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Local News Archives for 2020-11

R.C. Woman Arrested on Meth & Numerous Other Charges...

 

Nancy Hammons, 35, of Russell Springs, KY was arrested by KSP on Monday afternoon for Possession of Methamphetamine, DUI (4th or more offense), Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Driving Too Fast For Conditions, and Operating on a Suspended or Revoked License. She was lodged in the Russell Co. Detention Center.
 

Gov. Beshear, Dr. Stack: First Vaccine Shipments Arriving Soon

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 30, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear and Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH), said the state is expecting to receive approximately 38,000 doses of the vaccine against the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) as early as mid-December.

 

“Those will be provided to 38,000 individuals. We can go ahead and provide the first of these shots, and then we will receive the booster shots about three weeks later,” said Gov. Beshear. “We will be ready on moment one that we’re able to provide these vaccines.”

 

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines both require an initial shot followed by a booster shot.

 

While the number of doses and allocation plan are subject to change, the Governor said as of today the majority of the state’s initial vaccine shipment will go to long-term care (LTC) facilities; about 12,000 doses will go to hospitals to help inoculate health care workers.

 

“Every week we do not vaccinate long-term care residents, we lose them. With vaccines, we can provide such better protection to these individuals,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’ve been taking aggressive steps since the beginning of this virus, committed to fighting back, not surrendering to it or accepting avoidable loss.”

 

The state’s immediate goal is reducing COVID-19 deaths. With 66% of the deaths coming from LTC facilities, vaccines could help significantly decrease Kentucky’s COVID-19 death toll beginning in January. Also, because LTC residents tend to require the most care, vaccinations in LTC facilities will help reduce COVID-19’s burden on Kentucky’s health care system.

 

This week, the state is participating in an end-to-end exercise with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Pfizer and McKesson to test one shipment of an empty thermal shipping container and a mock ancillary kit to one clinic site, the University of Kentucky Medical Center. This test run will help the state prepare for the initial vaccine distribution to LTC and health care facilities; the initial distribution will, in turn, prepare the commonwealth for even larger, more complex distributions in the months ahead.

 

“There is an extensive process in play here. First of all, these companies had to build these vaccines, they had to do the research, they had to demonstrate that they were safe,” said Dr. Stack. “Concurrently, we’ve had to consider how we will use these vaccines when very small quantities are available at the beginning, but there are many, many people who need the vaccine. The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) is going to have an emergency meeting tomorrow to further refine their recommendations.

 

“There is a bright light at the end of the tunnel, but we’re not out of the woods yet. If we all mask up and socially distance, we can buy our hospitals the time they need.”

 

Kentuckians can visit the KYCOVID-19 website for more information on the vaccines, including the state’s draft plan and FAQs. A public service communication campaign is also expected to launch in December.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Nov. 30, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,124
  • New deaths today: 12
  • Positivity rate: 9.42%
  • Total deaths: 1,908
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,741
  • Currently in ICU: 421
  • Currently on ventilator: 229

 

The Governor said this is the second highest Monday COVID-19 case report.

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Daviess and Warren.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two women, ages 74 and 86, from Caldwell County; a 50-year-old woman from Daviess County; a 90-year-old man from Fayette County; a 68-year-old man from Grayson County; a 56-year-old woman from Jefferson County; a 77-year-old man from Marshall County; a 75-year-old woman and two men, ages 67 and 75, from McCracken County; an 87-year-old woman from McLean County; and an 84-year-old man from Webster County.

 

Dr. Deborah Birx, coordinator of the White House coronavirus task force, said if you traveled or met with people outside of your household for Thanksgiving, you should “assume that you were exposed [to COVID-19] and you became infected and you really need to get tested in the next week.”

 

Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund
Today, Gov. Beshear updated Kentuckians on the $40 million Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund. The application opened today at 12 p.m. EST.

 

More than 2,000 applications have been submitted, requesting nearly $19 million in aid.

 

“Our team of application processors is working diligently on each claim. They have been training and preparing for weeks to make sure we can help as many people as possible, as quickly as possible,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The fund has been designed to provide one-time grant awards of up to $10,000 per restaurant or bar, with a maximum of $20,000 to a business entity that operates multiple restaurants and bars. These grants are to be used as a reimbursement for business expenses incurred between March 6 and Dec. 31, 2020.

 

Reimbursable expenses include items like: rent, employee salaries, health insurance costs, inventory and personal protective equipment. To check eligibility, or to apply, visit teamkyfbrf.ky.gov.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, new statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: Bosnian, Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

 

R.C. MAN ARRESTED ON THEFT CHARGES

 

Russell County Sheriff Derek Polston reports the recovery of over $100,000 worth of stolen items recovered from a residence off Apple Lane in the Pleasant Hill area of Russell County. A Joint investigation by the Russell County Sheriffs Office and law enforcement agencies in Indiana and KSP recovered a travel trailer, John Deere Gators, zero turn mowers, ditch whitch, covered storage trailer and numerous other items which appear were stolen out of Indiana and taken to the Pleasant Hill area and used or sold.

 

Arrested was 50-year-old Anthony Cordell Ford of Apple Lane in the Pleasant Hill area. He was charged with Receiving Stolen Property over $10,000 and lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

The case remains under investigation by the Russell County Sheriffs Office and will be presented to a Russell County Grand Jury where more charges may be forthcoming. Also Indiana authorities will have charges as their investigation continues. 

 

 

Taylor Co. Man Airlifted After Commercial Vehicle Collision...

 

On Saturday, November 28, 2020 at 7:17pmCT, the Adair County Sheriffs Office was dispatched to a reported vehicle vs semi collision 7.5 miles north of Columbia on KY-55. Upon arrival, Deputies found that a 2013 Ford Fiesta, being operated by 25 year old Paul Rafferty of Taylor County, KY had struck a 1989 Freight-liner being operated by 67 year old Darrell Sprowles of Taylor County. Deputies observed Rafferty was unresponsive and pinned in the vehicle. 


Preliminary investigation indicates that Rafferty was traveling at a high rate of speed heading north, when he came upon Mr. Sprowles who was operating at a lower speed due to being loaded with grain. Rafferty was unable to recognize that the semi was going at a slower speed and was unable to slow in time before striking it in the rear.    
     
Rafferty had to be extricated with mechanical means by the Columbia-Adair County Fire Department. He was treated by Adair County EMS and transported to TJ Health Columbia. Rafferty was then flown by Air Methods to the University of Louisville Hospital.   
 

The collision was investigated by Deputy Joey Keith who was assisted on scene by Deputy Josh Durbin and Kentucky State Troopers.

 

 

Single Vehicle Collision Results in One Fatality


Burkesville, KY (November 30, 2020) The Kentucky State Police responded to a single vehicle injury collision on Wednesday, November 25th at approximately 12:13 PM 3.7 miles west of Burkesville on KY 90. Preliminary investigations indicate that 48 year old Angela Guerra of Burkesville, KY was operating a 1992 Chevrolet pickup east bound on Glasgow Rd. when she lost control of the vehicle and ran off the shoulder of the roadway. Guerra and her passenger Gerald Foster, age 62 of Burkesville were not wearing a seatbelt and transported to the Cumberland County hospital by EMS where they were later airlifted to UK hospital for serious injuries. On November 28th, 2020 KSP Post 15 was notified by the Fayette County coroner that Foster had succumbed to his injuries. KSP was assisted at the scene by the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Department, Burkesville Police Department, Burkesville and Marrowbone Fire Departments, Cumberland County Rescue Squad, Emergency Management, and Cumberland County EMS. This collision remains under investigation by Trooper Jason Warinner. 
 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 11-30-20

 

Russell County - 3 new cases Sunday. We had 12 cases released from isolation. We now have 92 active cases which 88 cases are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 2 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Somerset and 1 at UK. The new cases are males ages 17, 23, 35.

 

Adair County - 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 11 cases. We have had 971 total cases with 835 of those released and 31 deaths. We have 105 active cases with 96 of those in home isolation and 9 in area hospitals.

 

 

Another COVID-19 Death & 107 New Cases in Lake Cumberland District....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.95%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 1 new death today. We have experienced a total of 124 deaths resulting in a 1.5% mortality rate (about 1 in 67) among known cases. This compares with a 1.08% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 71 cases* in the hospital. This is 6 more than yesterday. We have had a total of 520 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.29% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.73%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 8,265 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.96% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 132 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 11; Casey: 7; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 2; Green: 11; McCreary: 19; Pulaski: 41; Russell: 12; Taylor: 22; and, Wayne: 4. In all, we have released 86.4% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 26 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 997 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/25/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1150.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Businesses, Schools, and Family. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 107 today: Adair: 5; Casey: 10; Cumberland: 3; Green: 3; McCreary: 18; Pulaski: 51; Russell: 3; and, Taylor: 14. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.018. This means our total case count is projected to double every 38.76 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 273 cases.
 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 78-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22m -year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 64-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 86-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is released, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is released, unknown;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is released, unknown;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we announce today is an 81-year-old female from Wayne who had been released from public health monitoring (meaning she was no longer contagious), but later succumbed to lasting complications from the disease. Keep in mind that locally, approximately 1 in every 67 people who contract COVID-19 will die from it.

 

A close look at the data will appear that the McCreary numbers are off by 1 today. That is because we removed one duplicate entry from McCreary. This also caused our total case count increase to be one less than our new case count increase for the day.

 

We added 108 new cases today compared with 98 new cases last Sunday. However, we have 26 fewer active cases (997 vs 1,023). Our hospitalized cases remain at a record-high level.

 

We often get asked questions about how many of our cases have underlying health conditions or how many of our COVID-19 related deaths were due to COVID-19 only. These types of questions demonstrate a narrow and lacking understanding of morbidity and mortality. It should be noted that almost everyone in Kentucky, even those who aren’t presently “sick” from anything, has “underlying health conditions” such as diabetes, high-blood pressure, heart disease, etcetera. Also, no matter what someone dies from, COVID-19 or otherwise, there are almost always co-morbidities (other contributing factors) such as, again, diabetes, obesity, heart disease, etcetera). When a COVID-19 death is announced by us, we have every reason to believe that COVID-19 was either the primary cause of death or was a major contributor thereof.

 

People often claim that in our total case count we count people multiple times; that we count them for every positive test they may have had. This is false. For every case we report, we have an associated name, birthdate, and address; and, that person is only listed once regardless of how many tests they may have had. If we discover we have reported a duplicate, such as the one referenced above, we adjust our numbers and report that publicly.

 

The one exception to this is when an individual contracts COVID-19 for a second time. Basically, this means they have had a lab confirmed COVID-19 illness, and then had a second lab-confirmed COVID-19 illness over 90 days later. Though rare, this is possible. In fact, 10 of our 8,265 cases, or .0012%, or about 12 in 10,000, have had repeat infections – have contracted COVID-19 twice. This could be due to waning post-exposure immunity, having contracted a slightly different strain of the COVID-19 virus, or due to having had a false-positive lab result. Again, this is very, very rare.

 

The practices of public health, epidemiology, the monitoring of communicable diseases, and the study of morbidity and mortality are sciences supported by scholarship and years of research. These are specialized fields practiced by providers aided by years of advanced education and experience. Please do not allow “social media conspiracy theories”, pseudo-sciences, or public opinion to cause you to discount the advice of public health officials. COVID-19 is serious (in our area, 1 in 67 people who contract it die from it, and 1 in 16 end up hospitalized). For 2020, it is now one of the leading causes of death in our nation.

 

Mother Nature has presented us with a challenge that is disruptive to our normal lives, we don’t like being inconvenienced by this disease, and leadership at the world, federal, state, and local levels have “politicized” it. But, know this, COVID-19 does not care about your political affiliation, your race, your sex, or your religion; nor does it care about county or state borders. When it attacks in clusters, it does not distinguish between churches or bars; between public or private schools; or, between government or private businesses. Let your guard down, and you could become 1 of the 16 who contract it who become hospitalized, or, more frightening, 1 of the 67 who will die.

 

There is hope. It is within your control to reduce your risk, and the risks of those around you. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 8,265 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 178,804 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 176,925 statewide plus 1,879 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

KSP Encourage Motorists to Prepare for Potential Winter Weather

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 29, 2020) – Kentuckians could experience their first taste of winter weather as a band of snow is predicted to impact the Commonwealth late Sunday night. The Kentucky State Police (KSP) are asking motorists to be aware that weather conditions may change rapidly over the next 24 hours.

 

“While we can never completely predict what the forecast will be, it is a great time for citizens to prepare for the winter driving season,” says KSP Spokesman Sgt. Billy Gregory.

 

Gregory says citizens need to rethink their driving behaviors this time of year, which include slowing down, leaving more space between cars and prepping their car with necessary supplies should they become stranded.

 

KSP developed a list of items motorists should place in their vehicles before the weather sets in. This includes a winter weather kit with items such as a cell phone charger, blankets, first-aid kit, jumper cables, windshield scraper, collapsible shovel, and a flashlight with batteries. To view KSP’s ‘Roadway Reminders for Winter Weather’, click here: http://kentuckystatepolice.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Roadway-Reminders-Winter-Weather-DSE.pdf.

 

“We are asking that you plan ahead and be patient as motorists navigate through this first wintery mix,” adds Gregory. “Today is a great opportunity to put together a kit of weather-related essentials before adverse weather arrives.”

 

The single most important tip Gregory could offer was something every driver has access to. “The best defense in any challenging driving situation is always going to be wearing a seat belt. Make sure you always wear it and that your passengers wear it as well.”

In addition to the roadway reminders, Gregory encourages citizens to refrain from dialing 9-1-1 to obtain road and weather conditions.

 

“Every year when winter weather hits, our radio rooms experience an increase of calls from people inquiring about road conditions,” notes Gregory. “Each call they receive about these type of inquiries, takes our telecommunicators away from helping callers who are experiencing true emergencies.”

 

KSP will use Facebook, Twitter and their website to share winter weather updates. Drivers are encouraged to check road and weather conditions before traveling by visiting https://transportation.ky.gov/sites/GoKY/home, an online traffic, roadway information and weather portal operated by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.

 

Gov. Beshear Thanks All Who Sacrificed for Greater Good During Holiday Weekend

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 29, 2020) – On Sunday, Gov. Andy Beshear thanked every Kentuckian who sacrificed for each other and rose to the challenge of battling COVID-19 together during the Thanksgiving holiday.

 

“The thing about this crisis is, all of us might step up in a different way, but each of our contributions matter,” said Gov. Beshear. “To every family who changed their traditions this year to keep others safe – thank you. To our only line health care workers and first responders who have put your own safety at risk during this pandemic – thank you. To our tireless neighbors battling food insecurity and making sure Kentuckians can put dinner on the table, on Thanksgiving and every day – thank you. And to the retail, grocery, logistics and food and beverage professionals who did the right thing to keep yourselves and customers safe this week – thank you. To these heroes, and so many others, you are all the best of Team Kentucky.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 29, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,803
  • New deaths today: 11
  • Positivity rate: 9.24%
  • Total deaths: 1,896
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,709
  • Currently in ICU: 407
  • Currently on ventilator: 218

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Daviess, Hardin and Boone.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as current orders.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two men, ages 70 and 80, from Caldwell County; an 87-year-old woman from Fulton County; a 60-year-old woman from Hopkins County; a 61-year-old woman and a 90-year-old man from McCracken County; an 88-year-old man from McLean County; and four women, ages 61, 83, 93 and 93, from Warren County.

 

“The massive increase of COVID-19 in the commonwealth during November has shattered prior records,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “As we finish the Thanksgiving weekend, we need to show our kindness and caring for each other now more than ever. The spread of the virus is at an all-time high, but science and experience have shown that we are not powerless to shape our future. If we all wear masks, stay six feet away from those outside our home, limit travel and stay home if we are sick, we can put ourselves on a better path, stay safe and suppress COVID-19.”

 

Reporting is limited on Sundays. Additional information, including the number of Kentuckians who have recovered from COVID-19, will be reported Monday.


More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

THANKSGIVING WEEKEND ARRESTS

 

  • Rita Hilbert, 36, of Columbia, KY was arrested by Columbia Police overnight (early Sunday morning) for Public Intoxication (Excluding Alcohol), Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Controlled Substance 2nd degree (Drug Unspecified); and Prescription Controlled Substance Not In Proper Container.
 
Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.
 
 
  • Johnny Dale Smith, 51, of Jamestown, KY was arrested by Russell Co. Sheriff's Deputy Kenny Perkins on Friday night and charged with TBUT (Auto) - $10,000 or More.
 
  • Randy Copley, 49, of Dunnville, KY was arrested Thursday evening by KSP for Trafficking in Methamphetamine 2nd or more offense and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. 
 
  • April Dawn Weston, 36, of Russell Springs, KY was arrested on Thursday by the RCSO for Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and was served 2 Bench Warrants for Court.
 
  • Tammy Pierce, 46, of Russell Springs, KY was arrested on Thursday afternoon by KSP for Trafficking in Methamphetamine 2nd or more offense, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Illegal Possession of a Legend Drug.
 
  • Steven Huff, 36, of Columbia, KY was arrested on Thursday afternoon by Russell Springs Police Officer Phillips for Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Tampering with Physical Evidence, Giving Officer False Identifying Information, and Probation Violation (for a Felony Offense).
 
Lodged in the Russell Co. Detention Center.
 

14 New COVID-19 Deaths in KY; 2437 New Cases....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 28, 2020) – On Saturday, Gov. Andy Beshear urged Kentuckians to strengthen their resolve in the fight against COVID-19, with the knowledge that help is on the way. 

 

“I know we’re tired. I know many of us are disappointed we couldn’t celebrate Thanksgiving or enjoy Black Friday shopping the way we usually do. But I promise you: we have come so far and we are almost there. Hang on, Team Kentucky,” the Governor said.

 

Gov. Beshear reminded Kentuckians to shop safely, purchasing gifts online when possible and avoiding crowded stores. If families do need to shop in person, he encouraged them to keep their time inside stores to a minimum and use curbside pickup whenever possible.

 

“Though we have to do it differently, please support our small businesses this weekend and holiday season,” said Gov. Beshear. “Shopping small supports some of our local businesses that have suffered the most economically as we’ve battled COVID-19. Let’s show them we have their backs.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 28, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers: 

  • New cases today: 2,437
  • New deaths today: 14
  • Positivity rate: 8.95%
  • Total deaths: 1,885
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,722
  • Currently in ICU: 408
  • Currently on ventilator: 220

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Boone, Madison, Kenton and McCracken.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 58-year-old woman from Barren County; an 86-year-old man from Hardin County; a 70-year-old woman from Hart County; a 74-year-old man from Logan County; a 73-year-old man from Marshall County; a 73-year-old man from McCracken County; a 66-year-old woman from Metcalfe County; a 75-year-old man from Monroe County; a 79-year-old man from Scott County; and five women, ages 57, 71, 78, 84 and 86, from Warren County.

 

The Governor again reminded Kentuckians that receiving one negative COVID-19 test result days before a gathering can’t guarantee that you won’t infect others at that event.

 

“Persistence is key to limiting the spread and preventing further COVID-19 related deaths,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “Don’t give in to mask fatigue. Wear your mask correctly. Vaccines are around the corner and may well be the weapon we need to defeat this illness; until then, every Kentuckian has to rise to this great challenge of our times to care for and protect each other by wearing masks, practicing social distancing, and staying home if you are sick.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.
 

2 New Covid-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District, 1 in Adair & 1 in Taylor

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.95%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 123 deaths resulting in a 1.51% mortality rate (about 1 in 66) among known cases. This compares with a 1.08% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.01% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 65 cases* in the hospital. This is 4 less than yesterday. We have had a total of 514 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.3% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.73%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 8,158 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.91% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 224 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 8; Casey: 10; Clinton: 22; Cumberland: 8; Green: 10; McCreary: 13; Pulaski: 88; Russell: 6; Taylor: 33; and, Wayne: 26. In all, we have released 86% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 104 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1023 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/25/2020 we were at our peak number log of active cases, 1149.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Businesses, Schools, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 11% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 122 today: Adair: 9; Casey: 13; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 1; McCreary: 30; Pulaski: 34; Russell: 10; Taylor: 16; and, Wayne: 7. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.018. This means our total case count is projected to double every 38.61 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 273 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 10 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 7m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is released, 11/23/20;
Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 97-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The deaths we report today are: a 66-year-old male from Adair and a 75-year-old male from Taylor. Both had been hospitalized. Our death rate continues to be high compared to the state average.

 

Though we still have high numbers, this week was an improvement over last, at least in some aspects. Maybe this is a fluke due to fewer people seeking testing over the holidays. Nevertheless, we will take the good news and hope it continues into the next week. We have 78 fewer active cases compared to last week (1,023 vs 1,101). We added 961 new cases this week compared to 1,203 last week. On the negative side, our deaths this week were higher than last (11 compared to 8), as was our hospitalizations (65 this Saturday compared to 63 last Saturday).

 

Remember, it is within our power to impact the spread of COVID-19, and it will take a community-wide committment to improve our situation. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.


The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 8,158 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 176,005 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 174,182 statewide plus 1,823 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

CAMPBELLSVILLE MAN ARRESTED FOR CHILD SEX ABUSE....

 

Michael Wilson, 21, was arrested on Thursday by Campbellsville Police and charged with Sexual Abuse, 1st Degree (Victim Under 12 Years of Age). He was lodged in the Taylor Co. Detention Center.
 

Campbellsville Police Arrest Taylor Co. Man for Bribery of Public Servant & Numerous Drug Charges....

 

Jason Korah Yocom, age 38, was arrested by Campbellsville Police early Friday morning around 2:00amET and charged with Trafficking in Methamphetamine & Marijuana, 2 counts of Possession of Marijuana, Trafficking in a Controlled Substance 3rd Degree (Drug Unspecified), Fleeing or Evading Police (on Foot), Bribery of a Public Servant, Criminal Mischief 3rd degree, Resisting Arrest, Tampering with Physical Evidence, and Public Intoxication (Excludes Alcohol).

 
Yocom was lodged in the Taylor Co. Detention Center.
 

TAYLOR CO. DEPUTY ASSAULTED; SUSPECT CHARGED WITH BURGLARY, ASSAULT, & MORE....

 

According to the Taylor County Sherriffs Office, a burglary occurred in the Hibernia Ridge Road area of Taylor County on Friday, November 27th, 2020.  Anthony Scott Robards, 34, was in a home without permission after stealing a Ford Ranger pickup truck in Louisville. During the course of the arrest, Robards allegedly assaulted Taylor County Deputy Dickie Benningfield and attempted to dispose of the key to the stolen pickup.
 
Robards was charged with Burglary, Auto Theft, Assault on a Police Officer and Tampering with Physical Evidence. He was lodged in the Taylor Co. Detention Center.
 

187 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT; NO NEW DEATHS

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.88%.

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 121 deaths resulting in a 1.51% mortality rate (about 1 in 66) among known cases. This compares with a 1.09% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.03% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 69 cases in the hospital. This is 7 less than yesterday. We have had a total of 512 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.37% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.77%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 8,036 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.85% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 212 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 11; Casey: 20; Clinton: 6; Cumberland: 7; Green: 17; McCreary: 22; Pulaski: 64; Russell: 24; Taylor: 29; and, Wayne: 12. In all, we have released 84.5% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 25 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1127 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/26/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1150.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Businesses, Schools, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 11% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 187 today: Adair: 24; Casey: 13; Clinton: 10; Cumberland: 5; Green: 6; McCreary: 31; Pulaski: 45; Russell: 16; Taylor: 24; and, Wayne: 13. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.02. This means our total case count is projected to double every 35.43 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 273 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 68-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 37-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 76-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 64-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old male who is hospitalized, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 79-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 10 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 104-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 39-year-old female who is released, 11/25/20;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 79-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 8m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

A close look at our numbers may appear that out total cases are off by 1 today. This is because we removed an earlier Clinton case that did not meet criteria.

 

We are presently experiencing continued high numbers of COVID-19 new cases. At our present growth rate, our total case count is expected to double in just over 35 days. We also have a record number of hospitalized cases at the moment.

 

There is hope! It is within our power to impact the spread of COVID-19. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 8,036 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 173,582 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 171,755 statewide plus 1,827 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

ADAIR COUNTY SCHOOLS FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM


The Adair County Schools Food Service Department will continue providing meals to all students during this time of uncertainty.
 
We will be issuing meals at the same bus stop locations and Adair County Primary Center, as we did at the beginning of school, on Monday, November 30, 2020.

These meals will be for Monday, November 30 and Tuesday, December 1, 2020.
 
The bus stops include:
  • Knifley Fire Department
  • Garden Church/Highway East 80
  • Adair County Primary Center
  • Breeding Fire Department
  • Jones Chapel Church/Gradyville
  • Purdy Church/Highway 206
  • Tarter’s Chapel Church/Portland
  • Gaddie Shamrock Lab/Hwy 55 South
 
Pick-up times are as follows:
  • Bus Stops 10am-11amCT
  • Adair County Primary Center 10am-12pmCT
 
Starting on Wednesdays, December 2, 9, and 16, 2020, we will provide 5-day meal boxes at Adair County Elementary School for the RED Tribe Students AND at Adair County Primary Center for all Virtual Students and BLUE Tribe students.
 
Pick-up times are as follows:
  • Adair County Elementary School 10am-1pmCT
  • Adair County Primary Center 10am-1pmCT
 
If you are unable to pick up meals at the times mentioned, please call Carol Roy or Dayna Parnell at the Central Office at 270-384-2476, extension 2003 or 2004. We will work with you to make arrangements to get the meals.
 

32 COVID-19 DEATHS REPORTED THURSDAY - HIGHEST EVER

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 27, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced case information for Thursday and Friday, including the highest number of new daily cases ever reported in the state and the second highest number of newly confirmed deaths.

 

The Governor asked families to avoid busy shopping areas to prevent a further escalation of COVID-19 cases. He reminded Kentuckians that many retailers are extending Black Friday deals to limit crowds.

 

“These new case reports are truly alarming. Please be careful when you’re shopping and consider safer options, like purchasing gifts online for delivery or curbside pick-up,” said Gov. Beshear. “Wash your hands, stay six feet apart from other shoppers and wear a mask at all times. Now is the time we need everyone to buckle down, stay strong and stop this surge in cases.”

