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Local News Archives for 2021-01

JAMESTOWN VEHICLE FIRE SUNDAY AFTERNOON


The Jamestown Fire Department was dispatched, along with the Russell County EMS, to a one vehicle accident just south of the square shortly jafter 1:00pmCT on Sunday afternoon. 

 

The driver was helped from the SUV and transported by EMS. The vehicle had caught fire after impact. Firefighters were on the scene for about an hour.

 

Jamestown Police, Russell Springs Police, and Jamestown Utilities were also on scene. Driver information wasn't available at the time of the press release.  
 

AREA ARRESTS 1-29-21

 

Bobby Beard, 50, of Russell Springs was taken into custody by Trooper Begley of the Kentucky State Police just before 8 last evening. Beard was charged with Trafficking in a Controlled Substance, 1st degree, 2nd or greater offense (Meth) and Drug Paraphernalia Buy/Possession.

 

Michael Colyer, 35, of Jamestown was taken into custody by officer Justice of the Russell Springs Police Department just after 12:30 yesterday afternoon. Colyer was charged with Assault, 4th Degree (Domestic Violence), Disregarding a Stop Sign, Fleeing or Evading Police, 2nd degree, (Motor Vehicle), Fleeing or Evading Police, 2nd degree (Foot), Burglary, 3rd degree, Operating a Vehicle with Expired Operators License, Bribery of a Public Servant, Failure to Notify Address change to the Department of Transportation and Reckless Driving.

 

Both were lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.

 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 1-29-21

 

Russell County 1 new case Thursday. We had 1 case released from isolation. We now have 66 active cases of which 56 cases are on self-isolation and 10 cases are hospitalized, 3 at UK, 3 at Somerset, 3 at Russell County Hospital and 1 at Bowling Green.

 

Adair County 12 new COVID19 cases to report Thursday. We released 8 cases yesterday. We have had 1,518 total cases with 1,427 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 42 active cases with 42 of those in home isolation. We have 0 case in the hospital at this time.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-28-21

 

 

Russell County 10 new cases Wednesday. We had 11 cases released from isolation. We now have 67 active cases of which 56 cases are self-isolated and 11 cases are hospitalized, 3 at UK, 3 at Somerset, 3 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Danville and 1 at Bowling Green.

 

Adair County 11 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 4 cases. We also have to report another death Wednesday. We have had 1,506 total cases with 1,419 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 38 active cases with 38 of those in home isolation. We have 0 case in the hospital at this time.

Gov. Beshear: Positivity Rate Declines, Vaccine Supplies Increasing

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 27, 2021) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear said the state’s positivity rate declined again. He also reminded Kentuckians that the federal government will increase each state’s supply of COVID-19 vaccines and guarantee a minimum supply for three consecutive weeks.

 

“The top-line message on vaccines is the same as it has been: Our one issue is supply. If we had three issues, they would be supply, supply and supply. We’ll figure out the distribution and we’re going to continue to improve. Our only limitation at this point is the number of doses we can get from the federal government,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The Governor said the state had three specific challenges, all related to a limited supply of the vaccine.

 

First, the small number of doses the state receives compared to the very large number of health care providers who would like to distribute it. Second, the state does not have enough vaccine doses or small enough vaccine batches to distribute them equitably on a county by county basis – instead the state is distributing equitably by region. Finally, as the state moves into larger and larger phases, the type of infrastructure needed from providers to accommodate patient needs changes.

 

Gov. Beshear said tomorrow he will announce more information on the state’s regional vaccine partners and the first Kroger Health regional vaccination center.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH), spoke to Kentuckians about the implications of the United Kingdom (UK) COVID-19 variant, after two cases of the strain were confirmed in Kenton County yesterday. He also encouraged individuals to keep getting tested for COVID-19 and reminded them it was normal if they experienced mild side effects after the second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

 

“The vast majority of COVID-19 mutations have no clinical meaning, they don’t functionally have an impact on us if we’re infected. But some of the mutations do cause the virus to be more effective,” said Dr. Stack.

 

“The COVID-19 B117 variant, the one we believe was first found in the United Kingdom, that variant is more contagious. If you get exposed to it, you’re more likely to be infected, so that means it can infect more people more easily.

 

“It’s not more dangerous or lethal for the person who gets it, but because it spreads to more people more easily, you could have more people who get sick and die. It is more important than ever that we wear our masks, watch our distance, wash your hands and stay at home and get tested when you are sick.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 27, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,424
New deaths today: 47

Positivity rate: 9.35%
Total deaths: 3,542
Currently hospitalized: 1,597
Currently in ICU: 387
Currently on ventilator: 225

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Daviess, Kenton, Boone and Warren. Each of these counties reported 75 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 330.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Memorial
Today, the Governor honored Ernest A. Bates, who was a heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) inspector with the Kentucky Department of Housing, Buildings and Construction for over 13 years. He passed away at age 76 from COVID-19.

 

“Outside of the 13 years with the state, Ernest was in the HVAC trade for over 48 years. He took pride in his work, knowing his efforts were helping the citizens of the commonwealth. Ernest stayed busy,” said Gov. Beshear. “He enjoyed buying and restoring old tractors, barbecuing, visiting with friends and camping. He was also a member of Rumsey United Methodist Church. More than anything, Ernest enjoyed being with his family, who are now mourning his loss.

 

“Ernest is survived by his wife of 28 years, Nancy, his son, Alan, who also works as an HVAC inspector in state government, his stepdaughters, Robin and Toni, nine grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Today we lift his family in prayer and give thanks to the many years of service Ernest gave to the commonwealth.”

 

Kentucky Broadband Speed Test
Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman also provided an update on the state’s broadband speed test. The crowd-sourcing project will gather data from Kentuckians needed to expand internet home access for distance learning, telework and telehealth. Individuals can take the free, anonymous speed test from Jan. 19 to Feb. 18 here.

 

“One week into our speed test, 31,400 households have participated so far. In our first week, we have just about outpaced other states that began their speed tests six months ago,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “The counties that have the highest participation rates so far are Scott, Harlan, Caldwell, Woodford and Lyon – thank you for making this a priority. We need everyone, no matter where you are from, to participate.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, information on testing locationsvaccinescontact tracingschool reports and guidanceguidance for health care providersand the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

"TRIBUTE TO MISSY GRIDER" FROM COFFEY'S VETERINARY CENTER....


 


 

IT IS WITH GREAT SORROW THAT WE SAY GOODBYE TO OUR BELOVED MISSY.  AS MANY OF YOU KNOW, MISSY GRIDER HAS BEEN AN ABSOLUTE ANCHOR IN OUR VETERINARY PRACTICE FOR NEAR 15 YEARS.  SHE HAS BEEN ONE TO ADVOCATE FOR TREATMENTS AND CARE, AND BEND THE "WILL OF THE WORLD" TO GET HELP FOR MANY, MANY ANIMALS.  MISSY COULD ALWAYS FIND A WAY TO MOVE HEAVEN AND EARTH TO GET HELP FOR THE LEAST OF THESE, EVEN VOLUNTEERING TO FOSTER TINY BABIES IN HER HOME TO GIVE THEM A CHANCE AT LIFE WHEN NEEDED. 

 

THE TERMS "FRIEND" AND "EMPLOYEE" DO NOT EVEN START TO DO HER JUSTICE.  ONLY THE WORD "FAMILY" COMES TO MIND AS I REFLECT ON HER YEARS WITH US.  MISSY WAS AND WILL ALWAYS BE FAMILY TO ME, AND I HOPE WE CAN MAKE HER PROUD AS WE TRY TO FOLLOW HER EXAMPLE OF PATIENT ADVOCACY AND ENSURE THAT MISSY’S HEART WILL ALWAYS LIVE HERE.

 

WE ASK YOUR PATIENCE AND COMPASSION AS WE TRY TO CARRY ON IN THE FACE OF THIS DEVASTATING LOSS TO OUR WORK FAMILY AND MOURN THE LOSS OF ONE OF THE BETTER ANGELS OF OUR TIME.  WE ARE HERE TO DO OUR BEST.... AND MISSY WILL BE WATCHING.

                     

 

DR. JANICE COFFEY & STAFF 

01/26/21

 

                                   

AREA ARREST 1-27-21

Rebekah McGuire age 26, of Russell Springs was taken into custody just before 3 a.m. this morning by Officer Phillips with the Russell Springs Police Department. She was charged with Operating a Motor Vehicle under the Influence of a Controlled Substance – 1st Aggravated Circumstances and Wanton Endangerment 1st Degree. She was lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-27-21

Russell County 20 new cases Tuesday. We had 7 cases released from isolation. We now have 68 active cases of which 58 cases are on self-isolation and 10 cases are hospitalized, 3 at UK, 3 at Russell County Hospital, 2 at Somerset, 1 at Danville and 1 at Bowling Green.

 

Adair County 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 5 cases. We have had 1,495 total cases with 1,415 of those released and 48 deaths. We have 32 active cases with 31 of those in home isolation. We have 1 case in the hospital at this time.

35 New Coronavirus Deaths in KY and Over 2700 New Cases...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 26, 2021) – On Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear said he had a call today with the President’s COVID-19 team where he learned the federal government will increase each state’s supply of COVID-19 vaccines by 17%.

 

“That is a great start,” said Gov. Beshear. “The other thing they are doing is guaranteeing a minimum supply for three straight weeks. One of the tough things we’ve been dealing with is only knowing on a Tuesday what we would have the next week and not knowing what we would have in the weeks after.”

 

He also said two cases of the COVID-19 variant from the United Kingdom (UK) have been confirmed in the commonwealth.

 

“Public health Commissioner Dr. Steven Stack is going to talk about this more tomorrow. The UK variant does spread more aggressively, but he’ll take us through all the implications of having this strain here,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 26, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,714
New deaths today: 35

Positivity rate: 9.63%
Total deaths: 3,495
Currently hospitalized: 1,566
Currently in ICU: 391
Currently on ventilator: 228

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Daviess, Warren, Kenton and Pike. Each of these counties reported 75 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 440.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED 01/26/21

 
As of 9:32amCT on Tuesday, January 26, 2021 the Adair County Boil Water Advisory for customers on 9344-14286 Burkesville Rd., Independence Ridge Rd and all side roads in between, Greenbriar Rd., Reese Hurt Rd., Chestnut Grove Rd., Marion Fudge Rd., and Toria Rd. has been lifted by the Division of Water Columbia Office. This means your water is safe for human consumption. You no longer have to boil your water.
 

SPECIAL CALLED A.C. FISCAL COURT MEETING JAN. 26TH...

 

The Adair County Fiscal Court will meet in Special Called session on Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at 4:30pmCT at the Jim Blair Center located at 901 Hudson Street, Columbia, KY. The public is invited to attend. This meeting will follow all restrictions set by the Governor. This meeting will also be live-streamed on the Adair County Fiscal Court Facebook page for all to view since in-person restrictions are in effect.

 

       AGENDA

       PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

       PRAYER

       CALL TO ORDER

       ROLL CALL

 

 1.   APPROVAL OF AGENDA

 2.   APPROVAL OF MINUTES

           Regular Called Meeting – January 12, 2021

 
3.   DISBURSEMENT

 4.  BUDGET TRANFERS

           Line-to-Line Transfers

           Fund-to-Fund Transfers

                                   

 5.   COURT ORDERS

 6.   READING OF ROADS

            `          

 7.   ACTION ITEMS:

  • SET YEARLY PAYRATE FOR FISCAL COURT EMPLOYEES
  • MACK TRUCK DISCUSSION & POSSIBLE ACTION
  • JUDICAL CENTER HVAC/BOILER BIDS DISCUSSION & AWARDING
  • PERMISSION FOR JUDGE TO SIGN COURT ORDERED COMMUNITY SERVICE AGREEMENT & RELEASE FROM LIABILITY 
  • REVENUE OPTIONS DISCUSSION WITH POSSIBLE ACTION & PUBLIC COMMENTS

 

 8.  ADJOURN                                                                               

 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 1-26-21

 

Russell County 6 new cases Monday. We had 10 cases released from isolation. We now have 55 active cases of which 47 cases are self-isolated and 8 cases are hospitalized, 3 at UK, 2 at Somerset, 1 at Russell County Hospital,1 at Danville and 1 at Bowling Green.

 

Adair County 4 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 10 cases. We also much report a death today. We have had 1,490 total cases with 1,410 of those released and 48 deaths. We have 32 active cases with 31 of those in home isolation. We have 1 case in the hospital at this time.

RUSSELL COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING RECAP...

 

The Russell County School Board met on Monday evening for their monthly meeting at the ANC. School Superintendent Michael Ford tells WAVE NEWS what took place…

 

ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY 01/25/21

 
Date Issued:  Monday, Jan. 25, 2021
Time Issued:  4:30 a.m.
 
A BOIL WATER ADVISORY is in effect for consumers of Columbia Adair Utilities District for customers 9344-14286 Burkesville Rd., Independence Ridge Rd and all side roads in between, Greenbriar Rd., Reese Hurt Rd., Chestnut Grove Rd., Marion Fudge Rd., Toros Rd. The advisory has been issued due to main line break. Following such an event, the potential exists for bacteriological contamination of the water supply therefore this Boil Water Advisory has been issued as a precautionary measure. Until further notice, boil all water used for drinking and cooking, bringing the water to a rolling boil for 3 minutes before using. This advisory will remain in effect until the situation has been corrected and test results have shown the water to be of an acceptable quality. For more information concerning the Boil Water Advisory, contact Lennon Stone at Columbia Adair Utilities District, 270-384-2181.
 
 

FEBRUARY 1-5, 2021 CMV WEEK IN COLUMBIA

 

The week of February 1-5, 2021 has been proclaimed as CMV Week in Columbia. It is in recognition of Bella Dawn Streeval, who would have had her 4th birthday next week.

 

Bella’s Bill for CMV – KY has been introduced in the Kentucky Legislature by Kentucky State Senator Max Wise. Joining the proclamation were: Sarah Streeval, Bella’s mother; and, her sibings: Jackson, Ben, and Mady.

 

 

Proclamation

CMV Week in Columbia

February 1-5, 2021

 

Whereas, Bella Dawn Streeval of Columbia, would have celebrated her fourth birthday this week;

Whereas, a bill has been introduced in the Kentucky State Senate, to honor her memory and to bring awareness to CMV (Cytomegalovirus) to the Commonwealth;

Whereas, the condition affects one out of every 200 children born in the United States,

Whereas, State Senator Max Wise has made introduction of this bill;

Whereas, we want to ensure that Bella Dawn Streeval’s memory is continued;

Whereas, we want to ensure that the public is made knowledge of; and, is educated on CMV;

Whereas, the city of Columbia, wants awareness to be known of CMV; and, specifically congenital CMV.

Therefore, we proclaim February 1-5, 2021, as CMV Week in Columbia in honor of Bella Dawn Streeval.

 

Pamela Hoots,
Mayor

 

 

 

Gov. Beshear: COVID-19 Positivity Rate Falls Below 10%

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2021) – On Monday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced Kentucky’s COVID-19 positivity rate has fallen below 10% for the first time since Dec. 31. Today’s new case report was also the lowest for a Monday since Jan. 4.

 

“Our cases are way too high, but I think when you look at this it shows how important the steps we took are and how important the ability to be able to take steps is when you are facing exponential growth in cases,” said Gov. Beshear. “We believe that this decline is real, not just a result of maybe fewer tests happening, because we know the positivity rate is also going down.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Monday, Jan. 25, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,268
New deaths today: 39

Positivity rate: 9.93%
Total deaths: 3,460
Currently hospitalized: 1,539
Currently in ICU: 374
Currently on ventilator: 203

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Calloway and Kenton. Each of these counties reported 40 or more new cases.

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Vaccine Update
Today, Gov. Beshear said Kentucky is working to become the fastest state to vaccinate school staff so that all schools can safely reopen for in-person classes.

 

The Governor announced that Kentucky has administered 88% of all initial vaccine doses sent to the state’s vaccination program.[1]

 

“Just last week, we administered the most doses we ever have, including second doses – 93,499 – and vaccinated the most people we ever have with initial doses – 82,511 people,” said Gov. Beshear. “The problem here is supply, supply, supply. We can vaccinate 250,000 Kentuckians per week, and we’re still building up our capabilities, but we’re only getting 56,000 new doses per week from the federal government.

 

“Fortunately, we believe that all long-term care facilities, skilled nursing homes and assisted living facilities have received their first doses of the vaccine. If there is any remaining facility that has not received it, call the Cabinet for Health and Family Services and we will make sure to raise that with CVS or Walgreens so we can correct it immediately.”

 

This Thursday, the Governor will provide an update on how Kentuckians in Phase 1A, 1B and 1C can sign up for an appointment at new regional Kroger vaccination centers as well as other partner locations.

 

Unemployment Insurance Update
Today, Amy Cubbage, general counsel for Gov. Beshear, updated Kentuckians on total unemployment insurance (UI) claims filed, total claims pending, $300 payments, 1099s, UI payment debit cards and fraud reporting.

 

Cubbage said there have been 1,542,008 unemployment claims, including duplicates, filed in Kentucky since the beginning of the pandemic. There are 40,748 pending claims with no fraud or identity issues. In total, there are approximately 665,000 unique claims representing about 600,000 claimants.

 

Cubbage said if claimants payments are delayed because they had to set up a new Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) claim, they will still get $300 for all the weeks they qualify for PUA.

 

Office of Unemployment Insurance (OUI) programmers are working on programming for how PUA claimants with backdated weeks claim those weeks in an expedited manner, and I’ll have an update regarding how that programming in our next update,” Cubbage said.

 

“We have received questions about the amounts listed on the 1099s our 2020 claimants are receiving. Multiple claimants have been confused by the total compensation amounts listed in box 1,” Cubbage added. “Please note that the amount listed on box 1 is the pre-tax amount of compensation you were entitled to. If you chose to have income tax withheld, the amounts you received either through a direct deposit or on your prepaid card will be after-tax amounts. Kentuckians with questions on this topic can email KYOU1099@ky.gov beginning tomorrow.

 

“If you are still receiving payments on a debit card, payments to that card will end this week. You will have until the end of February to spend any balance on that card. If you do not update your profile with a bank account before your next payment issues after the end of the debit card program, you will get a paper check. Please make sure we have your accurate mailing address uploaded if you will be getting a paper check. For new claimants who filed after Jan. 1, 2021, you should have only had the option for a direct deposit or paper check. This only affects those who chose a prepaid card prior during 2020.

 

“Finally, I want to warn Kentuckians that we have had an uptick of fraudulent claims. If you receive a letter from OUI regarding a claim for yourself or one of your employees and you or the employee did not file a claim, please email UIFraud@ky.gov and we will flag the claim and make sure nothing is paid. If you are concerned about identity theft, please check out the resources on the Kentucky Attorney General’s website.”

 

Utility Assistance for Kentucky Families
Today, Gov. Beshear announced up to $38 million is available to local governments to help Kentuckians with overdue utility bills in their jurisdiction. Each unit of local government may request up to $200,000 for assistance in their communities. To learn more, see the full release.

 

Appalachian Regional Commission Grants
Today, Gov. Beshear announced $2.5 million in Appalachian Regional Commission grants for two projects in Eastern Kentucky that will upgrade waterlines, create jobs and build a better Kentucky. To learn more, see the full release.

 

Kentucky Broadband Speed Test
Lt. Gov. Coleman reminded families to take the Kentucky Broadband Speed Test, a crowd-sourcing project that will gather data from Kentuckians needed to expand internet home access for distance learning, telework and telehealth. Kentuckians can take the free, anonymous speed test from Jan. 19 to Feb. 18 here. To learn more, see the full release.

 

“Gov. Beshear and I are committed to closing the digital divide for Kentucky families,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “If you don’t have internet access at home, we definitely need you to take part in this test! You can connect on any wireless network – at a business, local library or at a friend or family member’s house. You’ll choose ‘enter an address with no available service’ and after entering your home address you’ll identify the reason you do not have access at home.”

 

Memorial
On Friday, Gov. Beshear was joined by First Lady Britainy Beshear and Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman for a memorial flag ceremony on the Capitol grounds to commemorate the more than 3,300 Kentuckians lost to the coronavirus pandemic. To learn more, see the full release and video.

 

Today, the Governor recognized one of those Kentuckians, Tara Mahone.

 

“The Kentucky Court of Justice lost one of its own to COVID-19 when Tara Mahone passed away Jan. 15, 2021. Tara worked with young people as a court designated worker for Christian County,” said Gov. Beshear. “She was full of energy and had a smile that made you feel at ease. She exemplified service above self, especially for those in need. Her passion was to mentor the youth of her community.

 

“Her husband, Keith Mahone, said he was proud of all the work Tara had done ministering to youth and families. He said he was at peace knowing she was going to heaven and he will see her again. Tara will be inducted into the Department of Family and Juvenile Services’ Hall of Fame by the Administrative Office of the Courts.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Campbellsville Man Arrested on Numerous Charges After Passing Out In His Auto....

 
On Sunday morning, January 24, 2021 at 7:01amET, Campbellsville Police was dispatched to Stop light  #1 at Friendship Pike and US 68 in reference to a male passed out in a vehicle at the stop light. Officer Aaron Fields responded and came into contact with 49-year-old Robert G. Davis of Campbellsville.
 
After an investigation, Davis was arrested and charged with Operating on a Suspended or Revoked Operator’s License, DUI (4th or more offense), Possession of Methamphetamine (3rd or more offense), Possession of a Handgun by a Convicted Felon, Possession of Heroin, and No Insurance. Davis was lodged in the Taylor County Detention Center.
 

TAYLOR COUNTY WOMAN ARRESTED ON DRUG & THEFT CHARGES IN COLUMBIA

 

Just before 11:00pmCT on Sunday night, 28-year-old Christina Anderson of Campbellsville, KY was taken into custody by Officer Foster with the Columbia Police Department. She was charged with Possession of Marijuana and Receiving Stolen Property under $500. Anderson was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-25-21

 

Russell County 3 new cases Sunday. We had 9 cases released from isolation. We now have 59 active cases of which 52 cases are on self-isolation and 7 cases are hospitalized, 3 at UK, 2 at Somerset, 1 at Bowling Green and 1 at Danville.

 

Adair County 3 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 7 cases. We have had 1,486 total cases with 1,400 of those released and 47 deaths. We have 39 active cases with 38 of those in home isolation. We have 1 case in the hospital at this time.

LCDHD 01/23/21 COVID-19 UPDATE: 127 New Cases and 1 New Death.....

 
 
By Amy Tomlinson
Lake Cumberland District Health Department
 
We added 858 new cases this week compared to 929 last week. This good news should be tempered with the fact that we had more new cases the last 5 days of this week than the last 5 days of last week. Thus, our 7-day-average incidence rate went up each of the last 4 days of this week. For the 2nd week in a row, our new case rate was lower than the state's new case rate. We have 877 active cases today compared to 882 last week. We had 14 deaths this week. We have 49 hospitalized cases today compared to 57 last Saturday.
 
