claim that in our total case count we count people multiple times; that we count them for every positive test they may have had. This is false. For every case we report, we have an associated name, birthdate, and address; and, that person is only listed once regardless of how many tests they may have had. If we discover we have reported a duplicate, such as the one referenced above, we adjust our numbers and report that publicly.

 

The one exception to this is when an individual contracts COVID-19 for a second time. Basically, this means they have had a lab confirmed COVID-19 illness, and then had a second lab-confirmed COVID-19 illness over 90 days later. Though rare, this is possible. In fact, 10 of our 8,265 cases, or .0012%, or about 12 in 10,000, have had repeat infections – have contracted COVID-19 twice. This could be due to waning post-exposure immunity, having contracted a slightly different strain of the COVID-19 virus, or due to having had a false-positive lab result. Again, this is very, very rare.

 

The practices of public health, epidemiology, the monitoring of communicable diseases, and the study of morbidity and mortality are sciences supported by scholarship and years of research. These are specialized fields practiced by providers aided by years of advanced education and experience. Please do not allow “social media conspiracy theories”, pseudo-sciences, or public opinion to cause you to discount the advice of public health officials. COVID-19 is serious (in our area, 1 in 67 people who contract it die from it, and 1 in 16 end up hospitalized). For 2020, it is now one of the leading causes of death in our nation.

 

Mother Nature has presented us with a challenge that is disruptive to our normal lives, we don’t like being inconvenienced by this disease, and leadership at the world, federal, state, and local levels have “politicized” it. But, know this, COVID-19 does not care about your political affiliation, your race, your sex, or your religion; nor does it care about county or state borders. When it attacks in clusters, it does not distinguish between churches or bars; between public or private schools; or, between government or private businesses. Let your guard down, and you could become 1 of the 16 who contract it who become hospitalized, or, more frightening, 1 of the 67 who will die.

 

There is hope. It is within your control to reduce your risk, and the risks of those around you. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 8,265 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 178,804 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 176,925 statewide plus 1,879 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

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KSP Encourage Motorists to Prepare for Potential Winter Weather

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 29, 2020) – Kentuckians could experience their first taste of winter weather as a band of snow is predicted to impact the Commonwealth late Sunday night. The Kentucky State Police (KSP) are asking motorists to be aware that weather conditions may change rapidly over the next 24 hours.

 

“While we can never completely predict what the forecast will be, it is a great time for citizens to prepare for the winter driving season,” says KSP Spokesman Sgt. Billy Gregory.

 

Gregory says citizens need to rethink their driving behaviors this time of year, which include slowing down, leaving more space between cars and prepping their car with necessary supplies should they become stranded.

 

KSP developed a list of items motorists should place in their vehicles before the weather sets in. This includes a winter weather kit with items such as a cell phone charger, blankets, first-aid kit, jumper cables, windshield scraper, collapsible shovel, and a flashlight with batteries. To view KSP’s ‘Roadway Reminders for Winter Weather’, click here: http://kentuckystatepolice.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Roadway-Reminders-Winter-Weather-DSE.pdf.

 

“We are asking that you plan ahead and be patient as motorists navigate through this first wintery mix,” adds Gregory. “Today is a great opportunity to put together a kit of weather-related essentials before adverse weather arrives.”

 

The single most important tip Gregory could offer was something every driver has access to. “The best defense in any challenging driving situation is always going to be wearing a seat belt. Make sure you always wear it and that your passengers wear it as well.”

In addition to the roadway reminders, Gregory encourages citizens to refrain from dialing 9-1-1 to obtain road and weather conditions.

 

“Every year when winter weather hits, our radio rooms experience an increase of calls from people inquiring about road conditions,” notes Gregory. “Each call they receive about these type of inquiries, takes our telecommunicators away from helping callers who are experiencing true emergencies.”

 

KSP will use Facebook, Twitter and their website to share winter weather updates. Drivers are encouraged to check road and weather conditions before traveling by visiting https://transportation.ky.gov/sites/GoKY/home, an online traffic, roadway information and weather portal operated by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.

 

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Gov. Beshear Thanks All Who Sacrificed for Greater Good During Holiday Weekend

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 29, 2020) – On Sunday, Gov. Andy Beshear thanked every Kentuckian who sacrificed for each other and rose to the challenge of battling COVID-19 together during the Thanksgiving holiday.