 

Friday Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 27, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,747
  • New deaths today: 4
  • Positivity rate: 8.85%
  • Total deaths: 1,871
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,714
  • Currently in ICU: 390
  • Currently on ventilator: 216

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren and McCracken.

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 64-year-old woman and a 91-year-old man from Henderson County; and two women, ages 61 and 83, from Monroe County.

 

Thursday Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 26, there were:

  • New cases: 3,870
  • New deaths: 32
  • Positivity rate: 8.94%
  • Total deaths: 1,867
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,747
  • Currently in ICU: 388
  • Currently on ventilator: 206

 

Top counties with the most positive cases Thursday were: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton and Boone. Each of these counties reported more than 100 cases; Jefferson reported 755.

 

Those reported lost to the virus Thursday included a 73-year-old man from Barren County; a 66-year-old woman from Bell County; an 84-year-old man from Boone County; an 81-year-old woman and an 89-year-old man from Calloway County; an 86-year-old man from Christian County; a 96-year-old woman and an 86-year-old man from Fayette County; a 78-year-old woman from Floyd County; an 89-year-old woman and a 67-year-old man from Graves County; an 88-year-old woman from Hardin County; an 82-year-old woman from Henderson County; a 100-year-old woman from Hickman County; a 69-year-old man from Hopkins County; two women, ages 82 and 95, and an 88-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 63-year-old man from Johnson County; a 92-year-old woman and a 65-year-old man from Lee County; a 91-year-old man from Livingston County; an 88-year-old woman from McCracken County; a 91-year-old woman from Montgomery County; a 96-year-old woman and four men, ages 73, 81, 92 and 95, from Pike County; a 75-year-old man from Rockcastle County; an 86-year-old man from Shelby County; and an 84-year-old woman from Warren County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

7 NEW COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.88%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 7 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 121 deaths resulting in a 1.54% mortality rate (about 1 in 65) among known cases. This compares with a 1.1% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.06% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 76 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 498 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.34% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.87%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 7,849 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.76% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 162 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 21; Casey: 6; Clinton: 8; Green: 6; McCreary: 10; Pulaski: 41; Russell: 28; Taylor: 18; and, Wayne: 24. In all, we have released 83.8% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 29 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1152 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/25/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1152.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Schools, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 15% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 198 today: Adair: 24; Casey: 8; Clinton: 12; Cumberland: 5; Green: 5; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 70; Russell: 24; Taylor: 26; and, Wayne: 18. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.026. This means our total case count is projected to double every 27.33 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 273 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Adair: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Adair: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Adair: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
  • Adair: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Adair: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Adair: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Adair: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Casey: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 74-year-old female who is released, 11/24/20;
  • Casey: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 36-year-old male who is released, 11/24/20;
  • Casey: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Casey: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
  • Clinton: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is deceased, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 93-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is released, 11/24/20;
  • Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
  • Russell: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 63-year-old male who is deceased, expired;
  • Russell: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 95-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is released, 11/24/20;
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

In observance of the Thanksgiving Holiday, there will be no reports on Thursday the 26th.

 

A close look at the data may appear that our numbers are off by 1 today. This is because we moved one case from Taylor to a proper address outside our district.

 

We are very sad to report 7 deaths today. The deaths include a 90-year-old female from Cumberland who had been hospitalized; a 53-year-old female from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; an 88-year-old male from Pulaski who had been an assisted living resident; a 75-year-old male from Pulaski; a 63-year-old male from Russell who had been a long-term care resident; a 70-year-old female from Russell; and, an 80-year-old female from Wayne.

 

We have a record number of active cases, hospitalized cases are high, deaths are on the rise, and new cases are still very high. To help put in perspective the exponential growth we are currently experiencing, keep in mind: it took us 133 days to have 1,000 total cases in the Lake Cumberland area; 34 additional days to get to 2,000 cases; 33 more days to reach 3,000; 21 additional days to get to 4,000; 13 more days to get to 5,000; 10 more days to get to 6,000; and, only 5 more days to reach 7,000 total cases.

 

There is hope! It is within our power to impact the spread of COVID-19. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 7,849 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 167,981 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 166,139 statewide plus 1,842 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS 11-26-20

 

Russell County - 2 deaths Wednesday. We now have 16 deaths in Russell County. We have 24 new cases. We had 28 cases released from isolation. We now have 105 active cases which 99 cases are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized, 4 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at UK and 1 at VA in Lexington.

 

Adair County - 24 new COVID19 Cases to report Wednesday. We released 21 cases. We have had 933 total cases with 805 recovered and 30 deaths. We have 98 active cases with 90 in home isolation and 8 in area hospitals.

Gov. Beshear Urges Kentuckians to Keep Thanksgiving Celebrations Small, Safe as Cases Surge

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 25, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear reported 3,408 new COVID-19 cases and again asked all Kentuckians to follow safety precautions during Thanksgiving as cases surge in the commonwealth and across the country.

 

“Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays, and usually we get together with about 15 people,” said Gov. Beshear. “This year, we just can’t do that. I’m really disappointed, like all of us are, but protecting my parents, my kids, our neighbors and all of our health care workers has to come first. I’m grateful for all Kentuckians who are sacrificing this year to keep each other safe.”

 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends Americans avoid Thanksgiving travel. In addition, the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH) recommends the following for celebrating Thanksgiving safely:

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,408
  • New deaths today: 26
  • Positivity rate: 8.88%
  • Total deaths: 1,835
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,734
  • Currently in ICU: 409
  • Currently on ventilator: 216

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Boone, Warren, Hardin and Madison. Each county reported 100 or more new cases.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 60-year-old woman from Barren County; an 82-year-old man from Christian County; a 94-year-old woman from Daviess County; a 62-year-old man from Edmonson County; an 87-year-old man from Floyd County; a 91-year-old woman from Hancock County; a 90-year-old man from Hardin County; two women, ages 67 and 89, and three men, ages 62, 68 and 79, from Jefferson County; an 83-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 61-year-old woman from Lewis County; a 74-year-old woman and a 91-year-old man from Martin County; a 73-year-old woman from McLean County; a 98-year-old woman and a 66-year-old man from Monroe County; an 84-year-old man from Ohio County; two men, ages 79 and 87, from Oldham County; a 56-year-old woman from Spencer County; two women, ages 77 and 86, and a 77-year-old man from Warren County. 

 

The Governor again reminded Kentuckians that receiving one negative COVID-19 test result days before a gathering can’t guarantee that you won’t infect others at that event.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

NOV. 29TH IS MARY AVIS GUFFEY CAMPBELL DAY IN R.C.....

 

Russell County Judge Executive Gary D. Robertson is proclaiming Sunday, November 29, 2020 as Mary Avis Guffey Campbell Day as she will be celebrating her 100th birthday on November 29th.  

 

 

ADAIR MAN ARRESTED ON METH CHARGES FOLLOWING INVESTIGATION

 

On Tuesday, November 24, 2020 at 10:14pmCT, 23-year-old Christopher McClister of Columbia was charged with 2 counts of Trafficking in a Controlled Substance 1st degree (Methamphetamine) after a lengthy investigation.   
   

The case began when the Sheriffs Office initiated an investigation into multiple complaints of McClister (also known as “Critter”) selling narcotics, specifically methamphetamine. Over the course of the investigation the Sheriffs Office substantiated the complaints and was able to make a series of controlled buys of methamphetamine from McClister.

The case was presented to Commonwealth Attorney Brian Wright who brought the case before an Adair County Grand Jury. As a result the indictment arrest was issued. McClister was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail on a $15,000 full cash bond.
 
Chief Deputy Justin Cross was the lead investigator in the case. The Sheriffs Office was assisted by Columbia Police in the search and arrest of McClister.  
 

AREA ARREST 11-25-20

Christopher McClister age 23, of Columbia was arrest just after 10:30 last evening by Deputy Keith with the Adair County Sheriff’s Officer. McClister was charged with Trafficking in a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense Meth. He was lodged into the Adair County Regional Jail.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-25-20

Russell County 12 new cases Tuesday. We had 17 cases released from isolation yesterday. We now have 111 active cases which 106 cases are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 3 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at UK and 1 at VA in Lexington.

 

Adair County 22 new COVID19 Cases to report yesterday. We released 18 cases. We have had 909 total cases with 784 recovered and 30 deaths. We have 95 active cases with 88 in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals.

Adair County Man Arrested for Assaulting Couple With Hammer


On Tuesday, November 24th, 2020 at 8:02pmCT, Deputy Joey Keith and Deputy Derek Padgett responded to Riverview Road, 10 miles east of Columbia to a domestic assault in progress.  

Upon arrival, deputies located 30-year-old Anthony Antle on the porch of a residence. Antle had been in an altercation with a male and a female at the residence. He struck the male with a hammer and assaulted the female as well. Deputies also observed that he had destroyed household items and property with the hammer.  
      

Antle was quickly taken into custody and lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail on the following charges: Assault 2nd degree, Alcohol Intoxication in a Public Place, Assault 4th degree (Domestic Violence), and Criminal Mischief 2nd degree.

The incident remains under investigation by the Adair County Sheriff's Office.
 

Gov. Beshear: 'I'm Grateful We Know How to Celebrate Safely'

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 24, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear reminded Kentuckians that COVID-19 cases are already surging across the commonwealth and the entire nation. The virus’ exponential growth could accelerate further after the Thanksgiving holiday if our families don’t celebrate differently this year.  

 

“The number of people we lose is compounded when community spread is as high as it is and when it overwhelms the health care capacity of a state or region. This is happening in real time across the country,” said Gov. Beshear. “It’s starting to happen here in Kentucky. If we do not stop the exponential growth of cases, we will exceed our health care capacity. We will experience more loss and more death than we have to.”

 

Kentuckians should avoid travel and only have dinner with people who live in their household, or at a maximum, people from two households (no more than eight people total).

 

“Protect your family at Thanksgiving this year so they will be here at Christmas next year,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Just today, Ohio announced 98 COVID-19 deaths; Indiana announced 103; and Wisconsin announced 104.

 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends Americans avoid Thanksgiving travel. In addition, the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH) recommends the following for celebrating Thanksgiving safely:

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,690
  • New deaths today: 17
  • Positivity rate: 8.82%
  • Total deaths: 1,809
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,658
  • Currently in ICU: 390
  • Currently on ventilator: 207

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Hardin and Madison.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 90-year-old woman from Calloway County; two women, ages 64 and 81, and a 52-year-old man from Daviess County; an 81-year-old man from Hardin County; a 67-year-old man from Henry County; an 86-year-old woman and five men, ages 64, 67, 75, 76 and 88, from Jefferson County; a 78-year-old woman from Kenton County; a 60-year-old man from Martin County; a 90-year-old woman from McLean County; an 88-year-old woman from Metcalfe County; and an 81-year-old woman from Shelby County.

 

Finally, the Governor reminded Kentuckians that receiving one negative COVID-19 test result days before a gathering can’t guarantee that you won’t infect others at that event.

 

“It can take time for an infection to show up in a test,” said Gov. Beshear. “Please keep your Thanksgiving celebration as small as you can.”

 

KDPH especially advises against travel to any state with a positivity rate of 15% or higher. Currently, those states are: Wyoming (58.89%), South Dakota (44.14%), Iowa (43.14%), Idaho (40.12%), Kansas (38.23%), Pennsylvania (25.40%), New Mexico (23.87%), Missouri (22.59%), Alabama (22.15%), Utah (19.62%), Montana (18.71%), Arizona (18.54%), Mississippi (18.23%), Oregon (16.30%) and Ohio (15.87%).

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, new statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: Bosnian, Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

 

Food Safety Tips for the Holidays...

 

FRANKFORT, KY (Nov. 23, 2020) – This holiday season, the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH), an agency within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS), urges consumers to take precautions in purchasing and preparing food items and to pay close attention to good hygiene practices to combat foodborne illness during the upcoming holiday season.

 

In addition, Kentuckians should follow the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation to avoid Thanksgiving travel to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The Kentucky Department for Public Health has provided further guidance related to COVID-19 to help Kentuckians have a safe holiday week here:

 

"Unsafe handling and undercooking of food can lead to serious foodborne illness," said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health. "Turkeys may contain Salmonella and Campylobacter, harmful pathogens that are only destroyed by properly preparing and cooking the turkey. Similarly, leaving leftovers out for too long, or not taking care to properly clean cooking and serving surfaces, can lead to other types of illness. We want to be sure that all Kentuckians know the steps they can take to help prepare a safe and enjoyable holiday meal."

 

Here are a few simple food safety tips to avoid getting sick during the holiday season:
 

Safe Storage Temperatures

  • Keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. Hot foods should be held at 135 degrees Fahrenheit or warmer. Cold foods should be kept at least 41 degrees Fahrenheit or below.
  • Foods that sit out on the buffet table for longer than two hours should be discarded.

Safe Food Handling

  • Always wash your hands before and after handling food.
  • Use two cutting boards. One should be used for preparing raw meat, poultry and fish and the other for cutting cooked food or preparing salads.
  • Wash fruits and vegetables before preparing.
  • Keep your kitchen, dishes and utensils clean.
  • Never put cooked food back on plates or platters where raw meat or poultry were previously stored.
  • Wash and sanitize food contact surfaces often.
  • Never thaw a turkey or other meats/poultry on the kitchen counter. Thawing at room temperature increases the risk of bacteria growth at the surface even though the interior may still be chilled.
  • Thaw turkey and other frozen meat items in a refrigerator with a temperature of 41 degrees Fahrenheit or colder. The turkey should be thawed in its original wrap, on a tray placed in the bottom section of the refrigerator. A 20-pound turkey needs four to five days to thaw completely when thawed in the refrigerator.
  • A frozen turkey may also be completely submerged under cool running water at a temperature of 70 degrees Fahrenheit or less, or thawed in a microwave, provided that the turkey is cooked immediately after thawing.

 Cook Thoroughly

  • If you are cooking foods in advance of your party, be sure to cook foods thoroughly to a safe minimum internal temperature.
  • Use a metal-stemmed meat thermometer to determine when the turkey is done by inserting the thermometer in the thickest part of the turkey thigh. When the thermometer reaches between 165-180 degrees Fahrenheit, the turkey is done.
  • Safe cooking temperatures for other foods are as follows: seafood, 145 degrees Fahrenheit; ground beef, veal, lamb and pork, 160 degrees Fahrenheit; ground turkey, chicken and other poultry products, 165 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Don’t eat uncooked cookie dough, which may contain raw eggs.
  • Cook eggs until the yolks and whites are firm.
  • When making your own eggnog or other recipe calling for raw eggs, use pasteurized shell eggs, liquid or frozen pasteurized egg products, or powdered egg whites. Unpasteurized, raw shell eggs and egg products could contain Salmonella and other pathogens. Pasteurized shell eggs are now available at many grocery stores. Like all eggs, they must be kept refrigerated for safety and quality. Pasteurized shell eggs can be identified by a red “P” in a circle stamped on the shell.

Leftovers 

  • Leftovers should be stored in the refrigerator within two hours after cooking is complete, this includes pumpkin pie.
  • Leftovers should be divided into smaller portions and stored in several shallow containers in the refrigerator.
  • Use refrigerated turkey and stuffing within three to four days. Use gravy within one to two days.
  • Frozen leftovers should be eaten within two to six months.
  • Reheat all leftovers to 165 degrees Fahrenheit throughout or until steaming hot. Soups, sauces and gravies should be brought to a rolling boil for at least one minute.

 

Most importantly, if you are uncertain a food has been stored safely or is still safe to eat, it’s best to follow the old food safety maxim of “when in doubt, throw it out.”

 

For more information, visit the DPH Food Safety Branch website at https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/dph/dphps/fsb/Pages/default.aspx or call (502) 564-7181.

 

5 New COVID-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District; 118 New Cases....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.97%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 5 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 113 deaths resulting in a 1.52% mortality rate (about 1 in 66) among known cases. This compares with a 1.12% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.08% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 67 cases in the hospital. This is 6 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 67 on 11/23/2020. We have had a total of 475 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.41% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.95%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 7,414 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.55% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 149 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 6; Casey: 4; Clinton: 16; Cumberland: 8; Green: 10; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 36; Russell: 10; Taylor: 30; and, Wayne: 23. In all, we have released 84% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 36 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1071 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/20/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1127.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Schools, and Family. Of our active cases, 19% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 118 today: Adair: 8; Casey: 3; Clinton: 11; Green: 4; McCreary: 15; Pulaski: 47; Russell: 9; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 4. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.026. This means our total case count is projected to double every 26.56 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 274 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 61-year-old male who is released, 11/16/20;
Adair: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 68-year-old female who is released, unknown;
Adair: An 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: An 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 34-year-old female who is released, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: An 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: An 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: An 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 95-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 81-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: An 89-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: An 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 5-year-old male who is released, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the data may appear like the Clinton and McCreary numbers are off today. This is because we moved a case from Clinton to McCreary due to correcting a clerical error.

 

We are reporting 5 deaths today, an 86-year-old female from Clinton who had been a long-term care resident; an 80-year-old male from Clinton who had been a long-term care resident; an 81-year-old male from Clinton who had been recently hospitalized; and, a 88-year-old female from Russell who had been a long-term care resident. We also are reporting a death that occurred on 10/5 that we just found out about, a 72-year old male from Adair (for this patient, the primary cause of death may not have been COVID-19).

 

Not only are deaths on the rise, so too are hospitalizations. We have a record number of hospitalized cases today, 67. Also, all 10 or our district’s 10 counties remain in the “red-critical” range of community-spread.

 

To help understand exponential growth, keep this in mind. It took Lake Cumberland 168 days to get to 1% of our total population having tested positive; 55 additional days to get to 2%; and 21 days to get to 3% of the population having tested positive.

 

It took 66 days to get to 25 deaths; 88 additional days to get to 50; 53 more days to get to 75; and 31 days to get to 100 deaths.

 

It took 125 days to get to 100 hospitalizations; 42 additional days to get to 200; 48 more days to get to 300; and 24 to get to 400 total COVID-19 related hospitalizations.

 

In summary, while our growth rate has continued to progressively pick up steam, for deaths and hospitalizations, there was a slow-down along the way, but both have really accelerated of late. The hospitalization rate is particularly alarming since we desperately do not want our hospital infrastructures to become overwhelmed. If they do, it will not only be COVID-19 patients not getting appropriate care, but patients needing other services as well.

 

We continue to call upon all of our community leaders and citizens to face this challenge with the upmost seriousness before our medical infrastructures are compromised. There is hope! It is within our power to impact the spread of COVID-19. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 7,414 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 161,851 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 160,232 statewide plus 1,619 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

AREA ARRESTS 11-24-20

 

A Jamestown, KY man was arrested on numerous charges last evening. Christopher Camp, 21, was taken into custody by Officer Phillips with the Russell Springs Police Department for Failure to Appear (Citation for a Misdemeanor) All Terrain Vehicle Violation, Fleeing or Evading Police, 2nd Degree (Motor Vehicle), Failure to/Improper Signal, Disregarding Stop Sign, Improper Passing, Reckless Driving, Operating Off-Road Vehicle on Private/Public Land without Consent, Criminal Mischief 3rd Degree, Fleeing or Evading Police, 2nd Degree (on Foot), Possession of Methamphetamine, Drug Paraphernalia Buy/Possession, Operating on Suspended or Revoked Operator License, and Receiving Stolen Property under $10,000. He was lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.  

 

A Burkesville, KY woman was arrested for Burglary last evening. Savannah Branham, 27, was taken into custody by Deputy Daniels with the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office. She was charged with Burglary 2nd Degree and lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 11-24-20

 

Russell County - 9 new cases Monday. We had 10 cases released from isolation. We also had another death Monday for a total of 14 now. We now have 116 active cases which 111 are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 3 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at UK and 1 at VA in Lexington.

 

Adair County - 8 new COVID19 Cases to report yesterday. We released 6 cases. We are also sad to report 1 new death Monday. (It is reported that this death was last month and the health department was just notified today.)

We have had 887 total cases with 766 recovered and 30 deaths. We have 91 active cases with 82 in home isolation and 9 in area hospitals.

 

Gov. Beshear: Kentucky Continues to See Exponential COVID-19 Growth...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 23, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear implored Kentuckians to adhere to new restrictions and guidance that will help stop the rapid spread of COVID-19 in the commonwealth.

 

The number of Kentuckians diagnosed with COVID-19, hospitalized with the disease, admitted to the ICU and put on a ventilator because of complications from the virus continues to rise week over week. Today’s case report is the highest ever for a Monday.

 

“Day in and day out, our health care workers are doing what it takes. So day in and day out, we have to, too. Think about their sacrifice, every day going into a unit where they could contract this virus that they see people die from,” said Gov. Beshear. “What about our sacrifice? Over these coming months until we get to a vaccine, are we willing to step up for them and for each other, to make sure we can all get through this?

 

“We are at war. They are on the front lines and they are our only line. I will not abandon them. I will stand with them and I will make the difficult decisions it takes to make sure that our health care system can ultimately help everybody who needs it.”

 

The Governor shared a video in which health care workers ask all Americans to wear masks.

 

Wearing masks continues to be the most effective action Kentuckians can take to protect themselves and others. A recent study in Kansas from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that on average, counties that mandated mask-wearing saw a 6% reduction in cases; in contrast, the counties that opted out saw a 100% increase in cases.

 

The Governor said if Kentuckians do not take drastic measures to control the statewide outbreak, we will soon experience other states’ alarming current reality: New York has had to reopen a field hospital in Staten Island due to accelerating hospitalizations; in Wisconsin, the Mayo Clinic has been forced to put hospital beds in lobbies and a parking garage because hospitals have exceeded 100% capacity; and 22% of hospitals nationwide say they will face a critical staff shortage in the next week.

 

Finally, the Governor updated Kentuckians on COVID-19 in the state’s correctional facilities. He said that we have lost 15 inmates due to complications from COVID-19, including two who died this weekend from the Kentucky State Reformatory; we have also lost two corrections employees to COVID-19.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Monday, Nov. 23, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,135
  • New deaths today: 5
  • Positivity rate: 8.97%
  • Total deaths: 1,792
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,573
  • Currently in ICU: 391
  • Currently on ventilator: 203

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Madison, Boone, Kenton and McCracken.  

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 73-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 73-year-old man from Harlan County; two men, ages 85 and 88, from McCracken County; and a 77-year-old man from Webster County.

 

On Monday, Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, updated Kentuckians on contact tracing, COVID-19 clusters and new projections that account for Gov. Beshear’s additional restrictions.

 

“Contact tracing has a number of different purposes: case investigation, helping connect Kentuckians to helpful resources they need, contact notification and providing information about quarantining,” said Dr. Stack. “Recent models show that just for Jefferson County and 14 surrounding counties, if we had complete compliance with new requirements we could prevent almost 1,000 additional deaths by mid-January. Even with low compliance, 513 deaths would be prevented.”

 

Memorial
Today, Gov. Beshear honored LaTasha Benton of Lexington, who died of complications from COVID-19 at only 43. She was a key member of the Lexington community, dedicating her life to helping others. From tenants’ rights, affordable housing, to criminal justice reform, LaTasha was there to do whatever was needed to raise awareness and help those people who needed it most.

 

“LaTasha was a fighter. Her mother, Stephanie Pace, shared with The New York Times that LaTasha was her ‘Bionic girl,’” said Gov. Beshear. “LaTasha tested positive for COVID-19 at the end of October. She died on Nov. 6. LaTasha left behind her son, Daniel, her two brothers, Antonio and Robert, and her mother, as well as an entire community of people who loved her. LaTasha we are so sorry, and we grieve with your family. I will wear my mask for you and I hope everybody else does, too.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, new statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: Bosnian, Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends Americans avoid Thanksgiving travel. In addition, the Kentucky Department for Public Health recommends the following for celebrating Thanksgiving safely:

 

1 New COVID-19 Death in Lake Cumberland District; 98 New Cases...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.14%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 1 new death today. We have experienced a total of 108 deaths resulting in a 1.48% mortality rate (about 1 in 68) among known cases. This compares with a 1.13% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.1% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 61 cases in the hospital. This is 7 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 61 on 11/22/2020. We have had a total of 462 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.33% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.95%. The latest state data shows that an unreported % of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 7,296 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.49% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 92 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 13; Casey: 11; Clinton: 11; Cumberland: 3; Green: 2; Pulaski: 23; Russell: 4; Taylor: 8; and, Wayne: 17. In all, we have released 83.3% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 5 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1107 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/20/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1126.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Schools, and Family. Of our active cases, 19% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 98 today: Adair: 6; Casey: 12; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 3; Green: 2; McCreary: 7; Pulaski: 26; Russell: 3; Taylor: 27; and, Wayne: 10. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.027. This means our total case count is projected to double every 26.19 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 274 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 44-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 97-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is released, 11/20/20;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 88-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 79-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 70-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 96-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 89-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 70-year-old male who is hospitalized, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 94-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 4 months-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is released, 11/18/20;
Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we report today was a 90-year-old male nursing home resident from Pulaski.

 

We have 6 more active cases today than last Sunday. Last Sunday we added 70 new cases, this Sunday 98. All 10 of our District’s 10 counties remain in the “red-critical” range of community-spread. We also have a record number of hospitalized cases, 61.
 

We continue to call upon all of our community leaders and citizens to face this challenge with the upmost seriousness before our medical infrastructures are compromised. There is hope! It is within our power to impact the spread of COVID-19. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 7,296 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 159,673 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 158,100 statewide plus 1,573 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

Barn Destroyed by Fire in Adair County...


The Adair County Fire Department responded to a barn fire on Friday night at 677 Millerfield Road at property owned by Roger Holmes. The alarm came in at 7:15pmCT. Upon arrival, the barn was fully engulfed in flames and was a total loss along with about 50 rolls of hay. There were 17 firemen on the scene for about 2 hours.
 

MESSAGE REGARDING COLUMBIA CITY HALL OPERATING PROCEDURES

 
Attention all customers:
 
Due to the fact that our community continues to see a great influx in Covid-19 cases, we will have all doors to City Hall closed to incoming traffic. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause, however, we feel we must do this to protect those that are most vulnerable as well as keeping our staff as safe as possible.
 
The city currently offers alternative options for all bill payment to the city. Online bill pay for utility payments and property taxes as well as over the phone and the night deposit located at the rear of the building. This box is checked daily.  We do ask that you put your form of payment in a sealed envelope with something identifying what the payment is for. (i.e. Account number, Bill Number, or Account Holder’s name.) 
 