For the next couple of weeks, most of the state's COVID-19 vaccine supply will be utilized for Phase 1b school staff. Beginning the 2nd week of February, as we understand it now, the next big push for the state will Phase 1b those 70 and older. For everyone who thinks they should be able to readily get a vaccine at will, remember, the state is getting about 50,000 doses of vaccine per week to spread across 4.5 million people.
 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 10.56%.
 
Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today. We have experienced a total of 314 deaths resulting in a 1.83% mortality rate (about 1 in 55) among known cases. This compares with a 0.98% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.67% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 49 cases in the hospital. This is 7 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 963 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.61% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.6%. The latest data shows that 97.78% of Lake Cumberland's ICU beds are filled, and 43.33% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 17,158 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 8.21% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 113 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 11; Casey: 9; Clinton: 10; Cumberland: 3; Green: 10; McCreary: 10; Pulaski: 32; Russell: 4; Taylor: 19; and, Wayne: 5. In all, we have released 93.1% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 13 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 877 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district's 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,340.
 
Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Medical Facilities. We have had 66 cases tied to Christmas gaterings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 15 tied to New Year's events. Of our active cases, 12% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 127 today: Adair: 4; Casey: 14; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 1; Green: 10; McCreary: 17; Pulaski: 44; Russell: 16; Taylor: 13; and, Wayne: 5. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.007. This means our total case count is projected to double every 94.55 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.
 
Today's new cases include:
Adair: A 83-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8m-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 70-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 5m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
 
The death we report today is a 78-year-old individual from Wayne who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious but later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness.
 
COVID-19 Vaccination Status
We spend a great deal of our time of late explaining to people why there is not enough vaccine available in our area for everyone who wants one to get one. Here is an article that helps to explain the answer: COVID-19 Vaccine, Patience is Needed. Several people who contact us are very frustrated. While this is understandable, we ask for patience and to keep in mind: 1) we at the local health departments have no control over the federal contract with CVS and Walgreens, 2) the state Department for Public Health and the Governor's Office, not the local health departments, has control over how much vaccine is shipped to providers in our district, 3) currently, the state is only getting about 50,000 doses per week to spread across a population of about 4.5 million, 4) the local health departments have little influence on how any providers, other than the health departments, utilize the vaccine they receive, and 5) we post everything we know about the status of the vaccination efforts daily in our Daily Brief, so tying up our phone lines and staff with questions will produce no more information than simply reading our Daily Brief.
 
The Lake Cumberland area will continue in Phase 1a of our COVID-19 response, but has now also expanded into 1b, first responders and school staff. Also, do not forget about the federal contract with Walgreens and CVS pharmacies to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes -- residents and staff. It is our understanding that almost every nursing home in the state has been visited by either CVS or Walgreens to administer prime/1st doses of the vaccine.
 
The Lake Cumberland District's health departments are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases currently, as we have not been authorized to order additional first dose vaccines, nor have we been promised that we will be allowed to do so in the future.
 
The only prime/1st dose vaccines coming into the Lake Cumberland area at present are the 500 doses per week that are coming to the Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital. Also, select area providers (not the health departments) are receiving COVID-19 vaccine for the Adair, Casey, and Clinton County school staff this week. The week of January 25th we expect area providers will receive vaccine for school staff in Cumberland, Green, Russell, and Wayne, along with part of the school staff in Pulaski. The week of February 1st, we expect area providers will receive vaccine for the school staff in McCreary and the remainder of Pulaski. The push to vaccinate school staff will likely tie up most of the state's vaccine supply during these weeks.
 
The school clinic in Taylor was provided the week of 1/8/21 by Taylor Regional Hospital and approximately 300 vaccines were administered. The school clinic in Casey was provided on 1/20/21 and approximately 150 doses were provided by Cumberland Family Medical. The school clinic in Adair was provided on 1/22/21 and approximately 200 doses were given by Cumberland Family Medical. The school clinic in Clinton was provided on 1/22/21 and approximately 160 doses were given by Cumberland Family Medical.
 
Following the vaccination of school staff over the coming weeks, it is our present understanding the much of the state's weekly supply of vaccine will be diverted to regional, mass vaccination sites for the 70 and older population. These mass vaccination sites, as we understand it, will be provided via a state contract with Kroger, not through the local health departments.
 

WEEKEND ARRESTS 01/24/21

 
  • Christopher Austin Dickson, 22, of Columbia, KY was arrested overnight on Friday night by KSP for No Registration Plates, No Registration Receipt, DUI 3rd offense, Operating on a Suspended License, and Failure to Produce an Insurance Card.
  • Rex Allen Burton, 38, of Louisville, KY arrested by KSP on Friday night for Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Possession of Marijuana and Drug Paraphernalia, DUI, Failure to Surrender Revoked Operators License, Failure to Maintain Insurance, Operating on a Suspended or Revoked Operators License, No Insurance, No Registration Plates and No Registration Receipt.
  • Chelsey Neamon, 18, of Louisville, KY arrested Friday night by KSP and charged with Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Possession of Marijuana and Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of a Controlled Substance 3rd degree (Drug Unspecified), and Public Intoxication.
 
Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.
 
  • Kevin Russell, 43, of Jamestown, KY was arrested on Friday afternoon for DUI, Leaving the Scene of an Accident, Possession of Methamphetamine, Marijuana, and Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of a Controlled Substance 3rd degree (Drug Unspecified), and Wanton Endangerment.
  • Eric Elmore, 33, of Williamstown, KY was arrested Friday by the RCSO for Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Wanton Endangerment, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Failure to Appear. 
  • Brent Grimsley, 39, of Dunnville, KY arrested early Friday morning by KSP for Wanton Endangerment, DUI 3rd offense (Aggravating Circumstances), Failure to Notify the Dept. of Transportation of Address Change, No Operators License, No Insurance, Failure to Register Transfer of Motor Vehicle, and was served a Parole Violation Warrant. 
  • Paige Robbins, 30, Middleburg, KY arrested by the RCSO for Possession of Methamphetamine, Marijuana, and Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of a Controlled Substance 2nd degree (Drug Unspecified), Wanton Endangerment, Public Intoxication, and Contempt of Court.
 
Lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED 01/23/21

 
As of 8:55 a.m. on Saturday, January 23, 2021 the Columbia-Adair Utilities District Boil Water Advisory starting at 7973 Knifley Rd. to the Crossroads and all side roads in between. From the Crossroads to Eastridge Cemetery Rd and all side roads in between and all of Elkhorn Road. Then from Crossroads down to Roley/Yuma Rd and Roley area and Dry Creek, has been lifted by the Division of Water Columbia Office. This means your water is safe for human consumption and you no longer have to boil your water.
 

Remain in the Loop: COVID-19 Vaccine Progress and Updates

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 22, 2021) – Each week, a summary of the progress of the COVID-19 vaccination distribution will be made available.  The summary will include the number of vaccines received; how many vaccines were administered; a view of the phase-transition progress; vaccine allocation forecasts, and more.

 

Weekly Report (one-pager) (Updated Jan. 22, 2021)

Weekly Report (PowerPoint version)(Updated Jan.22, 2021)

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Questions? Call Kentucky’s COVID-19 hotline: (800) 722-5725.

 

Resources, FAQs, links to information, or ask a question: kycovid19.ky.gov

 

Gov. Beshear: COVID-19 Positivity Rate Continues to Decline

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 22, 2021) – On Friday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state’s COVID-19 positivity rate has fallen to the lowest rate since Jan. 2.

 

“Folks, there’s a pretty simple reason why I think our cases are declining, and that’s that I see you all doing the hard work,” said Gov. Beshear. “I see people wearing masks now more than ever and engaging in social distancing when they can. Keep it up. We are going to beat this virus in 2021. We’ve just got to protect everyone until we get there.”

 

Earlier in the day, he visited Broadbent Arena where 1,200 Jefferson County Public Schools teachers and staff were vaccinated today. Kentucky is among only 19 U.S. states – and is the only state in the region – that continues to prioritize vaccinations for all K-12 staffers. In addition, Kentucky is the only state with plans to finish the first round of these vaccinations by the end of the first week in February. To learn more, see the full release.

 

He was also joined by First Lady Britainy Beshear and Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman for a memorial flag ceremony on the Capitol grounds to commemorate the more than 3,300 Kentuckians lost to the coronavirus pandemic. To learn more, see the full release.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Jan. 22, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,756
New deaths today: 36

Positivity rate: 10.80%
Total deaths: 3,337
Currently hospitalized: 1,561
Currently in ICU: 387
Currently on ventilator: 195

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Bullitt, Warren and Daviess. Each of these counties reported 95 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 445.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

4 Russell Co. Residents Arrested on Drug Charges....

 
On Friday, January 15, 2021 Russell Springs Police Officer Hayden Phillips was at a residence on Luda St. in reference to an anonymous drug complaint. Consent to search the residence was granted and Officers located suspected methamphetamine, marijuana, drug paraphernalia, and a stolen firearm. 
 
  1. Ronald Sharp, 43, of Russell Springs, KY was charged with Trafficking in a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (> or = 2 grams methamphetamine), Possesion of Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of Marijuana, Receiving Stolen Property (Firearm), and Possession of a Handgun by a Convicted Felon. 
  2. Harley Russell, 25, of Monticello, KY was charged with Trafficking in a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (> or = 2 grams methamphetamine), and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
  3. David Smith, 50, of Russell Springs, KY was charged with Trafficking in a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (> or = 2 grams methamphetamine), and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
  4. Felisha Mann, 32, of Russell Springs, KY was charged with Trafficking in a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (> or = 2 grams methamphetamine) and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
 
All subjects were lodged in the Russell County Detention Center. 
 
Officer Hayden Phillips was assisted on scene by Russell County Sheriff’s Deputy Corey Meyer, Deputy Ronnie Golden, and KSP Trooper Billy Begley.
 

ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY 01/22/21

 
Date Issued: 1/22/21
Time Issued: 12:00 p.m. 
 
A BOIL WATER ADVISORY is in effect for consumers of Columbia Adair Utilities District on 7973 Knifley Rd. to the Crossroads and all side roads in between, from the Crossroads to Eastridge Cemetery Rd and all side roads in between and all of Elkhorn Road. The advisory is also for the Crossroads down to Roley/Yuma Rd., the Roley area, and Dry Creek. The advisory has been issued due to a main line leak
 
Following such an event, the potential exists for bacteriological contamination of the water supply therefore this Boil Water Advisory has been issued as a precautionary measure. Until further notice, boil all water used for drinking and cooking, bring the water to a rolling boil for 3 minutes before using.
 

KSP Post 15 Welcomes 3 New Troopers....

 
Columbia, KY (January 22, 2021) – Today, the Kentucky State Police Training Academy, along with the Governor’s Office and the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, presented graduation diploma’s to 45 new troopers. Of those, 3 new troopers are assigned to Post 15. These cadets have special significance as they represent the 100th training class since the inception of the agency in 1948. 
 
The troopers earned their badges after completing 24 weeks of intense training while following ‘Healthy at Work’ guidelines, unlike any other cadet class in history have undergone. The training included more than 1,000 hours of classroom and field study.
 
The Post 15 graduates of the 100th KSP Training Academy included: Austin Mattingly, Bloomfield, KY, Brandon Poole of Burkesville, KY and Jacob Smith of Liberty, KY.
 
17 cadets earned their Associate’s Degrees in General Occupational and Technical Studies from the Bluegrass Community and Technical College during their 24-weeks at the training academy. These cadets benefited from new hiring guidelines established by state legislature in 2017. The Post 15 troopers who received their associate’s degree included Austin Mattingly of Bloomfield, KY and Brandon Poole of Burkesville, KY. Through this revision, anyone who possesses a high school diploma or GED, and has 3 years of full-time work experience can apply for employment as a KSP Trooper and earn an associate’s degree during the training process.
 

Gov. Beshear Marks Loss of More Than 3,300 Kentuckians to COVID-19

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 22, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear was joined by First Lady Britainy Beshear and Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman for a memorial flag ceremony on the Capitol grounds to commemorate the more than 3,300 Kentuckians lost to the coronavirus pandemic.

 

“Every flag you see represents a real Kentuckian, one who was and is loved by their families and friends, who meant something to the communities in which they lived,” Gov. Beshear said. “Each and every loss is singular and heartbreaking.”

 

The Governor and Lieutenant Governor spoke briefly before they and the First Lady placed the last of 3,301 flags, one for each Kentuckian whose death has been attributed to COVID-19.

 

Gov. Beshear said the flag he placed was in honor of front-line health care workers lost to the coronavirus, including Dr. Rebecca Shadowen, a physician and infectious disease specialist in Bowling Green who was just 62 when she died of the coronavirus in early September of last year.

 

“I will be placing this flag in the ground for Dr. Rebecca Shadowen, and all of our health care heroes who have given their own lives during this pandemic to save others,” Gov. Beshear said. “This noble sacrifice cannot and will not be forgotten.”

 

The First Lady’s flag honors every parent, child and family member who has lost a loved one to this virus, including the Rev. Robert “Bob” Duggan, a husband, dad, grandad and longtime Presbyterian and United Methodist minister who was 81 when he died of COVID-19.

 

Lt. Gov. Coleman placed her flag in honor of educators lost to COVID-19.

 

“We grieve for the more than 3,000 Kentuckians who lost their lives to this virus. In a state as tight-knit as ours, one loss is too many; 3,000 is utterly devastating,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “I am dedicating my flag to the education community including Simone Parker, who taught science at Trigg County High School for 19 years and passed away two weeks ago.”

 

Also taking part in Friday’s ceremony were the Rev. Tonya Kenner of First United Methodist Church in Frankfort, who offered an opening prayer, and soloist Keith Dean, who sang the Gospel hymn “His Eye Is on the Sparrow.”

 

Gov. Beshear stressed that despite the virus’ dark toll, Kentucky has fared far better than most states due to decisive action and the compassion and sacrifices of people across the commonwealth. He noted that Kentucky currently is administering the safe and effective vaccines faster than the federal government is providing new doses to the state.

The Governor said that until more people are vaccinated, we remain in a dangerous time. The best way to honor those we have lost, he said, was to protect others.

 

“Let us also show them the respect they deserve by continuing to do what is right to protect those around us,” Gov. Beshear said. “Masking up, maintaining social distance, avoiding crowds and getting the vaccine when your turn comes around: All of these measures are desperately needed and show that you care about your fellow Kentuckians and honor these terrible losses.”

 

KSP Investigates Human Remains Found In Metcalfe County


On Tuesday, January 19, 2021 at approximately 9:45amCT, KSP Post 15 in Columbia, KY received a call of human remains being found in a wooded area on Edwin Williams Road in northern Metcalfe County. Several units responded and located the skeletal remains on the property. The Metcalfe County Coroner took the remains to the State Medical Examiner’s Office in Louisville, KY for identification. Detective Josh Dicken is investigating this incident.

 

 

Gov. Beshear: Educators Help Kentucky Set Pace on Vaccinations

 

Gov. Andy Beshear joined school and municipal leaders in Louisville as nearly 1,200 educators with Jefferson County Public Schools received COVID-19 vaccinations, highlighting Kentucky’s efforts to protect all of its K-12 staffers.

 

“From adapting to new instruction modes to help our children learn, to packing and delivering meals to ensure no child went hungry and so much more, our educators and school staffers have stepped up in countless ways to help during this pandemic,” the Governor said.
 

“The entire commonwealth owes all our teachers, bus drivers and school staff a tremendous debt of gratitude. Now, once again, they are answering the call as we prioritize their vaccinations in an effort to get our schools fully reopened. On behalf of everyone in the commonwealth, we thank you.”

 

Kentucky is among only 19 U.S. states – and the only state in the region – that continues to prioritize vaccinations for all K-12 staffers. In addition, Kentucky is the only state with plans to finish the first round of these vaccinations by the end of the first week in February.

 

Following the Governor’s call to prioritize educators, the Kentucky Department for Public Health organized a K-12 school vaccinator for all 120 counties, and vaccinations started last week. The Governor thanked Public Health Commissioner Dr. Steven Stack for helping develop the special program for educators as well as education leaders and regional vaccine partners for their support in making the program a success.

 

“Kentucky has been a leader in vaccination efforts to protect residents, medical personnel, first responders and now educators,” said Dr. Marty Pollio, JCPS superintendent. “More than 12,000 JCPS educators are scheduled to be vaccinated. This will be an extraordinary accomplishment by state and local leaders who recognize the importance of the health and safety of teachers, bus drivers and school employees who make learning possible.”

 

“Getting our kids back to school quickly and safely is vital to the current and future health of our community,” said Dr. Sarah Moyer, chief health strategist and director of the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness. “This pandemic has shown us the important role school plays in the mental health of our students, and our parents – how it helps keep families fed, women in the workforce, and reducing violence. School is a vital part of the ecosystem of the health of our city.”

 

“We share a common goal of getting our children back to in-person learning, and today we are thrilled to take a big step forward in making that goal a reality by starting vaccinations for JCPS educators,” said Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer. “I’m incredibly proud of what’s happening at our LouVax with our many dedicated public servants and an army of volunteers helping us eliminate COVID-19 in our city.”

 

“Every minute away from my students is a minute too long,” said Tonya Moore, JCPS special education teacher at J. B. Atkinson Academy, who was vaccinated Friday at the LouVax Drive-Thru Regional Vaccination Site. “Getting the vaccine was an important and personal decision for me. My students need me, and the vaccine provides a pathway for me to safely return to my classroom.”

 

Dr. SarahBeth Hartlage, Medical Director for Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness and for the LouVax Drive-Thru Regional Vaccination Site, said: “Our staff has accommodated every scale up to help more Kentuckians. This week we’re administering 6,000 doses, doubling the size of our program to date.”

 

The Governor thanked volunteers, local health department staff and health care professionals across Kentucky who are assisting in this historic vaccination effort. At Broadbent Arena alone, nearly 4,000 volunteers have signed up to help, led by more than 100 Louisville Metrostaffers.

 

“We are grateful that Governor Beshear and our public health officials have prioritized Kentucky’s educators and staff in this vaccination process,” said Jason E. Glass, Kentucky Commissioner of Education. “Doing so will allow us to restore more consistent in-person learning and making sure the Commonwealth's children have the learning experiences they deserve."

 

“As a mother and as a professional who works with a medically fragile population, I want to do my part to keep our community and the world safe, and certainly getting teachers and school staff vaccinated is critical to that,” said LouVax volunteer Karen Morrison, CEO of Gilda’s Club Kentuckiana, a nonprofit organization that supports families living with cancer. “For nearly a year, I’ve been worried every day that one of my family members or a member of Gilda’s living with cancer would get sick or die. I also worry for friends, many of whom are teachers, struggling to do their job and literally scared for their lives. One teacher friend was hospitalized and is still recovering. But today, so many parents like me can breathe a little easier. We have a long way to go, but with every car that comes through here we are one individual closer to a healthy community, including open and safe schools.”


This week, as Morrison volunteered, her daughter’s St. Francis School music teacher, Robert Bertke, arrived at the arena and rolled up his sleeve.

 

“I’m so grateful that Gov. Beshear is taking this step to protect teachers, so we can get back to serving our students in the best way we know how,” said Bertke. “In this moment, and over the last year, Gov. Beshear saved my life and the lives of many of my colleagues across the state.”

 

In the state’s vaccination plan, K-12 staff are in the second phase, following health care professionals and long-term care and assisted living facility residents and staff.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-22-21

Russell County 6 new cases Thursday. We had 8 cases released from isolation. We now have 58 active cases of which 52 cases are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized, 2 at UK,1 at Eastern State,1 at Danville ,1 at Somerset and 1 at Glasgow.

 

Adair County 2 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 5 cases. We have had 1,467 total cases with 1,373 of those released and 47 deaths. We have 47 active cases with 47 of those in home isolation. We have no active cases in the hospital at this time.

ADAIR COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING RECAP 01/21/21

 

Jim Lieb attended last night’s Adair County School Board meeting for WAVE NEWS and spoke with Superintendent Dr. Pamela Stephens following the meeting…

 

 

JAMESTOWN CITY COUNCIL MEETING RECAP 01/21/21

 

The Jamestown City Council met on Thursday evening for the regular monthly meeting. Jamestown Mayor Nick Shearer recognized long time Council member Larry Joe Murray, who recently passed away. Shearer spoke to WAVE NEWS about that and other actions that took place…

 

 

Adair County Man Arrested on Drug Charges Thursday....

 

Ryan Sneed, 33, of Columbia, KY was arrested on Thursday afternoon by KSP and charged with Possession of Methamphetamine, Trafficking in Marijuana, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Sneed was also served 2 Warrants for other Police Agencies. He was lodged in the Adair Co. Regional Jail.

 

Most New Covid-19 Deaths Ever Reported in One Day in KY at 58

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 21, 2021) – On Thursday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state’s highest-ever number of newly reported deaths, while also noting that the state’s positivity rate decreased.

 

“We still have too many cases, but it does appear we are seeing a decline from our highest week ever. Our positivity rate is down again. Far higher than we want, but this is a good trend,” said Gov. Beshear. “The hard part though about today’s report is it’s the most deaths we ever announced.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 21, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 3,728
New deaths today: 58

Positivity rate: 11.05%
Total deaths: 3,301
Currently hospitalized: 1,604
Currently in ICU: 395
Currently on ventilator: 209

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Boone, Hardin, Warren and Daviess. Each of these counties reported 125 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 604.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

The Governor noted Kentucky’s COVID-19 mortality rate (1%) is lower than the national (1.7%) and world (2.2%) averages.

 

“This I think is a testament to providing education to Kentuckians about this virus and about what to do if you contract it. And it’s a testament to our health care workers,” said Gov. Beshear. “You’ve done your commonwealth and your country proud.”

 

He also asked both Kentuckians and health care providers to be patient throughout the COVID-19 vaccine roll out.

 

“Splitting vaccine shipments into really small quantities just wouldn’t make sense, and would slow us down,” said Gov. Beshear. “That’s why we’re distributing by region, by population. This is not a competition, this is about us trying to find the right partners for the right phase.”

 

The Governor also shared a remembrance of one Kentuckian lost to COVID-19.

 

“Today, we share the story of Peggy Lynn Davis from Ashland, Ky. She was only 67 years old when she passed away on Friday from COVID-19,” said Gov. Beshear. “Peggy was loved by all, and her family saw that through the outpouring of wonderful stories about her after her death.

 

“Born and raised in Ashland, Peggy worked in health care and built her own successful business, even being recognized nationally. Despite this, Peggy always downplayed her professional accolades, saying her greatest accomplishments were her children.

 

“Now mourning Peggy’s loss are her husband, Robert Davis, their three sons, Bobby, JP and Wesley, and her three grandchildren.

 

“Her family said Peggy will be remembered as a selfless mother, not just to her family, but to everyone she cared for throughout her life. Today our thoughts and prayers are with Robert, Bobby, JP and Wesley.”