 

“The thing about this crisis is, all of us might step up in a different way, but each of our contributions matter,” said Gov. Beshear. “To every family who changed their traditions this year to keep others safe – thank you. To our only line health care workers and first responders who have put your own safety at risk during this pandemic – thank you. To our tireless neighbors battling food insecurity and making sure Kentuckians can put dinner on the table, on Thanksgiving and every day – thank you. And to the retail, grocery, logistics and food and beverage professionals who did the right thing to keep yourselves and customers safe this week – thank you. To these heroes, and so many others, you are all the best of Team Kentucky.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 29, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,803
  • New deaths today: 11
  • Positivity rate: 9.24%
  • Total deaths: 1,896
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,709
  • Currently in ICU: 407
  • Currently on ventilator: 218

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Daviess, Hardin and Boone.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as current orders.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two men, ages 70 and 80, from Caldwell County; an 87-year-old woman from Fulton County; a 60-year-old woman from Hopkins County; a 61-year-old woman and a 90-year-old man from McCracken County; an 88-year-old man from McLean County; and four women, ages 61, 83, 93 and 93, from Warren County.

 

“The massive increase of COVID-19 in the commonwealth during November has shattered prior records,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “As we finish the Thanksgiving weekend, we need to show our kindness and caring for each other now more than ever. The spread of the virus is at an all-time high, but science and experience have shown that we are not powerless to shape our future. If we all wear masks, stay six feet away from those outside our home, limit travel and stay home if we are sick, we can put ourselves on a better path, stay safe and suppress COVID-19.”

 

Reporting is limited on Sundays. Additional information, including the number of Kentuckians who have recovered from COVID-19, will be reported Monday.


More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

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THANKSGIVING WEEKEND ARRESTS

 

  • Rita Hilbert, 36, of Columbia, KY was arrested by Columbia Police overnight (early Sunday morning) for Public Intoxication (Excluding Alcohol), Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Controlled Substance 2nd degree (Drug Unspecified); and Prescription Controlled Substance Not In Proper Container.
 
Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.
 
 
  • Johnny Dale Smith, 51, of Jamestown, KY was arrested by Russell Co. Sheriff's Deputy Kenny Perkins on Friday night and charged with TBUT (Auto) - $10,000 or More.
 
  • Randy Copley, 49, of Dunnville, KY was arrested Thursday evening by KSP for Trafficking in Methamphetamine 2nd or more offense and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. 
 
  • April Dawn Weston, 36, of Russell Springs, KY was arrested on Thursday by the RCSO for Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and was served 2 Bench Warrants for Court.
 
  • Tammy Pierce, 46, of Russell Springs, KY was arrested on Thursday afternoon by KSP for Trafficking in Methamphetamine 2nd or more offense, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Illegal Possession of a Legend Drug.
 
  • Steven Huff, 36, of Columbia, KY was arrested on Thursday afternoon by Russell Springs Police Officer Phillips for Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Tampering with Physical Evidence, Giving Officer False Identifying Information, and Probation Violation (for a Felony Offense).
 
Lodged in the Russell Co. Detention Center.
 

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14 New COVID-19 Deaths in KY; 2437 New Cases....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 28, 2020) – On Saturday, Gov. Andy Beshear urged Kentuckians to strengthen their resolve in the fight against COVID-19, with the knowledge that help is on the way. 

 

“I know we’re tired. I know many of us are disappointed we couldn’t celebrate Thanksgiving or enjoy Black Friday shopping the way we usually do. But I promise you: we have come so far and we are almost there. Hang on, Team Kentucky,” the Governor said.

 

Gov. Beshear reminded Kentuckians to shop safely, purchasing gifts online when possible and avoiding crowded stores. If families do need to shop in person, he encouraged them to keep their time inside stores to a minimum and use curbside pickup whenever possible.

 

“Though we have to do it differently, please support our small businesses this weekend and holiday season,” said Gov. Beshear. “Shopping small supports some of our local businesses that have suffered the most economically as we’ve battled COVID-19. Let’s show them we have their backs.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 28, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers: 

  • New cases today: 2,437
  • New deaths today: 14
  • Positivity rate: 8.95%
  • Total deaths: 1,885
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,722
  • Currently in ICU: 408
  • Currently on ventilator: 220

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Boone, Madison, Kenton and McCracken.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 58-year-old woman from Barren County; an 86-year-old man from Hardin County; a 70-year-old woman from Hart County; a 74-year-old man from Logan County; a 73-year-old man from Marshall County; a 73-year-old man from McCracken County; a 66-year-old woman from Metcalfe County; a 75-year-old man from Monroe County; a 79-year-old man from Scott County; and five women, ages 57, 71, 78, 84 and 86, from Warren County.