For anyone wishing to turn on service through the City of Columbia Gas Department, you may call and set up a time to do so. This also applies to any zoning paperwork or other fees you made need to submit.  
 
Should you need to pick up an accident report, please call 270-384-4119 and someone will assist you in getting the report and leaving in outside box for pickup.  
 
The staff at City Hall will continue to work at the capacity currently mandated by the Governor’s office. There will still be staff here in the office, however we do ask that you call 270-384-2501 should you be outside and need assistance. All other city related departments are working as well and will continue to provide all usual services. 
 
None of us prefer to operate this way, however we do feel that it is in the best interest of everyone. 
 
Thank you, 
Mayor Hoots
 

KSP Investigates an Injury Collision in Casey Co....

 

****UPDATE****

 

Horse Cave, KY (November 23, 2020) - The Kentucky State Police arrested 48-year-old Dale Meredeth today at his

residence in Horse Cave, KY at approximately  7:47 A.M. CST.  Meredeth was arrested on an Indictment Warrant for the following charges:
 

  • Manslaughter 2nd Degree
  • Persistent Felony Offender II
  • Assault 1st Degree
  • Persistent Felony Offender II
  • Drug Paraphernalia - Buy/Possess
  • Operating Motor Vehicle U/Influence 1st Degree Aggravating Circumstances
  • Violation Part 396 Federal Safety Regulations
  • Violation Part 392 Federal Safety Regulations


Sgt. Randall Honeycutt is investigating.

 

Original News Release Below:

 

Liberty, KY. (July 9, 2020) – The Kentucky State Police investigated a two-vehicle injury collision on KY 49 near Martens Road approximately 10 miles north of Liberty on Thursday around 1:04pmET.

 

Preliminary investigation indicates a 2001 Freightliner semi-tractor trailer being operated by 48-year old Dale Meredith of Horse Cave was traveling South on KY 49 when for an unknown reason he crossed the centerline. Meredith overcorrected causing the load of logs to shift traveling back into the oncoming lane striking a 2013 Chevrolet operated by 27-year old Ida Burton of Liberty.

 

Meredith and Burton were both air lifted to the University of Kentucky Hospital with severe injuries.   

Sergeant Randall Honeycutt investigated the collision, and assisted by Kentucky State Police, Casey Co Sheriff’s Office, EMS, and Fire Department.

 

AREA ARREST 11-23-20

A Columbia woman was arrested last evening on several charges including Assault. Kristina Cooper age 24, was taken into custody by Officer Foster with the Columbia Police Department just before 10 last night. She was charged with Assault 3rd Degree, Police Officer or Probation Officer, Promoting Contraband – 1st Degree, 2 counts of Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession, Possession of an Alcoholic Beverage Container in Motor Vehicle Prohibited and Failure to appear. She was lodged into the Adair County Regional Jail.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-23-20

Adair County 6 new COVID19 Cases to report Sunday. We released 13 cases yesterday. We have had 879 total cases with 760 recovered and 29 deaths. We have 90 active cases with 80 in home isolation and 10 in area hospitals.

 

Russell County 3 new cases Sunday. We had 4 cases released from isolation. We now have 118 active cases which 113 are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 3 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at UK and 1 at VA in Lexington. The new cases are a 70 year old female who is hospitalized and a 45 year old female who is self-isolated and 18 year old male who is self-isolated.

Gov. Beshear Reports Highest Week Ever for COVID-19 Cases

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 22, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear announced 2,194 new cases and said today’s COVID-19 case report is the highest ever for a Sunday. The second highest Sunday was Oct. 25, when the Governor reported 1,462 new cases, 732 fewer than he announced today.

 

In addition, this was Kentucky’s highest week ever for new COVID-19 cases, surpassing the previous record week by 3,766 cases.

 

“This upcoming holiday week is a special time for all of our families, and I know everyone wants to have a normal Thanksgiving after such a difficult year,” said Gov. Beshear. “I wish more than anything that we could go back to normal safely, but we can’t. In order to protect our only line of health care workers and all of our fellow Kentuckians, keep gatherings small (eight people or fewer and two households at most), wear a mask, wash your hands and stay six feet apart.

 

“If we have a major surge of COVID-19 cases after Thanksgiving, our hospitals will simply not have the capacity to give everyone the care they need. Nothing is worth that risk.”

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: Bosnian, Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 22, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,194
  • New deaths today: 4
  • Positivity rate: 9.19%
  • Total deaths: 1,787
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,533
  • Currently in ICU: 389
  • Currently on ventilator: 208

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Boone and Kenton. Each of these counties reported more than 100 new cases.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 69-year-old woman from Allen County; a 78-year-old man from Daviess County; an 88-year-old man from McCracken County; and a 62-year-old woman from Ohio County.

 

Thanksgiving Guidance
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends Americans avoid Thanksgiving travel. In addition to avoiding travel, the Kentucky Department for Public Health recommends:

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, new statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

WEEKEND ARRESTS 11/22/20

 
Ernesto Trevino Richards, 32, of Jamestown, KY arrested by RSPD on Saturday night for TBUT (Firearm). He was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
 

SAT. EVENING REPORT: 188 NEW CASES IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 107 deaths resulting in a 1.49% mortality rate (about 1 in 67) among known cases. This compares with a 1.14% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.12% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 54 cases in the hospital. This is 1 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 54 on 11/21/2020. We have had a total of 455 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.32% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.04%. The latest state data shows that an unreported % of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 7,198 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.45% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 212 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 25; Casey: 12; Clinton: 8; Cumberland: 7; Green: 15; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 64; Russell: 22; Taylor: 32; and, Wayne: 19. In all, we have released 83.2% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 24 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1102 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/20/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1126.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Schools, and Family. Of our active cases, 18% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 188 today: Adair: 26; Casey: 17; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 5; Green: 5; McCreary: 20; Pulaski: 45; Russell: 16; Taylor: 32; and, Wayne: 19. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.027. This means our total case count is projected to double every 26.46 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 274 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 53-year-old male who is released, unknown;
Adair: A 22-year-old female who is released, unknown;
Adair: A 93-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 67-year-old male who is released, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 34-year-old female who is released, 10/14/20;
Adair: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 67-year-old male who is released, 10/27/20;
Adair: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 8 months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 15-year-old male who is released, 11/20/20;
Adair: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 64-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 93-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 43-year-old male who is released, 11/17/20;
Cumberland: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Green: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is released, 11/18/20;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is released, 11/18/20;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is released, 11/09/20;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 95-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 94-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is released, unknown;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old male who is released, 11/17/20;
Taylor: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is released, 11/20/20;
Taylor: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is released, 11/20/20;
Taylor: A 29-year-old male who is released, 11/20/20;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is released, 11/09/20;
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is released, 11/20/20;
Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 8-year-old female who is released, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is released, 11/20/20;
Wayne: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

It’s been our most challenging week since the onset of the outbreak — our most challenging week by far. At both the state and local level, record numbers of new cases were added. Last week Lake Cumberland added 886 new cases, this week, 1,204. Last Saturday, we had 981 active cases, today, 1,102. Last week we had 40 hospitalized cases on Saturday, today 54 (which ties for our most hospitalizations at any given time). We also reported 11 deaths this week. Finally, all 10 of our district’s 10 counties remain solidly in the “red-critical” range of community-spread.

 

At our present growth-rate, our total cases will double in 26 days. Imagine all the death and hospitalizations we’ve had up until this point potentially doubling in just 26 days. Imagine all the pain and suffering we’ve endured since March repeating itself, not in 8 and half months, but in 28 days.

 

We continue to call upon all of our community leaders and citizens to face this challenge with the upmost seriousness before our medical infrastructures are compromised. There is hope! It is within our power to impact the spread of COVID-19. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 7,198 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 157,430 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 155,908 statewide plus 1,522 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

FRI. EVENING REPORT: 3 More COVID-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District....

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 107 deaths resulting in a 1.53% mortality rate (about 1 in 65) among known cases. This compares with a 1.16% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.14% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 53 cases in the hospital. This is 5 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 54 on 11/07/2020. We have had a total of 453 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.46% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 15) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.1%. The latest state data shows that 71.29% of ICU beds and unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 7,010 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.36% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 143 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 22; Casey: 9; Clinton: 20; Cumberland: 5; Green: 5; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 37; Russell: 4; Taylor: 15; and, Wayne: 22. In all, we have released 82.4% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 16 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1126 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/20/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1126.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Schools, and Family. Of our active cases, 14% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 162 today: Adair: 13; Casey: 17; Clinton: 8; Cumberland: 4; Green: 10; McCreary: 10; Pulaski: 63; Russell: 8; Taylor: 14; and, Wayne: 15. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.027. This means our total case count is projected to double every 26.3 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 274 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 78-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 82-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old female who is released, 11/19/20;
Casey: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 81-year-old male who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 64-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 19-year-old male who is released, 11/14/20;
McCreary: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 7 months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is released, 11/12/20;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old male who is deceased, expired;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is released, 11/19/20;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 89-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is released, 11/19/20;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 68-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 76-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old male who is released, 11/17/20;
Taylor: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 87-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is released, 11/17/20;
Wayne: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old male who is released, 11/19/20;
Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the numbers may appear that Russell and Adair are off. That is because one case from yesterday was moved from Russell to Adair.

 

We are sad to have to report 3 deaths today: a 97-year-old female from Clinton; a 90-year-old male from Pulaski; and a 81-year-old male from Casey. We continue to have a higher than state average mortality rate.

 

We agin have a record number of active cases, 1,126. All 10 of our counties remain solidly in the “red-critical” range of community-spread.

 

There is hope! It is within our power to impact the spread of COVID-19 before our medical infratructures become overwhelmed. Citizens, commuinty-leaders, church-leaders, let’s step-up or game. Please, let’s everyone do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 7,010 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 153,651 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 152,206 statewide plus 1,445 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any

 

Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

Gov. Beshear: Follow New Steps to Halt Exponential Growth of COVID-19

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 21, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday said the state reported its second highest number of coronavirus cases and urged Kentuckians to adhere to the latest round of restrictions to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

 

“Today is our second highest day, just behind yesterday, with 3,711 new cases,” said Gov. Beshear. “We continue to be in exponential growth, which will threaten the health care capacity in this state. That’s why we’re taking action and that's why we’re fighting back.”

 

The Governor said the new restrictions are necessary to fight the exponential growth of the virus and voiced concern of reaching a point where there aren't enough doctors and nurses to help those who are sick and who need their help.

 

“I know these steps are hard, but I want to thank the vast majority of individuals and businesses out there – many that are hurt the most by these steps we’re taking – that are stepping up, agreeing and doing it right, knowing that the future of so many lives depends on it,” added the Governor. “And there’s a light at the end of the tunnel, with two effective vaccines. We’ve just got to get there. Let’s make sure that we work hard to protect one another, make sure our most vulnerable are there to get the vaccine. So mask up, follow these steps we’re taking the next three weeks and let’s stop this growth of the coronavirus.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 21, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,711
  • New deaths today: 21
  • Positivity rate: 9.14%
  • Total deaths: 1,783
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,514
  • Currently in ICU: 370
  • Currently on ventilator: 202

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today were reported in Jefferson, Fayette and Warren. Counties seeing the greatest number of new cases were reported in Jefferson, Fayette, Oldham, Boyd and Hardin.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 43-year-old, 72-year-old and 83-year-old men from Jefferson County; a 67-year-old and a 73-year old woman, both from Jefferson County; a 79-year-old man from Bullitt County; an 80-year-old man from Carter County; a 79-year-old woman from Monroe County; a 73-year-old, 75-year-old, and 90-year old woman, all from Pike County, and an 80-year-old man from Pike County; a 76-year-old and 91-year-old from Madison County; an 86-year-old and 90-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 58-year-old man from Barren County; a 75-year-old man from Lewis County; an 87-year-old and 92-year-old man from McCracken County; and a 94-year-old woman from McLean County.

 

“Kentucky, and much of the nation, is in a dangerous place right now,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “Stay home. Stay home with only your own household as much as possible. If you must leave your home, wear a mask every time you are in public and stay as physically far away from others as possible. This is necessary for you, your loved ones and the most vulnerable Kentuckians who depend on us all.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

JOE SPIRES WEEK IN COLUMBIA....

 
The week of November 23rd, 2020 has been proclaimed as “Joe Spires Week” in Columbia. Mr. Spires will be turning 100 years old next week. He is a lifelong resident of Adair County and served in World War II. If you would like to send Mr. Spires a birthday card, please send to the following address:
Joe Spires
110 Hudson Street, Apt. 106
Columbia, KY 42728
 
Pictured L to R: Columbia Police Chief Jason Cross, Mr. Joe Spires, & Mayor Pam Hoots
 

Record Day for COVID-19 Cases with 3,825; 20 New Deaths...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 20, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear once again reported the state’s highest ever number of new daily cases.

 

“This is exponential growth. It is shattering records over and over until we stop it. That’s why we are taking action – we have to,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’ve got more than 10,000 students quarantined right now just based on the last two weeks alone. We’ve got to do so much better.

 

“That’s why starting at 5 p.m. today, we’ve got new restrictions in place to help us slow down this speeding train and prevent avoidable death. Remember, your decisions are going to be what determines how many people live or die. Do your part.”

 

New requirements impact restaurants; bars; social gatherings; indoor fitness and recreation centers; venues and theaters; professional services; and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: Bosnian, Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Friday, Nov. 20, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,825
  • New deaths today: 20
  • Positivity rate: 9.15%
  • Total deaths: 1,762
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,544
  • Currently in ICU: 366
  • Currently on ventilator: 188

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Boyd, Boone and Kenton. Each of these counties reported more than 100 new cases.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 74-year-old woman and a 68-year-old man from Boone County; a 54-year-old man from Boyd County; an 88-year-old woman from Campbell County; two 85-year-old men from Fayette County; two women, ages 74 and 90, and an 82-year-old man from Hardin County; four women, ages 69, 86, 87 and 91, and two men, ages 80 and 92, from Jefferson County; a 77-year-old woman from Johnson County; a 93-year-old woman from Marshall County; a 93-year-old man from Nelson County; a 71-year-old man from Pike County; and a 72-year-old woman from Washington County.

 

Thanksgiving Guidance
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends Americans avoid Thanksgiving travel. In addition to avoiding travel, the Kentucky Department for Public Health recommends:

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, new statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

KSP Encourage Citizens to 'Buckle Up' During Thanksgiving Travel....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 20, 2020) –Thanksgiving weekend is traditionally one of the heaviest traveled holidays across the country. Kentucky State Police (KSP) announced today that they will step up patrols as part of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ‘Click It or Ticket’ Thanksgiving enforcement initiative. These efforts will target seat belt usage with an added focus on impaired driving and commercial vehicle safety.  

 

“We want all Kentuckians to be safe this Thanksgiving, not only from COVID-19, but on our roads as well,” said Gov. Andy Beshear. “Please limit travel this year in general, but if you are driving, buckle up and watch your speed. I appreciate all of our law enforcement officers who may spend this holiday away from their own families in order to keep other Kentuckians safe.”

 

KSP Spokesman Sergeant Billy Gregory says the agency will utilize federal overtime funds to increase the number of troopers and officers on roadways. “High visibility enforcement is a universal traffic safety approach designed to deter motorists from unsafe driving behaviors,” notes Gregory. “Often times during the holidays, drivers are so focused on getting to their family gatherings that they tend to forget about traffic safety. Seeing our patrol cars out there on the roadways is a great reminder to buckle up and slow down.”

 

Gregory says Kentuckians should be commended for regularly wearing their seat belts, as the commonwealth currently has an 89.7 percent usage rate. “While this is positive for our state, we have traditionally seen an increase in impaired driving during holiday festivities. If you plan to serve alcohol at your family gathering this year, we encourage people to plan ahead and arrange for sober rides home.”

 

The ‘Click It or Ticket’ campaign coincides with Operation C.A.R.E. (Crash Awareness and Reduction Effort), a national enforcement effort, scheduled to take place during the four-day holiday driving season beginning November 25 at 6 p.m. to November 29, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. These joint efforts across the country encourage drivers to buckle up and refrain from impaired driving.

 

“The best defense against an impaired driver is wearing a seat belt,” adds Gregory. “At the end of the day it’s not about writing tickets, it’s about you and your family members arriving home safely.”

 

According to the Kentucky Traffic Collision Facts Report, the four-day Thanksgiving holiday travel period accounted for 1,253 collisions with five fatal crashes in 2019.

 

48-YEAR-OLD RUSSELL CO. MAN DIES FROM COVID-19; 274 NEW CASES IN L.C. DISTRICT...

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 1 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 104 deaths resulting in a 1.52% mortality rate (about 1 in 66) among known cases. This compares with a 1.17% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.16% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 48 cases in the hospital. This is 4 less than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 53 on 11/07/2020. We have had a total of 441 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.44% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.17%. The latest state data shows that 71.29% of ICU beds and unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 6,848 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.28% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 179 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 11; Casey: 10; Clinton: 11; Cumberland: 7; Green: 15; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 47; Russell: 21; Taylor: 34; and, Wayne: 17. In all, we have released 82.3% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 94 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1110 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/19/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1110.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Schools, and Family. Of our active cases, 14% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 274 today: Adair: 9; Casey: 21; Clinton: 10; Cumberland: 16; Green: 17; McCreary: 17; Pulaski: 99; Russell: 33; Taylor: 33; and, Wayne: 19. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.027. This means our total case count is projected to double every 25.71 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/19/2020 when we added 274 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Cumberland: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 41-year-old female who is released, unknown;
Cumberland: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 14-year-old female who is released, unknown;
Cumberland: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 1 month-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is released, 11/18/20;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is released, 11/17/20;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 93-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 94-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Russell: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 95-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 89-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 75-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 61-year-old male who is released, 11/12/20;
Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is released, 11/18/20;
Taylor: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 4 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;

 

The death we announce today was a 48-year-old male from Russell.

 

We shattered yesterday’s new case record! Yesteday we added 191 cases, today 274. We also have a record number of active cases, 1,110. All 10 of our counties remain solidly in the “red-critical” range of community-spread. Unfortunately, the massive exponential growth we warned everyone about is here. All of the complacency, skepticism, and insistence that the gudiance doesn’t apply to us or our situation has caught up with us. Unfortunately, and bewilderingly, while many will face this challenge and do what is necessary, some will still cast doubt and resist efforts to slow the spread of this devestating disease.

 

There is hope! It is within our power to impact the spread of COVID-19 before our medical infratructures become overwhelmed. Citizens, commuinty-leaders, church-leaders, let’s step-up or game. Please, let’s everyone do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 6,848 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 149,808 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 148,390 statewide plus 1,418 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 11-20-20

 

Russell County had another death Thursday. We now have 13 deaths. We had 33 new cases yesterday. We had 21 cases released from isolation. We now have 121 active cases which 115 are on self-isolation and 6 are hospitalized, 3 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Ephraim McDowell in Danville, 1 at UK and 1 at VA in Lexington.

 

Adair County with 9 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 11 cases. We have 834 total cases with 700 of those released and 29 deaths. We have 105 active cases with 98 in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals.

JAMESTOWN CITY COUNCIL MEETING RECAP

 

The Jamestown City Council held their regular monthly meeting Thursday night at City Hall.  Mayor Nick Shearer discussed the Council’s actions with WAVE NEWS…
 

 

ADAIR COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING RECAP...

 

Jim Lieb attended last nights meeting of the Adair County School Board and spoke with Superintendent Dr. Stephens about what took place…

 

3 New COVID-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District including 2 Russell Co. Men.....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.13%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 103 deaths resulting in a 1.57% mortality rate (about 1 in 64) among known cases. This compares with a 1.18% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.18% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 52 cases in the hospital. This is 1 less than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 54 on 11/07/2020. We have had a total of 437 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.65% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 15) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.25%. The latest state data shows that 76.64% of ICU beds and unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 6,574 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.15% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 103 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 16; Casey: 11; Clinton: 8; Cumberland: 4; Green: 4; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 19; Russell: 6; Taylor: 11; and, Wayne: 18. In all, we have released 83% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 99 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1016 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/18/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1016.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. Of our active cases, 13% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 205 today: Adair: 18; Casey: 12; Clinton: 12; Cumberland: 3; Green: 8; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 81; Russell: 29; Taylor: 28; and, Wayne: 6. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.025. This means our total case count is projected to double every 28.59 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/18/2020 when we added 205 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Adair: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is released, 11/17/20;
  • Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is released, 11/17/20;
  • Clinton: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
  • Clinton: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 88-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 7m -year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 86-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is released, 11/17/20;
  • Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We are sad to have to report 3 additional deaths today: an 82-year-old male from Clinton; an 88-year-old male from Russell who had been hospitalized; and, a 51 year-old-male from Russell. Right now our data shows that 1 in 64 people who contract COVID-19 will die from it. Our mortality rate remains higher than the state average.

 

We broke two records today. Our new cases today were 205, beating yesterday’s record of 191. We also have the most active cases since the onset of the outbreak at 1,016. At our present growth rate, we expect our total cases to double in the next 28 days. Imagine all of the cases, hospitalizations, and death we have endured since March being condensed into the next 28 days! All of our health systems face the very real possiblity of being severely overwhelmed. All 10 of our counties remain in the “red-critical” range of community-spread, with all counties facing increasing numbers.

 

On Wednesday, Governor Beshear took necessary steps to slow the spread of COVID-19. Obviously, what we are doing at the moment isn’t working. He stated there will not be a shutdown, as he announced the new steps listed below. These steps are for 3-6 weeks in duration. Starting this Friday, November 20th at 5:00 p.m. and lasting through December 13th at 11:59 p.m., the new restrictions via Executive Order include:
 

  • Indoor social gatherings: should be limited to your current household plus one other household, equaling to 8 people or less per household,
  • Indoor venues, event spaces or theatres: no more than 25 people per room (includes funerals and weddings). This does not include places of worship, but he will release recommendations in regard to these types of establishments soon.
  • Restaurants and bars: closed to indoor dining. The public should use delivery or to-go options, and outdoor service only. A $40 million federal fund will be launched to assist restaurants and bars that are impacted. Entities that qualify will receive $10,000 to use for various costs. Businesses that receive 50% of their business via drive-thru will not qualify. These funds are more geared towards the “mom and pop” establishments.
  • Gyms, fitness centers, and pools: must maintain 6-feet spacing, group classes are prohibited, and should remain at 33% capacity. Masking will be required. When possible, businesses should allow employees to work from home.
  • Schools: all public and private schools (K-12) cease in-person instruction beginning November 23rd. Middle and high schools will remain in remote instruction until January 4, 2021. Elementary schools may reopen on December 7th, if their county is not in the red zone and the school follows all Healthy At School guidance.

 

Please, let’s step-up our efforts and everyone do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 6,574 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 146,057 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 144,753 statewide plus 1,304 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

Gov. Beshear: Kentucky Sets New Single-Day Record of COVID-19 Cases

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 19, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear said Kentucky set a new single-day record Thursday with 3,649 COVID-19 cases.

 

Today, Gov. Beshear also reported 112 red zone counties, the state’s highest positivity rate since May and 30 new deaths as he emphasized the need for new restrictions. Kentucky has experienced a 400% increase in positive cases over the past nine weeks.

 

“As our needs are increasing, more of our front line – our only line – health care workers are getting infected. More and more are in quarantine after a possible exposure, too,” said Gov. Beshear. “So as our need goes up, our capacity and ability to help people goes down. That’s why we’re taking these steps.”

 

Already, more than 250,000 Americans and more than 1,700 Kentuckians have died of COVID-19. The Governor said if we don’t take serious precautions now, our losses will be even greater before COVID-19 vaccines are readily available.

 

New requirements impact restaurants; bars; social gatherings; indoor fitness and recreation centers; venues and theaters; professional services; and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

Thursday’s Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,649
  • New deaths today: 30
  • Positivity rate: 9.18%
  • Total deaths: 1,742
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,550
  • Currently in ICU: 358
  • Currently on ventilator: 199 

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Kenton, Fayette, Boone, Warren, Hardin and Campbell. Each of these counties reported over 100 new cases.

The red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 93-year-old man from Boone County; a 75-year-old man from Breckinridge County; a 73-year-old woman from Calloway County; a 79-year-old man from Campbell County; a 94-year-old woman and a 79-year-old man from Daviess County; two men, ages 67 and 77, from Fayette County; a 67-year-old man from Gallatin County; a 70-year-old woman from Graves County; an 80-year-old woman from Hopkins County; three women, ages 53, 69 and 96, and two men, ages 70 and 95, from Jefferson County; five women, ages 75, 86, 90, 95 and 96, and three men, ages 64, 77 and 96, from Kenton County; a 73-year-old woman and a 58-year-old man from Lee County; a 69-year-old woman from McCracken County; two women, ages 92 and 96, from Monroe County; and an 89-year-old woman from Rockcastle County.

 

The Governor encouraged Kentuckians to donate blood to support local hospitals.

 

“The need for blood donors remains high as we continue to battle COVID-19 here in Kentucky and across the United States. For those looking to help, please visit RedCross.org/giveblood or KYBloodCenter.org today,” said Gov. Beshear. “Both of these organizations have implemented enhanced safety procedures for donors. It’s important we do what we can to help.”

 

Gov. Beshear announced United Parcel Service (UPS), one of the commonwealth’s larger employers, is stepping up to help Kentuckians whose livelihoods have been hurt by COVID-19. In particular, UPS is aiming to help restaurant and bar workers who have recently lost employment.

 

“Heading into the holiday season, UPS is planning to hire more than 1,000 people across Kentucky. These jobs include package handlers, warehouse workers and team members to help drivers delivering packages. These are good wages, and these jobs come at a crucial time for many Kentuckians. Thank you to UPS for making these opportunities available for our people during such a challenging year.”

 

Thanksgiving Guidance
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends Americans avoid Thanksgiving travel. In addition to avoiding travel, the Kentucky Department for Public Health recommends:

 

Memorial
Alexa Rose Veit was a 15-year-old freshman at Ballard Memorial High School. Alexa was born Feb. 11, 2005, with Down syndrome. However, she never let that stop her from accomplishing whatever she set her mind to. Her strength and resiliency always helped her overcome any challenge.