 

Tomorrow at 2 p.m. EST, Gov. Beshear, First Lady Britainy Beshear and Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman will honor Kentucky’s victims of COVID-19 in an outdoor ceremony. The memorial will include members of the Kentucky State Police Honor Guard as well as a performance by baritone Keith Dean of Frankfort.

 

The Governor, First Lady and Lieutenant Governor will also plant the final flags in a sea of more than 3,000 flags representing each Kentuckian lost to the virus.

 

Gov. Beshear to Co-Chair National Task Force on Economic Recovery and Revitalization
Gov. Beshear thanked the National Governors Association (NGA), which announced this week he will co-chair the association’s bipartisan Economic Recovery and Revitalization Task Force along with South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster. 

 

“I am deeply honored and humbled to be asked by the NGA to work on this crucially important issue,” the Governor said. “But the reason I said yes wasn’t because of any title; it’s because it meant that your concerns and Kentucky’s interests in rebuilding our economy, in building it better, in being a leader in the post-COVID world would be front and center.”

To learn more, see the full release.

 

Gov. Beshear Congratulates President Biden and Vice President Harris
“Congratulations to President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris. My administration worked well with the last presidential administration and we look forward to working well with this one,” said Gov. Beshear. “I also want to express my appreciation that in the first full day that President Biden has been in office, he specifically addressed the coronavirus pandemic. One of the most important things that I heard was a push to increase the supply of COVID-19 vaccines. The supply is our primary issue we are facing right now, given how efficiently we are getting vaccines out.”

 

New Test Launched to Improve Broadband Access
Lt. Gov. Coleman announced today the launch of the Kentucky Broadband Speed Test, a crowd-sourcing project that will gather data from Kentuckians needed to expand internet home access for distance learning, telework and telehealth. Kentuckians can take the free, anonymous speed test from Jan. 19 to Feb. 18 here.

 

“There is a digital divide in households across Kentucky, especially in rural areas, that has become even more apparent during the pandemic when so many people need it to attend school, go to work, get government services and conduct personal business from home,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said. “As an educator, I am especially concerned about the 13,000, or 2%, of Kentucky students who lack internet access at home so they are basically cut off from their teachers and classrooms. We have to do better by them.”

 

To learn more, see the full release.

 

RUSSELL CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED

 
The boil water advisory on Highway 1383 in Russell County has been lifted. You no longer have to boil your water.
 

AREA ARREST 1-21-21

James Davis age 35 or Russell Springs, was taken into custody last evening just after 10:30 by Officer Phillips with the Russell Springs Police Department. Davis was charged with Criminal Mischief 3rd Degree and Theft by Unlawful Taking or Disposition, all Others Under $500.  He was lodged into the Russell county Detention Center.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-21-21

Russell County 10 new cases Wednesday. We had 6 cases released from isolation. We now have 60 active cases which 53 cases are on self-isolation and 7 cases are hospitalized, 2 at UK, 2 at Somerset, 1 at Eastern State, 1 at Glasgow and 1 at Danville.

 

Adair County 10 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 4 cases. We have had 1,465 total cases with 1,368 of those released and 47 deaths. We have 50 active cases with 50 of those in home isolation. We have no active cases in the hospital at this time.

Gov. Beshear Announces $8.3 Million Award for Cleaner-Burning School Buses; Adair & Russell County Districts Awarded Funds

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2021) - Gov. Andy Beshear and Energy and Environment Cabinet Secretary Rebecca Goodman today announced that 93 school districts have applied for and been awarded $8.13 million to replace 169 older diesel school buses with cleaner diesel or propane buses.

 

“The past year has been enormously difficult for Kentucky’s school districts, and this is one area where we can give them much-deserved support,” said Gov. Beshear. “These buses will better protect our environment and will mean healthier air for the children in these 93 districts.”

 

In 2016, the U.S. Justice Department settled claims against Volkswagen for using defeat devices in 2009-2016 Volkswagen diesel vehicles, which allowed the vehicles to emit up to 40 percent more nitrogen oxides than allowed under the Clean Air Act.

 

As Attorney General, Gov. Beshear secured Kentucky's share of the settlement, $20.3 million awarded from the Volkswagen Environmental Mitigation Trust. In his first budget as Governor, he recommended that the settlement funds be used to replace more than 150 school buses across the state.

 

The Kentucky General Assembly authorized $8.5 million to reimburse local school districts for up to 50 percent of the cost to replace up to five school buses per district. Buses to be replaced were those in daily operation with a chassis year of 2001 or earlier. 

 

The 2020 General Assembly developed a spending plan for the funds and approved expenditures beginning July 1, 2020. There is $393,000 remaining in the fund. Fiscal Year 2020 authorizing legislation provided that unexpended Restricted Funds appropriated shall become available for expenditure in the 2020-2022 biennium.

 

A complete list of the school districts that are replacing buses can be found here. Under the program, districts receive reimbursement once they show they have received the new bus and stopped using the old one.

 

“We are thankful that so many school districts were able to take advantage of this program,” Cabinet Secretary Goodman said. “We will work closely with them throughout the scrappage and reimbursement process.”

 

“These new buses will be safely transporting the next generation of students for years to come,” said Kentucky Commissioner of Education Jason E. Glass. “This reimbursement will make a big difference for local districts as they replace their buses with healthier and more sustainable vehicles.”

 

Kentucky’s proposed Beneficiary Mitigation Plan (BMP) and other resources associated with the Settlement and Trust, can be found at:  https://eec.ky.gov/Energy/Pages/Volkwagen-Settlement.aspx.

 

137 New Covid-19 Cases in Lake Cumb. District; 3 New Deaths

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 11.55%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 302 deaths resulting in a 1.82% mortality rate (about 1 in 55) among known cases. This compares with a 0.97% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.66% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 89 cases in the hospital. This is 6 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 935 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.64% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.67%. The latest data shows that 88.89% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 26.92% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 16,577 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 7.94% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 124 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 4; Casey: 6; Clinton: 11; Cumberland: 3; Green: 5; McCreary: 26; Pulaski: 33; Russell: 2; Taylor: 16; and, Wayne: 18. In all, we have released 93.4% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 10 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 791 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,340.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Schools, and Medical Facilities. We have had 65 cases tied to Christmas gaterings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 15 tied to New Year’s events. Of our active cases, 16% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 137 today: Adair: 5; Casey: 8; Clinton: 14; Cumberland: 12; Green: 9; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 53; Russell: 4; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 19. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.007. This means our total case count is projected to double every 96.09 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old female who is hospitalized, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, 11/20/20;
Cumberland: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is released, 1/18/21;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 85-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The deaths we announce today are: an 86-year-old individual from McCreary; a 92-year-old individual from McCreary; and a 78-year-old individual from Pulaski who had been hospitalized.

 

While our new case rate does continue to slow relative to last week, all our counties are still in the “red-critical” range of community spread. With that much spread, if we are not all vigilant with following the guidance, the disease can quickly ramp back up. Please do not become complacent. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 16,577 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 331,521 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 330,907 statewide plus 614 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

COVID-19 Vaccination Status

Here is an article we recently published: COVID-19 Vaccine, Patience is Needed.

 

The Lake Cumberland area will contiue in Phase 1a of our COVID-19 response, but will now also be expanding into 1b, first responders and school staff. Also, do not forget about the federal contract with Walgreens and CVS pharmacies to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff.

 

We are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases currently, as vaccines are not readily available at the local health departments.

 

Added to the 500 doses per week Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital will still be receiving, our area is expected to receive COVID-19 vaccine for the Adair, Casey, and Clinton County school staff this week. The week of January 25th we expect vaccine for school staff in Cumberland, Green, Russell, and Wayne, along with part of the school staff in Pulaski.

 

The week of February 1st, we expect to receive vaccine for the school staff in McCreary and the remainder of Pulaski. The push to vaccinate school staff will likely tie up most of the state’s vaccine supply during these weeks. As we learn more, we will post it.

 

Dept. for Public Health Partners Receives Grant for Colorectal Cancer Screening Test Kits for Kentuckians

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 20, 2021) – The Department for Public Health, an agency of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, today announced receipt of a grant from Madison, Wisc.-based Exact Sciences Corp. for 1,000 Cologuard At-Home stool DNA colorectal screening test kits. Distribution of these kits will provide greater opportunity for uninsured and underinsured Kentuckians to have access to colon cancer testing that can be done in the privacy of their home.

 

Cologuard is a take-at-home stool test that utilizes DNA in a regular bowel movement to screen for colon cancer and colon polyps. Exact Sciences is the only company currently offering stool DNA testing for colon cancer, according to the company website. Kits are door-delivered and picked up and returned to the Exact Sciences Lab by the UPS Worldwide Hub in Louisville.

 

If a Cologuard test result is positive, a colonoscopy is performed to search for and remove polyps in the colon.

 

Eric Friedlander, secretary of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, noted that the kits will be available for two years through a program created in statute by the 2008 Kentucky General Assembly, the Kentucky Colon Cancer Screening Program (KCCSP).

 

“Kentucky has made impressive improvements in increasing colon cancer screening and reducing both incidence and mortality rates for colon cancer,” said Dr. Connie White, deputy commissioner for the Department for Public Health. “Our screening rates have more than doubled from 33 percent to 70.1 percent, improving our ranking from 49th, to 17th.”

 

The Kentucky Cancer Registry estimates that mortality has fallen 33 percent, which translates to 240 fewer deaths annually in Kentucky. And, colorectal cancer incidence has fallen 30 percent through polyp removal and prevention, which is 400 fewer cases, Dr. White said.

 

Dr. Whitney F. Jones, founder of the Colon Cancer Prevention Project and chair of the Kentucky Colon Cancer Screening Program advisory committee, described the grant as “a milestone in our vision for innovation, acceleration and most importantly, implementation of evidence-based platforms for colon cancer prevention and control.”

 

Rocky J. Adkins, advisor to Governor Andy Beshear, free of colon cancer for 25 years, said, “I cannot stress enough the importance of testing and screenings to help detect cancer and save lives.”

 

Dr. White said, “During this pandemic, many Kentuckians are being extra-cautious about going into public and health care settings for even routine care. This grant provides a wonderful opportunity for eligible individuals to get their colon cancer screening done at home.”

 

Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. in men and women combined even though it can be effectively prevented or detected early and treated through screening. One in three adults ages 50 to 75 are not screened as recommended according to American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines. Colorectal cancer is also on the rise in younger adults, prompting ACS to lower the recommended screening age to 45. ACS also stressed the importance of getting screened and following all positive noninvasive screening tests with a colonoscopy.

 

“Cost is a well-known barrier to screening and often patients don’t complete a follow-up colonoscopy because they fear a bill,” said Secretary Friedlander. “The General Assembly statute that established KCCSP took this into account. Kentuckians who are eligible to receive a Cologuard kit and whose tests results indicate the need for a colonoscopy will have this expense covered through KCCSP.”

 

Program eligibility questions may be directed to the Kentucky Colon Cancer Screening Program. Consumers should call the Kentucky Cancer Link at (877) 597-4655.

 

Exact Sciences Corp. is a leading provider of cancer screening and diagnostic tests, Exact Sciences relentlessly pursues smarter solutions providing the clarity to take life-changing action, earlier. Building on the success of Cologuard® and Oncotype DX®, Exact Sciences is investing in its product pipeline to take on some of the deadliest cancers and improve patient care. Exact Sciences unites visionary collaborators to help advance the fight against cancer. For more information, please visit the company's website at www.exactsciences.com, follow Exact Sciences on Twitter @ExactSciences, or find Exact Sciences on Facebook.

 

Gov. Beshear: Positivity Rate Below 12% for Fifth Day in a Row

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 20, 2021) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear said the state’s COVID-19 positivity rate has stayed below 12% for the fifth day in a row.

 

“While there is still so much pain and darkness in our commonwealth due to this pandemic, we are beginning to see the light ahead of us,” said Gov. Beshear. “This plateauing positivity rate is great news for Kentucky, especially as we continue to bring more of these live-saving vaccines to our people each week.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 20, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 3,433
New deaths today: 49

Positivity rate: 11.29%
Total deaths: 3,243
Currently hospitalized: 1,678
Currently in ICU: 399
Currently on ventilator: 205

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Boone, Warren and Daviess. Each of these counties reported 120 or more new cases.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Earlier today, the Governor also shared a message for President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris shortly after their inauguration.

 

“Congratulations, President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris. I look forward to working with your administration to better the lives for our people and to help us overcome the challenges of COVID-19,” said Gov. Beshear. “Together we can make a better country – a better Kentucky – for all.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

RUSSELL CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY 01/20/21

 
There is a Russell County Boil Water Advisory on Highway 1383, starting at the intersection of 1383 and going down to Union Baptist Church. The advisory was issued due to a water main break. Boil all water used for drinking & cooking purposes for at least 3 minutes until further notice.
 
 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-20-21

Russell County 4 new cases Wednesday. We had 2 cases released from isolation. We now have 56 active cases which 50 are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized,2 cases at Somerset,1 at Glasgow,1 at UK,1 at Danville and 1 at Eastern State.

 

Adair County 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 4 cases. We have had 1,455 total cases with 1,364 of those released and 47 deaths. We have 44 active cases with 44 of those in home isolation. We have no active cases in the hospital at this time.

Gov. Beshear Updates Kentuckians on New Hospital Funding, COVID-19 Cases, Vaccines

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2021) – On Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear updated Kentuckians on increased funding for Kentucky hospitals, COVID-19 cases and COVID-19 vaccines as well as bills he is vetoing because they are unconstitutional and a threat to Kentucky lives during this pandemic.

 

“I come to you today as our country passes a grim milestone of losing 400,000 Americans to the coronavirus. That is a staggering loss. It’s so large it’s hard to actually see it in your mind, to process how big it is,” said Gov. Beshear. “You could fill up both UK and UofL stadiums three-and-a-quarter times and that would represent the number of lives, the number of people that we have lost in America.”

 

The Governor said 332,450 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been received in Kentucky and 221,440 doses have been administered. Of the doses administered, 36,970 have been given to long-term care facility residents and staff.

 

More than 83,000 doses were administered from Jan. 10 to 16, about 16,000 more than were administered the week prior. Of the doses administered, 209,736 were first doses and 11,704 were booster doses.

 

The Governor said Kentucky is now administering the vaccine faster than the federal government is sending it new doses. The state expects to receive 56,175 new doses next week. Kentucky has been recognized as one of only nine states that have administered more than half of the doses they've received.

 

“Right now we can’t guarantee that every pharmacy across Kentucky gets vaccine, because we don’t have enough supply. That’s why today I formally requested from Operation Warp Speed that the federal government double the amount of vaccine we receive every week,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are proving we can get it out there. We are proving that we are efficient. We are proving that we can get it into people’s arms.”

 

“I am confident that in Kentucky if we had unlimited vaccine, we could easily immunize 200,000 to 250,000 people a week, if not more today, if we had enough vaccine,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health. “We get about 54,000 doses per week approximately, and that’s all we can do.”

 

The Governor also announced Kentucky hospitals will receive an additional $800 million to $1 billion annually to help advance the quality of care of Medicaid members and provide a stable base for hospitals that will extend beyond the financial challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services Secretary Eric Friedlander said, “This is an opportunity for Kentucky to really take a step forward in coverage for our fellow Kentuckians, for improving the quality of care and for paying hospitals what we should.”

 

Kentucky Hospital Association President and CEO Nancy Galvagni, said: “Our hospitals are proud to offer high-quality care close to home. And this program that CMS approved will help them continue to meet that goal. This enhanced funding will be crucial to our hospitals for upgrading equipment, for retaining their employees and covering the cost of providing quality care for their communities.”

 

To learn more, see the full release.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 19, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,250
New deaths today: 27

Positivity rate: 11.55%
Total deaths: 3,194
Currently hospitalized: 1,633
Currently in ICU: 442
Currently on ventilator: 208

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Campbell, Warren, Fayette and Kenton. Each of these counties reported 80 or more new cases.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Memorial
“Today we are sharing the story of Josephine Hollkamp of Louisville, who passed away on Jan. 5 from COVID-19. Her granddaughter Shannon reached out to us, sharing how her grandmother was a fighter, but unfortunately she did not survive the virus, passing away at 97.

 

“Shannon told stories of how her grandmother cared for her daily after school, and how she was always amazed by the love between her grandmother and her grandfather. Even in the little mundane parts of their day, love was always there. They were married for 53 years, and the family finds comfort knowing they are now reunited.

 

“Josephine lived a long and amazing life, full of travel, quilting and cooking. She always gave to others, volunteering her time with both her church and with Little Sisters of the Poor for 25 years. But more than anything, she loved being with her family. Josephine had nine children, more than 20 grandchildren and 30 great-grandchildren. She always made sure to say ‘I love you’ every day, and the family never left without a hug or a kiss.

 

“Shannon and their family ask us to mask up, if not for ourselves, for those around us. In honor of Josephine, let’s spread love by doing our part to keep those like her safe.”

 

Gov. Beshear Vetoes Unconstitutional Bills That Would Put Kentucky Lives at Risk
Today, Gov. Beshear vetoed five bills, including House Bill 1 and Senate Bill 1, allowing him to continue taking bold, effective actions to save lives, and ensuring future governors have the tools they need to address new emergencies quickly.

 

The Governor said his efforts to stop COVID-19 are widely supported by Kentuckians: 86% support asking people to stay at home and avoid gathering in groups; 78% support limiting restaurants to carry-out only; and 73% support prohibiting K-12 schools from teaching in-person.

 

“What this says is no matter what party you’re in, no matter who you voted for for president, the people of Kentucky support the ability to take steps necessary to protect us,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Normalized by population, Kentucky has a lower number of deaths than all neighboring states. The state has crushed or plateaued three different surges in cases. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) consistently has backed the effectiveness of Gov. Beshear’s restrictions aimed at preventing the spread of COVID-19 in restaurants and bars, gyms, schools and other venues.

 

Gov. Beshear also reminded Kentuckians that even the director of the CDC, Dr. Robert Redfield, advised against any bill that writes public health guidance into law.

 

“I want to make it clear that CDC guidance should not be interpreted as regulation; rather, they are meant as recommendations. It should be used in consideration for specific state and/or local regulations, but this guidance is meant to be flexible and adaptable,” Dr. Redfield said. “It is not meant to be prescriptive or interpreted as standards that can be regulated.”

 

These bills are unconstitutional: the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled “our examination of the Kentucky Constitution causes us to conclude the emergency powers the Governor has exercised are executive in nature, never raising a separation of powers issue in the first instance.”

 

“This is a way of saying under the Kentucky Constitution, this is the executive branch’s job,” said Gov. Beshear. “I certainly hope we wouldn’t think that in the middle of a battle, in the middle of a war, you would have a legislative branch debate and vote on tactics – that’s just not how the Constitution is set up.”

 

The Governor said Senate Bill 1 interferes with the Governor’s power and constitutional responsibility to confront emergencies; allows the General Assembly to exercise power outside of session and forces the Governor to call it back into session in the event of an emergency; and, the bill provides an inferior executive officer, the Attorney General, the power to approve or disapprove of the Governor’s decisions.

 

The Governor also said Senate Bill 1 would also be costly for taxpayers. If the General Assembly approved the Governor’s emergency action in 30-day increments, with no Saturday meeting days and five days to pass a bill or resolution through both chambers, special sessions would cost $65,000 per day. That would be $325,000 per five-day session and $3.25 million for 10 sessions.

 

The Governor emphasized that House Bill 5 is unconstitutional as well, because it would: “…prevent [the Governor] from executing new laws passed by the General Assembly or the United States Congress that require new or different governmental structures to carry out.  It would also disqualify the Commonwealth from federal grants that may require a new office or commission.”

 

The Governor said moving forward he would be working with lawmakers on a resolution to the legislation.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

CITY OF COLUMBIA FLAG SPONSORSHIPS....

 

The City of Columbia recently held a drive for local residents to sponsor flags in recognition of local veterans in our community.


The list is as follows:

 

 VETERAN                             BRANCH OF SERVICE             SPONSOR

Edgar Troutman                          U.S. Army                             Patti Troutman

Ricky Conner                              U.S. Army                             Carol Conner

Robert Troutman                         U.S. Army                             Patti Troutman

James Troutman                         U.S. Army                             Patti Troutman

Fred Troutman                            U.S. Army                             Patti Troutman

Gilbert Harmon                           U.S. Army                              Family

Ken Howard                               U.S. Air Force                        Sonja Reeder

Peter Trumpis                            U.S. Army                              Shea Toney

Mitchell Doll                               U.S. Marine Corps                 Emma Doll

Willard Fudge                            U.S. Army                              Shea Toney

Robert Bryant                            U.S. Army                              Aleisha Karnes

Ronnie Janes                            U.S. Army                              Tammy Hatcher

Frances Chesley                       U.S. Army                              Trish Parrish

Orvis Grider                              U.S. Army                              Shirley Grider

Clifton Cowan                           U.S. Army                              Rebecca Smith

Sanford Green                          U.S. Army                              Wanda Roots

Shane Ross                              U.S. Marines                         Connie Stotts

Dearing Fletcher                       U.S. Army                             Connie Stotts

Vernon Williams                        U.S. Army                             Tammy Humphress, Melinda Beard,

                                                                                              Jamie Cole, Jeremy Cole

Glenn Shirley Glasgow            U.S. Army                              Elizabeth Rouse Glasgow

Donald Loy                              U.S. Air Force                        Marsha Reddick

Walter (Gene) Hoots               U.S. Army                              Gene Hoots Family

William (Ralph) Hoots             U.S. Marines                          Gene Hoots Family

Edgar Holmes                         U.S. Army                              Beth Holmes

 

If you would like to honor someone, please call City Hall. The flags are being ordered for Spring. If you would like a flag they must be ordered by February 28, 2021.

 

4 RUSSELL COUNTY RESIDENTS ARRESTED ON METH CHARGES AFTER SEARCH OF RESIDENCE...

 
 
According to Russell County Sheriff Derek Polston, his department assisted Russell Springs Police Officer Hayden Phillips on a search warrant in the Pleasant Hill and Bernard Ridge area of Russell County. Four individuals were arrested at 100 Walnut Lane following the search.
 
48-year-old Phillip Sutton, 56-year-old Kathy Sutton, 31-year-old Tiffany Johnson, and 34-year-old Andrew Scott Rhodes of Russell Springs, KY were all charged with Trafficking in Methamphetamine 1st degree, Possession of Marijuana, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. They were lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
 
Assisting in the investigation were Russell County Deputies Kenny Perkins, Nathan Ginn, Corey Meyer, and Ron Golden & his K-9, KSP Trooper Zack Scott, Columbia Police Officer Trevor Foster & his K-9. 
 
 
 
 
 

Gov. Beshear: Up to $1 Billion Available to Aid Kentucky Hospitals

 
FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2021) – On Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced Kentucky hospitals will receive an additional $800 million to $1 billion annually to help advance the quality of care of Medicaid members and provide a stable base for hospitals that will extend beyond the financial challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.
 