 

The Governor again reminded Kentuckians that receiving one negative COVID-19 test result days before a gathering can’t guarantee that you won’t infect others at that event.

 

“Persistence is key to limiting the spread and preventing further COVID-19 related deaths,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “Don’t give in to mask fatigue. Wear your mask correctly. Vaccines are around the corner and may well be the weapon we need to defeat this illness; until then, every Kentuckian has to rise to this great challenge of our times to care for and protect each other by wearing masks, practicing social distancing, and staying home if you are sick.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.
 

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2 New Covid-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District, 1 in Adair & 1 in Taylor

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.95%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 123 deaths resulting in a 1.51% mortality rate (about 1 in 66) among known cases. This compares with a 1.08% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.01% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 65 cases* in the hospital. This is 4 less than yesterday. We have had a total of 514 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.3% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.73%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 8,158 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.91% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 224 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 8; Casey: 10; Clinton: 22; Cumberland: 8; Green: 10; McCreary: 13; Pulaski: 88; Russell: 6; Taylor: 33; and, Wayne: 26. In all, we have released 86% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 104 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1023 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/25/2020 we were at our peak number log of active cases, 1149.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Businesses, Schools, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 11% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 122 today: Adair: 9; Casey: 13; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 1; McCreary: 30; Pulaski: 34; Russell: 10; Taylor: 16; and, Wayne: 7. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.018. This means our total case count is projected to double every 38.61 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 273 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 10 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 7m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is released, 11/23/20;
Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 97-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The deaths we report today are: a 66-year-old male from Adair and a 75-year-old male from Taylor. Both had been hospitalized. Our death rate continues to be high compared to the state average.

 

Though we still have high numbers, this week was an improvement over last, at least in some aspects. Maybe this is a fluke due to fewer people seeking testing over the holidays. Nevertheless, we will take the good news and hope it continues into the next week. We have 78 fewer active cases compared to last week (1,023 vs 1,101). We added 961 new cases this week compared to 1,203 last week. On the negative side, our deaths this week were higher than last (11 compared to 8), as was our hospitalizations (65 this Saturday compared to 63 last Saturday).

 

Remember, it is within our power to impact the spread of COVID-19, and it will take a community-wide committment to improve our situation. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.


The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 8,158 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 176,005 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 174,182 statewide plus 1,823 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

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CAMPBELLSVILLE MAN ARRESTED FOR CHILD SEX ABUSE....

 

Michael Wilson, 21, was arrested on Thursday by Campbellsville Police and charged with Sexual Abuse, 1st Degree (Victim Under 12 Years of Age). He was lodged in the Taylor Co. Detention Center.
 

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Campbellsville Police Arrest Taylor Co. Man for Bribery of Public Servant & Numerous Drug Charges....

 

Jason Korah Yocom, age 38, was arrested by Campbellsville Police early Friday morning around 2:00amET and charged with Trafficking in Methamphetamine & Marijuana, 2 counts of Possession of Marijuana, Trafficking in a Controlled Substance 3rd Degree (Drug Unspecified), Fleeing or Evading Police (on Foot), Bribery of a Public Servant, Criminal Mischief 3rd degree, Resisting Arrest, Tampering with Physical Evidence, and Public Intoxication (Excludes Alcohol).

 
Yocom was lodged in the Taylor Co. Detention Center.
 

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TAYLOR CO. DEPUTY ASSAULTED; SUSPECT CHARGED WITH BURGLARY, ASSAULT, & MORE....

 

According to the Taylor County Sherriffs Office, a burglary occurred in the Hibernia Ridge Road area of Taylor County on Friday, November 27th, 2020.  Anthony Scott Robards, 34, was in a home without permission after stealing a Ford Ranger pickup truck in Louisville. During the course of the arrest, Robards allegedly assaulted Taylor County Deputy Dickie Benningfield and attempted to dispose of the key to the stolen pickup.
 
Robards was charged with Burglary, Auto Theft, Assault on a Police Officer and Tampering with Physical Evidence. He was lodged in the Taylor Co. Detention Center.
 

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