 

“One of those challenges came in July of 2019, when Alexa was diagnosed with leukemia. This fall she was in remission on day 30 of a two-year treatment plan,” said Gov. Beshear. “But the week of Halloween this year, Alexa started feeling sick. She tested positive for COVID-19 and managed the first few days at home before being taken to the hospital. Those who knew Alexa asked we help raise awareness of how deadly this virus is and how important it is to follow the guidelines put in place.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, new statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

ADAIR CO. SCHOOL BOARD MEETING AGENDA 11/19/20

 
The Adair County School Board will meet Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020 at 6:00pmCT at the Adair Co. Board Conference Room.
 
AGENDA
 
*Meeting called to order*
**Pledge of Allegiance**
**Prayer**
 
1.   APPROVAL OF AGENDA
2.   APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDA
 
CONSENT AGENDA
3.  APPROVAL OF MINUTES
4.  APPROVAL OF TREASURER’S REPORT
5.  APPROVAL OF PAYMENT OF BILLS
6.  APPROVAL TO MATCH FY-2021 1ST KETS OFFER OF ASSISTANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $17,583.00
7.  APPROVAL TO WRITE WHAS GRANT FOR THE 2021-2022 SCHOOL YEAR
8.  APPROVAL OF PAY APPLICATION 1 TO JENKINS-ESSEX CONSTRUCTION FOR ACPC SCHOOL ADDITION ($57,888.00)
9.  ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF PERSONNEL ACTION
_____________________________________________________________
 
REGULAR AGENDA
10.  SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT
11.  PUBLIC COMMENTS
12.  APPROVAL OF MONTHLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS – Renae Smith
13.  APPROVAL OF THE 2019-2020 AUDIT REPORT-(VIRTUAL) Mike Jones, Mather & Company
14.  BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS UPDATE – Steve Burton
15.  APPROVAL/REJECTION OF BIDS ON THE BASEBALL/SOFTBALL CONCESSION STANDS
16.  APPROVAL OF SURPLUS ITEMS FOR DECEMBER ONLINE AUCTION
17.  ADJOURNMENT
 

RUSSELL COUNTY COVID-19 CANCELLATIONS....

 
The regular meeting of the Russell County Hospital Board scheduled for today (Thursday) has been cancelled. The normal schedule will resume again on January 21st, 2021 at 5:00pmCT in the old Russell County Courthouse.
 
Due to the high positive cases reported in Russell County the last few days, the Russell County Clerks Office has decided to close Thursday and Friday and reopen Monday, November 23rd.  They apologize for any inconvenience. 
 
Due to rising Covid 19 numbers in Russell County, the Lake Cumberland Tourist Commission's November board meeting was canceled for Wednesday, Nov. 18th  and postponed to Wednesday, December 3rd, 2020. It will be a Special Called Meeting that will begin at 12:30pmCT at the Lake Cumberland Tourist Commission building in Russell Springs.
 
 

Top-Performing Child Support Collectors Honored in Virtual Awards Ceremony; Adair & Russell Co. Attorneys Recognized

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 19, 2020) - The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) has recognized the state’s 20 most successful child support collection partners from the past year, along with other employees who have increased payments for families served by the child support program.

 

The ceremony was hosted virtually from Frankfort this year due to COVID-19 restrictions by the CHFS Child Support Enforcement program (CSE), which is part of the CHFS Department for Income Support (DIS). CSE administers child support throughout Kentucky and contracts with local officials to manage responsibilities jointly.

 

“The commitment and dedication of these essential public servants is often overlooked, but they are the foundation to our continued mission to the Commonwealth, said DIS Commissioner Steven P. Veno, who leads the Department of Income Support. “Child support enforcement plays an important role in strengthening parental responsibility so that children receive reliable support from both of their parents as they grow to adulthood. Kentucky’s Child Support Enforcement program delivers more than $400,000,000 funds in child support payments every year to families across the Commonwealth. In SFY 2020, paternity was established for 5800 children in Kentucky.”

 

Lily Chan Patteson, Director of the Child Support Enforcement Division, added: “We are proud to recognize today our exemplary frontline County Attorney Offices and staff as well as our state child support staff throughout the state. These individuals and office are your neighbors, your family and your friends; they are in every county and city in the Commonwealth and their service is integral to the community.”

 

The core mission of the Child Support Enforcement relies heavily on the devoted commitment of state child support staff, 120 county attorney offices and their staff, and partners to be successful and to serve the Commonwealth and its citizens.

 

Top performing counties with 1,000 or fewer cases are as follows:                   

  • Adair County, County Attorney Jennifer Hutchison-Corbin
  • Green County, County Attorney Russ Goff
  • Hancock County, County Attorney Paul Madden Jr.
  • Hickman County, County Attorney Jason Batts
  • Lyon County, County Attorney Lee Wilson
  • McLean County, County Attorney Donna Dant
  • Morgan County, County Attorney Myles Holbrook
  • Woodford County, County Attorney Alan George

 

Top performing counties with 1,000-2,000 cases are as follows:

  • Allen County, County Attorney Hallye Arterburn
  • Carter County, County Attorney Brian Bayes
  • Grant County, County Attorney Stephen Bates
  • Ohio County, County Attorney Justin Keown
  • Oldham County, County Attorney John K. Carter
  • Russell County, County Attorney Kevin Shearer
  • Taylor County, County Attorney John D. Bertram                                       

 

Top performing counties with 2,000-4,000 cases are as follows:

  • Bell County, County Attorney Neil Ward
  • HarlanCounty, County Attorney Fred Busroe Jr.
  • Hopkins County, County Attorney Byron Hobgood

 

Top performing counties with 4,000 cases or more are as follows:

  • Boone County, County Attorney Robert Neace
  • Hardin County, County Attorney Jennifer Oldham

 

Rankings are based on paternity establishment, child support order establishment, current child support collections and past-due collections. Commissioner Veno expressed appreciation for all who were recognized at the awards ceremony.

Several other awards were also given to contractors and CSE staff.

 

They are as follows:

  • Contracting Official Office of the Year – Clark County Attorney’s Office
  • John R. Fendley Child Support Attorney of the Year – G. Davis Wilson, Bourbon County Attorney
  • Tim Olds Outstanding Customer Service Award – Matt Burberry, Office of Application Technology Services, KASES
  • Contracting Official Employee of the Year – Laura Byland, Kenton County Attorney’s Office 
  • State Child Support Field Office Employee of the Year – James Cook, Eastern Mountain Regional Office
  • Central Office Employee of the Year – June Miller, CSE Training Section
  • Commissioner’s Award – Lily Chan Patteson, CSE Division

 

Additional information is available at http://chfs.ky.gov/.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-19-20

Russell County 29 new cases Wednesday. We had 6 cases released from isolation to. We had 2 deaths reported. We now have 110 active cases which 105 cases are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 1 at UK, 1at VA in Lexington, 1 at Ephraim McDowell in Danville and 2 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County 18 new COVID 19 cases to report yesterday. We released 16 Wednesday. We have 825 Total cases with 689 recovered and 29 deaths. We have 107 active cases with 100 in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals.

Gov. Beshear Implements New Restrictions to Save Lives

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 18, 2020) – Following a record 33 deaths announced Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear is issuing new restrictions that will help stop the rampant spread of COVID-19 and save Kentuckians’ lives while keeping the economy open.

 

With more than 250,000 American lives, including those of more than 1,700 Kentuckians, lost to the virus, Gov. Beshear is joining state executives from across the country in implementing new restrictions.

 

“Since March 6 – the day Kentucky had its first confirmed case – we have been under attack and at war with the coronavirus. It has upended our routines, damaged our economy, threatened our children’s education and taken far too many lives,” Gov. Beshear said. “Now, it is time for Kentucky’s third counterattack on the coronavirus. Let me be clear about a few things.

 

This is not, and will not be, a shutdown. Our economy is open, and there will be no closings based on essential or nonessential services. But today we are announcing significant, but surgical and targeted steps designed to slow the spread of the virus and protect our people.”

 

While Kentuckians sacrificed a lot to keep Kentucky cases comparatively low early on, the state has experienced a 400% increase in positive cases over the past nine weeks, and the third spike shows that Kentuckians need to buckle down and comply with existing orders, like wearing a facial covering, while adopting new requirements.

 

The Governor said requirements for restaurants; bars; social gatherings; indoor fitness and recreation centers; venues and theaters; and professional services are effective at 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20, through 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 13. See the full executive order here.

 

Restaurants, Bars – No indoor food or beverage consumption; carryout and delivery encouraged; socially distance outdoor seating.

 

To help offset the financial impact on restaurants and bars, the Governor also announced he is dedicating $40 million in CARES Act funding to provide qualifying entities $10,000 in relief for various expenses, with a maximum award of $20,000 per business entity.

 

Businesses with at least 50% of their sales via drive-through will not be eligible. To focus on locally owned businesses, publicly traded companies are not eligible to apply. Applications are scheduled to open Nov. 30 and close Dec. 18. Businesses will be required to remain in compliance with all public health orders. Applications will be processed in the order they are received, and funds will be awarded until they are exhausted. Additional details on where to apply will be forthcoming.

 

Earlier this month, the Governor also waived alcoholic beverage renewal fees for Kentucky restaurants, bars and temporary venues for 12 months to help during the pandemic. 

 

Private social gatherings – Up to eight people from a maximum of two households

 

Gyms, fitness centers, pools, other indoor recreation facilities – 33% capacity limit; group classes, team practices and competitions prohibited; masks must be worn while exercising

 

Venues, event spaces and theaters – Each room will be limited to 25 people. This applies to indoor weddings and funerals, but excludes in-person worship services, for which the Governor will provide recommendations Thursday.

 

Professional services – Office-based businesses limited to 33% of employees; all employees who are able to work from home must do so; all businesses that can close to the public must do so.

 

In addition, new requirements for schools will begin Monday, Nov. 23. See the executive order here.

 

Schools – All public and private schools (K -12) to cease in-person instruction:

  • Middle and high schools will remain in remote or virtual instruction until at least Jan. 4, 2021.
  • Elementary schools may reopen for in-person instruction Dec. 7 if their county is not in the red zone and the school follows all Healthy at School guidance.

 

“As for our schools, I want to thank everyone who is working to continue to educate our children and to make sure they have access to healthy meals,” Gov. Beshear said. “Our children are resilient, but they are sacrificing so much and we need them to sacrifice even more right now so we can protect them from this surge in cases.”

 

Wednesday’s Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,753
  • New deaths today: 15
  • Positivity rate: 9.13%
  • Total deaths: 1,712
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,553
  • Currently in ICU: 359
  • Currently on ventilator: 176

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Boone, Kenton, Warren and Christian.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 15-year-old girl from Ballard County; a 60-year-old man from Barren County; a 75-year-old man from Caldwell County; a 90-year-old man from Calloway County; two women, ages 78 and 91, from Christian County; an 87-year-old man from Clay County; a 43-year-old man from Fayette County; a 78-year-old man from Hancock County; two women, ages 32 and 73, from Jefferson County; a 78-year-old man from Marshall County; a 68-year-old woman from McCracken County; an 86-year-old woman from Nelson County; and a 79-year-old woman from Pike County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Thanksgiving Guidance

 

RC CLERKS OFFICE TO BE CLOSED THE REST OF THE WEEK

Due to the high positive cases reported in Russell County the last few days the Russell County Clerks Office has decided to close Thursday and Friday and reopen Monday November 23rd.  We apologize for any inconvenience. 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-18-20

Adair County 23 new COVID19 cases to report Tuesday. We released 15 cases. We have had 807 total cases with 673 of those recovered and 29 deaths. We have 105 active cases with 98 of those in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals. 


Russell County 14 new cases yesterday. We had 11 cases released from isolation. We now have 89 active cases which 83 are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized.

 

All 10 Counties in Lake Cumb. District in "Red Critical Phase" of Community Spread; Hospitalizations up to almost Record Levels....

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 100 deaths resulting in a 1.57% mortality rate (about 1 in 64) among known cases. This compares with a 1.2% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.2% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 53 cases in the hospital. This is 5 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 55 on 11/07/2020. We have had a total of 427 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.7% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 15) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.3%. The latest state data shows that 76.64% of ICU beds and 32.86% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 6,369 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 3.05% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 187 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 15; Casey: 22; Clinton: 9; Cumberland: 5; Green: 17; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 49; Russell: 11; Taylor: 38; and, Wayne: 15. In all, we have released 84% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 4 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 917 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/14/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 980.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Family, and Schools. Of our active cases, 14% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 191 today: Adair: 23; Casey: 10; Clinton: 11; Cumberland: 3; Green: 12; McCreary: 7; Pulaski: 24; Russell: 14; Taylor: 45; and, Wayne: 42. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.025. This means our total case count is projected to double every 28.07 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/17/2020 when we added 191 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: An 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: An 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: An 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: An 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 9 months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 69-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Casey: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Casey: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 55-year-old female who is released, 11/16/20;
  • Casey: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: An 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 23-year-old female who is released, unknown;
  • Green: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 19-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Green: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Green: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 71-year-old male who is released, asymptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
  • Russell: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: An 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 92-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: An 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
  • Taylor: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: An 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 91-year-old female who is hospitalized, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 6 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: An 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 73-year-old female who is hospitalized, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the data would suggest that the Clinton and Wayne numbers are off today. That is because we moved one case in our records from yesterday from Clinton to Wayne.

 

We added a record number of new cases today, 191. Our hospitalizations are up too, almost to record levels. We now have all 10 of our district’s 10 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread. Yesterday I reported that area hospitals were reporting capacity concerns. Today, during the Governor’s report, similar concerns were expressed across the entire state. Also, at our present growth rate, our total cases are projected to double in just under a month. There is very real concern our health departments and hospitals will both soon be overwhelmed!

 

It is past time for our communties to come together to slow the spread of COVID-19. It is within our power to impact the spread of COVID-19. Businesses and schools should carefully follow the COVID-19 guidance. Too often we hear justification as to why the guidance shouldn’t apply to their situations. Also, we as citizens need to step-up our compliance with masking and social distancing. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by: 1. wearing our face coverings, 2. avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), 3. social distancing when around others, 4. increasing our hand hygiene, 5. increasing our general sanitation, and  6. avoid touching our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 6,369 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 143,215 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 142,008 statewide plus 1,207 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

Gov. Beshear will Announce "New Restrictions" on Wednesday to help slow the rapid spread of COVID-19.....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 17, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear again warned Kentuckians that they must take action to stop COVID-19, as cases are increasing rapidly in the commonwealth. Families, schools, businesses and community leaders should all come together and do their part.

 

“When we talk about our health care workers, we call them our front line of defense,” said Gov. Beshear. “But really, they’re our only line. We don’t have back up. So if we are going to truly care about them and ensure there are enough doctors and nurses to help people who are sick, we have to lower community spread.”

 

The White House Federal COVID-19 Report for Kentucky explained that “there is now aggressive, unrelenting, expanding broad community spread across the country, reaching most counties, without evidence of improvement, but rather further deterioration. Current mitigation efforts are inadequate and must be increased to sustain the health system for both COVID and non-COVID emergencies. We share the strong concern of Kentucky leaders that the current situation is worsening and that all Kentuckians need to do their part to stop the spread. The Governor’s active measures are commended.”

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, shared new models that demonstrate how COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths will likely progress in the state if Kentuckians don’t take action to flatten the curve.

 

He showed the success of Kentucky’s Healthy at Home program and mask mandate in suppressing the virus and helping the state avoid an exponential increase in cases during the spring and summer. Unfortunately, he said without new action, Kentucky will likely see that exponential growth in cases in the fall and winter.

 

Dr. Stack explained that COVID-19 is expected to be the nation’s third leading cause of death in 2020, only behind heart disease and cancer.

 

“This is not political. We are trying to keep people safe from a once-in-a-century pandemic,” said Dr. Stack. “If your neighbor’s house is burning down, are you going to stand idly by, or are you going to try to rescue them from the fire? I am confident that if we come together we can interrupt this third climb, but it’s got to be Team Kentucky pulling together.”

 

He also highlighted a video from Pikeville Medical Center CEO Donovan Blackburn.

 

“Our COVID-19 ICU patients range from 32 years old to 90 years old,” said Blackburn. “With 83 COVID-19 patients and climbing, we – like other hospitals in the state and region – are nearing our capacity. We are also at risk of shutting down other vital services. So that we do not overburden our hospitals and health care workers, I urge all Kentuckians to please take this seriously and mask up.”

 

Gov. Beshear said he will announce additional steps to combat the virus Wednesday at 4 p.m. EST.

 

“When you look at the severity of this, action has to be taken,” the Governor said.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,931
  • New deaths today: 33
  • Positivity rate: 9.10%
  • Total deaths: 1,697
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,521
  • Currently in ICU: 354
  • Currently on ventilator: 178

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Madison, Daviess, Boone, Hardin and Kenton.

The red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 85-year-old man from Barren County; a 69-year-old man from Breathitt County; a 60-year-old man from Calloway County; a 36-year-old woman from Christian County; four women, ages 83, 90, 91 and 91, from Daviess County; an 89-year-old man from Floyd County; a 51-year-old man from Grayson County; a 78-year-old woman from Green County; an 85-year-old man from Hancock County; a 93-year-old woman from Henderson County; three women, ages 75, 78 and 93, and five men, ages 49, 79, 87, 88 and 94, from Jefferson County; two men, ages 68 and 72, from Jessamine County; a 94-year-old woman and an 89-year-old man from Madison County; two women, ages 92 and 94, from McLean County; an 86-year-old woman from Monroe County; a 68-year-old woman and a 74-year-old man from Ohio County; a 65-year-old man from Oldham County; a 99-year-old woman from Rockcastle County; and a 58-year-old woman from Trigg County.

 

Contact Tracing
The Governor implored Kentuckians to cooperate with contact tracers as COVID-19 hospitalizations in the state hit a record high. Families can learn more about the process in this video from Judy Mattingly, director of the Franklin County Health Department.

 

“As the number of cases rise, the number of people who have been exposed increases exponentially. Our local health departments are overwhelmed. It is our duty as Kentuckians to help and protect our neighbors,” said Gov. Beshear. “This includes notifying contacts if they have been exposed to COVID-19.

 

“If you are a close contact of someone who has COVID-19, you must take the right steps to protect yourself and others. Please stay home and quarantine for 14 days since your last exposure. If you develop symptoms like fever, cough, shortness of breath or fatigue, get tested. Find the nearest testing location at kycovid19.ky.gov.”

 

A close contact is someone who was within six feet of someone with COVID-19 for a total to 15 minutes or more either two days before symptoms began or before a positive COVID-19 test if asymptomatic. Kentuckians who are quarantining should stay away from others in their households; if possible, they should use a separate bedroom and bathroom.

 

Surge Testing Update
Gov. Beshear recently announced the commonwealth’s partnership with U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to conduct COVID-19 surge testing.

 

Additional testing provided through HHS began Monday, Nov. 16 in Lexington at the Keeneland Race Course. 

 

Appointments are required and can be made at https://www.doineedacovid19test.com. Drive-through testing will be conducted Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Kentuckians are asked to use Keeneland Gate 1 access, at Versailles Road and Man O’ War to access the Keene Barn parking lot test site (4201 Versailles Road).

 

The Keeneland site will administer the highly reliable PCR test and provide 400 appointments per day with test results in 48-72 hours. Additionally, individuals who receive a COVID-19 test will receive five cloth face coverings.

 

All Kentuckians are welcome at these sites and are urged to take advantage of the additional COVID testing available to them. All testing sites in the commonwealth are listed at kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Economic Development
The Governor also shared some good news by congratulating two companies on their expansions in the commonwealth.

 

Stanley Engineered Fastening, a Stanley Black & Decker company, plans to create 49 high-paying jobs for Kentuckians with a $6 million expansion at its Christian County facility. Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Group opened their $100 million expansion in Bowling Green, a project that is creating 70-plus full-time jobs.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

4 COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.98%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 4 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 100 deaths resulting in a 1.62% mortality rate (about 1 in 62) among known cases. This compares with a 1.09% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.21% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 48 cases in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 55 on 11/07/2020. We have had a total of 418 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.77% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 15) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.38%. The latest state data shows that 72.46% of ICU beds and 32.64% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 6,178 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.96% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 96 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 13; Casey: 4; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 4; Green: 12; Pulaski: 12; Russell: 6; Taylor: 9; and, Wayne: 29. In all, we have released 83.6% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 14 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 913 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/14/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 980.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Schools, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. Of our active cases, 13% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 114 today: Adair: 7; Casey: 8; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 5; Green: 18; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 24; Russell: 11; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 9. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.023. This means our total case count is projected to double every 29.95 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/11/2020 when we added 190 cases. 

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 39-year-old female who is released, 11/14/20;
Casey: A 84-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 5m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 75-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 57-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 96-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Green: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 86-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 88-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 73-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is released, 11/14/20;
Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;

 

We are sad to have to report 4 deaths today, a 71-year-old male from Casey, who had been hospitalized; an 83-year-old female from Clinton, who had been hospitalized; an 86-year-old male from Clinton, who was long-term care resident; and, a 74-year old male from Wayne who had been hospitalized. At our current mortality rate about 1 in 62 people who contract COVID-19 will die from it.

 

Also, local data reveals that about 1 in 15 people who contract COVID-19 will be hospitalized. I spoke with a regional hospital director today who informed me that our area hospital capacity is becoming a very real concern. It isn’t just a space issue, but also a staffing issue. With COVID-19 being so wide-spread now in our area, state, and nation, there simply isn’t enough medical staff to meet the increasing demand. When the added COVID-19 demand is combined with the usual seasonal surge in inpatient care, the numbers are looking grim. Plus, the hospitals to which our area would generally refer overflow patients to – such as those in Lexington and Louisville – are also becoming full. At our present growth rate, our COVID-19 numbers are expected to double in just under a month. This means that two systems, the public health and hospital systems, which are already taxed to near capacity, will potentially face an overwhelming demand. In other words, it is past time for everyone to step-up their COVID-19 precautions.

 

For the first time in a while the local numbers are caught up enough so that the state and local incidence maps match. So, by both state and local numbers, we have 9 of our 10 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread. Only McCreary is in the “orange-accelerated” range, and it is 1 case per 100,000 away from also being in the red.

 

It is within our power to impact the spread of COVID-19. Businesses and schools should carefully follow the COVID-19 guidance. Too often we hear justification as to why the guidance shouldn’t apply to their situations. Also, we as citizens need to step-up our compliance with masking and social distancing. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 6,178 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 140,246 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 139,097 statewide plus 1,149 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report).

 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-17-20

 

Russell County 11 new cases yesterday. We had 6 cases released from isolation. We now have 86 cases which 80 cases are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized, 2 at Somerset, 2 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at VA in Lexington and 1 at UK.

 

Adair County 7 new COVID19 cases to report Tuesday. We released 13 cases. We have had 784 total cases with 658 recovered and 29 deaths. WE have 97 active cases with 89 in home isolation and 8 in area hospitals.

JT CITY COUNCIL HAD A SPECIAL CALLED MEETING LAST EVENING...

Last night Jamestown City Council met and voted on the annexation of property on Airport Road. Mayor Nick Shearer tells WAVE NEWS the 2nd reading will take place at the regular monthly meeting Thursday night…

 

RC SCHOOL BOARD MEETING RECAP....

 

The Russell County School Board met last evening for the regular monthly meeting. Superintendent Michael Ford spoke to WAVE NEWS following the meeting....

 

 

Female Arrested on Drug & Other Charges Following Altercation in Restaurant Parking Lot

 

Tompkinsville, KY (November 16, 2020)Kentucky State Police Post 15 responded to assist Tompkinsville Police with an altercation that occurred in the Sonic parking lot on Sunday, November 15th, 2020 at approximately 8:00pmCT. 48-year-old Jeannie Ramos of Owensboro, KY became disorderly after being confronted about a stolen cell phone that was in her possession. Ramos attempted to leave the parking lot in a 2011 Mazda, ramming the victim’s car twice almost striking the victim. Upon arrival, Trooper Allen Shirley observed Ramos being disorderly and appeared to be intoxicated. Officer Ricky Shirley utilized his canine resulting in an alert on the vehicle. A search of the vehicle was conducted resulting in smoke pipes and several small bags of suspected methamphetamine being located. 
 

Ramos was arrested and charged with Disorderly Conduct 2nd degree, DUI 1st (aggravating circumstance), Failure to produce Insurance Card, Wanton Endangerment 1st degree, Possession of a Controlled substance 1st degree 2nd offense (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia, menacing and criminal mischief 2nd degree. Ramos was lodged in the Barren County Detention Center.

 

HEAD-ON GREEN CO. COLLISION SENDS 2 TO LOUISVILLE HOSPITAL...

 
The Green County Sheriffs Dept investigated a head-on collision Saturday night on Highway 68 the Edmonton Road, Sheriff Robbie Beard, Wendy Hudson, 48, of Campbellsville, KY swerved to miss a deer in the roadway and collided head-on with an auto operated by Dalton Young of Greensburg. Both drivers were entrapped in the wreckage and had to be freed by Green County Fire and Rescue. Hudson and Young were airlifted to University of Louisville Hospital; a passenger in the Hudson vehicle, Paul Cothern of Campbellsville, KY was taken to Jane Todd Crawford Hospital. 
 
The accident occurred at 8:00pmCT and was investigated by Deputy Rainwater with the Green County Sheriffs Office. He was assisted by the Greensburg-Green County Fire and Rescue, Campbellsville Fire and Rescue, and the Summersville & Exie Fire Departments.
 

Gov. Beshear: Kentucky Cases Increasing at Frightening Pace....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 16, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear warned Kentuckians that COVID-19 continues to spread at a frightening pace within the commonwealth and across the United States.

 

As of this morning, two companies, Moderna and Pfizer, have announced their vaccines appear to be more than 90% effective as clinical trials continue. The Governor said he hopes this great news will inspire all Kentuckians to keep fighting the virus in the months before those vaccines become widely available.

 

“We need everybody with this news to buckle down, to make sure you are making good decisions each and every day because people’s lives depend on it,” said Gov. Beshear. “If we can just get to the point where this vaccine will be widely available, we can make sure we don’t lose people. We need your help. This is now a time-limited virus. So if you’re tired, now you can see the end. Let’s get our second wind.