The Governor said the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) received approval Jan. 14 from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on a new directed payment initiative that increases inpatient Medicaid payments for Kentucky hospitals. Pending Kentucky General Assembly legislative approval and federal approval of details plans, payments could begin in March.
 
With over one-third of Kentucky’s population enrolled in Medicaid, the Governor said the payments are critical to building a better Kentucky by assuring equal access to quality care in the commonwealth.
 
“Health care is a basic human right, and our people deserve the highest-quality care possible,” said Gov. Beshear. “Our hospitals and medical professionals are the pillars holding up our communities during this unprecedented time. Our hospitals need additional support to ensure they can continue to meet the needs of Kentuckians and our health care heroes and sheroes deserve our sincere thanks for standing strong on the frontlines helping to save lives.”
 
In order to receive these funds, hospitals will have to abide by higher quality standards that will be developed in collaboration with CHFS and the Kentucky Hospital Association (KHA).
 
KHA President and CEO Nancy Galvagni said: “KHA is delighted by the news that CMS has approved this new directed payment plan. It will mean the difference between keeping the lights on rather than locking the doors for a number of our hospitals. We appreciate our partnership with Gov. Beshear’s administration and are eager to work with our partners in the General Assembly to enact the necessary legislation to ensure that Kentuckians have access to quality health care.”
 
CHFS Secretary Eric Friedlander explained that hospitals would cover the increased cost of the program and said House Bill 183 has been filed, which, contingent upon this approval, would provide the flexibility for further protecting smaller, rural hospitals.
 
If HB 183 passed, the Department for Medicaid Services (DMS), an agency of the cabinet, also could access an additional $50 million to $80 million in funding to support the Kentucky Medicaid program.
 
Directed payments were established by the federal government to allow states with Medicaid managed care programs to increase payments for eligible classes of providers to advance Medicaid program goals of improving quality and access to health care services. “This approval signals support of payment reforms designed to increase access to care and promote quality services for Medicaid members,” said DMS Commissioner Lisa Lee.
 
Funding is subject to continued federal approval and acknowledgement of this program in the state budget.
 
Over 1.6 million Kentuckians currently are enrolled in Medicaid.
 
There are 112 hospitals in Kentucky, excluding university-affiliated and state mental hospitals.
 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-19-21

Russell County 9 new cases Monday. We had 9 cases released from isolation. We now have 54 active cases which 48 cases are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized,1 at Eastern State,1 at UK,1 at Glasgow ,1 at Danville and 2 at Somerset.

 

Adair County 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 3 cases. We have had 1,450 total cases with 1,360 of those released and 47 deaths. We have 43 active cases with 43 of those in home isolation. We have no active cases in the hospital at this time.

TJ HEALTH COLUMBIA COVID-19 VACCINE UPDATE....

 

While we are still waiting to receive the vaccine for those 70 and older, we have plans in place to distribute it quickly and efficiently once it arrives in our hospitals in Glasgow and in Columbia. At this time, we are unsure when it will arrive.

 

In the meantime, beginning Monday, January 18th, seniors age 70 and older who are in Phase 1B of vaccine distribution may contact T.J. Regional Health to sign up for the vaccine waiting list. Please choose ONLY ONE of the following options to get on the list:

 

Fill out the online form at www.tjregionalhealth.org/vaccine OR call 270.659.1010.

 

PLEASE DO NOT SIGN UP BOTH WAYS – DUPLICATE ENTRIES WILL DELAY THE PROCESS ONCE WE BEGIN CALLING PATIENTS TO SCHEDULE APPOINTMENTS.

 

The online form is accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The phone line will be open Monday-Friday from 8am-4pmCT until further notice. There is tremendous demand and high volume, so please be patient.

 

At this time, the waiting listing is for Phase 1B - seniors age 70 and older.

 

Details for Phases 1C and beyond will be announced in the near future as more information becomes available.

 

Theft of ID and Credit Cards results in Police Chase and Drug Charges...

 
In December, the Adair County Sheriff's Office initiated an investigation into the theft of personal identification information such as social security number and other forms of ID of an Adair county resident. Deputies were able to work with the credit card company and identify retailers where the card was used. Deputies then were able to get video footage from the retailers and identified the person using the card as 35-year-old Brandon Jones of Columbia, KY. A warrant was issued for his arrest, however Jones did not have a permanent residence and was staying multiple places and eluding arrest.
 
On Sunday, January 17, 2021 the Adair County Sheriff's Office received information where Brandon Jones may be and Deputies Brandon Hitch, Derek Padgett and Josh Durbin began searching an area 10 miles east of Columbia in the Sano community. Around 1:00amCT yesterday, deputies approached a residence off Marlo Campbell Road and as they pulled in, a vehicle fled from the residence and the pursuit ensued. Deputies were able to bring the pursuit to a safe stop on Free Union Road close to the Russell County line. The vehicle was occupied by Brandon Jones who was arrested on the warrants as well as multiple additional charges stemming from the chase. 
 
Jones was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail on the following charges:
 
  1. Theft of Identity 
  2. Fleeing and Evading Police 1st degree
  3. Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (methamphetamine) 
  4. Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
  5. Tampering with Physical Evidence
  6. Reckless Driving
  7. Wanton Endangerment 2nd 
  8. Disregarding Stop Sign
  9. Failure to Illuminate Headlights
  10. Criminal Littering

 

Sheriff Brockman assisted the deputies on scene. The investigation is continuing.

 

RC Hospital Answers COVID-19 Vaccination Questions

 

Patrick Branco, CEO at Russell County Hospital states "we have been receiving a significant number of questions, requests and demands for information on when vaccines will be available to members of our community".  


In answer to these questions and concerns he has provided the following information for the Russell County community:


On December 30th we received our first shipment of 100 doses of the vaccine. We immediately distributed all those to the frontline workers in the healthcare system that were ready to take the initial doses. We immediately ordered an additional 100 doses for the following week but that order was delayed as the State made critical determinations about where the limited number of doses could be distributed statewide. On January 11th we received our next shipment of 100 doses and we again distributed those to the top priority individuals in priority 1a. Immediately upon receipt of our second 100 doses we ordered an additional 100 doses and we believed we would be in a position to be receiving about 100 doses every week or every other week and we could plan accordingly.


Unfortunately, there is a significant shortage of the vaccines across the State and at this time we will not be able to provide any vaccines until that supply improves. I have be assured that we will be provided with the 200 doses necessary to provide the booster to first 200 we vaccinated.


We are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases currently, as we are not aware of a timeline in which we might receive more vaccine. We will promptly notify the community when we receive assurance of new shipments of the vaccine and we will begin the process of compiling a waiting list for distribution based on priority 1b (>70 years old) and higher risk individuals.


At RCH we are deeply committed to helping rid this disease from our midst and committed to serving the needs of our community.  We ask that everyone please be patient with us and know that we are doing everything in our power to get the vaccine into the arms of our community!  

Branco stated "I have rarely seen a more dedicated health care team of nurses, technicians, providers and support staff than I have encountered here in Kentucky.  In addition to a solid partnership with the State, District, and Local Department of Health we have been united in our desire to serve quickly, competently, and compassionately. One day soon we will have this virus under good control and God willing return to our normal lives again".

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-18-21

Adair County 1 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 7 cases. We have had 1,445 total cases with 1,357 of those released and 47 deaths. We have 41 active cases with 41 of those in home isolation. We have no active cases in the hospital at this time.

 

Russell County NO new cases Sunday. We had 13 cases released from isolation. We now have 54 active cases which 49 cases are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 1 case at Eastern State, 1 case at TJ Sampson in Glasgow, 1 case at UK and 2 cases at Somerset.

114 New Coronavirus Cases in Lake Cumb. District; No New Deaths...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 11.74%.

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 295 deaths resulting in a 1.81% mortality rate (about 1 in 55) among known cases. This compares with a 0.95% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.67% mortality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 74 cases in the hospital. This is 6 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 916 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.62% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.7%. The latest data shows that 88.89% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 35.09% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 16,300 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 7.8% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 134 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 5; Casey: 4; Clinton: 10; Cumberland: 10; Green: 6; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 49; Russell: 8; Taylor: 15; and, Wayne: 21. In all, we have released 92.7% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 20 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 890 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,340.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. We have had 65 cases tied to Christmas gaterings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 15 tied to New Year’s events. Of our active cases, 15% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 114 today: Adair: 13; Casey: 13; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 5; Green: 4; McCreary: 17; Pulaski: 22; Russell: 12; Taylor: 18; and, Wayne: 9. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.008. This means our total case count is projected to double every 82.66 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, Unknown;
Adair: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, Unknown;
Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 59-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 69-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 60-year-old male who is hospitalized, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We are happy to report no new COVID-19 related deaths today, though we did experience 12 deaths this week. Our hospitalizations are still high. We have 74 cases hospitalized today compared to 69 last week. We are glad that our cases trended down this week at the state and local level. Lake Cumberland added 929 new cases this week compared to 1,492 last week. We have 890 cases today compared to 1,102 last week.

 

Until the vaccine is widely available, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 16,300 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 324,972 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 324,325 statewide plus 647 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released.

 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

COVID-19 Vaccination Status

Here is an article we recently published: COVID-19 Vaccine, Patience is Needed.

The Lake Cumberland area remains largely in Phase 1a of our COVID-19 response. This includes vaccines for healthcare workers and first responders. Let us also not forget about the federal contract with Walgreens and CVS pharmacies to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff.

 

We are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases currently, as vaccines are not readily available at the local health departments.

 

According to the Governor, the next big push of the COVID-19 vaccine will be to vaccinate school faculty and staff. While the Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital will still, at least for the near future, be receiving 500 doses per week as a regional COVID-19 Center, much of the remaining supply of vaccine over the next few weeks will likely be tied up with the effort to vaccinate school personnel.

 

As we learn more, we will post it.

 

Adair County Man Arrested on Felony Drug Charges After Early Morning Traffic Stop....

 
On Thursday, January 14, 2021 the Adair County Sheriffs Office arrested 58-year-old Joseph Turner of Columbia. Turner was arrested after K-9 Deputy Josh Durbin initiated a traffic stop on a 1999 Dodge truck at 5:02amCT in the Coburg community, 10 miles north of Columbia. Following a search of the vehicle, methamphetamine, marijuana, and drug paraphernalia was located. Turner was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail on charges of Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (Methamphetamine), Possession of Marijuana, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. 
 
The case remains under investigation by the Adair County Sheriffs Office. 
 

Columbia Man Arrested for Alcohol Intoxication and Falsely Reporting an Incident


Columbia Police responded to Harper Valley Trailer Court off Tutt Street on Friday night, January 15, 2021 after a male subject called and reported a stolen handgun. Upon making contact with the caller, identified as 49-year-old Bradley West of Columbia, KY he was found to be intoxicated but continued to insist a neighbor had stolen his gun but would not give officers the neighbors name. 
 

While officers were on the scene, Mr. West went to his vehicle and retrieved a shotgun shouting he was going to get his property himself before police were able to quickly subdue West without incident. 

Bradley West has been charged with alcohol intoxication, falsely reporting an incident, and wanton endangerment of police offiicers. After West was placed into custody, a search of his residence was conducted and officers located the handgun in the exact spot West had stated the gun was stolen from.


Officer Trevor Foster made the arrest. He was assisted on scene by Officer Evan Burton and Adair County Deputy Josh Durbin.

 

COLUMBIA MAN ARRESTED ON METH CHARGES....


Columbia Police were called to assist Adair EMS on a possible drug overdose on Mitchell Street in Columbia on Saturday morning, January 16, 2021.


Upon arrival, a male resident at the home was found to be in possession of 26 grams of suspected methamphetamine as well as various drug paraphernalia, including baggies and scales. 

Joshua Akin, 31, was taken into custody and charged with Trafficking in a Controlled Substance (Methamphetamine) over 2 grams and Resisting Arrest. 
Akin was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

Officer Gary Roy made the arrest. He was assisted on scene by Officer Ethan Pike and Adair EMS.
 

HEAD-ON COLLISION SENDS BOTH DRIVERS TO THE HOSPITAL

 

The Columbia Police Department responded to a two vehicle collision with injuries on Thursday morning, January 14, 2021 at the intersection of Edmonton Road and Burksville Street. Prior to the collision, Adair 911 had been receiving multiple calls from West 80 Edmonton Road concerning a reckless driver operating a late model white Buick. 

The operator of the Buick, Constantine Consequences, 34, of Edmonton, KY struck a white Ford Ranger head-on which was operated by Ronnie Wray, 66, of Columbia. Both subjects were transported by Adair EMS to TJ Health Columbia where Consequences was later taken to UK in Lexington for further treatment. 

Constantine Consequences has also been charged with DUI, no out of state registration, no insurance, and possession of marijuana. 

Officer Ethan Pike investigated the collision. He was assisted on scene by additional Columbia Police Units, Fish and Wildlife, as well as Breeding Fire Department.

 

3955 New Coronavirus Cases in KY; 19 New Deaths...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear updated Kentuckians about COVID-19 case information and vaccines, as well as security measures at the State Capitol this weekend.

 

“These case numbers are still far too high, but there is hopeful news today, too. We are on track as we ramp up to meet our goal of administering 90% of all vaccine received within seven days of arrival,” said Gov. Beshear. “In fact, last week we administered more doses of vaccine than we received.”

 

The Governor said 325,625 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been received in Kentucky and 190,547 doses have been administered. Of those doses, 31,158 have been administered to long-term care facility residents and staff.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Jan. 15, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 3,955
New deaths today: 19

Positivity rate: 12.09%
Total deaths: 3,061
Currently hospitalized: 1,644
Currently in ICU: 392
Currently on ventilator: 203

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Oldham, Fayette, Kenton and Boone. Each of these counties reported 160 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 584.

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Security at Capitol Increased for Next Several Days
Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced heightened security measures around the Kentucky State Capitol grounds in Frankfort following the Jan. 6 attack by domestic terrorists on the U.S. Capitol.

 

To learn more, see the full release and this video.

 

AREA ARRESTS 01/15/21

 

  • Michael Foster, 35, of Russell Springs was arrested Friday afternoon by KSP for Rape 1st degree and Incest (with someone incapable of consent and/or physically helpless, under 18 years of age). Foster was also charged with 1st degree Strangulation.
  • Billy Wayne Shearer, 40, of Jamestown, KY was arrested Friday by the RCSO for 4th degree Assault (Domestic Violence) with Minor Injuries.
 
Lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
 
  • Daniel Cappiello, 49, of Columbia, KY was arrested early this morning by Burkesville Police for Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Possession of Marijuana, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
  • Amye McFall, 21, of Columbia, KY was arrested today by CPD for Trafficking in methamphetamine and Possession of Marijuana.
 
Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY 6PM THIS EVENING THRU 12PM ON SATURDAY....

 
 
...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY NOW IN EFFECT FROM 7 PM EST /6 PM CST/
THIS EVENING TO 1 PM EST /NOON CST/ SATURDAY...
 
* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations up to one inch.
  Localized amounts near 2 inches possible for some.
 
* WHERE...Portions of east central and south central Kentucky.
 
* WHEN...From 7 PM EST /6 PM CST/ this evening to 1 PM EST /noon
  CST/ Saturday.
 
* IMPACTS...Locally poor visibility and quick accumulations on
  pavement possible this evening. Plan on slippery conditions for
  untreated roads.
 
PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...
 
Slow down and use caution while traveling.
 
The latest road conditions for the state you are calling from can
be obtained by calling 5 1 1.
 

State Transportation Crews Deploy Ahead of New Snow Front

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2021) – Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) snowfighters deployed in various sections of the commonwealth today to get a jump on an approaching weather front bringing snow.

 

Forecasters warned of a squall-like system moving into western Kentucky early today and spreading eastward, beginning with rain and a few light snow showers but turning increasingly to snow toward evening with less than 1 inch accumulation over most of the state.

 

KYTC crews mainly were spot treating bridges and known slick spots. They also pretreated surfaces so that snow and ice would be easier to clear later.

 

“Keeping roadways as safe as possible is one of the most important roles of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, and that is never more important than in snow and ice season,” said Gov. Andy Beshear.

 

“Part of the task is to get a jump on the weather whenever possible,” Transportation Secretary Jim Gray said. “Our crews are experienced. They know the usual trouble spots, and we monitor weather forecasts constantly.”

 

KYTC can call on nearly 2,000 frontline crews to maintain safe travel on state routes – a mission complicated by the ongoing novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

 

KYTC snowfighters spend several months every year training, stocking up on salt and road treatment supplies and making sure the cabinet’s 1,024 plow trucks are serviced and ready. This year, the cabinet’s proactive planning had to take into account the COVID-19 pandemic, which to date has killed more than 3,000 Kentuckians and has the potential for sidelining entire work crews.

 

“Snow and ice preparations begin long before the winter months and this year has been unique with a health crisis in play,” Secretary Gray said. “We’ve done our best to see around the corner by planning how to keep our work crews as protected as possible from COVID, and also how to adapt plans to cover for crews that suddenly have to be taken out of rotation because of COVID.

 

“We ask Kentuckians to partner with us by paying attention to weather advisories, limiting trips during poor weather conditions, and showing our crews grace as we make necessary adjustments brought on by the pandemic. This is uncharted territory and we will get through this together,” Secretary Gray said. 

 

KYTC uses a three-tier system to prioritize treatment and snow clearing on state-maintained routes. Route designations are based on factors such as traffic volume and connectivity to hospitals and other critical servicess. During routine snow and ice events, crews operate using snow and ice priority route maps for maximum efficiency of equipment and materials usage. For severe winter storm events, the Cabinet has established a snow emergency plan to deploy resources within each county as needed to cover highest priority routes.

 

Crews will follow healthy at work guidelines and maintenance facilities are closed to the public to minimize exposure. KYTC maintains the majority of roads, streets and bridges that are part of the State Highway System. Examples include interstates, parkways and U.S. route designations.

 

Keep Kentucky Moving Safely

Safe roadways are a shared responsibility, especially during inclement weather when risks increase. KYTC encourages motorists to prepare for winter and remain safe by following these tips:
 

  • Travel only as necessary during major snow events. Stock vehicles with ice scrapers, jumper cables, blankets, a flashlight, cell phone charger, non-perishable snacks and first aid kit should you get stranded on the road.
  • Winterize vehicles. Have your car battery, tire pressure and brakes checked. Make sure your heater, defroster, headlights and windshield wipers are working properly.
  • When snow and/or ice are on roadways, drive slowly no matter what type of vehicle you’re in. It takes more time and distance to stop your vehicle in poor weather conditions, so brake early and slowly.
  • Pay attention to weather advisories and allow more time to travel for routine commutes.
  • Slow down when approaching intersections, off-ramps, bridges or shaded areas. These are all candidates for developing black ice—a thin coating of clear ice that can form on the pavement surface that may be difficult to see.
  • Maintain a safe distance from snowplows and other heavy highway equipment and do not pass snowplows on the shoulder.
  • Know before you go. Download the free WAZE app or visit goky.ky.gov to check traffic conditions before you travel. The map also offers access to select traffic cameras on interstates and parkways.
  • Eliminate distractions while driving (e.g. using phone and eating).
  • Throughout the winter season, KYTC will be highlighting the men and women across the state who serve on the frontlines and behind the scenes of the Cabinet’s snow and ice removal efforts. Follow @KYTC and like us on facebook.com/kytc120. Follow your local KYTC Department of Highways district office on Twitter and Facebook for regional transportation updates. The Cabinet’s snow and ice information website, snowky.ky.gov, provides details about priority routes, helpful winter weather tips, fact sheets and videos on salt application and snow removal.

 

Gov. Beshear: Security at Capitol Increased for Next Several Days

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced heightened security measures around the Kentucky State Capitol grounds in Frankfort following the Jan. 6 attack by domestic terrorists on the U.S. Capitol.

 

“There have been domestic terror threats against state capitols all over the United States. Our commitment is that what happened at the U.S. Capitol will not happen here,” the Governor said. “We have the commitment and participation of the Kentucky State Police, Frankfort Police and the Kentucky National Guard to ensure the safety of everyone in this area. There have been no requests for permits for gatherings at the Capitol in the coming days, so there are no gatherings or rallies that can or should be happening.”

 

Gov. Beshear said that in addition to an increased law enforcement presence, areas near the Kentucky State Capitol will be closed on Sunday.

 

“To further ensure the safety of everyone – both on or around the grounds and in the neighborhoods surrounding the Capitol in Frankfort – we will be closing the Capitol grounds entirely on Sunday,” he said.

 

The Governor acknowledge that the measure would inconvenience some in the area.

 

“We appreciate everyone’s understanding and your patriotism,” he said. “Domestic terror is never OK. We must stop it every time we see it, and we cannot let what we saw at the U.S. Capitol become a new normal for this country.”

 

Brig. Gen. Haldane (Hal) B. Lamberton, Adjutant General of the Kentucky National Guard, said Guard soldiers’ involvement in the security effort has been approved.

 

“Gov. Andy Beshear has authorized the Kentucky National Guard to support the safety and security of the state Capitol grounds and surrounding area over the coming days,” he said.

 

Acting Commissioner Lt. Col. Phillip Burnett Jr. of the Kentucky State Police said the measures were necessary to protect both the public and state buildings.


“In order to protect all citizens, the Kentucky State Police provides security at the state Capitol. KSP has not received any requests or notifications of a rally.

However, precautions have been put in place to ensure the safety of both the public and state buildings, and will be adjusted as needed,” Lt. Col. Burnett said. “In an effort to minimize the potential of an extreme event, Capitol grounds will be closed on Sunday.”

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-15-21

 

Russell County 3 new cases Thursday. We had 7 cases released from isolation. We now have 69 active cases which 65 cases are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized,1 at Eastern State, 1 at T J Sampson and 2 at Somerset.

 

Adair County 11 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 10 cases. We have had 1,422 total cases with 1,334 of those released and 47 deaths. We have 41 active cases with 41 of those in home isolation. For the first time in a long time, we have no active cases in the hospital at this time.

RUSSELL SPRINGS CITY COUNCIL MEETING RECAP

 

The regular monthly meeting for the Russell Springs City Council was held last evening. Mayor Eddie Thomas shares with WAVE listeners what took place... 

 

 

Gov. Beshear: Kroger Regional Vaccination Sites Will Open Feb. 1 for Phase 1A, 1B and 1C

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear, state officials and Kroger leadership announced a new partnership to significantly increase the speed of COVID-19 vaccinations across the commonwealth.

 

The first Kroger regional, drive-through vaccination sites will open the week of Feb. 1 for Kentuckians in Phase 1A, 1B and 1C. For more details on who is included in each phase, click here. On Jan. 28, the Governor said more details would be announced on site locations and how to sign up.