 

“Today, we’re talking about where this virus is; tomorrow, we’re going to share some modeling about where we think it’s going; and then on Wednesday, if we don’t see a change in the numbers, we’ll talk about some additional steps that we may have to take to try to get this virus under control.

 

“If we have to take additional steps, it will not look like what we went through in March, in April and into May. At that time, we did not have enough testing; we had almost no PPE to protect those in hospitals; we didn’t know the most effective ways to treat this virus so the mortality rate was through the roof; and we didn’t know as much about the spread. If we have to take additional steps, they will be more targeted.”

 

Today, Cabinet for Health and Family Services Secretary Eric Friedlander also updated Kentuckians on the state’s efforts against COVID-19 in long-term care facilities.

 

“We are working around the clock to continue to do all that we are able to combat what is a vicious, highly contagious disease,” said Secretary Friedlander. “Among 382 long-term care facilities with active cases, 38 have at least 15 active cases, a dramatic rise from the 15 facilities with at least 15 active cases as of Oct. 30. There’s a continued need to balance the emotional and mental well-being of residents and their family members and the harsh reality of this pandemic.”

 

The Kentucky Department for Public Health will mobilize strike teams to hard-hit facilities, and the Kentucky National Guard also will mobilize 10 non-clinical support teams. Guidance has been updated with regard to communal dining, group activities and offsite travel, including a recommendation that residents leave a facility only when medically necessary and for needs that cannot be met on site or through telehealth.

 

“Holiday visits will need to look different this year. If a resident leaves a facility for an outing, the resident will be expected to go into quarantine upon returning to the facility,” said Secretary Friedlander. “We continue to encourage compassionate care, televisits and outdoor visits.”

 

Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman celebrated American Education Week and congratulated Recognizing Inspirational School Employees Award winners. She also announced that to date, more than $3.7 million has been raised for the Team Kentucky Fund, which already has assisted more than 2,500 Kentucky families. Applications for the fund will close at 5 p.m. today as Lt. Gov. Coleman expects all funds will be exhausted once current applications are processed.

 

“I would like to thank Community Action Kentucky (CAK) for their partnership. I said they would be the hands and feet of the Team Kentucky Fund, and that has turned out to be true,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said. “For every $1 given to the Team Kentucky Fund, CAK has leveraged their existing programs to provide a total of $2.22 to Kentucky families. That is a tremendous return on investment.”

 

If Kentuckians have an outstanding application with the Team Kentucky Fund, CAK will continue to work with them and will be in contact. If Kentuckians still need support, they should reach out to their local CAK office or visit kycovid.ky.gov to view additional resources which may be available to them.

 

Finally, Secretary of the Executive Cabinet J. Michael Brown updated Kentuckians on COVID-19 in the state’s correctional facilities. Unfortunately, there has been a sizable outbreak at Lee Adjustment Center, where there are 29 active staff cases and 434 active inmate cases.

 

“The news from the corrections front is not good. We’ve seen an increase week over week of 514 inmate cases and 52 staff cases. That brings our total for the year to over 2,000 inmate cases and over 280 staff cases,” said Secretary Brown.

 

“Our fear, frankly, is that we haven’t completely finished testing the facility and we already know that half of the inmates have tested positive for COVID-19. It’s alarming. We wanted to bring this to everyone’s attention to show that sometimes in spite of our best efforts, this virus continues to strike us.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Nov. 16, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,514
  • New deaths today: 3
  • Positivity rate: 8.98%
  • Total deaths: 1,664
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,442
  • Currently in ICU: 360
  • Currently on ventilator: 128

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton and Hardin.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 66-year-old woman from Graves County; a 63-year-old woman from Henderson County; and an 83-year-old woman from Jefferson County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Couple Arrested on Drug Charges Following Traffic Stop....


On Friday, November 13th, 2020 at 10:34pmCT, Adair County K-9 Deputy Josh Durbin initiated a traffic stop 19 miles north of Columbia in the Elkhorn community on a 1989 Toyota truck. During the stop, there was probable cause that controlled substances were in the vehicle. With the assistance of K-9 "Nitro" a search of the vehicle was conducted.

The vehicle operator, 42-year-old Charles Perry of Mannsville, KY was arrested for Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (Methamphetamine), Possession of a Controlled Substance 2nd degree, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Operating on a Suspended License. 

A passenger, 27-year-old Shana D. Laytart of Campbellsvile, KY was arrested for Possession of Methamphetamine and Possession of a Controlled Substance 2nd degree (Drug Unspecified). 


Both were lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail. The Adair County Sheriffs Office is continuing the investigation.

 

COVID-19 Case Count Increases by 70 in Lake Cumberland District...

 


Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.88%.

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 96 deaths resulting in a 1.58% mortality rate (about 1 in 63) among known cases. This compares with a 1.21% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.24% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 48 cases in the hospital. This is 1 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 55 on 11/07/2020. We have had a total of 408 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.73% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 15) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.38%. The latest state data shows that 72.46% of ICU beds and 32.64% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 6,064 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.9% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 156 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 24; Casey: 13; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 5; Green: 4; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 75; Russell: 13; and, Taylor: 15. In all, we have released 83.6% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 86 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 899 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/14/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 984.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Schools, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. Of our active cases, 14% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 70 today: Adair: 10; Casey: 5; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 4; Green: 8; Pulaski: 24; Russell: 4; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 1. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.023. This means our total case count is projected to double every 30.42 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/11/2020 when we added 190 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 72-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Green: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2 Months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Russell: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The surge is so great at the moment, the health department is falling behing on case investigations and contact tracing. As of today, we are 2 to 4 days behind. We are also behind in entering data into the state system causing the numbers the new cases the Governor reports and the number of counties he reports as being in the “red-critical” range of community-spread is off. Even still, with the numbers we can verify locally we have nine of our district’s ten counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Pulaski, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. This leaves only McCreary in the “orange-accelerated” range.

 

We call upon our citizens and community leaders to step-up your efforts in regards to COVID-19. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 6,064 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 138,686 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 137,586 statewide plus 1,100 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

AREA ARREST 11-16-20

 

Christopher Bunch, 22, of Russell Springs, KY was taken into custody overnight by Deputy Corey Meyer with the Russell County Sheriff’s Office. Bunch was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance, 1st Degree, 2nd Offense (Meth), Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession, Rear License Not Illuminated, Failure to or Improper Signal and No Operators-Moped License.

 

CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-16-20

 

Adair County 10 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 24 cases. We have had 777 total cases with 645 recovered and 29 deaths. WE have 103 active cases with 95 in home isolation and 8 in area hospitals.

 

Russell County 4 new cases Sunday. We had 13 cases released from isolation. We now have 81 active cases which 77 are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at UK, 1 at VA in Lexington and 1 at Somerset.

Gov. Beshear Urges Action as KY's Weekly COVID-19 Cases Hit Record High....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 15, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Sunday asked all Kentuckians to recommit to following safety guidelines as Kentucky again set a record for cases reported in one week. Today’s report also represented the highest number of new cases ever reported on a Sunday.

 

“Coronavirus is present in every corner of the commonwealth and it’s spreading at a truly alarming rate,” the Governor said. “This is not a drill; this is a health emergency that we all need to take seriously. Let’s come together as Team Kentucky to defeat this virus.”

 

Gov. Beshear reminded community leaders, schools, businesses and residents in the state’s hardest hit areas to follow the Red Zone Reduction Recommendations. Thursday’s red zone counties should follow the recommendations Monday, Nov. 16, through Sunday, Nov. 22.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Sunday, Nov. 15, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,449
  • New deaths today: 3
  • Positivity rate: 8.88%
  • Total deaths: 1,661
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,383
  • Currently in ICU: 330
  • Currently on ventilator: 156

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Kenton and Boone.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 93-year-old woman from Fayette County and an 84-year-old woman and an 85-year-old man from Oldham County.

 

“Kentucky’s state motto is ‘United We Stand, Divided We Fall.’ This motto has never been more applicable than now, as we fight the most deadly pandemic in over 100 years,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “Unless Kentuckians come together, we will continue on this dangerous trajectory with disastrous consequences.”

 

As we end yet another highest week ever of COVID-19 cases, Dr. Stack reminds everyone to watch your space, wear a mask and wash your hands in order to save your life and the lives of those around you.

 

Reporting is limited on Sundays. Additional information, including the number of Kentuckians who have recovered from COVID-19, will be reported Monday.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

162 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT REPORTED SATURDAY EVENING...

 

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.95%.

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 96 deaths resulting in a 1.6% mortality rate (about 1 in 63) among known cases. This compares with a 1.22% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.26% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 47 cases in the hospital. This is 2 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 55 on 11/07/2020. We have had a total of 407 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.79% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 15) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.45%. The latest state data shows that 71.92% of ICU beds and 31.26% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 5,994 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.87% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 109 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 9; Casey: 11; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 5; Green: 9; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 32; Russell: 13; and, Taylor: 21. In all, we have released 82% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 53 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 985 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/14/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 985.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. Of our active cases, 15% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 162 today: Adair: 3; Casey: 3; Clinton: 18; Cumberland: 7; Green: 13; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 58; Russell: 11; Taylor: 34; and, Wayne: 9. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.023. This means our total case count is projected to double every 30.3 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/11/2020 when we added 190 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 90-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is released, 11/13/20;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 79-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old male who is released, 11/13/20;
Taylor: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 81-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the data will show that our new cases went up by 163 but our total cases only went up by 162. That is because we removed one case from a prior day.

 

This has been our most difficult week since the onset of the outbreak. As of today, we have a record number of active cases, 985. This is 234 more than last Saturday. At both the state on the local level we experienced a record number of new cases. We add 866 new cases this week, compared to 631 last week. We also experienced 11 deaths this week. Also, our hospitalization rate of 6.79 means that about 1 out of every 15 cases will become hospitalized. The surge is so great at the moment, the health department is falling behing on case investigations and contact tracing. As of today, we are 2 to 4 days behind. We are also behind in entering data into the state system causing the numbers the new cases the Governor reports and the number of counties he reports as being in the “red-critical” range of community-spread is off. Even still, with the numbers we can verify locally we have 9 of our district’s 10 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Pulaski, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. This leaves only McCreary in the “orange-accelerated” range.

 

We call upon our citizens and community leaders to step-up your efforts in regards to COVID-19. Please don’t wait until one of your loved ones dies or is hospitalized to take this seriously. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 5,994 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 137,251 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 136,137 statewide plus 1,114 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread.

 

The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

Gov. Beshear Urges Kentuckians to Act as COVID-19 Cases Again Hit Record High, Deaths Continue....

 

FRANKFORT, KY (Nov. 14, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear reported the state’s highest number of COVID-19 cases yet again with the test positivity rate reaching almost 9% as the commonwealth’s alarming spread of the coronavirus continues with more than 11,500 cases and 68 deaths in the last four days alone.

 

“If we don’t grab ahold of those red zone county reduction recommendations, if we don’t see those steps being done and ultimately see those numbers coming down, we are going to have no choice but to take additional steps as we move forward,” Gov. Beshear said. “Please take this seriously. You are either a part of the solution fighting the good fight to help other people or you’re helping to spread this virus.”

 

The Governor said Saturday was again worse than previous days, with 419 children alone testing positive and COVID-19 in every part of the commonwealth.

 

“So please, do your part. Do your civic duty. Wear your mask. There is so much suffering out there right now,” Gov. Beshear said. “If we’re not careful, it’s going to get even worse than this, which is almost unimaginable compared to where we were months ago.”

 

The Governor also provided an update and good news related to the Brent Spence Bridge, which has been closed since early Wednesday after an incident and subsequent fire that damaged the major thoroughfare between Kentucky and Ohio. The U.S. Dept. of Transportation has already approved $12 million in funding for repairs. Kentucky Transportation Secretary Jim Gray was at the site Saturday for the third consecutive day. The Governor said inspections continue on the bridge and he will continue to share updates as they become available.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Saturday, Nov. 14, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,303
  • New deaths today: 11
  • Positivity rate: 8.95%
  • Total deaths: 1,658
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,378
  • Currently in ICU: 308
  • Currently on ventilator: 167

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Kenton and Boone.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 90-year-old woman and 94-year-old man from Fayette County; a 72-year-old man and 93-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 70-year-old man from Kenton County; a 65-year-old man from Knott County; a 79-year-old woman from Lee County; a 69-year-old man from Lewis County; an 88-year-old man from McLean County; a 91-year-old woman from Perry County; and a 90-year-old woman from Wolfe County.

 

“This week, we’ve had our highest positivity rates, our highest daily reported case counts and are on track to set yet another unfortunate milestone – another highest week,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health. “We have had some frightening setbacks lately and the outlook is grim. I urge all Kentuckians to protect themselves and others by wearing a mask, watching your space and washing your hands. While we wait for a coronavirus vaccine, we should all be getting the flu vaccine.”

 

Dr. Stack said an influenza outbreak on top of the COVID-19 pandemic would be disastrous in the next few months.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

TAYLOR CO. WOMAN DIES FROM COVID-19; CASE COUNT INCREASES BY 158 IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT....

 
 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.68%.
 
Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today. We have experienced a total of 96 deaths resulting in a 1.65% mortality rate (about 1 in 61) among known cases. This compares with a 1.24% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.28% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 45 cases in the hospital. This is 3 less than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 55 on 11/07/2020. We have had a total of 405 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.94% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 14) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.51%. The latest state data shows that 71.92% of ICU beds and 31.26% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 5,832 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.79% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 102 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 11; Casey: 15; Green: 9; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 51; Russell: 8; Taylor: 2; and, Wayne: 1. In all, we have released 82.4% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 55 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 932 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/13/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 932.
 
Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. Of our active cases, 17% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 158 today: Adair: 20; Casey: 7; Clinton: 29; Cumberland: 11; Green: 11; McCreary: 7; Pulaski: 22; Russell: 15; Taylor: 15; and, Wayne: 21. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.021. This means our total case count is projected to double every 32.71 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/11/2020 when we added 190 cases.
 
Today’s new cases include:
  • Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 93-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 90-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 77-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the data will show that our new cases went up by 160 but our total cases only went up by 158. That is because we removed some duplicates from days prior.

 
We are reporting 1 death in Taylor, an 85-year-old famale. We are at a record number of active cases in our district at 932. We also are about 4 days behind in case investigations and/or contact tracing. Even still, with the numbers we can report we have nine of our district’s ten counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Pulaski, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. This leaves only McCreary in the “orange-accelerated” range.
 
We call upon our citizens and community leaders to step-up your efforts in regards to COVID-19. Please don’t wait until one of your loved ones dies or is hospitalized to take this seriously. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 5,832 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 133,920 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 132,844 statewide plus 1,076 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread.
 
The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 
For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.
 

123 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT; 1 NEW DEATH...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.29%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 1 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 95 deaths resulting in a 1.67% mortality rate (about 1 in 60) among known cases. This compares with a 1.25% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.31% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 48 cases in the hospital. This is 2 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 50 on 11/06/2020. We have had a total of 392 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.91% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 14) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.61%. The latest state data shows that 70.71% of ICU beds and 33.45% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 5,674 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.72% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 117 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 22; Casey: 7; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 4; Green: 12; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 21; Russell: 4; Taylor: 34; and, Wayne: 3. In all, we have released 82.9% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 5 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 877 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/12/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 877.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. Of our active cases, 18% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 123 today: Adair: 13; Casey: 6; Clinton: 9; Cumberland: 1; Green: 1; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 36; Russell: 11; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 35. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.021. This means our total case count is projected to double every 33.79 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/11/2020 when we added 190 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 90-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 60-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 7months-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;

 

A close look at the data may appear off by 2. We removed two duplicates from yesterday.

 

We are reporting 1 death in Russell today, an 81-year-old male who had been hospitalized.

 

While we continue to get caught up on our backlog of cases, we remain approximately 3 days behind. Even still, with the numbers we can report we have nine of our district’s ten counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Pulaski, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. This leaves only McCreary in the “orange-accelerated” range.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 5,674 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 130,719 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 129,680 statewide plus 1,039 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread.

 

The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

Gov. Beshear Announces Record High COVID-19 Cases and Deaths

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 13, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state’s highest ever number of new daily COVID-19 cases and deaths, as the pandemic significantly worsens across the commonwealth and the United States.

 

“Like almost every state in America, we are seeing a surge here in Kentucky that is concerning and deadly,” said Gov. Beshear. “But like every state in America, the power to stop it is in our hands.

 

“This amount of community spread continues to hit our more vulnerable. We are mourning another loss of a veteran from the Thomson-Hood Veterans Center.

 

“This is the toughest spot we’ve been in so far. Please follow those red zone county recommendations and school recommendations. You must do your part. If you are not wearing a mask, you are putting yourself at personal risk. We cannot let this escalation continue. Everybody’s got to pull their weight. Come on, Team Kentucky. Too many of us are hurting and too many of us are dying.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Friday, Nov. 13, 2020Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,173
  • New deaths today: 25
  • Positivity rate: 8.68%
  • Total deaths: 1,647
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,358
  • Currently in ICU: 307
  • Currently on ventilator: 147

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Hardin, Kenton and Boone. Each of these counties has more than 100 new cases; Jefferson County has 630.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include four women, ages 76, 79, 88 and 92, and three men, ages 73, 81 and 88, from Barren County; two women, ages 71 and 92, from Bullitt County; a 93-year-old woman from Christian County; a 65-year-old woman and an 84-year-old man from Hardin County; a 62-year-old man from Harlan County; an 87-year-old woman and a 69-year-old man from Hart County; two men, ages 76 and 94, from Logan County; a 65-year-old man from Marion County; a 79-year-old woman from Mason County; a 69-year-old man from Ohio County; an 83-year-old woman and two men, ages 62 and 83, from Pike County; and a 79-year-old woman and an 81-year-old man from Warren County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

ADAIR CO. SCHOOLS GOING TOTALLY VIRTUAL MONDAY, NOV. 16TH

 
 
Adair County Schools will be Totally Virtual beginning Monday, November 16th - November 24th, 2020. Hopefully our Blue/Red Hybrid Schedule will begin on November 30th. A School Messenger call will be sent to confirm the date for moving back to the Blue/Red Hybrid Schedule. 
 
On Thursday, students were given food for today (Friday), Monday and Tuesday. Students today (Friday) will be given food for Monday and Tuesday. 
 
On Wednesday, November 18th, 2020 boxes of frozen meals for a week can be picked up at the following schools from 11:00am-2:00pmCT: 
  • ACPC – all Virtual students that usually pickup food each Wednesday & all In Person BLUE students. 
  • ACES – all In Person RED students. 

 

Please contact your child’s school if you need to make other arrangements to pick up your child’s food on Wednesday. 
 

R.C. MAN DIES FOLLOWING MOTORCYCLE CRASH ON THURSDAY..

 
Dunnville, KY (November 13, 2020) - Trooper Matt Brumley is investigating a motorcycle fatality that occurred Thursday, November 12, 2020 at approximately 3:47pmCT on north US127 near the Russell-Casey County line. Preliminary investigations indicate that Austyn Deel, 22, of Russell Springs, KY was operating a 2003 Kawasaki motorcycle southbound on US127 when he attempted to overtake several vehicles and ran off the roadway striking an earth embankment. Deel was not wearing a helmet and was transported to Russell County Hospital where he was pronounced deceased a short time later.
 
KSP Trooper Brumley was assisted at the scene by additional KSP personnel, Russell County EMS, and the Russell County Sheriff’s Department.

AREA ARREST 11-13-20

A Russell Springs man was charged with DUI and Evading Police Thursday and lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.

Gary Harmon age 54, was taken into custody by Deputy Wine with the Russell County Sheriff’s Office just before midnight. Harmon was charged with Operating a Motor Vehicle under the Influence of Alcohol/Substance 3rd (Aggravated Circumstance) and Fleeing or Evading Police, 1st degree (Motor Vehicle).

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-13-20

 

Russell County 12 new cases yesterday. We had 4 cases released from isolation. With another death reported on Thursday. We now have 10 deaths. We now have 85 active cases which 80 are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 2 at UK, 1 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Somerset and 1 at VA in Lexington.

 

Adair County 13 new Cases to report yesterday. We released 22 cases. We have 745 total cases with 601 recovered and 29 deaths. We have 115 active cases with 110 in home isolation and 5 in area hospitals.

Get winter ready! KU Offers Info to Help Prepare for the Cooler Season....

 
(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) – Kentucky may be experiencing the mild weather of fall now, but it won’t be long before the winter chill sets in. According to Energy.gov, heating your home accounts for 42% of your energy bill. To help area residents keep their homes comfortable as the mercury drops, Kentucky Utilities Company is reminding area residents of simple tips to help prepare.
 
1. Tune it up: Have a certified professional give your furnace a tune-up to make sure it’s operating efficiently and ready to perform. Remember to change your filter each month or according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Date your filter or set a reminder to help keep track of when it’s time for a new one.
 
2. Set a program: Consider the schedules of those in the household and adjust programmable thermostats accordingly. Setting the thermostat to the lowest comfortable setting can help manage expenses. Even adjusting your thermostat setting by one degree can make a difference.
 
3. Seal it up: Seal leaks and gaps around the home with caulk, spray foam or weather-stripping. 
 
4. Uncover it:  Open curtains, drapes and blinds on sun-facing windows to allow the sun’s rays to help naturally heat your home. Make sure registers are not blocked by drapes or furniture so warm air can easily circulate throughout the home.
 
5. Layer Up: Wearing items like sweatshirts, socks and slippers and adding an extra blanket can help keep you warm around the house without cranking up the thermostat.
 
Watch videos at lge-ku.com/energy-efficiency-tips to help guide you through weatherization techniques.
 

ADAIR COUNTY INDICTMENTS 11/12/20

 

An Adair County Grand Jury returned numerous indictments this week. To read the complete indictments, click here.

18 COVID-19 Deaths Today; 2,342 New Cases in KY...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 12, 2020) – On Thursday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced 94 red zone counties and implored Kentuckians to follow red zone recommendations and school recommendations, as other states reach frightening milestones in our nationwide battle against COVID-19. Texas alone has surpassed 1 million cases; El Paso, Texas, is doubling its supply of mobile morgues; the Mayo Clinic Health System is reporting that 100% of its hospital beds are full in northwestern Wisconsin; and North Dakota is allowing COVID-19-positive health care workers to continue working in COVID-19 wings because of a significant health care worker shortage.

 

“Remember, what this is supposed to do is provide a way for communities to come together to stop the virus,” said Gov. Beshear. “The biggest employer in Franklin County is the state government, and we will be following the red zone recommendations next week. Anybody who can work virtually is going to work virtually. Any service that can be done virtually will be. We are going to live up to what we’re asking other people to do.”

 

Gov. Beshear also shared good news with Kentuckians.

 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now says masks protect both the wearer and those around them from COVID-19 and reduce the risk of transmitting or catching the virus by more than 70% in various instances.

Three partner agencies of Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) have been awarded $1.4 million from the Coronavirus Relief Fund to assist with services that support prevention of abuse and domestic violence. To see the full release, click here.

 

The Governor also announced on Thursday that the Abandoned Mine Lands Pilot Program awarded the City of Pikeville a $6 million grant for a new building in the Kentucky Enterprise Industrial Park, which Wright Concrete & Construction Inc. of Pikeville will lease. The addition will immediately create 40 new jobs and 20 more jobs in the near future.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Thursday, Nov. 12, 2020Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,342
  • New deaths today: 18
  • Positivity rate: 8.29%
  • Total deaths: 1,622
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,311
  • Currently in ICU: 299
  • Currently on ventilator: 163

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Christian, Kenton, Warren and Boone.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 77-year-old man from Allen County; an 86-year-old woman from Christian County; a 66-year-old man from Clay County; a 75-year-old woman from Clinton County; two 75-year-old men from Henderson County; two women, ages 89 and 96, from Jefferson County; a 76-year-old man from Lee County; an 80-year-old man from Lincoln County; two men, ages 57 and 90, from McLean County; a 78-year-old man from Oldham County; two women, ages 68 and 86, and an 82-year-old man from Pike County; and a 93-year-old woman and a 70-year-old man from Rockcastle County.

 

Remembrance
After recognizing Veterans Day yesterday, today, the Governor honored John Vereb of Mount Washington, a U.S. Army veteran and an emergency nurse and nursing instructor. Mr. Vereb tragically passed away from COVID-19 on Oct. 23 at only 52 years old and he leaves behind his wife, Angela, and their three children, Harrison, Conner and Alayna. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Mr. Vereb was detailed to the emergency department at the Robley Rex Veterans Affairs Medical Center in March, where he often treated COVID-19 patients. On Oct. 11, Mr. Vereb was diagnosed with COVID-19 and died just 13 days later.

 

“John was proud to serve his country and fellow veterans. To honor John, his family asks all Kentuckians to do their patriotic duty to protect themselves and others by wearing a mask and social distancing,” said Gov. Beshear. “It is a small sacrifice to make for those on the front lines who sacrifice, all to serve you.”

 

The Governor also thanked all Kentucky health care workers treating veterans during the pandemic, calling them “heroes serving our heroes.”

 

Pandemic – Electronic Benefits Transfer
Today, CHFS Secretary Eric Friedlander updated Kentuckians on the Pandemic – Electronic Benefits Transfer (P-EBT) program that provides nutritional resources to families who have lost access to free or reduced-price school meals due to school closures.

 

Some Kentuckians enrolled in Medicaid who have been receiving P-EBT benefits are awaiting their new P-EBT card. A vendor with whom the Cabinet for Health and Family Services is contracted to produce and provide P-EBT, Fidelity Information Services LLC, is working through a backlog to get these cards issued so Kentuckians receive their benefits as soon as possible. This vendor works with other states, many of which were also issuing P-EBT cards.

 

“This week alone, over 100,000 cards were printed and mailed. Nearly a half-million cards have been mailed, with about 135,000 remaining,” said Secretary Friedlander. “Children in Kentucky will receive their new cards by the end of the month. Beneficiaries were auto-enrolled and do not need to make additional requests for these benefits.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Sen. Max Wise to Participate in Russell County Town Hall Meeting....

 
FRANKFORT, Ky. (November 12, 2020): Senator Max Wise (R-Campbellsville) will be in Russell County for a town hall meeting on Tuesday, December 15, 2020
 
The town hall meeting will focus on discussions related to the upcoming 2021 Regular Session of the Kentucky General Assembly. Over the past several months, Sen. Wise and fellow lawmakers have spent their time preparing legislative priorities. Legislative committee meetings have focused on Kentucky’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and its various impacts on health, education, the state budget, and more. 
 
“I am excited to be in Russell County for another town hall event. Speaking directly to citizens of the 16th Senate District is an important responsibility,” Senator Max Wise said. “The year 2020 has brought many challenges. People understandably have questions and concerns right now, and they want their voices to be heard. I appreciate local officials here in Russell County for providing a platform of communication.” 
 
The town hall meeting will be held Tuesday, December 15, at 12:00pmCT at the Russell County Auditorium Natatorium Complex at 2167 South Highway 127, Russell Springs, KY 42642.
 
Per the Constitution of Kentucky, the 2021 Kentucky General Assembly will convene on Tuesday, January 5, 2021.
 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-12-20

Yesterday was said to be the worst day in the Lake Cumberland District since the outbreak of the Corona virus. Our 10 county area has 192 new cases Wednesday.

 

Per the Lake Cumberland District Health Department Adair County has 22 new COVID19 cases. We only released 3 cases. Also, sad to report 2 new deaths yesterday. We have had 732 total COVID 19 cases with 579 recovered and 29 deaths.

 

Russell County 23 new cases Wednesday. We had No cases released from isolation. We now have 78 active cases which 72 are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized. Judge Gary Robertson is again asking everyone to start doing better by wearing masks and social distancing to help control this virus. We now have 9 deaths in Russell County. The hospitalized cases are 1 at Ephraim McDowell in Danville, 1 in Somerset, 1 VA in Lexington, 1 at Russell County Hospital.

2 MORE COVID-19 DEATHS IN ADAIR; 192 NEW CASES IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 7.68%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 94 deaths resulting in a 1.69% mortality rate (about 1 in 59) among known cases. This compares with a 1.26% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.32% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 46 cases in the hospital. This is 3 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 50 on 11/06/2020. We have had a total of 387 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.97% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 14) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.6%. The latest state data shows that 71.14% of ICU beds and 30.93% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 5,551 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.66% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 72 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 3; Casey: 8; Cumberland: 5; Green: 11; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 14; Taylor: 23; and, Wayne: 6. In all, we have released 82.6% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 119 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 872 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/11/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 872.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 20% cannot be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 192 today: Adair: 22; Casey: 18; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 3; Green: 14; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 46; Russell: 23; Taylor: 32; and, Wayne: 24. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.021. This means our total case count is projected to double every 33.77 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/11/2020 when we added 192 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 57-year-old male who is deceased, still symptomatic
Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
Casey: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Casey: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 91-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 86-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 18-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Green: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 82-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 75-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is released, 11/08/20
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Russell: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 65-year-old female who is released, 11/09/20
Taylor: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
wayne: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 71-year-old male who is released, 10/29/20
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Wayne: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The 2 deaths we report today are a 62-year-old female from Adair who had been hospitalized and a 57-year-old male from Adair who had been hospitalized.

 

Wow! We exceeded our single-day new cases record by 79 today, adding 192 cases. We also surpassed our highest active-case record by 114. We now have 872 active cases. We are experiencing large growth, and more frequent deaths and hospitalizations. While we continue to get caught up on our backlog of cases, we remain approximately 3 days behind. Even still, with the numbers we can report we have nine of our district’s ten counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Pulaski, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. This leaves only McCreary in the “orange-accelerated” range.

 

We make this plea, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 5,551 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 128,376 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 127,344 statewide plus 1,032 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread.
 

The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

2 MORE COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 7.68%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 92 deaths resulting in a 1.72% mortality rate (about 1 in 58) among known cases. This compares with a 1.25% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.34% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 43 cases in the hospital. This is 1 less than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 50 on 11/06/2020. We have had a total of 382 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.13% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 14) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.74%. The latest state data shows that 71.44% of ICU beds and 31.56% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 5,358 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.56% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 99 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 18; Casey: 18; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 2; Green: 7; McCreary: 7; Pulaski: 20; Russell: 5; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 13. In all, we have released 84.2% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 2 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 753 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/06/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 759.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. Of our cases, 23% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 103 today: Adair: 16; Casey: 8; Clinton: 8; Cumberland: 1; Green: 6; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 23; Russell: 11; Taylor: 19; and, Wayne: 8. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.019. This means our total case count is projected to double every 37.75 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/06/2020 when we added 113 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 11 weeks-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 91-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is released, 11/09/20
  • Russell: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 72-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 62-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, 11/04/20
  • Taylor: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 7m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Taylor: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We are sad to report 2 more deaths today: a 61-year-old male from Adair who had been hospitalized; and, a 82-year-old male from Russell who had also been hospitalized. We still have a higher than state average mortality rate.

Our cases are still growing rapidly. We are beginning to get caught up on our backlog of cases but remain approximately 3 days behind. Even still, with the numbers we can report we have nine of our district’s ten counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Pulaski, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. This leaves only McCreary in the “orange-accelerated” range.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 5,358 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 125,538 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 124,646 statewide plus 892 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

Gov. Beshear Sounds Alarm on COVID-19 Surge, Reports 2,700 New Cases

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 11, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear warned every Kentuckian that they must take the pandemic more seriously in order to protect themselves, their families and their community. Kentuckians are in significantly greater danger of contracting COVID-19 now than they were in March or April; on Wednesday, the Governor reported 2,700 new cases, the state’s highest ever daily total. In addition, the positivity rate has increased to 8.12%, the highest it has been since May 5.

 

“This entire state is in danger. COVID-19 is absolutely everywhere. We need everybody to wear your masks and follow red zone reduction recommendations and school recommendations. It is a must if you want to lessen the impact in your community,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

On Veterans Day, the Governor also thanked veterans “for their service to this country and to this commonwealth.” He continued, “We are deeply, deeply grateful.”

 

Finally, Gov. Beshear updated Kentuckians on the Brent Spence Bridge.

 

“Our Transportation Cabinet is utilizing unmanned aerial systems equipment to aid in the inspection of the structure so we can do that safely, determine the amount of damage and start to get to work on repairs,” said Gov. Beshear. “The debris is the obstacle for inspections to begin; the bridge’s temperature is no longer the obstacle.” To see the full release about the early morning crash and fire on the bridge, click here.

 

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet will post updates about the bridge here.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 11, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,700
  • New deaths today: 14
  • Positivity rate: 8.12%
  • Total deaths: 1,604
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,274
  • Currently in ICU: 297
  • Currently on ventilator: 151

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Boone, Kenton, Hardin, Nelson, Campbell and Daviess.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here.

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 62-year-old man from Bell County; a 56-year-old woman from Christian County; a 100-year-old woman from Fayette County; two women, ages 74 and 77, and six men, ages 61, 67, 71, 78, 84 and 97, from Jefferson County; a 77-year-old woman from Lawrence County; a 75-year-old man from Magoffin County; and an 85-year-old woman from Montgomery County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Columbia Man Arrested After Not Returning Child to her Mother....


The Columbia Police Department has charged an Adair County man with multiple felonies after receiving an "attempt to locate" call earlier in the evening on Tuesday, November 10, 2020.
 

The initial call came into KSP Post 15 concerning an 18 month old said to be with her father, 33-year-old Richard Price, who would not return the child and was possibly under the influence. First believed to be headed in the vicinity of South 61 and Hwy 768, Price was located by family members around Goodwill off Dohoney Trace. As family members called in they had located him and the child, Mr. Price (according to witnesses) brandished a knife and drove behind Goodwill before fleeing on foot behind Whayne’s Supply Store, leaving the child in the vehicle. Price was soon located and apprehended as he was attempting to hide in brush along a fence row. 

Richard Price is facing multiple felony charges including wanton endangerment, fleeing and evading, and tampering with physical evidence. He is also facing misdemeanor drug charges and traffic violations. 

 

The 18-month-old was not harmed and was able to be returned to the care of her mother.

CPD Officers Trevor Foster and Adam Cravens responded to the call. They were assisted on scene by multiple officers from Kentucky State Police and the Adair County Sheriffs Office. 
 

AREA ARREST 11-11-20

A Russell County man was charged with several offenses including Burglary and Assault overnight. William Galbreth age 34, of Russell Springs, was taken into custody by Deputy Meyer of the Russell County Sheriff’s Office just after midnight. Galbreth was charged with Burglary 2nd Degree, Assault, 4th Degree Dating Violence (No Visible Injury), Indecent Exposure, 2nd Degree, Terroristic Threatening, 3rd Degree, Criminal Mischief, 3rd Degree and Disorderly Conduct, 2nd Degree. He was lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.

 

Richard Price age 33, of Columbia was taken into custody by Officer Foster with the Columbia Police Department just after 11 last night. He was charged with Fleeing or Evading Police 1st Degree (on foot), Tampering with Physical Evidence, Wanted Endangerment, 1st Degree, Booster Seat Violation and Possession of Marijuana. He was lodged into the Adair County Regional Jail.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-11-20

Russell County we had our 9th death yesterday in Russell County. We have 11 new cases. We had 5 cases released from isolation. We now have 55 active cases which 49 are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized .The new cases are females ages 5,40,48,54,55,65 and males ages 49,55,62,72,73.

 

Adair County had 16 new cases of Covid19 to report Tuesday. We released 18 cases as well. We also have to report 1 new Death yesterday. We have 710 total cases with 576 of those recovered and 27 deaths. We have 107 active cases with 102 in home isolation and 5 in area hospitals.

ADAIR FISCAL COURT MET LAST NIGHT...

The Adair County Fiscal Court met last evening for the regular monthly meeting for the county leaders. Jim Liebe attended the meeting for WAVE NEWS and files this report…

 

Kentucky Office of Highway Safety Encourages Seat Belt Use as Holidays Approach.....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky.  (Nov. 10, 2020) – As we enter the holiday season, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s (KYTC) Office of Highway Safety is joining law enforcement around the Commonwealth for the annual Click It or Ticket campaign.

 

The federally-funded campaign is part of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) high-visibility seat belt enforcement effort running Nov. 16-29.

 

“KYTC’s mission is to provide a safe transportation system for all road users, but this cannot be accomplished without the public’s help,” said KYTC Secretary Jim Gray. “We are asking all motorists to make safe choices when in a vehicle. This includes buckling up – every trip, every time.”

 

Last year, there were 567 motor vehicle occupants killed on Kentucky roads. Of those deaths, 300 were not wearing a seat belt, car seat or booster seat.

 

“It’s such a simple act, yet gives you the best chance of surviving a crash” said KYTC State Highway Engineer James Ballinger. “Sometimes even the most attentive drivers are involved in a crash caused by other drivers, so taking two seconds to buckle up should be the first thing you do after getting into a vehicle.”


According to NHTSA, a majority of unrestrained deaths occur during nighttime hours defined as 6 p.m. – 5:59 a.m. In Kentucky last year, 237 roadway deaths occurred at night. Of those, 136 were unrestrained.

 

“While following the data is important to identify opportunities to improve safety, our focus is not on numbers – it’s on people,” said Ballinger. “Wearing a seat belt is the law, but it’s not about writing tickets – it’s about saving lives.”

 

According to NHTSA, when worn correctly, seat belts reduce the risk of fatalities by 45 percent for front-seat vehicle occupants and by 60 percent for pickup truck, SUV and minivan occupants. Properly fastened seat belts contact the strongest parts of the body, such as the chest, hips and shoulders. A seat belt spreads the force of a crash over a wide area of the body, putting less stress on any one part, and allows the body to slow down with the crash, extending the time when the crash forces are felt by the occupant.

 

“Please, help us spread this life-saving message,” said Ballinger. “A seat belt is the best way to ensure you and your loved ones make it home safely so buckle up – day and night.”

 

For additional information please visit https://www.nhtsa.gov/campaign/click-it-or-ticket.

 

2120 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 14 MORE DEATHS....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 10, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear encouraged Kentucky families to be safe this Thanksgiving, especially in light of the newest federal report for the commonwealth that emphasizes the risks of gathering with people from other households. He also encouraged Kentuckians to keep getting tested for COVID-19 and announced that the state ranks sixth in the country for daily COVID-19 tests per million residents, according to Kaiser Health News.

 

“Thanksgiving is one of my favorite times during the year. It is a special time for my family which is normally spent with a lot of extended family,” said Gov. Beshear. “But this year those larger gatherings can be very dangerous. We are seeing COVID-19 spread and the resulting loss happening more at family and social gatherings than anywhere else right now. This, right now, is the most dangerous time we’ve had with this virus.”

 

Canadians celebrate Thanksgiving earlier in the fall (the second Monday of October) and both provincial and federal officials have pointed to the holiday as one cause for a recent spike in COVID-19 cases across their country.

 

“As you make your plans for the holidays, I urge you, please – 2020 has been a mess for all of us – but we’ve got to hang in there just a little bit longer,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH). “We are very optimistic in the first signs for the first vaccine to report information from its major trial. It suggests that our scientists have been able to figure out ways to get us back to life more like we used to know it, but we have to stay the course this Thanksgiving.”

 

Community leaders, schools, businesses and families in red zone counties should continue to follow reduction recommendations (school-specific recommendations here). Kentuckians should also follow KDPH’s Thanksgiving guidance, which includes:

  • Avoid in-person gatherings with people who do not live in your household.
  • Always wear a face covering or mask when you are not eating or drinking.
  • Maintain a social distance of at least 6 feet.
  • Avoid large gatherings, especially those held indoors.
  • Do not host or attend crowded parades.
  • Avoid shopping in crowded stores before, on or after Thanksgiving.
     

Kentuckians can choose creative, safer ways to celebrate, including:

  • Shopping online and/or at less crowded small businesses.
  • Enjoying hiking, hunting or other outdoor activities during the holiday weekend.
  • Supporting fellow Kentuckians by buying Kentucky Proud ingredients or ordering take-out from local restaurants for a Thanksgiving meal with their household.
  • Hosting a virtual dinner where they can share recipes with extended family and friends and spend time together remotely. Consider these conversation starters from Real Simple.

 

To learn more, see KDPH’s full guidance, one-pager and guidance slide.

 

Gov. Beshear highlighted that this morning he joined Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs Commissioner Lt. Col. (Retired) Keith Jackson and Humana executives virtually to announce that over the next four years, the health care company is committed to hiring 600 veterans and 150 military spouses in Kentucky. Gov. Beshear said Humana’s commitment to hire veterans and military spouses by the end of 2024 is a welcome addition to state’s goal of being the most military and veteran friendly state in America. See the full release here.

 

The Governor also announced that the state has expanded life-saving crisis services for Kentuckians at risk of suicide. An additional Community Mental Health Center, Pathways, Inc., has been added to the list of accredited agencies serving as National Suicide Prevention Lifeline call centers within the state. Pathways, Inc. serves Bath, Boyd, Carter, Elliott, Greenup, Lawrence, Menifee, Montgomery, Morgan and Rowan counties. See the full release here.

 

Kentuckians can reach the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline by dialing 1-800-273-8255 (TALK).

“Every person on the Pathways, Inc. team is a hero,” said Gov. Beshear. “You are helping others – and in many cases, saving their lives – during their moment of greatest need. I want all Kentuckians to know that when they’re struggling, there is always someone they can call.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,120
  • New deaths today: 14
  • Positivity rate: 7.68%
  • Total deaths: 1,590
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,189
  • Currently in ICU: 286
  • Currently on ventilator: 139

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Hardin, Madison and Laurel.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 80-year-old woman and a 69-year-old man from Bracken County; an 84-year-old man from Bullitt County; a 91-year-old woman from Daviess County; an 86-year-old man from Hopkins County; five men, ages 76, 84, 86, 87 and 89, from Jessamine County; an 87-year-old man from Marshall County; a 92-year-old woman from McLean County; a 68-year-old man from Muhlenberg County; and a 76-year-old man from Shelby County. All five men from Jessamine County were residents at Thomson-Hood Veterans Center.

 

KDPH recommends a 14-day self-quarantine for travelers who are returning from any of these states reporting a COVID-19 test positivity rate of 15% or higher: South Dakota (53.97%), Iowa (48.29%), Kansas (41.27%), Idaho (38.64%), Wyoming (34.50%), Missouri (20.97%), Alabama (19.77%), Montana (18.14%), Utah (17.98%), North Dakota (16.11%), Pennsylvania (15.99%) and Wisconsin (15.39%).

 

Memorial
Today, the Governor recognized Timothy England, a 10-year employee of the Kentucky Department of Housing, Buildings and Construction, who passed away on Nov. 8 due to COVID-19 complications. He was only 60 years old. Tim was a Heating and Cooling Systems field inspector. He traveled the state making sure systems were working and properly installed for new home buyers and businesses.

 

“This remembrance is particularly hard because it’s someone who was one of our own in state government. Tim, a Glasgow native, enjoyed spending time with family, and I’m told his grandkids were his life.  He also enjoyed camping, riding motorcycles, and just being outdoors with his wife. His family says he loved making people laugh,” said Gov. Beshear. “We promise to your family to work harder so that others don’t have to go through what they are going through right now.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Taylor Co. Man Arrested on Federal Drug Charges Following 8-Month Investigation....

 
 
On Tuesday, November 3, 2020 the Columbia Area Drug Task Force executed a state search warrant at 1629 East Broadway, Lot 6, in Campbellsville, KY as a result of an 8-month long investigation into the distribution of methamphetamine, heroin, fentanyl, cocaine, and prescription narcotics in and around Taylor County. In addition to evidence of drug trafficking, law enforcement seized 5 handguns from the residence, one of which had recently been reported stolen.
 
Dennis James Carrier, 42, of Taylor County was subsequently arrested on state charges and is currently being held on a Federal Indictment for Possession with the Intent to Distribute Fentanyl, Possession of a Firearm by a Prohibited Person, Possession of a Firearm in Furtherance of a Drug Trafficking Offense, and Distribution of Methamphetamine.
 
The Columbia Area Drug Task Force includes detectives from the Kentucky State Police Drug Enforcement Special Investigation Branch, the Campbellsville Police Department and the Columbia Police Department. The task force was assisted by members of the Kentucky State Police Post 15, the Taylor County Sheriff’s Department, the Marion County Sheriff’s Department, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF).

5 NEW COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT REPORTED MONDAY (Including 2 from Adair & 1 from Russell)....

 
 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 7.49%.
 
Deaths: We are sad to report 5 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 90 deaths resulting in a 1.71% mortality rate (about 1 in 58) among known cases. This compares with a 1.29% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.37% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 44 cases in the hospital. This is 1 less than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 50 on 11/06/2020. We have had a total of 380 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.23% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 14) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.75%. The latest state data shows that 71.33% of ICU beds and 28.32% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 5,255 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.52% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 63 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 19; Casey: 8; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 3; Green: 3; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 5; Taylor: 9; and, Wayne: 11. In all, we have released 84% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 16 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 751 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/06/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 759.
 
Where Did Cases Visit Pior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. Of our cases, 26% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 84 today: Adair: 19; Casey: 3; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 5; Green: 4; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 23; Russell: 3; Taylor: 13; and, Wayne: 9. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.019. This means our total case count is projected to double every 36.79 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/06/2020 when we added 113 cases.
 
Today’s new cases include:
  • Adair: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Casey: A 24-year-old female who is released, 11/08/20
  • Clinton: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 81-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 9-year-old male who is released, 10/15/20
  • Green: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 6m-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

We are so sorry to have to announce 5 deaths today. Today we lost a 77-year-old male from Adair who had been hospitalized; a 88-year-old male from Adair; a 99-year-old male from Casey who had been hospitalized; a 74-year-old male from Clinton who had been hospitalized; and, a 80-year-old female from Russell who had been hospitalized.

 
We still have 9 of our district’s 10 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Pulaski, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. This leaves only McCreary in the “orange-accelerated” range.
 
Despite the high numbers we can officially report, due to the surge of new cases the high numbers of contacts associated with each, we have MANY, MANY cases not reported as their investigations have not been finalized. We have every employee working on COVID-19 and are hiring staff as quickly as we can, be we cannot keep pace with this volume of cases.
 
Therefore we implore, please, please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 5,255 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 123,411 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 122,567 statewide plus 844 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 

COLUMBIA WOMAN AIRLIFTED FOLLOWING 1-VEHICLE COLLISION IN ADAIR COUNTY....

 
On  Wednesday, November 4, 2020 at 10:58amCT, the Adair County Sheriffs  Office responded to a 9-1-1 call of an injury collision 9 miles east of Columbia on Acree Road. The preliminary investigation shows that 24-year-old Hailey Melton of Columbia was operating a 2005 Buick when she failed to negotiate a curve and dropped off the roadway. In an attempt to recover the vehicle she overcorrected, ran off the right side of the roadway and overturned.
 
Melton, along with a passenger Amber Melton and four juvenile children, were all treated at the scene by Adair County EMS and transferred to TJ Health Columbia. Hailey Melton was then flown by helicopter to the UK Hospital in Lexington, KY.
 
The collision is being investigated by Chief Deputy Justin Cross. The Columbia-Adair County Fire Department and KSP assisted at the scene. 
 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-10-20

Russell County had one new death on Monday, we now have had 8 deaths total. We currently have 50 active cases which 45 are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 2 at UK, and 2 at Somerset and 1 at Ephraim McDowell in Danville. We had 3 new cases Monday. The new cases are females ages 34 and 41 and a 24 year old male. All are self-isolated.

 

Adair County 19 new cases of Covid19 to report yesterday. We released 19 cases as well. We also have to report 2 new Deaths Monday. We have 694 total cases with 558 of those recovered and 26 deaths. We have 110 active cases with 104 in home isolation and 6 in area hospitals.

RC FISCAL COURT MET LAST NIGHT

The Russell County Fiscal Court met Monday night for the regular monthly session for the county leaders.

County Judge Gary Robertson tells WAVE NEWS listeners what took place…

 

RUSSELL CO. MAN ARRESTED ON METH CHARGES IN COLUMBIA.....

 

Columbia Police responded to a party passed out in a vehicle on Page Street on Monday morning. Upon making contact, officers found a male subject within the car who would initially not wake up. 

After making entry into the vehicle, the party was brought to and found to be under the influence. A search yielded suspected drug paraphernalia and narcotics. 

Brandon Gillock, 40, of Russell Springs is facing various charges including possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a controlled substance methamphetamine. 


Sergeant Charles Greer made the arrest. He was assisted on scene by Officers Jamie Cole and Drew Conn.

 

 

ADAIR CO. FISCAL COURT NOV. 10TH MEETING AGENDA

 
The Adair County Fiscal Court will meet in regular session on Tuesday, November 10, 2020 at 6:00pmCT via Zoom and aired on the Adair County Fiscal Court's Facebook Live page.  
 
AGENDA
 PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
 PRAYER
 CALL TO ORDER
 ROLL CALL
                                 
1.   APPROVAL OF AGENDA
2.   APPROVAL OF MINUTES 
  • Regular Called Meeting – October 27, 2020  
3.   DISBURSEMENTS
 
4.   REPORTS
  • SHERIFF’S REPORT 
  • ROAD DEPARTMENT REPORT 
  • G.R.A.S. REPORT 
  • COMMITTEE REPORTS 
  • JAIL REPORT 

 

5.   TREASURER
  • TREASURER’S REPORT         
                       
6.   BUDGET AMENDMENTS                                            
7.   BUDGET TRANFERS 
  • LINE TO LINE TRANSFERS
  • FUND TO FUND TRANSFERS
                                
8.   COURT ORDERS 
9.   READING OF ROADS
 
10. ACTION ITEMS:                                    
  • TILES FOR ROAD DEPARTMENT
  • RECYCLING CENTER PART TIME HIRE
  • 911 GRANT APPROVAL
  • PERMISSION TO SIGN SENATE BILL 66 GRANT APPLICATION FOR AMBULANCE SERVICE
  • CHRISTMAS IN GRADYVILLE-USE OF VOTING BUILDING

 

11.  OTHER BUSINESS
12.  PUBLIC COMMENTS
13.  ADJOURN 
                                                                       

Lake Cumberland District COVID-19 Case Count Increases by 63; 9 of 10 Counties in Red-Critical Range of Community Spread....

 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 7.17%.
 
Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 85 deaths resulting in a 1.64% mortality rate (about 1 in 61) among known cases. This compares with a 1.3% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.39% morality rate at the national level.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 45 cases in the hospital. This is 2 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 45 on 11/08/2020. We have had a total of 371 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.17% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 14) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.49%. The latest state data shows that 71.33% of ICU beds and 28.32% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 5,171 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.48% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 80 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 13; Casey: 10; Clinton: 6; Cumberland: 4; Green: 4; McCreary: 13; Pulaski: 18; Russell: 1; Taylor: 5; and, Wayne: 6. In all, we have released 84.1% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We released 17 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 735 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/06/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 758.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Medical Facilities.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 63 today: Adair: 6; Casey: 4; Clinton: 10; Green: 8; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 18; Russell: 5; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 1. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.019. This means our total case count is projected to double every 36.1 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/06/2020 when we added 113 cases.
 
Today’s new cases include:
  • Adair: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 94-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Casey: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 74-year-old female who is hospitalized, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is released, 1/11/03
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We’re off to a quick start this week. Last Sunday we added 44 new cases, today 63. We also have the most ever hospitalized COVID-19 cases at 45. We are back to having nine of our district’s ten counties in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Pulaski, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. This leaves only McCreary in the “orange-accelerated” range.
 
Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 5,171 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 121,614 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 120,838 statewide plus 776 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 
For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.
 

Gov. Beshear: Dangerous Rise in Cases Requires Red Zone Counties to Take Urgent Action....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 9, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear warned Kentuckians that at this time we face significant danger from COVID-19. Eighty counties are in the red zone as cases, hospitalizations and deaths increase rapidly. Monday’s positivity rate was the highest since May 5.

 

“If you’re not wearing a mask, you’re putting yourself at a real risk for contracting COVID,” said Gov. Beshear. “This is happening everywhere, which means we can’t bring in health care workers from other places. If everywhere is surging, we’re going to end up on our own. That means if we get overrun and we don’t have enough staff in hospitals, it’s our friends, our neighbors, maybe even our family members who won’t get the treatment they need.”

 

Community leaders, schools, businesses and families in red zone counties should follow reduction recommendations (school-specific recommendations here).