 

“Last year, when we were wondering when anybody who wanted a COVID-19 test would be able to get one, Kroger made that a reality. That testing partnership created the national model for surge testing,” said Gov. Beshear. “These drive-through vaccination sites are fantastic news all Kentuckians, and we’re grateful to the entire Kroger team for making it possible. Your help in this effort will save countless lives.”

 

The Governor announced that Transportation Secretary Jim Gray has also been named Director of the Vaccine Distribution Project.

 

“This is all about Team Kentucky delivering on an ambitious, life-saving project,” said Secretary Gray. “This regional system will grow over time to reach even more Kentuckians. As we speak, we are working to get sites evaluated and secured. We are committed to ensuring equitable distribution of the vaccine and everyone will have their turn.”

 

“We are proud to partner with the state on efforts to make sure all Kentuckians have access to the COVID-19 vaccine as quickly as possible,” said Meggen Brown, Chief Nursing Officer and National Clinical Director at Kroger Health. “Kroger Health’s vision is to help people live healthier lives, and that has never been more important.”

 

Vaccinations have already begun for K-12 school personnel through individual school districts and will continue to ramp up over the next few weeks. The Governor said the state expects to finish administering initial vaccination doses for K-12 educators and support staff the week of Feb. 1.

 

“The great news is, we expect to finish first dose vaccinations for school staff the week we said we would start,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The Governor urged Kentuckians to be patient as vaccine allocations from the federal government are still far too small to cover everyone in Phase 1A, 1B and 1C who wants to be vaccinated. However, it is critically important that the state gets vaccines into arms quickly. That means in some cases, vaccine providers will need to vaccinate Kentuckians out of the phase sequence in order to meet the state’s goal of administering 90% of vaccines within one week of their arrival at a distribution site.

 

The Governor and the Kentucky Department for Public Health outlined these phases to help providers distribute vaccines in the most equitable order they can while still vaccinating people as fast as possible. To learn more, see the Jan. 4 release.

 

“I know people are understandably anxious and want to get the vaccine as soon as they can, especially those who are high-risk. We want to do our very best to put those people in the front of the line, but we also need to move quickly so vaccines don’t just sit in a freezer, helping no one,” said Gov. Beshear. “The faster we increase our vaccination numbers, the safer we all will be, because we will get closer to herd immunity as a state more quickly. That’s the overarching goal, so we ask Kentuckians to bear with us if they have to wait a little while in order to get an appointment.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 14, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 4,084
New deaths today: 51

Positivity rate: 12.34%
Total deaths: 3,042
Currently hospitalized: 1,661
Currently in ICU: 409
Currently on ventilator: 196

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Kenton, Boone, Oldham and Fayette. Each of these counties reported 170 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 642.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Vaccine Update
The Governor said 324,650 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been received in Kentucky and 172,537 doses have been administered. Of the doses administered, 28,977 have been given to long-term care facility residents and staff.

 

More than 67,000 doses were administered from Jan. 3 to 9, about 30,000 more doses than were administered the week prior. Since Jan. 10, more than 45,000 additional doses have been administered.

 

Walgreens and CVS have a contract with the federal government to administer vaccines to residents and staff at long-term care facilities.

 

Adam Mather, inspector general at the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, announced that during the week of Jan. 4 to 10, Walgreens completed vaccinations at 72 long-term care facilities, with 3,512 residents and 2,059 staff receiving doses.

 

That week, CVS completed vaccinations at 75 long-term care facilities, with 2,973 residents and 2,432 staff receiving doses.

 

Unemployment Insurance Update
Today, Amy Cubbage, general counsel for Gov. Beshear, updated Kentuckians on virtual appointment scheduling, federal Continued Assistance Act implementation and the number of Kentuckians who have now received unemployment insurance (UI) payments.

 

“The virtual appointment schedule is an 18-calendar day rolling schedule,” Cubbage said.  “For instance, day 1 is today, Jan. 14. Day 18 is Jan. 31. Appointments for Feb. 1 should be on the website tomorrow for claimants to schedule. Appointment hours are 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. daily. There are currently 16 staff working 125 appointments a day.”

 

The system allows claimants to schedule, reschedule and cancel appointments as well as add the appointment information to their calendars. If a claimant forgets their appointment information, they can go to the website, enter their email address and the system will resend the appointment information. The system is also set to send reminders to claimants with appointments the day before their scheduled appointment.

 

“The programming for the federal Continuing Assistance Act is largely finishedAdditional $300 per week payments should start going out next week,” Cubbage said. “Additional PUA/PEUC weeks should be ready to claim without opening a new claim, even if you had exhausted your full number of weeks previously.”

 

Cubbage added, “We are changing the way we report numbers to give a more accurate context for the work done by the Office of Unemployment Insurance since the beginning of the pandemic.

 

The total numbers from the beginning of the pandemic to the end of November are as follows:

  • Total Claims[1]: 1,539,784
  • Total Claims Paid/Payable: 547,836
  • Total Claims Denied: 27,552
  • Total Pending with Fraud/Identity Issues: 90,144
  • Total Pending with No Fraud/Identity Issues: 23,236
  • Total Amount Paid: $5,450,709,280 

 

Kentucky National Guard Members to Assist with Presidential Inauguration
Today, Gov. Beshear announced that the Kentucky National Guard will send approximately 270 personnel to the Washington, D.C. region who will be on duty through the presidential inauguration Jan. 20.

 

The peaceful transfer of power is a bedrock of our democracy. Historically, the Kentucky National Guard has assisted in and around Washington, D.C., during presidential inaugurations. Given the attack of Jan. 6 on our U.S. Capitol and on lawmakers, more of our soldiers and airmen will be traveling to the region to ensure safety and security. They will assist civilian law enforcement with security operations, including protecting property, for the Wednesday inauguration,” said Gov. Beshear. “These brave men and women will once again proudly serve the commonwealth and the country during this historic moment when our new president is sworn in.”

 

Hitachi Creating 200 Jobs in Berea
As Kentucky rebuilds its economy and puts new emphasis on attracting well-paying jobs and industries of the future, Hitachi Automotive Electric Motor Systems America Inc. is establishing a new, 200-job operation in Berea to manufacture motors for electric vehicles. For more information, see the full release.

 

Memorial

“Today we share the loss of Lewis Bass, known to many in Louisville and throughout Kentucky as Sonny. He was 99 years old. He was a beloved community leader who was always ready to jump in and help others. His granddaughter Anna said his true loves were his family, the University of Louisville and giving back to his community.

 

“Sonny was born in the West End of Louisville and dedicated his life to helping the entire city succeed. He was a three-year football letterman and a two-year letterman in basketball at the University of Louisville, before serving his country during World War II. When he returned to Louisville, Sonny took the first step in his many business ventures, which included co-founding what is now known as Humana. Sonny was a gifted tennis player and played competitively into his golden years.

 

“But his greatest achievement was meeting Gladys, his wife of 74 years, and beginning the family he loved so much. Gladys, Sonny and many other family members were infected with COVID, but unfortunately, it hit Sonny the hardest.

 

Despite the efforts of those at Baptist East Hospital he passed away on Dec. 11. Gladys is recovering, and thankfully her family was able to locate caregivers to help with her recovery despite the challenges of the virus.

 

“Sonny was special. Not only did he accomplish so much professionally and within the community, he also made everyone who came in contact with him smile. He lived by the motto, ‘It only takes a minute to give a little joy and see a smile.’ Anyone who knew Sonny can’t help but smile when they think of him – he was an all-around great man. 

 

“Today we lift Gladys and their entire family in prayer. This is a huge loss for them, and the entire community of Louisville. Today we mask up for Sonny.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, information on testing locationsvaccinescontact tracingschool reports and guidanceguidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

1] This still includes duplicate claims for total claims. The number of unique claims from March to November 2020 is approximately 665,000. A number of pending claims have been resolved since the end of November. Kentucky’s unemployment rate has consistently been lower than the national average through the pandemic, except for one month, where it was only slightly above. Many months have been significantly lower.

 

ARRESTS 01/14/21

 
  • Nicole Hicks, 36, of Russell Springs was arrested today (Thursday) by the RCSO for Operating on a Suspended or Revoked Operators License, No Registration Plates, No Registration Receipt, and a Communications Device Violation.
  • William Scottie Phelps, 39, of Liberty, KY was arrested today for Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Cultivating Marijuana (less than 5 plants), Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Parole Violation (for a Felony Offense).
 
Lodged in the Russell Co. Detention Center.

KYTC Seeking Input on U.S. 127 Improvement Study in Russell County

 

SOMERSET, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2021) – Public input is needed to help the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) identify transportation concerns along the U.S. 127 corridor in Russell County between the Jamestown Bypass and KY 379.

 

KYTC along with the Lake Cumberland Area Development District and Stantec Consulting Services has been working to analyze existing conditions and wants to hear from you regarding your safety and traffic concerns within the study area. Your input is essential to identify the needs of roadway users on a local and regional level. Please take a moment to help the team identify needs along the highway, by completing a short survey available at https://transportation.ky.gov/DistrictEight/Pages/US-127-Russell-Springs-Improvement-Study.aspx. The site also includes a story map which summarizes existing conditions in the study area and an opportunity for you to place points on an online mapping portal to enter location-specific data about existing traffic and safety concerns.

 

The study team will use engineering, traffic data (current and projected to 2045), and public input to help develop possible short- and long-term highway improvements. Another round of public involvement in late Spring 2021 will collect your input on any proposed improvements. Further funding will be necessary to advance any improvement concept identified as part of this study.

 

Please complete the survey by February 15, 2021. For additional project information or special assistance, please contact the KYTC Project Manager, Jeff Dick at JeffD.Dick@ky.gov or call 606-677-3507.

 

Updates can also be found at www.facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8 or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8.  

 

WINTER PREPAREDNESS

 

(Info. from the Lake Cumberland District Health Dept.)

 

Prepare for extremely cold weather every winter—it’s always a possibility. There are steps you can take in advance for greater wintertime safety in your home.

 

Listen to weather forecasts regularly and check your emergency supplies whenever a period of extreme cold is predicted. Although periods of extreme cold cannot always be predicted far in advance, weather forecasts can sometimes provide you with several days notice.

 

If you plan to use a fireplace or wood stove for emergency heating, have your chimney or flue inspected each year. Ask your local fire department to recommend an inspector or find one online.

 

If you’ll be using a fireplace, wood stove, or kerosene heater, install a smoke detector and a battery-operated carbon monoxide detector near the area to be heated. Test them monthly and replace batteries twice a year. All fuel-burning equipment should be vented to the outside. Each winter season have your furnace system and vent checked by a qualified technician to ensure they are functioning properly.

 

If you are over 65 years old, place an easy-to-read thermometer in an indoor location where you will see it frequently. Your ability to feel a change in temperature decreases with age. Older adults are more susceptible to health problems caused by cold. Check the temperature of your home often during the winter months.

 

Insulate any water lines that run along exterior walls so your water supply will be less likely to freeze. To the extent possible, weatherproof your home by adding weather-stripping, insulation, insulated doors, and storm windows or thermal-pane windows.

 

If you have pets, bring them indoors. If you cannot bring them inside, provide adequate shelter to keep them warm and make sure they have access to unfrozen water.

 

On a separate note, it is important to point out that Kentucky is one of the unhealthiest states in our nation; but, a few healthy lifestyle choices could change this. First, eating normally proportioned helpings of nutritious foods including at least five fruits and vegetables a day can lower weight and reduce heart disease and diabetes. Second, exercising about 30 minutes per day can lower blood pressure. Third, avoiding the use of tobacco products can reduce several types of cancer. Finally, making sure you get your needed preventive screenings can detect diseases early and greatly increase your chances for a positive health outcomes, while receiving your recommended vaccinations can prevent acquiring disease in the first place.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATED 1-14-21

Russell County 11 new cases Wednesday. We had 14 cases released from isolation. We now have 73 active cases which 67 cases are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Eastern State, 1 at VA in Lexington. 1 at Norton’s, 2 at Somerset and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County 2 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 14 cases. Adair also reported a death Wednesday. We have had 1,411 total cases with 1,324 of those released and 47 deaths. We have 40 active cases with 38 of those in home isolation and 2 in area hospitals.

McConnell Statement on Senate Schedule

 

WASHINGTON, D.C.U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) issued the following statement today regarding the Senate schedule:

 

“The House of Representatives has voted to impeach the President. The Senate process will now begin at our first regular meeting following receipt of the article from the House.

 

“Given the rules, procedures, and Senate precedents that govern presidential impeachment trials, there is simply no chance that a fair or serious trial could conclude before President-elect Biden is sworn in next week. The Senate has held three presidential impeachment trials. They have lasted 83 days, 37 days, and 21 days respectively.

 

“Even if the Senate process were to begin this week and move promptly, no final verdict would be reached until after President Trump had left office. This is not a decision I am making; it is a fact. The President-elect himself stated last week that his inauguration on January 20 is the ‘quickest’ path for any change in the occupant of the presidency.

 

“In light of this reality, I believe it will best serve our nation if Congress and the executive branch spend the next seven days completely focused on facilitating a safe inauguration and an orderly transfer of power to the incoming Biden Administration. I am grateful to the offices and institutions within the Capitol that are working around the clock, alongside federal and local law enforcement, to prepare for a safe and successful inauguration at the Capitol next Wednesday.”

 

47 New COVID-19 Deaths in KY & Over 4500 New Cases....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 13, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state’s fourth-highest report of new COVID-19 cases and third-highest report of new COVID-19 deaths.

 

“We’re going to pass 3,000 COVID-19 deaths in the commonwealth,” said Gov. Beshear. “That is tragic. We can stop this. We need to wear masks. We need to follow the rules and restrictions, and now is not the time to pull away the authority that keeps us safe. That allows us to be fluid and flexible with a virus that appears to be mutating and spreading more aggressively.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 13, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 4,560
New deaths today: 47

Positivity rate: 12.29%
Total deaths: 2,991
Currently hospitalized: 1,702
Currently in ICU: 403
Currently on ventilator: 225

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Oldham, Kenton, Fayette, Daviess and Boone. Each of these counties reported 160 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 664.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

SENATOR MAX WISE ANNOUNCES COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP FOR 2021 REGULAR SESSION

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (January 13, 2021) – The Senate Majority Caucus has announced the committee assignments for the 2021 Regular Session of the Kentucky General Assembly. Senator Max Wise (R-Campbellsville) will serve as the chairman of the Senate Standing Committee on Education. He will also serve as the co-chairman of the Education Assessment & Accountability Review Subcommittee.

 

Additionally, Senator Wise will serve as a member on the Senate Standing Committees on Agriculture; Health & Welfare; and Transportation. He is also a liaison member on the Budget Review Subcommittee on Education

 

“I am honored to have been appointed to these committees, as both a member and a leader,” said Senator Wise. “This session will be unlike any other as we address issues regarding the pandemic and the annual state budget. I am eager to get to work with fellow lawmakers and stakeholders to address these issues and many others.”

 

Senate committee memberships are confirmed during the first of the session by the Senate Committee on Committees.

 

To learn more about the 2021 Kentucky General Assembly and other legislative matters, please visit www.legislature.ky.gov.

 

LCDHD Update on COVID-19 Vaccine; Patience is Needed

 

There is growing frustration and confusion about the COVID-19 vaccine availability. There is a misconception that Lake Cumberland providers have vaccine they are not giving. There is a misconception we are not willing to put in the time needed to give the vaccines. Below we will clarify the present situation and, taking all things into account, beg for your patience and understanding.

 

Phase 1a (Our Present Situation)

Phase 1a includes long-term care residents and staff, and medical staff.

 

Not including the vaccine that is flowing through the federal contract with Walgreens and CVC for the long-term care residents and staff, as of today, as far as we know, most of the COVID-19 vaccine that has been allocated to our district has either already been administered or will be gone by the end of the week having been utilized for Phase 1a recipients, and Phase 1b, first responders. In a few instances, some surplus vaccine has been used for other populations, but on a very limited basis.

 

For now, the local health departments have not been authorized to order any Phase 1b vaccine. Across the state, efforts are being made at the state-level to move any available vaccine to areas where there are still Phase 1a demand.

 

The total COVID-19 vaccines received by your local health departments so far (again, these have already either been given, or will be given by the end of the week for Phase 1a recipients only), is as follows:

 

  • Adair: 300
  • Casey: 100
  • Clinton 100
  • Cumberland = 100
  • Green = 100
  • McCreary = 100
  • Pulaski = 800
  • Russell = 300
  • Taylor = 100
  • Wayne = 100

 

Should some small amount of any of this vaccine remain after we have met Phase 1a demand, we will open that up to the seventy and older population.

 

Keep in mind that area hospitals also received vaccine for their staff and to help vaccinate the medical community and first responders. Like us, we believe the hospitals have exhausted most of their inventory.

 

Phase 1b Status 

Phase 1b includes first responders (fire, police, etc.), school personnel, and those 70 and older. 

 

First Responders

The local health departments and hospitals have utilized surplus Phase 1a vaccine to target this population. Therefore, first responders have largely been taken care of.

 

School Staff

We have identified providers to administer the school vaccine in every county. Generally speaking, this will be the provider who already holds the school nurse contract with each school board. We have already provided to the state the lists of every school staff member (public, private, and Christian schools) who want the vaccine. For now, we are waiting on the vaccine to be delivered and have been told to expect it for this population in late January or early February.

 

Those 70 and Older

The local health departments and other area providers who have been approved to administer the COVID-19 vaccine stand ready to begin this phase. The problem is, the vaccine simply is not yet available.

 

Let’s break this down. According to census data, there are about 4.67 million people in Kentucky. At 209,369, Lake Cumberland accounts for 4.69% of the state’s total population. The state is presently receiving about 50,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccine per week. Combining what doses all providers in Lake Cumberland together might receive, Lake Cumberland’s portion of the weekly state allocation based on its proportion of the state’s population size would be about 2,343 doses per week.

 

The percent of Kentucky’s population that is 65 plus (the census data breaks at 65 plus, not 70, but this will give us a pretty good idea of what we are up against), is 16.8%. Applied to Lake Cumberland’s population, this would be about 35,174 people needing the vaccine. Now assume that 60% of that population will be willing to take the vaccine. This equals about 21,104 people. Remember, this is a two-dose vaccine, so we need double the amount or about 42,208 doses to vaccinate our elderly population.

 

Remember, the amount of vaccine Lake Cumberland might receive weekly is only 2,343 doses. Again, 42,208 doses needed, and 2,343 doses potentially received weekly. Let that sink in. At that pace it will take us about 4 months to vaccinate the 70 and over population once we are authorized to order this vaccine.

The bottom-line is, we need a lot of patience. The few drug companies who are manufacturing this vaccine are trying to produce enough for the entire planet. Hopefully, production can speed up, but none of us should expect the vaccination efforts to be over soon.

 

Phase 1c Status and Beyond 

Taking the above into account, vaccination efforts for these groups will be several months away.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-13-21

 

Russell County 10 new cases Tuesday. We had 8 cases released from isolation. We have 76 active cases which 69 cases are on self-isolation and 7 cases are hospitalized, 4 cases at Somerset, 1 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at VA in Lexington and 1 at Eastern State Hospital.

 

Adair County 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 12 cases. We have had 1,409 total cases with 1,310 of those released and 46 deaths. We have 53 active cases with 50 of those in home isolation and 3 in area hospitals.

ADAIR COUNTY FISCAL COURT MEETING RECAP....

 

The Adair County Court met last night, Jim Liebe for WAVE NEWS spoke with County Judge Gayle Cowan following the meeting for details... 

 

 

OVER 3,000 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY & 22 NEW DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 12, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced more than 3,000 cases and shared more details on the state’s unemployment one-time relief payment program.

 

“This is the fourth-highest Tuesday, it’s higher than the last couple weeks, so we’re trying to determine where these numbers are going,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are sure that this is a surge caused by gatherings through the holidays, but there is a chance from what we are seeing in the data that while people gathered during the holidays, maybe now they’ve changed their behavior back to be being very careful. If that’s the case, hopefully we’ll see a leveling off, but only the data over the next week is going to let us know.”

 

Gov. Beshear also expressed concerns Tuesday about the Kentucky House of Representatives moving forward with an impeachment petition even though it was filed by four individuals who have made threatening comments and organized extremist rallies, including those where heavily armed men hung the Governor in effigy and another held at the State Capitol last weekend.

 

Unemployment One-Time Relief Payment Program
Today, Gov. Beshear signed an executive order creating the Unemployment One-Time Relief Payment Program to be administered by the Office of Unemployment Insurance (OUI) and funded by Coronavirus Relief Fund money for up to $48 million. The program will provide one-time supplemental payments to claimants:

 

  1. $400 to claimants under any OUI program who: (a) would otherwise have qualified for 2020 FEMA Lost Wages Assistance but their weekly benefit amount was below $100, and (b) who had an approved claim in November and December 2020 but a weekly benefit amount of less than $176. Approximately 25,000 Kentuckians are eligible for this payment; and
  2. $1,000 to claimants under any OUI program between March 4 and Oct. 31, 2020, with verified identities and no indication of fraud, but whose claims were not yet adjudicated and paid. Approximately 16,500 Kentuckians are eligible for this payment.

 

“For those who were able to file a claim, we want to help these people until we can get to their claims,” said Gov. Beshear. “And we want to help the people who were working regular, full-time jobs before this crisis but still didn’t make enough to qualify for Lost Wages Assistance when they lost their jobs.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 12, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 3,053
New deaths today: 22

Positivity rate: 12.23%
Total deaths: 2,944
Currently hospitalized: 1,733
Currently in ICU: 397
Currently on ventilator: 205

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Madison, Kenton, Fayette, Boone and Warren. Each of these counties reported 90 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 368.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

RUSSELL COUNTY IS GETTING THE CORONAVIRUS VACCINE.....

 
Jeff Henderson, with our sister station 98.7 the BUCK, sat down recently and talked with Russell County Hospital Administrator Patrick Branco about the distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine.....
 
 

 

VACCINATION FOR COVID 19 ACROSS THE LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT

 
Vaccination for COVID 19 began December 23rd across the Lake Cumberland District. Each of the 10 health departments received limited doses of the vaccine. These doses were given to individuals identified by the Kentucky Department for Public Health Tier 1a. The Tier 1a individuals consist of long-term care facilities (LTCF) residents and staff, assisted living facilities (ALT) residents and staff, healthcare personnel in clinical settings (inpatient, outpatient, dental and homebased). The health departments focus has been on healthcare personnel. 
 
The long-term care facilities (LTCF) residents and staff, are being vaccinated by a contact through the Department for Public Health with Walgreens and CVS pharmacies. We anticipate these facilities in our District should be vaccinated by March.    
 
Hospitals across the Lake Cumberland District have received limited supplies of vaccine. They are asked to follow the Kentucky Department for Public Health Tier Vaccination guidelines. The hospitals have vaccinated their employees, as well as, in some counties assisted with additional health care personnel.    
 