 

“We are clearly at the worst place we have been for this disease,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health. “It took us almost 15 weeks from the start of this pandemic in Kentucky just to get to the number of cases we had last week alone.”

 

Today, the Governor also highlighted positive progress in economic development and education.

 

First, to pioneer a new line of highly durable engineered hardwood flooring, AHF Products plans to invest $2.5 million and create 20 full-time jobs at its Somerset facility in Pulaski County early next year. For more information, see the full release.

 

Next, the Work Ready Kentucky Scholarship, an effort to boost education and employability among adults, provides up to 60 hours of tuition for anyone who has not yet earned an associate degree in specific technical programs. The scholarship can begin covering tuition costs for more than 350 courses after federal, state and campus grants and scholarships are applied. Kentuckians can call 833-711-WRKS or visit https://workreadykentucky.com to receive assistance from advisors on how to enroll in the program. For more information, see the full release.

 

Earlier in the day, Gov. Beshear announced he is among the leaders in a coalition of 20 states who are defending the Affordable Care Act ahead of a U.S. Supreme Court hearing Tuesday that could decide the fate of coverage for people with preexisting conditions, Medicaid expansion and other key pieces of our health care system. As attorney general and now as governor, Gov. Beshear has fought to protect health care, including maintaining coverage for nearly 1.8 million Kentuckians with preexisting conditions. For more information, see the full release.

 

Case Information

As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Nov. 9, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,745
  • New deaths today: 11
  • Positivity rate: 7.49%
  • Total deaths: 1,576
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,133
  • Currently in ICU: 300
  • Currently on ventilator: 142

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Lee, Bell, Boone, Daviess and Kenton.

 

The new red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 67-year-old man from Adair County; a 78-year-old woman and two men, ages 66 and 70, from Bullitt County; a 43-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 50-year-old woman from Graves County; a 73-year-old man from Green County; a 96-year-old woman from Hancock County; a 95-year-old woman and a 92-year-old man from Hardin County; and an 81-year-old woman from Jefferson County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Campbellsville Man Arrested on Meth Charges After Passing Out in a Yard....

 
On Saturday, November 7, 2020 at 2:54pmET, Campbellsville Police responded to the corner of Coppock Street and South Central Avenue in reference to a male who was passed out in a yard. 20-year-old Justin Sanchez of Campbellsville was subsequently arrested and charged with Possession of Methamphetamine and arrested on a Taylor County Warrant. He was lodged in the Taylor County Detention Center.
 

COLUMBIA WOMAN ARRESTED ON METH CHARGES FOLLOWING TRAFFIC STOP....

 
On Sunday, November 9, 2020 Columbia Police made a drug arrest after initiating a traffic stop on Russell Road (HWY 80). The stop was made just after 9:00pmCT. The operator, 42-year-old Michelle Clark of Columbia, gave consent to search the vehicle resulting in drug paraphernalia and suspected methamphetamine being located.
 
Clark was taken into custody and charged with numerous traffic violations as well as Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Possession of Methamphetamine.
 
Officer Ethan Pike was the arresting Officer. He was assisted on scene by Officer Trevor Foster.
 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-9-20

Russell County 5 new cases Sunday. We had 1 case released from isolation. We now have 48 active cases which 43 are on self-isolation and 5 are hospitalized, 2 cases at UK, 2 cases in Somerset and 1 case at Russell County Hospital. The new cases are males ages 28, 33, 33 and females ages 38, 38. We are back in red zone today 27.28.

Adair County 6 new cases of Covid19 to report yesterday. We released 13 cases. We have 675 total cases with 539 of those recovered and 24 deaths. We 112 active cases with 105 in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals.

Gov. Beshear Announces Highest Weekly COVID-19 Case Total, Urges Kentuckians to Act

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 8, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Sunday implored Kentuckians, especially those in red zone counties, to follow the recommendations to reduce the spread of COVID-19, with a continued escalation in cases that includes Kentucky’s highest test positivity rate in more than half a year and the highest number of cases in a week by almost 500 cases.

 

“This virus is spreading in communities in every corner of the commonwealth, and everyone, from our businesses and schools to individuals, must do their part to stop the spread and save lives,” Gov. Beshear said. “Without each of us doing our part, the rampant spread will continue to take more Kentuckians. Let’s come together as Team Kentucky to defeat this virus.”


Gov. Beshear reminded community leaders, schools, businesses and residents in the state’s hardest hit areas to follow the Red Zone Reduction Recommendations. Thursday’s 80 red zone counties should follow the recommendations Monday, Nov. 9, through Sunday, Nov. 15.

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Nov. 8, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,177
  • New deaths today: 4
  • Positivity rate: 7.24%
  • Total deaths: 1,565
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,102
  • Currently in ICU: 279
  • Currently on ventilator: 148

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Kenton and Boone.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two 92-year-old men and a 77-year-old man from Hardin County; and a 76-year-old man from Marion County.

 

“With colder outdoor temperatures just around the corner, I encourage you to get outside and enjoy the great weather while it lasts,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health. “Remember that the very basics of COVID are the more we have contact with each other, the more transmission we’re going to see. So please avoid social gatherings, maintain a social distance of at least six feet, wear a mask and wash your hands thoroughly. Now is not the time to let your guard down. We must maintain our vigilance.” 
 

Reporting is limited on Sundays. Additional information, including the number of Kentuckians who’ve recovered from COVID-19, will be reported Monday.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

"I AM A SOLDIER" FOR ALL VETERANS.....

 

With Veterans Day coming up this Wednesday, Nov. 11th, I had a request to post this beautiful song played this morning on The WAVE. It's a song that was written by the late Howard Bailey and recorded with the help of Danny Bailey at Red Brick Recording Studio in Columbia. The song is "I Am A Soldier".

 

 

WEEKEND ARRESTS 11/08/20

 
  • Dylan Scott Anderson, 26, of Russell Springs, KY was arrested early this morning by the ACSO for DUI (4th or more Offense), Failure To/Or Improper Signal, Failure of Seller to Remove/Retain License Plate, No Seatbelt, Failure to Produce Insurance Card, Possession of Marijuana and Drug Paraphernalia, and Possesssion of Open Alcoholic Beverage Container in Motor Vehicle.
  • Heather Chittum, 37, of Columbia, KY was arrested Saturday night by KSP for DUI 2nd Offense (Aggravating Circumstance), Failure to Wear Seatbelt, and Possession of Open Alcoholic Beverage Container in Motor Vehicle.
  • Jerry Gale Butler, 39, of Albany, KY arrested by the CCSO overnight for Trafficking in Methamphetamine, DUI, Reckless Driving, No Seatbelt, and Possession of Open Alcoholic Beverage Container in Motor Vehicle.
 
Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

Worst Week in Lake Cumberland District Since Onset of Coronavirus.....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 7.17%.

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 85 deaths resulting in a 1.66% mortality rate (about 1 in 60) among known cases. This compares with a 1.3% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.41% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 43 cases in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 43 on 11/07/2020. We have had a total of 369 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.22% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 14) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.56%. The latest state data shows that 73.12% of ICU beds and 29.92% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 5,108 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.45% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 86 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 10; Casey: 11; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 6; Green: 8; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 14; Russell: 3; Taylor: 20; and, Wayne: 10. In all, we have released 83.6% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 7 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 752 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/06/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 758.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Medical Facilities.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 79 today: Adair: 8; Casey: 6; Clinton: 6; Cumberland: 7; Green: 11; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 26; Russell: 4; Taylor: 8; and, Wayne: 2. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.019. This means our total case count is projected to double every 36.77 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/06/2020 when we added 113 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
Clinton: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
Clinton: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
Clinton: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
Clinton: A 6 Months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Cumberland: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Green: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Russell: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

This was the worse week for the state and for the Lake Cumberland District in terms of new cases since the onset of the outbreak. Lake Cumberland’s new case rate exceeds the state average. We have 172 more active case today than we did last Saturday. We are at our peak number of hospitalizations at 43; 2 more than last Saturday. We experienced 3 deaths this week.


8 of our district’s 10 counties are now in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Pulaski, Taylor, and Wayne. This leaves only McCreary, and Russell in the “orange-accelerated” range.

 

We have largely caught up on our delinquent data entry into the state system. We are hopeful the state reports will begin to better align with ours early next week.


Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.


The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 5,108 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 120,387 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 119,661 statewide plus 726 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

2162 COVID-19 CASES; 17 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday reported 2,162 new COVID-19 cases, making it the highest number of cases ever reported on a Saturday since the beginning of the pandemic in the commonwealth.

 

The state’s positivity rate today is 7.17%, the highest in the state since May 5.

 

“Since March 6, when COVID-19 was first reported in Kentucky, we have not had this many new cases reported on a Saturday, and sadly we are also reporting 17 more deaths,” Gov. Beshear said. “As Kentuckians we need to come together right now. We need everyone wearing a mask, following the red zone recommendations and other guidance, like limiting travel and social distancing, so that we can stop this alarming escalation of cases.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Nov. 7, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,162
  • New deaths today: 17
  • Positivity rate: 7.17%
  • Total deaths: 1,561
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,129
  • Currently in ICU: 289
  • Currently on ventilator: 149


Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Kenton and Boone.


Those reported lost to the virus today include a 66-year-old woman and a 71-year-old man from Barren County; a 93-year-old woman from Knott County; a 76-year-old man from Breathitt County; an 80-year-old man and an 81-year-old woman from Lee County; a 75-year-old man, a 63-year-old man, a 59-year-old man and an 86-year-old woman from Jefferson County; a 70-year-old man from Livingston County; a 68-year-old man from Daviess County; an 85-year-old man from Graves County; an 81-year-old woman and a 82-year-old man from Grayson County; a 76-year-old man from Warren County; and an 85-year-old man from Jessamine County.

 

“We have been witnessing an escalation in COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, patients in the ICU and on ventilators statewide over the past few weeks and it is an alarming and deeply concerning situation,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health. “Now is a critical time for Kentuckians to work together to defeat this virus by following the recommendations meant to slow and limit new cases – socially distance, wear masks and practice good hand hygiene. We are all in this together, and we can only stop further spread of the virus by working together.”

 

On Saturday, the Governor also issued a statement congratulating the President-elect.

 

“Congratulations to President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris,” said Gov. Beshear. “We will work with the incoming administration, as we have the current White House, to improve lives and opportunities for every Kentuckian. Now, the election is over and it is time to come together as Americans and as Kentuckians. We are in the fight of our lifetime against COVID-19 and we must unite to battle this virus that has killed 235,000 Americans, including more than 1,500 Kentuckians.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

112 New COVID-19 Cases in Lake Cumberland District; 1 More Death...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 6.77%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 85 deaths resulting in a 1.69% mortality rate (about 1 in 59) among known cases. This compares with a 1.31% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.43% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 43 cases in the hospital. This is 7 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 43 on 11/06/2020. We have had a total of 369 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.34% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 14) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.56%. The latest state data shows that 73.12% of ICU beds and 29.92% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 5,029 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.41% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 49 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 6; Casey: 7; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 4; Green: 2; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 4; Russell: 5; Taylor: 14; and, Wayne: 1. In all, we have released 83.2% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 62 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 759 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/06/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 759.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Places of Worship.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 112 today: Adair: 16; Casey: 10; Clinton: 8; Cumberland: 2; Green: 7; McCreary: 7; Pulaski: 30; Russell: 2; Taylor: 19; and, Wayne: 11. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.018. This means our total case count is projected to double every 38.7 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/06/2020 when we added 113 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 88-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 87-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Casey: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 75-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 77-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 91-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Green: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Green: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Green: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 76-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

A close look at the data may appear that the numbers are off by 1. This is because we removed a case from yesterday. Our case numbers remain very high, both new cases and a record number of active cases. We are also at our peak number of hospitalized cases at 43. One in every 14 people from our district who contract COVID-19 end up hospitalized.

 

The death we report today is a 92-year-old female from Clinton. Our mortality rate for COVID-19 remains high, killing about 1 in 59 cases.

 

Nine of our district’s ten counties are now in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, McCreary, Pulaski, Taylor, and Wayne. This leaves only Russell in the “orange-accelerated” range.

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 5,029 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 118,202 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 117,505 statewide plus 697 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

Gov. Beshear: Red Zone Communities Must Work Together Against Virus

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 6, 2020) – On Friday, Gov. Andy Beshear said communities in red zone counties must work together to defeat an alarming spike in COVID-19. Today, the Governor reported Kentucky’s highest COVID-19 test positivity rate since June 1 and its third highest number of new daily cases.

 

“These numbers are truly frightening. I know we’ve been in this fight for so long that it’s easy to get numb to the scary headlines and high case numbers,” said Gov. Beshear. “That’s normal. It’s human nature. But you have to understand this is the most dangerous COVID-19 has ever been in the commonwealth and it is leading to more of our fellow Kentuckians becoming sick, being hospitalized and dying. We can only get back to normal if we address it head on and that is why I am urging all of you, especially those in red counties, to follow recommendations for reducing the spread in your community.”

 

Gov. Beshear reminded community leaders, schools, businesses and residents in the state’s hardest hit areas to follow the Red Zone Reduction Recommendations. Thursday’s 80 red zone counties should follow the recommendations Monday, Nov. 9, through Sunday, Nov. 15.

 

Case Information As of 3:00pmCT on Friday, Nov. 6, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,302
  • New deaths today: 10
  • Positivity rate: 6.77%
  • Total deaths: 1,544
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,153
  • Currently in ICU: 299
  • Currently on ventilator: 158

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Hardin, Warren, Campbell and Bullitt.

The new red zone counties for this upcoming week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two women, ages 89 and 99, from Hardin County; two men, ages 88 and 104, from Jessamine County; two men, ages 72 and 80, from Laurel County; a 76-year-old man from Lyon County; an 82-year-old man from McLean County; a 92-year-old woman from Muhlenberg County; and a 38-year-old woman from Todd County.

 

The Governor encouraged Kentuckians to take advantage of free COVID-19 testing the Kentucky Department for Public Health is offering in collaboration with local and federal partners. To see the new free COVID-19 testing partnership locations and hours, click here. To see all COVID-19 testing locations in the commonwealth, click here.

 

More Information To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY 11/06/20

 
Date Issued:  11/6/2020
Time Issued: 10:30 A.M.
 
A BOIL WATER ADVISORY is in effect for consumers from 5237 Greensburg Road to 6960 Greensburg Road, Slick Rock Road, Cedar Grove Road, Brockman-Keltner Road and Dick Grant Road. The advisory has been issued due to main line leak. Following such an event, the potential exists for bacteriological contamination of the water supply therefore this Boil Water Advisory has been issued as a precautionary measure. Until further notice, boil all water used for drinking and cooking, bringing the water to a rolling boil for three minutes before using. This advisory will remain in effect until the situation has been corrected and test results have shown the water to be of an acceptable quality. For more information concerning the Boil Water Advisory, contact Lennon Stone at Columbia Adair Utilities District, 270-384-2181.
 

69-Year-Old Clinton County Woman Dies of COVID-19; 107 New Cases in Lake Cumb. District...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 6.5%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 1 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 84 deaths resulting in a 1.71% mortality rate (about 1 in 58) among known cases. This compares with a 1.33% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.45% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 36 cases in the hospital. This is 2 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 41 on 10/30/2020. We have had a total of 358 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.28% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 14) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.58%. The latest state data shows that 71.27% of ICU beds and 28.9% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,917 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.35% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 98 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 13; Casey: 3; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 4; Green: 3; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 22; Russell: 14; Taylor: 14; and, Wayne: 20. In all, we have released 84.1% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 8 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 697 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/05/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 697.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Places of Worship.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 107 today: Adair: 16; Casey: 12; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 4; Green: 7; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 32; Russell: 7; Taylor: 12; and, Wayne: 7. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.017. This means our total case count is projected to double every 40.47 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/05/2020 when we added 107 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Adair: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Casey: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 87-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 69-year-old female who is deceased, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Green: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
McCreary: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we are reporting today is a 69-year-old female from Clinton who had been a nursing home resident who expired while in the hospital. Also, we had a record number of new cases today at 107, and have our highest number of active cases at 697. Nine of our district’s ten counties are now in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, McCreary, Pulaski, Taylor, and Wayne. This leaves only Russell in the “orange-accelerated” range.

 

If you have been watching the hospital numbers closely, you may notice a discrepancy between yesterday and today’s numbers. This is because one case was corrected as hospitalized yesterday after the Daily Brief went out.

 

It should be noted that, due to the recent surge in cases, and due to a medical absence of one of our key staff, we are behind entering a significant number of cases into the state system. While our local numbers are current (as reported in our news briefs, and on our webpages), the numbers reported by the Governor’s Office and posted on the state’s COVID-19 webpage will be significantly off. We have reported this through the State Department for Public Health to the Governor’s Office. In any event, please utilize our local data for the time being.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,917 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 115,907 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 115,277 statewide plus 630 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

 

Russell County Fiscal Court Nov. 9th Meeting Agenda

 
RUSSELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT MEETING NOVEMBER 9, 2020 - 5:30 P.M.
 
AGENDA
 
WELCOME, PLEDGE & OPENING PRAYER MINUTES
PAY BILLS
DETENTION CENTER REPORT
SHERIFF’S REPORT
RC SHERIFF 2019 FINAL TAX SETTLEMENT
RC SHERIFF 2020 AMENDED BUDGET
TREASURER’S MONTHLY SETTLEMENT REPORT & AE TRANSFERS 1st READING BUDGET AMENDMENT ORDINANCE 20-06
2ND READING BUDGET AMENDMENT ORDINANCE 20-05
RC CLERK – 2020 AMENDED BUDGET
HEALTH INSURANCE – OPEN ENROLLMENT
TOURISM BOARD APPOINTMENT
EXTENSION BOARD APPOINTMENTS
ROAD CHANGES
OTHER BUSINESS
ADJOURN
 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE... 11-6-20

Russell County 7 new cases Thursday. We had 14 cases released from isolation. We now have 46 active cases which 40 are on self-isolation and 6 are hospitalized, 2 at Russell County, 2 at UK and 2 in Somerset. The new cases are females ages 42, 48, 74 and males ages 14, 34, 41, 73.

Adair County 16 New COVID cases yesterday, 13 released from isolation. 645 total cases, 510 released, 24 deaths, 111 Active Cases, 105 in home isolation and 5 in area hospitals.

2,318 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 20 MORE DEATHS.....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 5, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced 80 red zone counties, 12 more than were listed last week. He reminded Kentuckians that this is the most dangerous period of the pandemic so far: Today’s new cases report is one of Kentucky’s highest ever, second only to the day Gov. Beshear reported a significant backlog from Fayette County. Yesterday, the United States recorded more than 100,000 new daily cases, the first time any country in the world has done so.

 

“This means we just need more out of everybody,” said Gov. Beshear. “It’s got to be a concerted community effort everywhere this virus is out of control.”

 

The Governor also announced new support for bars, restaurants and temporary venues to help them save costs as COVID-19 rages across the commonwealth, with indoor dining discouraged, and as the weather gets colder, limiting outdoor seating.

 

The Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control is granting a 12-month fee renewal waiver to current licensees. Licensees who have not yet renewed in 2020 will be granted relief until their 2021 renewal date. Those who have already paid for 2020 will have their fees waived in 2021.

 

“From the start of this pandemic, I have asked all of our state government leaders to find creative ways to help families and businesses that have been severely financially hurt by this crisis,” said Gov. Beshear. “This has certainly been a difficult year for our bars, restaurants and venues, and they deserve this innovative support as we face what could be a very painful winter.”

 

The fee waiver does not apply to producers, distributors, wholesalers and others that were able to continue operations throughout the state of emergency.

 

The Governor also applauded the Department of Fish and Wildlife for providing innovative online educational opportunities for children, parents, caregivers and educators during the pandemic. Salato Wildlife Education Center’s Facebook live educational programming and other virtual learning resources can be found on the department’s website fw.ky.gov and social media accounts.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,318
  • New deaths today: 20
  • Positivity rate: 6.50%
  • Total deaths: 1,534
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,102
  • Currently in ICU: 291
  • Currently on ventilator: 129

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Hardin, Boone, Nelson and Boyd.

The new red zone counties for this upcoming week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 81-year-old woman from Boyd County; a 71-year-old man from Breckinridge County; a 52-year-old man from Bullitt County; an 83-year-old man from Carroll County; two women, ages 86 and 94, from Christian County; a 76-year-old man from Daviess County; a 75-year-old woman from Fayette County; four women, ages 78, 83, 90 and 102, and three men, ages 62, 78 and 80, from Jefferson County; a 93-year-old man from Laurel County; an 81-year-old man from Marshall County; an 81-year-old woman and an 83-year-old man from Martin County; and a 71-year-old woman from Muhlenberg County.

 

The Governor encouraged Kentuckians to take advantage of free COVID-19 testing the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH) is offering in collaboration with local and federal partners. To see the new free COVID-19 testing partnership locations and hours, click here. To see all COVID-19 testing locations in the commonwealth, click here.

 

Secretary of the Executive Cabinet, J. Michael Brown, updated Kentuckians on COVID-19 in the commonwealth’s correctional facilities. There have been 1,255 total inmate cases in Department of Corrections (DOC) prisons, 214 of which are active. There have been 221 COVID-19 cases among DOC staffers and 34 of those cases are active. With each positive case, staff or inmate, the DOC works closely with KDPH to determine testing needs.

 

The Governor highlighted more than $1.6 billion in Coronavirus Relief funds the commonwealth has used to support public health, local governments, schools, long-term care facilities, utility and eviction relief, unemployment insurance and more during the pandemic. Some examples of expenses included $219 million for PPE, testing, contact tracing and public awareness, as well as $102 million to support testing and nurse strike teams at long-term care facilities. The Governor said that funds cycled through the economy support a balanced budget.

 

Memorial
Today, Gov. Beshear honored Dr. Mohammad Jawed, a loving father to three daughters, a beloved husband and one of our frontline health care workers. He was only 59 when he passed away Oct. 31 after battling COVID-19 for over a month at the University of Kentucky Medical Center. 

 

“He humbly served the southeastern Kentucky community for over 23 years as a well-respected physician,” said Gov. Beshear. “Dr. Jawed truly was a hero, battling multiple myeloma, a cancer that affected his plasma cells, over the last two years while continuing to work as a frontline health care worker, even during the COVID-19 pandemic. He dedicated his life to supporting his family and caring for his patients.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

MISSING METCALFE TEEN LOCATED....


****UPDATE AT BOTTOM****

Edmonton, Ky (November 3, 2020) – Kentucky State Police is seeking assistance from the public in attempting to locate 17 -year-old, Amber Rowe, of Edmonton, KY. Amber is a 5’ 02 ” 195 pound, white female with brown hair and brown eyes. She was last seen on Skyline Drive in the evening hours of October 26th, 2020 wearing grey pants and a grey and black hooded sweat shirt. 

 

If anyone has information regarding her whereabouts, please contact the Kentucky State Police, Post 15 at 1-800-222-5555 or your local law enforcement agency. Tpr. Ricky Cross is investigating.

 

 

                    *********UPDATE***********

 

Amber Rowe was located Tuesday, November 3, 2020 in Greenville, KY. She was released to her guardian.

 

Casey County Man Charged With Murder Following Property Dispute...


Liberty, KY (November 5, 2020) – Detectives from KSP Post 15 are conducting a murder investigation in Casey County following a property dispute that occurred on Wednesday, November 4th, 2020 at approximately 5:44pmET 4 miles east of Liberty on Dry Ridge Rd.


During the investigation, it was determined that Randall Atwood, 58, of Liberty, KY and Elza King, 33, of Liberty, KY were involved in a verbal altercation over a property dispute. During the altercation, Atwood retrieved his firearm and discharged the weapon striking King. King was fatally injured and was pronounced deceased by the Casey County Coroner.
 

Atwood was charged with Murder and lodged in the Casey County Detention Center.
 

KSP was assisted at the scene by the Casey County Sheriff’s Department, Liberty Police Department, Casey County EMS, and Casey County Rescue Squad. This incident remains under investigation by Det. Marvin Blakey. 
 

Meth Arrest Made Following Early Morning Traffic Stop in Columbia....

 

Columbia Police initiated a traffic stop on Campbellsville Street early Thursday morning which resulted in drug charges. 

The vehicle was stopped as it was headed into town just after 1AM near Grant Lane. After making contact with the operator, it was later determined she was under the influence and taken into custody. K-9 unit was additionally utilized and after alerting on the vehicle, drug paraphernalia and suspected methamphetamine was located. 

Lindsey Keeney, 29, of Louisville has been charged with operating under the influence, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of controlled substance methamphetamine, as well as other traffic violations. 


Officer Trevor Foster was the arresting Officer. He was assisted on scene by Officer Adam Cravens.
 

AREA ARRESTS 11-5-20

 

 

  • Jeremy Stamper, 34, of Russell Springs was arrested by Deputy Perkins with the RCSO on Wednesday evening. Stamper was charged with Theft by Unlawful Taking ($10,000 or more but under $1 million) and Criminal Mischief 1st Degree. He was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

  • Brett Allen, 32, of Columbia, KY was arrested by KSP early this morning. He was charged with DUI 3rd offense and Driving on a DUI Suspended License. Allen was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-5-20

Adair County 21 New COVID cases Wednesday. 10 released,108 active cases, 103 home isolation and 5 in area hospitals

 

Russell County 10 new cases today. We had 5 cases released from self-isolation today. We now have 53 cases which 47 are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized, 2 at UK, 2 in Somerset and 2 at Russell County Hospital. The new cases are males ages 6, 35, 39,50,53,62 and females ages 29,62,62,67.

Adair Reports 21 New COVID-19 Cases; 10 More in Russell.....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 6.3%.

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 83 deaths resulting in a 1.73% mortality rate (about 1 in 58) among known cases. This compares with a 1.34% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.47% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 34 cases in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 41 on 10/30/2020. We have had a total of 355 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.38% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 14) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.59%. The latest state data shows that 70.98% of ICU beds and 27.96% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,810 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.3% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 53 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 10; Casey: 4; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 6; Green: 3; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 5; Russell: 5; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 4. In all, we have released 84% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 45 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 689 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/04/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 689.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Places of Worship.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 98 today: Adair: 21; Casey: 9; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 2; Green: 6; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 19; Russell: 10; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 10. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.017. This means our total case count is projected to double every 40.87 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/03/2020 when we added 106 cases.
 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 59-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 66-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 84-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 74-year-old female who is released, 10/16/20
  • Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We are at our highest ever number of active cases at 689 and are still seeing very high numbers of new cases. On a bright note, Pulaski dropped back out of the “red-critical” range of community-spread. Therefore, eight of our district’s ten counties are now in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, McCreary, Taylor, and Wayne. Pulaski, and Russell are in the “orange-accelerated” range.