We have requested additional vaccine to continue vaccinating Tier 1a. After all identified Tier 1a individuals have been vaccinated, we will begin vaccination for Tier 1b.  Tier 1b is identified as first responders, K-12 school employees and persons over 70 years of age. Tier 1b is an extremely large group of individuals.  We want remind everyone that this is no easy task.  We realize many individuals want to be vaccinated.  However, there is very limited amounts of vaccine available at this time.
 
We do want to assure the public that we are working diligently to vaccinate the community as guided by the Department for Public Health. Everyone be aware, it may be summer before unlimited vaccine will be available for the community at large.   
 

Marson Elected Vice President of State Tourism Organization

 

RUSSELL Co, KY – Erin Carrico, executive director of the Murray Convention & Visitors Bureau, has been elected 2021 president of the Kentucky Association of Convention & Visitors Bureaus (KACVB) with Janette Marson, executive director of the Lake Cumberland Tourist Commission as her Vice President.

 

KACVB is an association focusing on political advocacy, public awareness and education for Convention & Visitors Bureaus across the Commonwealth. The organization’s goal is to elevate the understanding of the tourism industry’s economic and social contribution to society as well as to monitor and influence government policies and programs affecting members, the convention and visitor industry.

 

In addition, the organization encourages ongoing educational opportunities for members which enhance their proficiency and to support high standards if professional practices throughout the convention and visitor industry.

 

“Due to COVID, the tourism industry has been turned upside down,” Carrico said. “Tourism is the economic driver in so many communities in Kentucky and they need as many voices as possible, to help them recovery. It is an honor to stand and represent our industry.”

 

KACVB works with sister organizations such as the Kentucky Department of Tourism, Kentucky Travel Industry Association, Kentucky Restaurant Association and the Kentucky Marina Association.

 

Carrico will serve as president of KACVB through the year and will conclude her appointment at the December 2021 meeting. Carrico has been the executive director of the Murray CVB since June 2009. Janette Marson will take over as KACVB President in 2022.

 

Executive officers for 2021 include: Vice President Janette Marson, Lake Cumberland Tourist Commission; Secretary Lori Murphy, Richmond Tourism Commission; Treasurer Traci Cunningham, Oak Grove Tourism; Immediate Past President Nancy Turner, Winchester-Clark. County Tourism Commission.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-12-21

 

Russell County 12 new cases reported Monday. We had 11 cases released from isolation. We now have 74 active cases which 68 cases are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized, 4 at Somerset, 1 at VA in Lexington and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 6 cases. We have had 1,404 total cases with 1,298 of those released and 46 deaths. We have 60 active cases with 57 of those in home isolation and 3 in area hospitals.

RUSSELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT MET MONDAY NIGHT

The Russell County Fiscal Court met Monday night in its regular monthly session... 

 

County Judge Gary Robertson tells WAVE NEWS it was a short but productive meeting... 

 

Governor condemns domestic terrorism, unveils letter from CDC director Dr. Robert Redfield saying public health guidance should not be written into law...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 11, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced more than 2,000 new COVID-19 cases, condemned domestic terrorism and said General Assembly actions that would significantly limit the state’s ability to fight the deadly virus are dangerous and unfeasible.

 

“We’ve seen some bills move through the General Assembly that attempt to create new ways of addressing the coronavirus,” said Gov. Beshear. “One bill that passed attempted to put U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines into law as the law that could be enforced. Today I received a letter from Dr. Robert Redfield, CDC director, cautioning against this.”

 

“I want to make it clear that CDC guidance should not be interpreted as regulation; rather, they are meant as recommendations. It should be used in consideration for specific state and/or local regulations, but this guidance is meant to be flexible and adaptable,” Dr. Redfield said. “It is not meant to be prescriptive or interpreted as standards that can be regulated.”

 

The CDC consistently has backed the effectiveness of Gov. Beshear’s restrictions aimed at preventing the spread of COVID-19 in restaurants and bars, gyms, schools and other venues.

 

On Monday, Gov. Beshear also condemned domestic terrorists and a threat made at public health commissioner Dr. Steven Stack’s home.

 

“One of the ways we absolutely know what individuals attempted to do, in terms of harming or kidnapping elected officials, were the zip ties some of those individuals carried into the U.S. Capitol and to our State Capitol,” said Gov. Beshear. “These aren’t people who believe in the rule of law; they are people who believe they can take the law into their own hands to bully and intimidate others. We here in Kentucky will not be bullied. Anybody who believes that domestic terror is the way to go, we’ll be ready for you. And to those who in their elected positions will use the words of hate or anger, and will try to stir it up – stop.

 

“Someone vandalized our own Dr. Stack’s home, spray-painting ‘COVID is PCR fraud’ on his mailbox. This wasn’t about the spray paint. It was about those individuals trying to create terror, saying we know where you live and we know how to get to you. But we will not let that happen. Because of Dr. Stack’s work, thousands of people are alive today who wouldn’t have been without him. Trying to create fear in his family is the lowest form of low.”

 

Today, in accordance with a proclamation from the White House, Gov. Beshear directed that flags at all state office buildings be lowered to half-staff until sunset Jan. 13, as a sign of respect for the service and sacrifice of United States Capitol Police Officers Brian Sicknick and Howard Liebengood, as well as law enforcement in Kentucky and across the country. For more information, see the full release here.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Monday, Jan. 11, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,085
New deaths today: 21
Positivity rate: 12.35%
Total deaths: 2,922
Currently hospitalized: 1,709
Currently in ICU: 381
Currently on ventilator: 207

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Boone, Madison, Morgan and Warren. Each of these counties reported 60 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 358.

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Memorial
“Today we mourn the loss of another educator in Kentucky. Simone Parker was only 46 years old when she passed away from COVID-19 earlier this month. She taught for 19 years at Trigg County High School in Cadiz and was described by everyone who knew her as an extraordinary educator. She always said, ‘Once they are mine, they are always mine,’ about her students. And that was true,” said Gov. Beshear. “She was often found taking care of her kids in and out of the classroom, doing whatever was needed to make sure they succeeded.  

 

“Her husband, William Parker, shared that once you met Simone you were considered family to her. She never met a stranger.

 

“William and Simone were set to celebrate 24 years of marriage later this year before he, Simone and her sister who lives with them all tested positive for COVID-19. Unfortunately, it hit Simone harder, and the Monday before Christmas she had to be taken to the hospital. During this time she was intubated and sedated, and couldn’t speak. William said the hardest part was not being able to truly say goodbye to his wife of 23 years.

 

“Today we lift William and the rest of Simone’s family and community in prayer, including her students, colleagues and friends who she cared for.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

JANUARY IS "NATIONAL RADON ACTION MONTH"....

 

Test Your Home to Determine Risk of Radon Gas Exposure

 

You can’t see it, smell it or touch it.

 

The #1 cause of lung cancer outside of smoking is a radioactive gas that everyone breathes in every day, usually at low levels, according to the National Cancer Institute.

 

Radon gas is produced from a natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water. This radioactive gas can be detected in homes, offices and schools; it enters buildings through cracks in floors and walls, construction joints or gaps around service pipes, electrical wires and sump pits.

 

When radon gas exceeds acceptable levels, the result can be deadly.

 

Scientists estimate 15,000 to 22,000 lung cancer deaths in the U.S. each year are related to radon.

 

People who breathe in radioactive particles, swallow water with high radon levels or are exposed to radon for a long period of time are susceptible to lung damage and lung cancer. The Environmental Protection Agency says nearly 1 out of every 15 homes in America is estimated to have elevated radon levels.

 

How Do You Know if You’re at Risk?
The EPA reports elevated levels of radon gas have been measured in every state. Everyone is at some risk. Smokers who are exposed to elevated levels of radon gas are at higher risk of developing lung cancer.

 

Testing is the only way to determine how much radon is present in your home or drinking water. Short-term (3- to 4-day) and long-term (3- to 12-month) test kits are available. In some cases, manufacturers of these kits will conduct analysis and post results online.

 

How to get a free radon test kit?
Call the Kentucky Radon Program at: (502) 564-4856.

 

How Much is Too Much?
No level of radon exposure is considered completely safe, however the EPA only recommends reducing radon levels in your home if your long-term exposure averages 4 picocuries per liter (pCI/L) or higher. A pCI is a measure of the rate of radioactive decay of radon gas. (These are the tiny particles that can get trapped in your lungs when you breathe.)

 

Reducing Radon Gas in Your Home
The American Cancer society says a variety of methods can be used to reduce radon gas levels in your home, including sealing cracks in floors and walls and increasing ventilation though sub-slab depressurization using pipes and fans.

 

The EPA recommends using a state or nationally certified contractor because lowering high radon levels often requires technical expertise and special skills. Two agencies have set the standard for participants seeking certification:

 

January is National Radon Action Month
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has designated January as National Radon Action Month, a time when health agencies across the country urge all Americans to have their homes tested for radon. Schools, businesses and other buildings also should be tested, according to the EPA.

 

Visit the EPA website for ideas on how to help spread the word about Radon testing and mitigation.

 

What is Being Done to Protect Employees
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and OSHA set limits on exposure to radon in the workplace.

In mines, one of the most dangerous areas for radon exposure, features have been added to lower radon levels. For uranium miners, millers and transporters who have certain health problems as a result of exposure during atmospheric nuclear weapons tests or while employed in the uranium industry during the Cold War arsenal build up from 1945 to 1962, the U.S. government has established the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act.

 

Other Resources

On a separate note, it is important to point out that Kentucky is one of the unhealthiest states in our nation; but, a few healthy lifestyle choices could change this. First, eating normally proportioned helpings of nutritious foods including at least five fruits and vegetables a day can lower weight and reduce heart disease and diabetes. Second, exercising about 30 minutes per day can lower blood pressure. Third, avoiding the use of tobacco products can reduce several types of cancer. Finally, making sure you get your needed preventive screenings can detect diseases early and greatly increase your chances for a positive health outcomes, while receiving your recommended vaccinations can prevent acquiring disease in the first place.

 

Kentucky State Police Post 15 Investigates Fatal Collision In Clinton County

 

Albany, KY (January 11, 2021) On January 9th, 2021 at approximately 5:43 PM Kentucky State Police Post 15 received a call from Clinton County Dispatch requesting assistance on a two vehicle collision that had resulted in a fatality. Preliminary investigations indicate that 31 year old Jesse Brown of Monticello, KY was operating a 1999 Chevy Silverado, west bound on KY 90, holding a 7 month old child in his lap when he entered into the east bound lane and struck a 2012 Ford Focus head on being operated by 61 year old Debra Brown of Albany, KY. Mrs. Brown was pronounced deceased at the scene by the Clinton County Coroner. Jesse Brown and the infant child were located at the Wayne County Hospital where the child was treated and later transferred to the University of Kentucky Hospital, listed in stable condition. Mr. Brown was not injured.
 

Brown was arrested and charged with Murder, Speeding 26 < MPH, DUI 1st aggravating circumstance, Wanton Endangerment and Leaving the scene of an accident. He was lodged in the Clinton County Detention Center. This incident remains under investigation by Trooper Jason Warinner.
 

Trooper Warinner was assisted at the scene by Clinton County Sheriff’s Department, Clinton County EMS, Albany Fire Department, Clinton County Coroner’s Office, and Clinton County State Highway Department.  
 

HOUSE FIRE CLAIMS LIFE OF GREEN CO. WOMAN...

 

One person died Sunday in a house fire on Sand Lick Road in Green County. The structure caught fire claiming the life of a Green County woman. The body has been sent to the state medical examiners office for positive identification. Green County firefighters say it's unclear on how the fire started. The investigation continues. 
 

LCDHD REPORT SUNDAY, JAN. 10, 2020: NO NEW DEATHS & 84 NEW CASES....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 12.45%.

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 280 deaths resulting in a 1.81% mortality rate (about 1 in 55) among known cases. This compares with a 0.96% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.68% mortality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 67 cases* in the hospital. This is 2 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 871 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.64% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.8%. The latest data shows that 95.56% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 32.76% of ventilator capacity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 15,456 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 7.4% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 144 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 9; Casey: 6; Clinton: 12; Cumberland: 7; Green: 4; McCreary: 7; Pulaski: 55; Russell: 8; Taylor: 13; and, Wayne: 23. In all, we have released 91.4% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 60 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 1,043 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,340.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. We have had 60 cases tied to Christmas gaterings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 7 tied to New Year’s events. Of our active cases, 9% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 84 today: Casey: 12; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 2; Green: 1; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 46; Russell: 1; Taylor: 11; and, Wayne: 5. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.014. This means our total case count is projected to double every 48.78 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Casey: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 19-year-old female who is released, Resolved;
Casey: A 12-year-old female who is released, Resolved;
Casey: A 48-year-old female who is released, Resolved;
Casey: A 21-year-old female who is released, Resolved;
Casey: A 18-year-old female who is released, Resolved;
Casey: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 29-year-old male who is released, Resolved;
Cumberland: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 42-year-old female who is released, Resolved;
Green: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is hospitalized, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We are getting numerous questions about why different counties in the state are at different places with their COVID-19 vaccine administration response. For the moment, all counties are supposed to still be primarily focused on Phase 1a (medical staff, and nursing homes). However, since the Moderna vaccines come in shipments of 100 doses, in some occasions there may be some left-over vaccine from week to week where Phase 1a recipients can not be found. Every provider in every county is encouraged to use this surplus vaccine. So, in some instances, some counties will vaccinate a few folks in Phase 1b (first responders, school staff, or those ages 70 and over) with this surplus Phase 1a vaccine. Also, since 100 doses goes much farther in a small county with a population of, say, 6,000, than it would in a county with a population of 70,000, everyone is going to have to become comfortable with the fact that some counties are going to get ahead of other counties when progressing through the COVID-19 vaccination phases.

 

Also, as far as the local health departments go, the State Department for Public Health arranges for our vaccines to be shipped to us from the drug companies. Likewise, any other area providers who are receiving vaccines (hospitals and maybe a few others), are having their orders also arranged directly by the State Department for Public Health. The local health departments have no input over which local providers receive the vaccine or how they distribute it. They are all supposed to be following the COVID-19 Vaccination Phase Guidance, but if they don’t, it is outside of our influence. We do plan on reaching out to our community health care partners soon and beginning to have online meetings with them to better coordinate our overall response. Again, though, how they ultimately chose to utilize their vaccine will be up to them.

 

On a very positive note, we ended last week with no deaths the last couple of days. We start this week with no known COVID-19 deaths in our district. Also, we began last week with 115 new cases, today, 84. However, we have 1,043 active cases today compared with 795 last Sunday; and, we have 67 hospitalized cases today compared to 63 last Sunday. For our district, we had our largest 7-day incidence rate per 100,000 last week on Friday, a little over 103 new cases per day (a little more than 1 per 1,000 per day). Finally, our district’s ICU capacity is stretched very thin. So, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 15,456 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 304,712 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 303,625 statewide plus 1,087 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

COVID-19 Vaccination Update

LCDHD is currently operating in Phase 1a of our COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan. This includes vaccines for healthcare workers and first responders. We are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases at this time, as vaccines are not readily available. Please follow this website and the LCDHD social media sites such as Facebook for details about future vaccine availability once additional vaccine is received. Also, don’t forget about the contract with Walgreens and CVS pharmacies to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff.

 

JAMESTOWN COUPLE ARRESTED ON DRUG CHARGES....

 

John Camp, 46, and Nolina Camp, 46, were taken into custody on Sunday afternoon by Deputy Perkins with the Russell County Sheriff’s Office and Trooper Harper of the Kentucky State Police. Both were charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st, degree, 1st offense (METH), Possession of Marijuana, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. They were lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-11-21

Russell County We had 1 new case Sunday. We had 8 cases released from isolation. We now have 73 active cases which 69 cases are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 3 cases at Somerset and 1 case at VA in Lexington.

 

Adair County NO NEW CASES yesterday. 9 released, 1399 total cases with 1292 released. 61 active cases with 58 in home isolation 3 in area hospitals

WEEKEND ARRESTS 01/10/21

 
  • Krista Meece, 48, of Russell Springs - arrested on Saturday by KSP for Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of Marijuana, Possession of a Controlled Substance 3rd degree (Drug Unspecified), Prescription Controlled Substance Not in Proper Container, Resisting Arrest, Fleeing or Evading Police (on foot), and Non-Payment of Court Costs, Fees, or Fines.

 

  • Jason Bernard, 40, of Russell Springs - arrested Saturday afternoon by the RCSO for Improper Start From Parked Position, Reckless Driving, 2 counts of Failure to Appear, Possession of Open Alcoholic Beverage Container in Motor Vehicle, Failure to Wear Seatbelt, Failure of Non-Owner Operator to Maintain Required Insurance, Speeding, No Registration Receipt, and Failure to Signal.
 
Lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
 
 
  • Reshandall Leigh Bridgewaters, 39, of Columbia - arrested by the ACSO early this morning (Sunday) for Criminal Mischief 3rd degree, Receiving Stolen Property, Violation of a Kentucky EPO/DVO, and Tampering with Physical Evidence.

 

  • Jerry Alan Loy, 45, of Columbia - arrested Saturday night by the ACSO for Alcohol Intoxication in a Public Place and Violation of Conditions of Release.
 
Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.
 

LCDHD REPORT - SATURDAY, JANUARY 9, 2021


Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 12.32%.

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 280 deaths resulting in a 1.82% mortality rate (about 1 in 55) among known cases. This compares with a 0.96% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.69% mortality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 65 cases* in the hospital. This is 6 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 869 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.65% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.83%. The latest data shows that 77.78% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 28.33% of ventilator capacity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 15,372 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 7.36% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 153 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 11; Casey: 12; Clinton: 12; Cumberland: 2; Green: 10; McCreary: 15; Pulaski: 44; Russell: 7; Taylor: 16; and, Wayne: 24. In all, we have released 91% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 11 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 1,103 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,338.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. We have had 60 cases tied to Christmas gaterings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 6 tied to New Year’s events. Of our active cases, 8% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 142 today: Adair: 5; Casey: 7; Clinton: 11; Cumberland: 3; Green: 11; McCreary: 14; Pulaski: 70; Russell: 7; Taylor: 8; and, Wayne: 6. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 47.45 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 20-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 23-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 89-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 93-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is released, Resolved;
McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is released, Resolved;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4m-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We are glad to have ended the week with two days of no COVID-19 related deaths. However, at the state and local level, we experienced a sharp spike in new cases compared to last week. Locally, we 1,493 new cases this week compared to 1,006 last week. Last Saturday we had 861 active cases, today, 1,103. We experienced 10 deaths this week. Last Saturday, we had 61 cases hospitalized, today, 65.

 

We still aren’t sure when the state will authorize us to start ordering Phase 1b vaccine for the seventy and older age group. Monitor our Daily Brief and social media for breaking information.

 

With cases on the rise, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 15,372 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 301,515 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 300,398 statewide plus 1,117 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.


COVID-19 Vaccination Update

LCDHD is currently operating in Phase 1a of our COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan. This includes vaccines for healthcare workers and first responders.
 

We are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases at this time, as vaccines are not readily available.
 

Please follow this website and the LCDHD social media sites such as Facebook for details about future vaccine availability once additional vaccine is received. Also, don’t forget about the contract with Walgreens and CVS pharmacies to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff.

 

A.C. STUDENT MEAL PICK-UP SCHEDULE

 
On Monday, January 4, 2021, the Adair County Schools Food Service Department will provide 5-day meal boxes at Adair County Primary Center for all Virtual Students and BLUE Tribe Students; and at Adair County Elementary School for the RED Tribe Students.
 
Pick-up times are as follows:
  • Adair County Elementary School 10:00 – 1:00
  • Adair County Primary Center 10:00 – 1:00
 
As we transition back into the Hybrid schedule starting January 11, 2021, we will go back to meal pickups for all Virtual Only students on Wednesday, January 13, 2021. The pickup time and place will be the same as before; Adair County Primary Center from 10:00 to 12:00. Students who attend school in person on the Blue/Red schedule will continue to bring meals home for the days they are not physically at school.
 
If you are unable to pick up meals at the times mentioned, please call Carol Roy or Dayna Parnell at the Central Office at 270-384-2476, extension 2003 or 2004. We will work with you to make arrangements to get the meals.
 

RUSSELL CO. FISCAL COURT MEETING MONDAY, JAN. 11TH

 
The Russell County Fiscal Court will meet on Monday, January 11, 2021 at 5:30pmCT. 
 
AGENDA 
  • WELCOME, PLEDGE & OPENING PRAYER 
  • MINUTES 
  • PAY BILLS 
  • DETENTION CENTER REPORT 
  • SHERIFF’S REPORT 
  • TREASURER’S MONTHLY & QUARTERLY SETTLEMENT REPORTS & AE TRANSFERS 
  • 1st READING ORDINANCE 21-01 BUDGET AMENDMENT 
  • TRANSFER $374,242.00 FROM GENERAL TO JAIL AS BUDGETED 
  • TRANSFER $38,809.00 FROM GENERAL TO 911 DISPATCH AS BUDGETED 
  • TRANSFER $1,500.00 FROM GENERAL FUND TO EMERGENCY SHELTER FUND 
  • TRANSFER $12,500.00 FROM GENERAL TO TOURISM AS BUDGETED 
  • PAY FIRE DEPARTMENT & RESCUE SQUAD SUPPORT AS BUDGETED 
  • APPROVE 2021 COUNTY PERSONNEL COMPLIMENT 
  • OPEN BIDS FOR PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE CONTRACT – JUDICIAL CENTER

 

243 New Coronavirus Cases in Lake Cumberland District and NO New Deaths...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 11.93%.

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 276 deaths resulting in a 1.84% mortality rate (about 1 in 54) among known cases. This compares with a 0.98% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.69% mortality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 62 cases* in the hospital. This is 11 less than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 851 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.68% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.89%. The latest data shows that 95.56% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 26.7% of ventilator capacity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 14,987 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 7.17% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 331 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 22; Casey: 8; Clinton: 54; Cumberland: 18; Green: 6; McCreary: 31; Pulaski: 89; Russell: 20; Taylor: 31; and, Wayne: 52. In all, we have released 90.8% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 88 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 1,096 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,338.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. We have had 59 cases tied to Christmas gaterings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 5 tied to New Year’s events. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 243 today: Adair: 11; Casey: 9; Clinton: 33; Cumberland: 14; Green: 8; McCreary: 25; Pulaski: 54; Russell: 17; Taylor: 34; and, Wayne: 38. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.013. This means our total case count is projected to double every 54.79 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 2m-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 39-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 23-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 19-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 10-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 33-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A -year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 52-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 54-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Cumberland: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 54-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 53-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 75-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21 Months-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 79-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 13-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 80-year-old female who is released, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 86-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is released, 1/06/21;
Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is released, 1/06/21;
Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is released, 1/06/21;
Wayne: A 7months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 3months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The Clinton and Pulaski numbers will be off by 1 each today as we have removed a duplicate entry in each county. Also, the Casey numbers will be off by 2 as we have removed 2 duplicate entries there.