It should be noted that, due to the recent surge in cases, and due to a medical absence of one of our key staff, we are behind entering a significant number of cases into the state system. While our local numbers are current (as reported in our news briefs, and on our webpages), the numbers reported by the Governor’s Office and posted on the state’s COVID-19 webpage will be significantly off. We have reported this through the State Department for Public Health to the Governor’s Office. In any event, please utilize our local data for the time being.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,810 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 113,597 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 113,009 statewide plus 588 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

Russell Co. Community Blood Drive November 5th


There will be a Russell County Community Blood Drive Thursday, November 5th from 12:30pm-5:00pmCT in the SKRECC Community Room. Here's R.C. Circuit Clerk Tony Kerr with details.... 

 

 

Gov. Beshear Urges Kentuckians to Renew Fight Against COVID-19....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 4, 2020) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear encouraged Kentuckians to renew their fight against COVID-19, while celebrating positive budget and economic development news for the commonwealth.

 

“Our number of hospitalized people goes up every day. These are a lot of Kentuckians who are fighting for their lives,” said Gov. Beshear. “Let’s keep lighting our homes up green. There’s a lot of pain out there and it’s hitting everybody. We’re thinking of every family, whether we know you or we don’t. We hurt with you and we grieve with you.”

 

Today, Gov. Beshear announced that based on the recently released Quarterly Economic and Review Report issued by the Office of the State Budget Director, he anticipates that his administration will be able to balance the current fiscal year 2021 budget with no further budget cuts to state agencies or to the state’s Road Fund. He further announced he anticipates finishing fiscal year 2021 on June 30, 2021, with more than $460 million in the Budget Reserve Trust Fund, or “Rainy Day” Fund, the highest total for the fund in state history.

 

“Today’s news means that critical areas such as education, health care and public safety will not suffer from midyear cuts, but will instead be fully supported at their budgeted amounts,” said Gov. Beshear. “A number of factors that helped in balancing the budget include better-than-expected revenue collections through the first four months, which has been supported by federal COVID-19 relief payments to Kentucky’s businesses and individuals as well the substantial investment in health care spending in response to the pandemic.”

 

The Governor said additional flexibility in the use of CARES Act money that was announced around Labor Day and an assumption that the commonwealth’s economic circumstances will stay aligned with the U.S. economy through June 2021 also contributed to balancing the budget.  

 

Today, Gov. Beshear also announced that leaders of the newly formed U.S. Medical Glove Co. LLC expect to create 192 full-time, high-tech jobs at a Paris manufacturing facility to produce medical-grade gloves. The company will help meet the world’s increased need for personal protective equipment and will focus on hiring veterans. To read the full release, click here.

 

The Governor highlighted that new White House recommendations agree with steps taken in Kentucky. The White House advises high-visibility, color-coded community action plans. It also recommends that Americans, including students and teachers in K-12 schools, wear a mask and stop holding gatherings beyond their immediate household. The White House also backs effective best practices like limiting restaurant indoor capacity to less than 50% and restricting hours until cases and the test positivity rate decrease. The Governor added that an A.P. VoteCast exit poll said 71% of Kentucky voters strongly or somewhat favor requiring people to wear masks when around other people outside of their homes.

 

Long-Term Care Update
Today, Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) Secretary Eric Friedlander updated Kentuckians about the state’s ongoing efforts to provide testing and personal protective equipment, as well as leverage CARES Act funding for the commonwealth’s long-term care facilities.

 

He said the state has spent about $30 million in CARES funding to support resident and staff testing. Other efforts include expanding telehealth, developing a personal care assistance program to assist with staffing and working with community partners to bring a long-term care task force together and have an impactful local response.

 

“The thing we focus on is making sure our seniors and most vulnerable are taken care of,” Secretary Friedlander said.

 

“Now, after keeping our rates lower in Kentucky, we are seeing increases in community spread across the commonwealth. We must act. Please, all we have to do is wear masks and follow the guidelines. It is the best way we can protect ourselves, our families and our seniors.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,635
  • New deaths today: 11
  • Positivity rate: 6.30%
  • Total deaths: 1,514
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,066
  • Currently in ICU: 286
  • Currently on ventilator: 125

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Warren, Laurel, McCracken and Boone.

 

Red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

“One of the concerns we have related to hospitals is not that we will first run out of bed space but that we may not have enough health care workers to staff all those beds,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two women, ages 79 and 96, from Hancock County; three women, ages 60, 81 and 89, and four men, ages 59, 71, 72 and 72, from Jefferson County; an 82-year-old woman from Knott County; and a 91-year-old woman from McLean County.

 

Today, the Governor issued an executive order to renew the state’s face coverings mandate for another 30 days and signed an executive order that extends previous orders allowing pharmacists to dispense 30-day refills. The current executive order is set to expire tonight at 11:59 p.m. The new order will be effective for 30 days beginning Nov. 5.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED 11/04/20

 
As of 2:56 p.m. on Wednesday, November 4, 2020 the boil water advisory for Columbia Adair Utilities customers on Grant Lane and from 821 Campbellsville Road to 1463 Campbellsville Road and all side roads in between has been lifted by the Division of Water. This means your water is safe for human consumption. You no longer have to boil your water.

67-Year-Old Adair Co. Man Dies from COVID-19; 105 New Cases in Lake Cumb. District....

 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 6.24%.
 
Deaths: We regret we must report 1 new death today (see below). We have experienced a total of 83 deaths resulting in a 1.76% mortality rate (about 1 in 57) among known cases. This compares with a 1.35% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.48% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 34 cases in the hospital. This is 1 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 40 on 10/30/2020. We have had a total of 351 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.45% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.59%. The latest state data shows that 72.4% of ICU beds and 28.87% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,712 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.26% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 70 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 10; Casey: 2; Clinton: 10; Cumberland: 13; Green: 8; Pulaski: 15; Russell: 5; Taylor: 3; and, Wayne: 4. In all, we have released 84.6% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 34 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 644 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/03/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 644.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Places of Worship.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 105 today: Adair: 17; Casey: 9; Clinton: 6; Cumberland: 1; Green: 6; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 25; Russell: 4; Taylor: 18; and, Wayne: 14. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.017. This means our total case count is projected to double every 40.54 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 11/03/2020 when we added 106 cases. Today’s new cases include:
 
  • Adair: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 75-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 85-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Green: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The numbers above for Pulaski will appear to be off by one. That is because we removed a duplicate Pulaski entry for yesterday.
 
We are reporting 1 new death today, a 67-year-old male from Adair who had been hospitalized. We also reported a 73-year-old male from Green yesterday. He had also been hospitalized.
 
We added a record number of new cases today, 106. We have the most active cases ever, 644. Nine of our district’s ten counties are now in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, McCreary, Pulaski, Taylor, and Wayne. Only Russell is in the “orange-accelerated” range. With the increased volume of new cases we are experiencing daily, the health department is struggling to keep up with investigations and contact tracing. Cases coming in in the afternoon are being pushed until the next day. If our capacity becomes exceeded and we are not able to contact trace effectively and quarantine high-risk close contacts, the chances of increased community-spread goes up substantially. At this point, the safest thing to do would be for everyone to assume that you are going to encounter a positive case. Therefore, please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
It should be noted that, due to the recent surge in cases, and due to a medical absence of one of our key staff, we are behind entering a significant number of cases into the state system. While our local numbers are current (as reported in our news briefs, and on our webpages), the numbers reported by the Governor’s Office and posted on the state’s COVID-19 webpage will be significantly off. We have reported this through the State Department for Public Health to the Governor’s Office. In any event, please utilize our local data for the time being.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,712 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 111,902 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 111,379 statewide plus 523 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

Golden Rule Wilson Real Estate & Auction Announces Benefit for St. Jude Children's Hospital


St. Jude Children's Research Hospital announced today that Golden Rule - Wilson Real Estate and Auction will be conducting the Get Sold on St. Jude Kids program.  This program will raise funds to help continue the research, patient care, and educational programs of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

 

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is internationally recognized for its pioneering work in finding cures and saving children with cancer and other catastrophic diseases.  Founded by the late entertainer, Danny Thomas, and based in Memphis, TN, St. Jude freely shares its discoveries with scientific and medical communities around the world.  No family ever pays for treatments not covered by insurance, and families without insurance are never asked to pay.  St. Jude is financially supported by ALSAC, its fund-raising organization.  In 1962 when the hospital opened, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common form of childhood leukemia, was only survived by four percent of our patients; the current cure rate is now 85%. For more information, please visit www.stjude.org.

 

Golden Rule - Wilson Real Estate and Auction has donated special items to be auctioned for the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - all going on NOW in conjunction with Mrs. Norma Foley’s Online Only Absolute Auction.  The special items include a RARE AUTOGRAPHED RICK PITINO NBA BASKETBALL, a BRAND NEW STOK TOWER GRILL, a FRAMED WESTERN  PRINT BY JACK TERRY, and a LARGE DECORATIVE HOME INTERIOR MIRROR.   If you would like to be a part of this year’s event, get online and get bidding NOW at www.GoldenRuleAuction.com.  Donations will also be accepted from anyone at the auction pick up - your participation and tax deductible donation will be greatly appreciated.

 

The funds raised in this event will help ensure that children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases will have a better chance to live.  For more information, please contact Mr. Chris Wilson at 270-866-6600 or 270-384-1111.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE FOR 11-4-20

Russell County 4 new cases yesterday. We had 5 cases released from isolation. We now have 48 active cases which 42 are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized, 1 in Danville at Ephraim McDowell, 2 at UK, 2 at Somerset, and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County 17 new COVID cases to report Tuesday. We released 10 cases and we have 1 new death. We have had 608 total cases with 487 recovered and 24 deaths. We have 97 active cases with 93 in home isolation and 4 in area hospitals.

JAMESTOWN CITY COUNCIL MEETING RECAP

 

Jamestown City Council held a special called meeting last evening concerning annexation.  Mayor Nick Shearer talked with WAVE NEWS following the meeting... 
 

 

KSP Post 15 October 2020 Activity Report 

 
 
Columbia, KY (November 3, 2020) - During the month of October 2020, there were 22 traffic accidents investigated by the State Police working in the Post 15 area in the 11 counties of Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Marion, Metcalfe, Monroe, Russell, Taylor and Washington.
 
There were 2 fatal collisions during the month of October in the Post 15 area:
  1. Pamela Caldwell, 62, of Washington Co. was killed on 10/05/2020 in Washington Co.
  2. Lisa Cooper, 46, of Adair Co. was killed on 10/14/2020 in Adair Co..

 

This brings our yearly fatality count to 26 compared with 23 through this same period in 2019.
Statewide fatality count stands at 647 compared with 637 through this same period in 2019.
 
During the month of October 2020, there were 1154 citations written, 193 courtesy notices written, 459 complaints answered, 95 motorists assisted, 51 criminal cases opened and 187 criminal arrests made.
 

RUSSELL CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY 11/03/20

 

There is a Russell County Boil Water Advisory on a section of Highway 80 starting at address 3600 at the North Hwy 76/80 intersection down to the South Hwy 76/80 intersection, ending at address 3962. The advisory was issued this afternoon due to a water main break. Until further notice boil all water used for drinking & cooking purposes for at least 3 minutes.

Adair Annex Opens to Public Wednesday With Restrictions....

 
Beginning Wednesday, November 4, 2020 the Adair Co. Annex will be open to the public WITH RESTRICTIONS. We will continue to have someone monitor the front doors and MASKS WILL BE REQUIRED for entry. If someone refuses to wear a mask, they will be asked to wait outside and someone will come out to them.  I understand mask wearing should be a personal choice, but at the same time, it is our responsibility to keep our staff safe as well.  If any office begins to get several occupants, you may be asked to wait in the foyer for a short time.  Please bear with us as we continue to serve everyone in an efficient but safe manner.
 
We ask that anyone who will, continue to utilize the drop boxes and do any business you can by mail.  You may also call each office for assistance at the numbers provided below.
 
Adair County Judge Executive  270-384-4703
Adair County PVA  270-384-3673
Adair County Clerk  270-384-2801
Adair County Sheriff  270-384-2776
Adair County Attorney  270-384-3216
Adair County Child Support  270-384-5932
 
Gale Cowan
Adair County Judge Executive
 

Gov. Beshear: Virus Continues to Surge Across Commonwealth....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 3, 2020) – On Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear said Kentuckians should be alarmed by the surge of COVID-19 cases in the commonwealth and renew their commitment to stop the spread of this disease before the crisis escalates further.

 

“It continues to be a difficult time in the commonwealth, where every day, things appear to be getting worse and more concerning,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are seeing not only a surge in the virus, but more and more of our kids by percentage who are getting it.”

 

Families, schools, businesses and community leaders in counties listed in the red zone should follow nine recommendations to keep people safe. All Kentuckians should consider adopting some of these recommendations to help their county avoid the red zone. Today’s COVID-19 case report is the highest ever for a Tuesday.

 

He encouraged all Kentuckians to vote safely and make their voices heard today.

 

“I think Kentuckians are really focused on what appears to be a record turnout. I believe this election will be one that is good for democracy and shows that Kentucky can be a model for the country,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,795
  • New deaths today: 11
  • Positivity rate: 6.24%
  • Total deaths: 1,503
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,037
  • Currently in ICU: 259
  • Currently on ventilator: 116

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Laurel, Boone and Kenton.

Red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include: a 71-year-old man from Hardin County; four women, ages 86, 91, 92 and 94, and a 59-year-old man from Jefferson County; an 88-year-old woman from Monroe County; a 76-year-old man from Montgomery County; an 82-year-old woman and a 71-year-old man from Muhlenberg County; and a 78-year-old man from Ohio County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

MISSING JUVENILE

 

Edmonton, Ky (November 3, 2020) – Kentucky State Police is seeking assistance from the public in attempting to locate 17 -year-old, Amber Rowe, of Edmonton, KY. Amber is a 5’2”, 195 pounds, white female with brown hair and brown eyes. She was last seen on Skyline Drive in the evening hours of October 26th, 2020 wearing grey pants and a grey & black hooded sweat shirt. 
 

If anyone has information regarding her whereabouts, please contact the Kentucky State Police, Post 15 at 1-800-222-5555 or your local law enforcement agency. Tpr. Ricky Cross is investigating.

 

1 New COVID-19 Death in Lake Cumb. District; 87 New Cases.....

 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 6.25%.
 
Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today. We have experienced a total of 82 deaths resulting in a 1.78% mortality rate (about 1 in 56) among known cases. This compares with a 1.36% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.5% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 33 cases in the hospital. This is 9 less than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 40 on 10/30/2020. We have had a total of 349 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.58% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.57%. The latest state data shows that 68.88% of ICU beds and 29.32% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,607 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.21% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 103 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 17; Casey: 3; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 7; Green: 5; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 26; Russell: 7; Taylor: 22; and, Wayne: 7. In all, we have released 85% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We released 17 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 610 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/01/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 626.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Places of Worship.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 87 today: Adair: 8; Casey: 6; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 5; Green: 6; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 32; Russell: 2; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 14. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 43.49 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/28/2020 when we added 91 cases. Today’s new cases include:
 
  • Adair: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 90-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 74-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is released, unknown
  • Wayne: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 45-year-old male who is released, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we are reporting is a 73-year-old male from Green. 9 of our 10 counties are now in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, McCreary, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. Pulaski is the only county in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread.
 
It should be noted that, due to the recent surge in cases, and due to a medical absence of one of our key staff, we are behind entering a significant number of cases into the state system. While our local numbers are current (as reported in our news briefs, and on our webpages), the numbers reported by the Governor’s Office and posted on the state’s COVID-19 webpage will be significantly off. We have reported this through the State Department for Public Health to the Governor’s Office. In any event, please utilize our local data for the time being.
 
Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,607 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 110,129 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 109,670 statewide plus 459 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

R.C. WOMAN ARRESTED ON ASSAULT CHARGES....

 

A Russell Springs woman was taken into custody yesterday afternoon on assault charges. Chasity Marcum, 32, was arrested by Deputy Perkins with the Russell County Sheriff’s Office on the charge of Assault 2nd Degree (a class C felony). Marcum was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11/3/20

 

Russell County 2 new cases Monday. We had 7 cases released from isolation. We now have 49 active cases which 43 are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized, 2 at Russell County Hospital, 2 at UK and 2 in Somerset. The new cases are 35 and 51 year old males who are both self-isolated.

 

Adair County had 8 new COVID cases yesterday and had 17 released. No new deaths.

Today's COVID-19 Report Highest Ever For A Monday....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 2, 2020) – On Monday, Gov. Andy Beshear said all Kentuckians need to act now to stop a COVID-19 surge that could overwhelm the commonwealth’s health care system and force businesses and schools to close again.

 

“In America and in Kentucky, this is getting increasingly more and more dangerous. The newest numbers are absolutely staggering,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’re losing 1,200 Americans per day and we have some individuals who say, ‘Oh, it’s not real.’ Think about the amount of grief that is crying out every day in this country and this commonwealth based on those who we have lost.”

 

Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in counties listed in the red zone on Thursdays should follow nine recommendations the following Monday through Sunday. All Kentuckians should consider adopting some of these recommendations to help their county avoid the red zone. Today’s COVID-19 case report is the highest ever for a Monday.

 

The Governor reminded Kentuckians to vote safely in the 2020 general election tomorrow if they have not done so already. He encouraged all voters to wear a mask and stay six feet apart from others at the polls.

 

Finally, the Governor addressed the Friday report that a former Kentucky State Police training slideshow included quotes from Adolf Hitler and Robert E. Lee.

 

“We believe that presentation was only given one single time, to one single class, but it is absolutely and totally unacceptable. Unacceptable. While we believe that this was used just one time 6 years ago, we’re not stopping there. We are checking all training materials going back in time and looking at the present,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’re committed to making this right. To our brothers and sisters in the Jewish community and the Black community in Kentucky, this should never have happened. You should never have to see this news.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Nov. 2, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,032
  • New deaths today: 3
  • Positivity rate: 6.25%
  • Total deaths: 1,492
  • Currently hospitalized: 988
  • Currently in ICU: 270
  • Currently on ventilator: 142

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren and McCracken.

 

Red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 82-year-old man from Hardin County; a 93-year-old man from Jessamine County; and a 59-year-old man from Whitley County.

 

Gov. Beshear explained how Kentucky’s mask mandate helped limit the commonwealth’s COVID-19 cases and deaths to less than half of what neighboring Tennessee experienced without a mask mandate.

 

Every two minutes, we are losing one of our fellow Americans to COVID-19.

 

Fast 4
Today, the Governor announced that Healthcare Asset Network, doing business as HANDLE Global, which develops, sells and implements technology in support of the health care equipment supply chain, is expanding in Jefferson County with a $7.8 million investment toward additional warehousing and 80 high-paying jobs across its distribution and headquarters operations. To read the full release, click here.

 

Next, Gov. Beshear updated Kentuckians that he has designated $15 million in CARES funding for the Healthy at Home Utility Relief Fund. The fund can assist households with income up to 200% of the Federal Poverty Level that have suffered financially due to COVID-19, covering up to $500 for past-due utility, water or wastewater bills. For a limited number of households, the fund can pay up to $200 for past-due electric or natural gas bills, up to two times. Kentuckians can apply at their local Community Action Agency: To locate your local office, call 800-456-3452 or visit www.capky.org.

 

Applicants will need the following documentation:

  • Most current utility bill;
  • Proof of arrearage, payment plan or disconnect notice for utilities;
  • Proof of Social Security Number or Permanent Residence card (Green Card) for each member of the household; and
  • Proof of all household’s (all members) income from the preceding month.

 

“Again, this is just another way, on top of health care, food assistance, rental assistance and the extra $400 of unemployment the state opted to provide – when not many other states did – that we are trying to help people make it through,” said Gov. Beshear. “Please take advantage of this program.”

 

Gov. Beshear advised absentee voters to use drop boxes this close to Election Day. Finally, the Governor highlighted Kentuckians who are stepping up in the fight against COVID-19 and sharing their stories with the hashtag #MaskUpKY

 

“If you still have an absentee ballot, don’t mail it; take it to a drop box. That’s the best way to make sure that it is counted,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

VOTING REMINDERS FROM ADAIR CO. CLERK....


Voters who have requested absentee ballots must return them as soon as possible. If by mail, they need to be postmarked by November 3rd. If dropping in the ballot box, they must be dropped by 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov 3rd. The Drop-off Box is located in the foyer of the Adair County Annex Building, 424 Public Square, Columbia. The Annex Basement is open today from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and tomorrow (Tuesday) from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. for voting.

 

The only voting locations open Tuesday from 6 to 6 are the following: 

 

All totals received from absentee voting, early voting, and election day will be released as normal after the polls close at 6 on Tuesday evening.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 11-2-20

Adair County 4 new COVID19 cases to report today. We did not release anyone yesterday. We have had 583 total cases with 460 of those released and 23 deaths. We have 100 active cases with 96 in home isolation and 4 in area hospitals.

 

Russell County 1 new case Sunday. We had NONE released from isolation. We now have 54 active cases which 49 are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Somerset,2 at UK and 2 at Russell County Hospital. The new case is a 74 year old male who is self-isolated.

Gov. Beshear: Highest Week of COVID-19 Cases Demands Attention....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 1, 2020) – On Sunday, Gov. Andy Beshear said there were more new cases of the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) recorded in Kentucky this week than any other since the beginning of the pandemic.

 

“If you’re not alarmed by these record numbers of COVID-19 cases, you should be,” said Gov. Beshear. “I know we’re tired, but if we do not get the spread of this disease under control, we risk a darker, more deadly period this winter than we ever experienced in the spring.”

 

Red zone counties should follow nine recommendations to slow the spread of COVID-19 and all counties should consider adopting some of these measures to help them avoid the red zone.

 

Case Information
As of 3pmCT Sunday, Nov. 1, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,423
  • New deaths today: 4
  • Positivity rate: 6.14%
  • Total deaths: 1,489
  • Currently hospitalized: 994
  • Currently in ICU: 250
  • Currently on ventilator: 136

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Johnson and McCracken.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 72-year-old man from Bullitt County; a 64-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 74-year-old man from Jessamine County; and a 64-year-old woman from Madison County.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health, noted that indicators are “telling us what we’d hoped to avoid: Kentucky is in a critical situation. The spread of COVID-19 is accelerating at a dangerous pace,” with the coronavirus having spiked for a third time.

 

Dr. Stack observed that several contiguous counties in Eastern Kentucky entered the red zone last week, at the same time these same counties reported flu cases. Though the flu can happen at any time during the year, it is more active in fall and winter.

 

“Having multiple viruses actively circulating at the same time makes the situation even more difficult, but we have effective defenses that work for these and other viruses. Avoid gatherings. If you’re around people, remain at least six feet apart from those not in your household. Wear a face mask. Wash your hands thoroughly. Avoid touching your eyes and mouth. And, clean surfaces with sanitizing wipes or a chlorine bleach solution. It’s a highly effective killer of germs of all sorts.”  

 

Reporting is limited on Sundays. Additional information, including the number of Kentuckians who have recovered from COVID-19, will be reported Monday.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Gusty Winds This Afternoon; Freeze Warning Tonight.....

 
 
 
Gusty northwest winds are expected behind a cold front today.
Wind gusts could approach 40 mph during the late morning and
afternoon hours. This may result in difficult driving conditions
for high profile vehicles, especially on north/south roadways.
Light weight lawn objects or decorations should be tied down or
secured to prevent them from being blown away.
 
Winds will slacken this evening after the sun sets, but the
combination of light winds and air temperatures in the 30s could
result in wind chills dropping into the 20s.
 
..FREEZE WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 10 PM CST
THIS EVENING 
TO 8 AM CST MONDAY...
 

* WHAT...Temperatures at or below freezing for about 3 to 6 hours
  is expected to end the growing season.

 

* TEMPERATURE...25 to 30 degrees for Monday morning lows. A few
  typical cold spots in the low 20s.

 

* Impacts...The freeze Monday morning will likely kill sensitive
  vegetation and end the growing season.

 

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Freeze Warning means sub-freezing temperatures are imminent or
highly likely. These conditions will kill crops and other
sensitive vegetation.

 

WEEKEND ARRESTS 11/01/20

 

  • Justin Woodall, 35, Jamestown, KY was arrested by RSPD late Saturday night and charged with Shoplifting Under $500. He was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
  • Tammy Bright, 49, of Jamestown, KY arrested by KSP early Sunday morning and charged with Operating a Motor Vehicle Under the Influence of Alcohol. She was lodged in the R.C. Jail.
  • Terry Williams, 24, of Tompkinsville, KY was arrested by KSP on Saturday night for DUI (Aggravating Circumstances), No Registration Receipt, Failure to Produce Insurance Card, and 2nd Degree Wanton Endangerment. He was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

?

1-Vehicle Accident Sends Adair Co. Woman to Lexington Hospital; Weather Conditions a Factor in the Crash...

 

On Thursday, October 29, 2020 the Adair County Sheriff’s Office responded to a single vehicle accident around the 4300 block of KY55 north. Upon arrival, deputies located a single vehicle on its side. The preliminary investigation determined that a 2007 Lincoln MKZ traveling north and being operated by 33-year-old Ashley Bunch of Jamestown, KY left the right hand shoulder of the roadway and struck an earth embankment. The vehicle then overturned and struck a guardrail. Upon striking the guardrail, the vehicle slid on its side into a Kentucky Transportation Cabinet electronic sign and trailer. According to the ACSO weather conditions (fog & rain) were a determining factor in the crash. 
 
Ms. Bunch was transported to TJ Health Columbia by Adair EMS and later taken to the University of Kentucky Hospital in Lexington, KY for treatment of her injuries. 
 
The Adair County Sheriff’s Office was assisted on scene by Adair County EMS and the Columbia/Adair Fire department.