 

Our new case rate is considerably higher than the state rate, so let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 14,987 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 292,447 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 291,430 statewide plus 1,017 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

COVID-19 Vaccination Update

LCDHD is currently operating in Phase 1a of our COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan. This includes vaccines for healthcare workers and first responders. We are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases at this time, as vaccines are not readily available. Please follow this website and the LCDHD social media sites such as Facebook for details about future vaccine availability once additional vaccine is received. Also, don’t forget about the contract with Walgreens and CVS pharmacies to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff.

 

Over 4,700 New COVID-19 Cases in KY and 13 New Deaths....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 8, 2021) – On Friday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the third-highest ever report of new COVID-19 cases, surpassed only by the Jan. 7 and Jan. 6 reports.

 

The Governor has reported 15,403 new COVID-19 cases in just three days.

 

“We are at a really tough point once again in our war against COVID-19. We have successfully stopped three waves of this virus, but we are now seeing a real and significant increase in cases and our positivity rate from people’s gatherings around the holidays,” said Gov. Beshear. “I wish it hadn’t happened. We’ve got to make sure that moving forward we are not gathering in that way, and we’ve got to know that we wear a mask now to protect ourselves.

 

“You need to be wearing a mask anywhere outside of your own household. It’s gotten that bad and these mutated versions appear to be spreading really fast.”

 

According to the most recent White House Federal Report for Kentucky, the state’s fall and winter surge has been at “nearly twice the rate of rise of cases as the spring and summer surges.”

 

The report continues: “The acceleration suggests there may be a United States COVID-19 variant that has evolved here, in addition to the United Kingdom variant that is already spreading in our communities and may be 50% more transmissible.

 

“Aggressive mitigation must be used to match a more aggressive virus: Without uniform implementation of effective face masking (two or three-ply and well-fitting) and strict social distancing, epidemics could quickly worsen as these variants spread and become predominant.”

 

The White House report recommends the creation of high throughput vaccination sites, continued active vaccination encouragement by the Governor, health officials and other community influencers and televised vaccinations, as Gov. Beshear and state officials conducted Dec. 22, in addition to four more group vaccinations where photos were shared with the media on Dec. 23, Dec. 28, Jan. 4 and another set on Jan. 4.  

 

The Governor also shared guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which directly conflicts with the policies outlined in Kentucky House Bill 1 that would strip the Governor of emergency powers to enact some restrictions that have saved thousands of lives during the pandemic and are supported by Kentuckians.

 

recent poll indicated 66% of Kentucky voters approve of the way the Governor has handled the pandemic. The COVID States Project, a consortium of top universities, in its latest report, finds solid majorities of Kentuckians support all seven COVID-restriction categories, which includes 85% supporting restrictions on large gatherings, nearly 74% backing limits on restaurants and 67% supporting limits on in-person school instruction.

 

The CDC advises: “Given the potential for a rebound in the number of cases or level of community transmission, a low threshold for reinstating more stringent mitigation standards will be essential.”

 

The Governor also suggested the bill was both counterproductive and contradictory: “The CDC reopening plan written into the guidance that would become law in this bill says that if we’ve got cases going up instead of two weeks of cases going down, things should be shut down. This is the problem when you put guidance into law that was never intended to be law: House Bill 1, based on what it references, may be requiring a shut-down of Kentucky that does not and should not need to happen.

 

“Also, is House Bill 1 saying that restaurants have to be open but people aren’t allowed to go in them? That makes no sense.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Jan. 8, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 4,750
New deaths today: 13

Positivity rate: 11.9%
Total deaths: 2,856
Currently hospitalized: 1,748
Currently in ICU: 393
Currently on ventilator: 217

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Oldham, Kenton, Warren and Morgan. Each of these counties reported 150 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 758.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Condolences for U.S. Capitol Police Officer Killed in Line of Duty
The Governor said he was heartbroken to learn a Capitol police officer has died after sustaining injuries from the attack on our U.S. Capitol by domestic terrorists.

 

“This is what happens when you foster disrespect, hate, and division,” said Gov. Beshear. “Every public servant must be responsible for their words and the messages they send. Our thoughts and prayers are with the officer’s family.”

 

Vaccine Progress Update
The Governor said 107,799 initial vaccine doses have been administered across the state; 47,385 have been administered since Monday’s report, which Gov. Beshear said highlights the impact of the state’s push to dramatically speed up vaccinations in the commonwealth.

 

“A shot that sits in a freezer for an extended period of time is no use to anyone,” said Dr. Stack. “Because it is incredibly difficult to find everyone who meet very specific, discrete criteria, and because, unfortunately, there is a substantial portion of the population who is opting to wait for the vaccine or has some concern or hesitancy about it, at the end of the day, we want every vaccination administration site to give at least 90% of the vaccine that reaches the state within seven days, even if that means moving to people in a lower priority category who are willing and able to receive it.”

 

New Northern Kentucky Testing Location Announced
Today, Gov. Beshear announced a new COVID-19 testing site, created in partnership with U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, at the Covington West IRS Parking Lot
(302 W. 4th Street Parking Lot, Covington, KY 41011).

 

The site will be open Jan. 11 to Jan. 14 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

When they arrive at the testing location, Kentuckians should follow instructions on the signage and given by onsite personnel. There are no public restrooms available at the test site. After receiving an appointment, it is very important to print and bring the test voucher on the day of your test. Kentuckians can register for a test here.

 

Unemployment Insurance Update
Today, Amy Cubbage, general counsel for Gov. Beshear, said of the almost 1.5 million claims, only 90,000 initial claims across all programs have unresolved issues. 

 

“A number of those claims appear to be fraudulent claims that will never pay out, and we estimate the true number of claims in that group is approximately 30,000. Only about 5% of claimants have outstanding initial issues, with about a quarter of those having filed in the last three months,” Cubbage said. “We are also proud that we have been able to pay benefits to more than 90% of claimants, where prior to the pandemic our average payment rate was 75%.”

 

Cubbage also provided more information about the new federal benefits provided by Congress in December in the Continued Assistance Act. The Continued Assistance Act provided:

 

  • An 11-week extension of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program for non-traditional and contract employees, which means claimants under that program can qualify for a total of 50 weeks;
  • An 11-week extension of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program, which provides some claimants who have exhausted traditional UI benefits continued benefits;
  • An opportunity to regain the Extended Benefits program; and
  • An 11-week $300 per week supplement similar to the $600 per week supplement Congress provided during the spring and summer.

 

She explained more about stimulus payments for unemployment insurance claimants announced by the Governor last night. The Office of Unemployment Insurance (OUI) is working on programming to get these payments out to those who qualify by the end of next week. These are one-time payments that will arrive in the same manner as regular unemployment payments, whether by direct deposit to a bank account or a prepaid debit card. There are two types of payments under this program:

 

  1. A $1,000 payment to people who have filed claims from March 4 through Oct. 31 and have yet to have their claims resolved.  Kentuckians are eligible if OUI has proof of identity and if their claims have not been flagged as fraudulent. Approximately 20,000 to 24,000 Kentuckians are eligible for these payments.
  2. A $400 payment to people who would have qualified for the $400 FEMA supplemental payment in August and September, but didn’t have a benefit amount high enough to qualify under the President’s order. People who drew a weekly benefit amount of $175 or less in November and December will qualify for the $400.  Approximately 60,000 Kentuckians are eligible for these payments.

 

“Watch the KCC website for updates on timing and more specific details about these payments,” Cubbage said. “Also, if you receive your benefits on a prepaid debit card, please check the notice on the KCC website about the upcoming change in debit card providers. There will be a lag between providers, so unless you change your payment method to direct deposit into a bank account you will receive a paper check for a short period of time. If you prefer to receive a check rather than a direct deposit, please make sure we have your correct address.”

Finally, Cubbage provided an update on overpayments to claimants.

 

“You may remember that early in the pandemic we had some issues with mistaken payments being made to claimants, and now they’ve been asked to pay those back. As you know, the Governor asked us to find a way to forgive those overpayments because those were our mistake, not yours,” Cubbage said. “The Continued Assistance Act actually amended the federal law and allows us to waive those, but state law doesn’t at this time. So we are hoping the General Assembly will give us the flexibility to waive those payments while they are here. We look forward to working with them to achieve that.”

 

Long-Term Care Update
Today, Adam Mather, inspector general at the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, provided an update on vaccine progress in the commonwealth’s long-term care facilities.

 

As of yesterday, vaccinations had been given to staff and residents in 287 long-term care and assisted living facilities. Nearly 24,000 initial doses have been administered.

 

“There will be significant ramp-ups and a pledge by both partners to be finished administering initial doses by Jan. 25. Some delays in vaccinating residents have been related to COVID-19 outbreaks in facilities, but those residents will be able to be vaccinated at a later date. As the Governor mentioned, staff vaccinations remain a bit of an issue, but a caveat to that is that some of the facilities have decided to split their staff in half in case there are any reactions, so they can ensure they don’t have a staffing shortage.

 

“With that said, I want to point out that we haven’t seen any negative side effects from residents or staff reported other than soreness.”

 

Price-Gouging Prohibited
Today, Gov. Beshear signed an executive order prohibiting price-gouging, extending a previous order. This order will remain in effect for the duration of the state of emergency.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Gov. Beshear: 'Better Kentucky Budget' Allows Commonwealth to Lead in Post-COVID Economy


FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 7, 2021) – Thanks to the many sacrifices made by Kentuckians during the pandemic, the State of the Commonwealth is stronger and more prepared than most to defeat COVID-19 and sprint into our future, Gov. Andy Beshear declared this evening in a speech to a joint meeting of the General Assembly.

 

The Governor delivered his combined State of the Commonwealth and Budget Address in a virtual speech recorded in his office due to coronavirus restrictions and delayed a day by the attack on the U.S. Capitol by domestic terrorists.

 

“Tonight, I address both a state and a country that are hurting,” Gov. Beshear said during his address. “Hurting from a pandemic that has swept across the world, upended our economy and taken the lives of our loved ones. Hurting from attacks on our democracy that yesterday rose to the level of a direct attack on the United States Capitol.”

 

The Governor urged Kentuckians to reject violence and political rhetoric that incites hatred and division.

 

Looking to the future, the Governor unveiled a three-pillared Better Kentucky Budget proposal that will help ensure we take full advantage of every opportunity and lead in the post-COVID economy.

 

“To achieve our goal of a better Kentucky, all branches of government must be prepared to take bold action,” Gov. Beshear. “We have not had this much opportunity for new investment in our people and our future in a generation. Let’s make it count. Let’s have courage. Let’s be bold. Let’s not fumble the opportunity.”

 

The Governor’s proposal includes measures everyone should support. The proposed budget includes relief to unemployed workers and small businesses; makes long-needed improvements to the unemployment system; provides assistance for more Kentuckians to attend college or earn a certificate; and expands broadband. It also includes raises for educators and state employees; an extra $100 million to build and renovate schools; funding increases for K-12 and higher education; full funding for retirement and Medicaid; money for additional social workers; and an additional $100 million for the Rainy Day Fund, which is now at its highest level ever.

 

During his address, before laying out details of his vision for a better Kentucky, the Governor asked those willing to say a prayer and participate in a moment of silence for the more than 2,800 Kentuckians lost to COVID-19.

 

He also recognized Kentuckians’ selfless actions, which, along with the smart, aggressive steps his administration has taken, suppressed three waves of infection and saved thousands of Kentucky lives.

 

“You don’t have to take my word for it,” the Governor said.
 

“You can look at the devastating experiences in states that failed to take the same aggressive steps we have to stop this deadly virus. Adjusted for population, we have suffered less than half the number of deaths as the people of Tennessee and less than one-fourth the number of deaths as the citizens of North and South Dakota. Through these trials, we learned that an effective virus response is necessary to sustain and rebuild our economy.”

 

Despite the economic damage caused by the pandemic, which negatively affected many small businesses and families, Gov. Beshear said the hard work of his administration, especially his State Budget Director, John Hicks, led to encouraging state budget news that allows the state to provide relief to those still hurting and to invest.

 

Director Hicks said the budget is structurally sound, fiscally responsible including the largest ever Rainy Day Fund and includes $600 million in one-time funds. The budget also adheres to the revenue estimates of the Consensus Forecasting Group and it does not rely on new taxes, new revenue measures or spending cuts.

 

Pillar 1: Immediate Relief to Families and Businesses Harmed During the Pandemic For small business relief for those that have experienced losses because of the pandemic, the Governor is proposing a fast-tracked bill to immediately make available $220 million in the Better Kentucky Small Business Relief Fund. This represents the single largest relief fund of its kind in generations.

 

For individual relief, the Governor is authorizing $48 million in CARES Act funding to those who have waited too long to receive unemployment benefits and to help those who missed out on the federal government’s Lost Wages Assistance Program because they made too little.

 

The Better Kentucky Budget also allocates $47.5 million to correct a legacy of underfunding the unemployment insurance (UI) system after the Governor’s administration inherited a UI operation running on an IT system that has been in operation since the 1970s and is functionally obsolete.

 

In the years leading up to the pandemic, the previous administration, and previous sessions, closed in-person offices and cut 95 skilled employees from UI. In addition, the UI budget was slashed by $16 million. This, coupled with a once-in-a-lifetime, 1,300% year-over-year increase in claims meant many Kentuckians have had to wait too long during a difficult time for their payments. The Governor’s budget includes General Fund spending of $1.1 million in fiscal year 2021 and $8.4 million in fiscal year 2022 to provide funding to restore employees to help with unemployment claims at the 12 career centers throughout the commonwealth.

 

“This is help they are owed and deserve and far too many have waited far too long,” the Governor said.

 

Finally, using CARES Act funding, the Governor has already repaid $152 million in UI loans, and his budget proposal adds another $100 million in repayment.

 

Pillar 2: Investing in Our People The Governor is prioritizing the needs of our children and families, including their education, health care and retirements.

 

Gov. Beshear recognized that educators and school staffers have had to overcome incredible challenges this year, quickly adjusting to online instruction when needed and making sure children were fed even when they were not in the classroom.

 

The Governor is proposing a $1,000 raise for teachers and classified staffers, who have gone above and beyond in their duties.

 

He is investing in our children by increasing the SEEK formula and funding textbooks and technology. The Governor is supporting preschool programs in disadvantaged areas and restoring a teacher loan forgiveness program.

 

The Governor also is proposing a 1% raise for our hardworking state employees. He is seeking to improve compensation for local and state law enforcement and firefighters, who are always on the front lines, with a $600 stipend increase from the Law Enforcement and Firefighters Foundation Program funds, bringing the stipend up to $4,600. He also provides a full exclusion of military pensions from the Kentucky income tax, recognizing the service that our men and women in uniform have provided to our country and the commonwealth, and welcoming them to live, work and retire here.

 

The Better Kentucky Budget invests in our families’ health care by fully funding Medicaid, adding 76 new social workers for child protective services, increasing the number of slots available for Michelle P Medicaid waivers and more. He said his administration will continue to address inequities in access to health care, which have been spotlighted by the pandemic.

 

The Governor is supporting the selfless local health departments by doubling their General Fund support, adding another $12 million in fiscal year 2022 to improve their epidemiology and clinical capacity.

 

To support healthy retirements, the Governor is providing pension relief to critical quasi-governmental agencies, like child advocacy centers and domestic violence shelters, as well as local health departments and community mental health centers. The Governor’s Better Kentucky Budget also includes full pension funding for the Teachers’ Retirement System for just the second time.

 

The Governor includes more than $580,000 for the University Press of Kentucky and $20 million in aid to small nonprofit organizations.

 

In doing what is right, Gov. Beshear’s budget reinstates funding for the Commission on Women, reinstates the Office of Minority Empowerment and provides additional funds each year to reinvest in the Commission on Human Rights.

 

Pillar 3: Investing Boldly in Our Future The third pillar of the Better Kentucky Budget makes bold, strategic investments in our future using $272 million in one-time funds to improve infrastructure and create thousands of jobs, all while exercising fiscal responsibility.

 

“The shock of COVID-19 has brought on our current transformational period, and how we lead in the next year will dictate whether Kentucky simply recovers back to the old normal or, instead, takes its place among the most productive and innovative states in the union,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

His budget focuses on repairing crumbling schools, some of which date to before the 1930s, with a one-time $100 million investment to renovate or replace them. This will improve the educational experience for students and teachers, while also creating thousands of construction jobs.

 

He is investing in our workforce with more dollars to higher education and by creating the Better Kentucky Promise, a program that aims to provide the necessary last dollars that should allow nearly 6,300 Kentuckians to complete associate’s degrees or secure certificates.

 

The budget provides $50 million to fund last-mile broadband coverage. This is the first time ever that state dollars have been used to invest in expanding broadband.

 

“We used to think of broadband in terms of just business. Now we know it touches every part of our lives: the education of our kids, how we receive health care. This is the most important infrastructure of the future,” Gov. Beshear said.

 

The Governor is proposing the Emerging Industries Fund, which is designed to provide flexible resources targeted to Kentucky’s future economy and developing technologies in agritech, aerospace, health care, logistics, advanced manufacturing and other key areas. By incentivizing these sectors, Kentucky will be more prepared to succeed in the post-COVID economy.

 

The Better Kentucky Budget also includes $7.7 million in state bond funds to match $38.7 million in federal dollars to repair, replace and improve local drinking water and wastewater infrastructure, and $6 million in state bonds so that localities can access federal funds for critical flood control projects in our communities.

 

The Governor also wants lawmakers to address the transportation budget. He said doing so will require both short-term and long-term solutions, but it is time to create more jobs and stimulate the economy.

 

Building a better Kentucky also means our laws do not unduly restrict us from innovation.

 

“I’m asking all of my cabinet secretaries to identify ways to modernize with an eye towards determining what services can remain remote. A resident of Paducah or Ashland who wants a license or certificate shouldn’t have to spend more time in their car coming to Frankfort than he or she does actually taking the test to get the certificate,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

And speaking of laws that unduly restrict growth, the Governor said it is time to legalize medical marijuana, pass sports betting and save historic horse racing.

 

The Governor also said part of building a better Kentucky is acknowledging and addressing the racism that continues to exist in this country and in this commonwealth.

 

“To live our motto, ‘United We Stand,’ requires us to view and treat each other as equals,” Gov. Beshear said.

 

Finally, Gov. Beshear urged lawmakers to come together in support of all Kentucky families, and to take the virus seriously to avoid more pain, death and disruption and to set politics aside.

 

“So, let me be clear: Every moment in this short session that we spend fighting is a loss for our Kentucky families. Such fighting will leave us empty-handed and further behind those states that recognize this moment and this opportunity. Our goal should be to act swiftly and with wisdom on behalf of the people of the commonwealth.

 

“Now is our time. We can’t play politics while our people struggle,” the Governor added.

 

The Governor said there are many issues that Republicans and Democrats can agree on, and he looks forward to working with Senate President Robert Stivers, House Speaker David Osborne and every member of the General Assembly to set a positive tone in Frankfort and take advantage of this opportunity.

 

The Governor said: “We get to decide how history looks back on us in 10, 20 or 50 years. This is our chance. Let’s think and act differently so we can get different and better results.”


During his remarks, the Governor mentioned that over the past year, the words of President Abraham Lincoln, whose statue holds a place of pride in the Capitol Rotunda, have motivated him during the tough days and inspired his vision.

 

“I am reminded of his message to the federal legislature in 1862. He said, ‘The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country.’

 

“While half of the country disagreed with every decision President Lincoln made, history has judged him amongst our greatest leaders.

 

“President Lincoln – the epitome of leadership in times of turmoil and division – reminds us of the importance of this moment. He said, ‘Leave nothing for tomorrow which can be done today.’”

 

Gov. Beshear concluded his remarks by reminding Kentuckians that this is likely one of the most important and formative years for Kentucky in a generation.

 

“Let’s get to work in building a better Kentucky,” he said.

 

Note: To help limit the spread of COVID-19, the Governor filmed his nearly 30 minutes of remarks at his desk in the Capitol Building in Frankfort. Based on a suggestion from KET, the speech was pre-recorded to avoid any technical issues. KET will provide full coverage and live close captioning.

 

37 New COVID-19 Deaths and Over 4900 New Cases in KY....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 7, 2021) – On Thursday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced nearly 5,000 new COVID-19 cases in the commonwealth’s second-highest daily report – yesterday’s report was the highest-ever – and the state’s highest positivity rate since May 5.

 

The Governor has announced 10,653 cases in just two days.

 

“We are in a dangerous place. It is now clear that we are seeing an escalation related to holiday gatherings. This is not the time to make it harder to react to this virus when it may be surging again,” said Gov. Beshear. “We have to have the tools to fight back.

 

“Wear your masks all the time when you are indoors and there is anybody else there who is from outside your household. At this point, do it for your own safety. That’s what we need to do to get through these next couple months. Over the last two days, we have vaccinated 32,524 Kentuckians. We are ready to defeat this virus and we need to make sure we protect our people while we do.”

 

He said Kentuckians can watch his joint State of the Commonwealth and budget address tonight at 7 p.m. EST via his social media channels, where closed captions are also available. For full coverage, Kentuckians can tune to Kentucky Educational Television.

 

Yesterday, the Governor released a statement on the events that unfolded at the United States Capitol that you can view here.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 7, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 4,911
New deaths today: 37
Positivity rate: 11.9%
Total deaths: 2,843
Currently hospitalized: 1,744
Currently in ICU: 424
Currently on ventilator: 217

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Kenton, Morgan and Boone. Each of these counties reported 150 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 683.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

R.C. HOSPITAL RECEIVES 2020 KEMI DESTINY AWARD...

 
Russell County Hospital is the recipient of the 2020 KEMI Destiny Award. This award symbolizes what can be accomplished when an organization works together to improve workplace safety. Russell County Hospital demonstrates their ability to manage a formal safety program, provide on-site training and regular safety meetings for employees, and display an ongoing commitment to safety from all levels throughout their hospital. 
 
Kentucky Employers’ Mutual Insurance (KEMI) annually honors Kentucky organizations as KEMI Destiny Award winners for their commitment and success in maintaining a safe workplace. The Destiny Awards are presented annually by KEMI to policyholders that best exemplify KEMI’s motto, “Control your own destiny.”
 
Congratulations to the staff at Russell County Hospital for receiving this award. 
 

2 More Deaths & 282 More COVID-19 Cases in the Lake Cumberland District; Cases Surging Again

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 11.66%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 276 deaths resulting in a 1.87% mortality rate (about 1 in 53) among known cases. This compares with a 0.98% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.7% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 73 cases* in the hospital. This is 14 less than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 846 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.74% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.9%. The latest data shows that 97.78% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 26.67% of ventilator capacity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 14,744 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 7.06% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.


Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 62 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 3; Casey: 4; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 4; Green: 3; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 4; Taylor: 9; and, Wayne: 14. In all, we have released 90.1% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 218 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 1,184 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,338.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Schools, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. We have had 58 cases tied to Christmas gaterings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 2 tied to New Year’s events. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 282 today: Adair: 9; Casey: 17; Clinton: 25; Cumberland: 14; Green: 6; McCreary: 13; Pulaski: 85; Russell: 24; Taylor: 37; and, Wayne: 52. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.01. This means our total case count is projected to double every 67.28 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 88-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 74-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 68-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 74-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 31-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Green: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 40-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 83-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 60-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 97-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 42-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 94-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is released, unknown;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic

 

Our Adair and Wayne numbers appear off by one today. This is because we moved 1 case from Wayne to Adair.

 

The deaths we report today are: a 68-year-old female from Adair who had been hospitalized; and a 72-year-old male from McCreary who had been hospitalized.

 

Cases are starting to surge again at the state and local level. I assume this is a result of holiday gatherings. We have had 58 cases so far that report attending a Christmas gathering. With the return of some degree of in-person school instruction, the next few weeks will likely be heavy with cases. So, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 14,744 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 287,491 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 286,541 statewide plus 950 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released.

 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.


COVID-19 Vaccination Update

LCDHD is currently operating in Phase 1a of our COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan. This includes vaccines for healthcare workers and first responders. We are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases at this time, as vaccines are not readily available.

Please follow this website and the LCDHD social media sites such as Facebook for details about future vaccine availability once additional vaccine is received. Also, don’t forget about the contract with Walgreens and CVS pharmacies to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff.

 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 1-7-21

 

Russell County 24 new cases Wednesday. We had 4 cases released from isolation. We now have 83 active cases which 80 cases are on self-isolation and 3 cases are hospitalized, 2 at Somerset and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County 9 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 3 cases. Adair County reported 1 death. We have had 1,371 total cases with 1,228 of those released and 46 deaths. We have 97 active cases with 94 of those in home isolation and 3 in area hospitals.

2nd Stimulus Checks Being Processed


The IRS is processing the 2nd round of Economic Impact Payments. Direct deposit payments have started and paper checks will be mailed through January. See: go.usa.gov/xAK4f #COVIDreliefIRS

 

People can check the status of both their first and second stimulus payments by using the Get My Payment tool on the IRS website.

 

Some people may not receive their money the same way as in the first round.

 

34 New Coronavirus Deaths in KY; Over 5,700 New Cases

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 6, 2021) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the highest-ever daily report of COVID-19 cases in the commonwealth and the highest positivity rate since May 5.

 

“Today’s numbers show how critically important a centralized effort and response is to defeating this virus,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Before announcing today’s COVID-19 report, the Governor released a statement on the events unfolding at the United States Capitol that you can view here.

 

He said Kentuckians can watch his joint State of the Commonwealth and budget address tomorrow night at 7 p.m. EST via his Facebook and YouTube channels, where closed captions are also available. For full coverage, Kentuckians can tune to Kentucky Educational Television.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 6, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

 

New cases today: 5,742
New deaths today: 34

Positivity rate: 11.7%
Total deaths: 2,806
Currently hospitalized: 1,778
Currently in ICU: 428
Currently on ventilator: 244

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Kenton and Daviess. Each of these counties reported 200 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 828.

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Congressman Comer Statement on Violence at U.S. Capitol

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – “At this time, my staff and I are safe and I am in an undisclosed location after evacuating the House floor when protestors made their way inside the Capitol. The outrageous rioting and violence taking place at the Capitol Building is completely unacceptable and not who we are as a nation of law and order. Mob violence is wrong regardless of political affiliation.”

 

Gov. Beshear, Legislative Leaders Agree to Delay State of the Commonwealth

 

 

FRANKFORT, KY (Jan. 6, 2021) – Gov. Beshear released the following statement about the delay of the State of the Commonwealth:

 

“Based on the events at our nation’s Capitol, the Senate President, Speaker of the House and I have jointly agreed to delay the joint session for the State of the Commonwealth and the Budget address to 7 p.m. tomorrow, Thursday, Jan. 7. We all recognize the gravity of this situation.” – Gov. Andy Beshear

 

You can watch Gov. Beshear’s statement on the unfolding events at the United State Capitol here.

 

3 New Covid-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 11.36%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 274 deaths resulting in a 1.89% mortality rate (about 1 in 53) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.7% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 87 cases* in the hospital. This is 6 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 836 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.78% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.93%. The latest data shows that 91.11% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 25% of ventilator capacity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 14,462 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6.92% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 138 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 5; Casey: 2; Clinton: 22; Cumberland: 7; Green: 5; McCreary: 9; Pulaski: 39; Russell: 12; Taylor: 14; and, Wayne: 23. In all, we have released 91.4% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 153 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 966 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,338.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Schools, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. We have had 54 cases tied to Christmas gaterings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 1 tied to a New Year’s event. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 294 today: Adair: 28; Casey: 10; Clinton: 32; Cumberland: 14; Green: 5; McCreary: 32; Pulaski: 51; Russell: 25; Taylor: 45; and, Wayne: 52. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.011. This means our total case count is projected to double every 64.68 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 31-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Clinton: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 25-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Cumberland: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 91-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Cumberland: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 87-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 85-year-old male who is deceased, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is released, 1/04/21;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 73-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 2months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 68-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 4m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the data will appear that the Clinton numbers are off by 1 today. This is because 1 case was removed as not meeting case definition.

 

The deaths we report today are: an 85-year-old male, long-term care resident from McCreary; a 66-year-old female, long-term care resident from Taylor who had been hospitalized; and a 93-year-old female, long-term care resident from Taylor who had been hospitalized.

 

We are being inundated with phone calls, and messages about the COVID-19 Vaccine. Rather than calling or sending us messages, read our Daily Brief and social media posts for the very latest information.

 

New cases are still very high, and our area mortality, and hospitalization rates remain high. So, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 14,462 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 281,681 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 280,836 statewide plus 845 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released.

 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

COVID-19 Vaccination Update

LCDHD is currently operating in Phase 1a of our COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan. This includes vaccines for healthcare workers and first responders.
 

We are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases at this time, as vaccines are not readily available.

 

Please follow this website and the LCDHD social media sites such as Facebook for details about future vaccine availability once additional vaccine is received. Also, don’t forget about the contract with Walgreens and CVS pharmacies to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff.

 

Soon, hopefully sooner than later, we will be able to move to Phase 1b when our communities receive vaccine for the 70+ age group. In case the local health departments receive some of those vaccines, we are actively planning how to make these appointments once we know how much vaccine is available. Also, we are actively working with community partners to coordinate the vaccination of school employees.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-6-21

Local Corona Virus Update 1/6/20

 

Russell County 25 new cases Tuesday. We had 12 cases released from isolation. We now have 63 active cases which 60 cases are on self-isolation and 3 cases are hospitalized, 2 cases at Russell County Hospital and 1 case at Somerset.

 

Adair County 28 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 5 cases. We have had 1,362 total cases with 1,225 of those released and 45 deaths. We have 92 active cases with 87 of those in home isolation and 5 in area hospitals.

1781 New Coronavirus Cases in KY; 23 New Deaths

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 5, 2020) – On Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear updated Kentuckians on vaccination and contact tracing progress in the commonwealth.

 

“2021 is going to be the year that we defeat the coronavirus. It’s going to take months. We are still going to sustain heartbreaking losses along the way. But vaccines are here. The first two that received emergency approval are highly effective. And I’m working day in and day out, along with the Department for Public Health and many others in state government, to get them out even faster,” said Gov. Beshear. “That is my primary mission right now.”

 

The Governor announced the state is expected to receive an additional 53,800 initial vaccine doses the week of Jan. 11: 27,300 from Pfizer and 26,500 from Moderna. Kentucky is also expected to receive 57,000 initial doses this week. These numbers do not include booster doses sent to Kentucky for people who have already received an initial dose.

 

At least 66,582 initial vaccine doses have already been administered in Kentucky.

 

Mark Carter, Cabinet for Health and Family Services executive policy advisor, updated Kentuckians on the state’s contact tracing program.

 

Sixty out of 61 local health departments use the state’s contact tracing system. Since mid-May, the state has hired 1,200 more contact tracing staff members, raising the total number of staffers to more than 1,600.

 

The federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act designated $78 million for the statewide contact tracing system, of which $47.7 million, or 61% has already been spent. The rest of the funding will be spent before Dec. 31, 2021.

 

Contact tracers successfully contacted 94,000 Kentuckians identified as having been exposed to the virus, helping prevent further spread of the virus, avoiding hospitalizations and saving lives.

Carter estimated that, at minimum, contact tracing efforts have prevented more than 2,000 hospitalizations and 400 deaths.

 

In addition, Carter estimated that prevented hospitalizations saved more than $31 million in health care costs, on top of saving families from the physical, mental and emotional toll of a hospitalization.

 

Carter also said that contact tracing staff had conducted 258,000 daily check-ins with Kentuckians infected or exposed to COVID-19.

 

Finally, Carter spoke about some of the challenges that have prevented contact tracers from reaching even more exposed Kentuckians, including delayed adoption of the statewide system and a dramatic increase in cases which overwhelmed local health departments and slowed the time between exposure and being called by a contact tracer.

 

“While we all are anxious to be vaccinated, until we can be, we have to do the things we always harp on: wearing a mask, social distancing, getting tested if you feel sick, washing your hands and participating in contact tracing,” said Carter. “If we can do that, we’ll get to the vaccine and we’ll get through this pandemic together.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 5, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,781
New deaths today: 23
Positivity rate: 11.4%
Total deaths: 2,772
Currently hospitalized: 1,760
Currently in ICU: 430
Currently on ventilator: 215

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren and Kenton. Each of these counties reported 60 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 314.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

8 COVID-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 11.2%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 8 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 271 deaths resulting in a 1.91% mortality rate (about 1 in 52) among known cases. This compares with a 0.98% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.7% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 81 cases* in the hospital. This is 2 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 828 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.84% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.94%. The latest data shows that 95.56% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 29.31% of ventilator capacity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 14,168 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6.78% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 158 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 17; Casey: 2; Clinton: 18; Cumberland: 4; Green: 6; McCreary: 11; Pulaski: 38; Russell: 7; Taylor: 20; and, Wayne: 35. In all, we have released 92.3% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 5 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 813 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,339.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Schools, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. Of our active cases, 12% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 171 today: Adair: 18; Casey: 4; Clinton: 16; Cumberland: 7; Green: 4; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 48; Russell: 21; Taylor: 23; and, Wayne: 29. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.011. This means our total case count is projected to double every 66.22 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old female who is released, unknown;
Adair: A 45-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 74-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old male who is released, 1/03/21;
Clinton: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 87-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4m-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 92-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at our numbers may appear some of the county data is off. This is because we moved one case today from Green to Taylor.

 

The deaths we report today are: an 84-year-old male from Casey who had been hospitalized, who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious, who later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness; a 93-year-old female long-term-care resident from McCreary who had been hospitalized; an 81-year-old male from McCreary who had been hospitalized; a 63-year-old male from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; an 85-year-old male from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; a 61-year-old male from Russell who had been hospitalized; a 100-year-old female long-term care resident from Wayne; and a 94-year-old female from Wayne who had been hospitalized.

 

Most of our area schools are planning to return to some degree of limited in-person instruction over the next few days. This will increase the potential of significant community-spread dramatically. Therefore, it is more important than ever to vigilantly observe the guidance.

 

So, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 14,168 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 279,770 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 279,143 statewide plus 627 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

KSP Investigates Double Fatal in Pulaski County


Eubank Ky. (January 05 , 2021) – On January 04, 2021 at approximately 6:20 PM, the Kentucky State Police, London Post responded to a two vehicle collision that occurred on US 27 N at the intersection of 27 and KY 70 in Pulaski County.  

 

The initial investigation indicates that a 2012 Toyota pickup operated by Philip C. Hall, 39 years old of Eubank, KY, was traveling on west on KY 70, when he attempted to cross the northbound lane of US 27 and collided with a 1994 Ford pickup that was also traveling northbound on US 27, driven by Barbara Haste, 56 years old of Waynesburg, KY. Evidence at the scene and on the roadway appeared to show Mrs. Haste attempted to avoid the collision.

 

As a result of the collision, Barbara A. Haste and her passenger Diane Haste, 59 years old of Waynesburg, KY. suffered life threatening injuries, and died on scene. They both were pronounced deceased by the Pulaski County Coroner’s office. Mr. Hall nor his juvenile passenger were injured in the collision. An autopsy is scheduled for both Barbara and Diane Haste in Frankfort at the state medical office.

 

Alcohol is suspected in this accident toxicology is pending. Philip Hall was arrested and charged by the Pulaski County Sherriff’s Office. Charges below.

 

  1. Operating motor vehicle under the influence 1st
  2. Wanton Endangerment 1st
  3. Failure to use child restraint device in vehicle

 

KSP Post 11 Trooper Larkey is continuing the death investigation. He was assisted at the scene by Post 11 Personnel, the Pulaski County SRT, Eubank Police Department, Pulaski County Sheriffs Office, Eubank Fire Department, and the Pulaski County Coroner’s office.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-5-21

Russell County reported another death on Monday, We now have 36 deaths. The death is a 61 year old male. We have 21 new cases yesterday. We had 7 cases released from isolation. We now have 50 active cases which 48 are on self-isolation and 2 cases are hospitalized at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County 18 new COVID19 cases to report Monday. We released 17 cases. We have had 1,334 total cases with 1,220 of those released and 45 deaths. We have 69 active cases with 64 of those in home isolation and 5 in area hospitals.

2319 New COVID-19 Cases in KY; 26 New Deaths

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 4, 2020) – On Monday, Gov. Andy Beshear and Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, provided an update on the COVID-19 vaccine and announced that Kentuckians will be inoculated in four phases.

 

The Governor said the state’s goal is to administer 90% of all vaccine doses received in the state within seven days of arrival and that the newly announced additional phases provide clarity on when more Kentuckians can get the vaccine. The phases also help providers understand what order vaccines should be administered in, which is crucial if they are having challenges meeting the 90% weekly goal or if they have extra thawed vaccine.  

 

The Governor said 60,414 vaccine doses have already been administered in Kentucky; 57,000 doses (27,300 from Pfizer and from 29,700 from Moderna) will be delivered this week.

 

“We’ve got to get these things out faster. I’m not OK with the pace that they are currently being provided. We have too many people out there who are rightfully anxious, and they need to see this whole country pick up the pace. We are certainly going to do it here in Kentucky,” said Gov. Beshear. “Today we’re going to talk about some changes we’re making, some additional clarification, so if we ever have another case like those two stores that thaw too much vaccine again, they know exactly what population should get it.”

 

The planned vaccination phases are:

  • Phase 1a: Long-term care facilities, assisted living facilities, health care personnel
  • Phase 1b: First responders, Kentuckians age >= 70, K-12 school personnel
  • Phase 1c: Kentuckians age >= 60, anyone older than 16 with U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) highest-risk conditions for COVID-19, all essential workers
  • Phase 2: Age >= 40
  • Phase 3: Age >= 16
  • Phase 4: Children under the age of 16 if the vaccine is approved for this age group (estimated to comprise 18% of Kentucky’s population)

 

“We are committed to getting this done quickly, efficiently and in the best way we know how and are able to deliver. We’re committed to ramping up the pace dramatically,” said Dr. Stack. “We’re asking every vaccination site to use the prioritization guidance and stick with that, but the top level goal is for every vaccine administration site in the state to administer 90% or more of the vaccine doses they receive within one week, so we don’t have vaccine doses waiting in a freezer until the next week.”

 

To view the CDC’s highest-risk conditions for COVID-19, click here. To view essential workers, defined for these vaccination phases, click here.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Monday, Jan. 4, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,319
New deaths today: 26

Positivity rate: 11.2%
Total deaths: 2,749
Currently hospitalized: 1,737
Currently in ICU: 456
Currently on ventilator: 216

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Boyd, Kenton, Warren and Pulaski. Each of these counties reported 70 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 429.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 79-year-old woman and an 81-year-old man from Boone County; a 54-year-old woman from Boyle County; three women, ages 73, 84 and 92, and a 72-year-old man from Campbell County; a 92-year-old man from Franklin County; a 70-year-old woman from Gallatin County; two men, ages 40 and 70, from Grant County; a 95-year-old woman and three men, ages 72, 78 and 92, from Jefferson County; four women, ages 66, 74, 99 and 102, and three men, ages 86, 88 and 90, from Kenton County; an 82-year-old woman from Lewis County; a 65-year-old man from Marshall County; and an 89-year-old woman and a 64-year-old man from Simpson County.

 

The Governor noted that today’s new cases report was the highest ever for a Monday.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

115 New Coronavirus Cases & 3 New Deaths in Lake Cumb. District...

 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 11.12%.
 
Deaths: We regret we must report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 263 deaths resulting in a 1.88% mortality rate (about 1 in 53) among known cases. This compares with a 0.98% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.71% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 79 cases* in the hospital. This is 7 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 819 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.85% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.96%. The latest data shows that 95.56% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 27.59% of ventilator capacity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 13,997 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6.7% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 212 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 6; Casey: 5; Clinton: 23; Cumberland: 8; Green: 7; McCreary: 11; Pulaski: 82; Russell: 13; Taylor: 22; and, Wayne: 35. In all, we have released 92.3% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 100 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 808 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,340.
 
Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 13% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 115 today: Adair: 7; Casey: 6; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 5; Green: 4; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 31; Russell: 12; Taylor: 20; and, Wayne: 17. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.011. This means our total case count is projected to double every 64.32 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases. Today’s new cases include:
 
Adair: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 76-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 64-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 74-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old female who is released, 1/01/21;
Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 75-year-old female who is deceased, expired;
Taylor: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 90-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old female who is released, 1/02/21;
Wayne: A 68-year-old male who is deceased, expired;
Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
 
The deaths we report today are a 75-year-old male long-term care resident from Taylor; a 68-year-old male from Wayne; and a 73-year-old female long-term care resident from Wayne.
 
We are uncertain when the next COVID-19 vaccine shipments will arrive. After health care workers and nursing homes, as of today, the next phase will include school staff, first responders, and those who are seventy and older.
 
All our counties are back in the “Red-Critical” range of community spread. We are still having high numbers of new cases, and high rates of hospitalizations and death, so let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 13,997 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 277,432 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 276,826 statewide plus 606 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.
 

FSA REMINDS FOREIGN FARM OWNER OF REPORTING RULE

 

Foreign persons who have bought, sold, or transferred to another person, land that is all or part agricultural in Green County have 90 days to report the transaction to the Farm Service Agency.

Officials with FSA say the report is required by the Agricultural Foreign Investment Disclosure Act, and failure to report could result in civil penalties.

Individuals or companies that specialize in land holding, land transfers, or management services should contact the county FSA office for additional details of the Agricultural Foreign Investment Disclosure Act.

 

WEEKEND ARRESTS 1/4/21

 

  • Andrew Bates, 30, of Columbia - arrested Sunday afternoon by KSP for Failure to Produce Insurance Card, No Registration Receipt, No Registration Plates, No Seatbelt, and Contempt of Court.
 
  • Randy Edwards, 18, of Edmonton - arrested Saturday by KSP for Wanton Endangerment 1st degree, Speeding, Reckless Driving, Operating on a Suspended or Revoked Operators License and Fleeing/Evading Police (motor vehicle).
 
  • Melissa LeeAnne Davis, 21, of Columbia - arrested by KSP on Friday afternoon and charged with Speeding, Reckless Driving, 2 counts of Wanton Endangerment 1st degree, DUI, Failure to Produce Insurance Card, No Seatbelt, Fleeing/Evading Police and Resisting Arrest.
 
Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.
 
-----
 
  • Wesley Taylor, 32, of Russell Springs - arrested by RSPD on Saturday afternoon for Trafficking in Methamphetamine.
 
  • David Passmore, 42, of Dunnville - arrested on Saturday afternoon by the RCSO for Burglary 2nd degree and Wanton Endangerment.
 
Lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
 

Russell County Man is Dead from a Self-Inflicted Gunshot Wound Following a Standoff with Police....


According to Russell County ?Sheriff Derek Polston, last Thursday, December 31st, 2020 (New Years Eve) at approx. 3:30pmCT, Deputies Corey Meyer, Kenny Perkins and Ron Golden responded to a welfare check call of an individual at 326 Country View Road in the Bernard Ridge area of Russell County. Deputies encountered a male subject, identified as Eric Kellog, with a rifle pointing it at them from inside the residence and acting erratically. Additional Russell County Deputies and Kentucky State Police arrived on the scene. During the nearly 10-hour standoff, shots were fired from the house by Mr. Kellog toward officers on scene behind cover. No officers were hit and law enforcement did not return fire. Warrants for the subject along with a search warrant was obtained at that time. Sheriff’s deputies, KSP Troopers and a family member made numerous attempts to contact Kellog with a PA speaker to come outside and talk, but he wouldn’t.

At that time, Sheriff Polston asked for additional help from the Kentucky State Police Special Response team. Upon arrival, the team made numerous attempts to get the subject to come out peacefully, but Mr. Kellog still refused. Entry was later made by the Special Response Team and the individual was found with a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Eric Kellog was pronounced dead by the R.C. Coroners Office.

The case is still under investigation by KSP and the Russell County Sheriffs Office.

Assisting at the scene were Russell Springs Police Officers, Lucas Justice, Hayden Phillips, Russell County EMS, Russell County Coroners Office, and the Russell County Attorneys Office. The case remains under investigation by the Kentucky State Police.

 

4 New Coronavirus Deaths in Lake Cumberland District; Numerous Cases Tied Back to Holiday Gatherings....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 10.79%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 4 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 260 deaths resulting in a 1.87% mortality rate (about 1 in 53) among known cases. This compares with a 0.98% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.72% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 72 cases* in the hospital. This is 6 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 811 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.84% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5%. The latest data shows that an unreported % of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and an unreported % of ventilator capacity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 13,882 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6.65% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 294 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 6; Casey: 11; Clinton: 32; Cumberland: 7; Green: 21; McCreary: 17; Pulaski: 96; Russell: 25; Taylor: 24; and, Wayne: 55. In all, we have released 91.6% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 138 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 908 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,340.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 16% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 160 today: Adair: 15; Casey: 3; Clinton: 20; Cumberland: 10; Green: 10; McCreary: 14; Pulaski: 32; Russell: 9; Taylor: 19; and, Wayne: 28. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.011. This means our total case count is projected to double every 64.24 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is released, 1/01/21;
Casey: A 23-year-old female who is released, 1/01/21;
Clinton: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 60-year-old male who is released, 12/29/20;
Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 60-year-old male who is released, 12/29/20;
Clinton: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 60-year-old male who is released, 1/01/21;
Clinton: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 70-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
McCreary: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 72-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is released, 1/01/21;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, UnkNown;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, UnkNown;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is released, 1/01/21;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is released, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the numbers may appear some of our counties’ data are off. This is because we moved one case from Adair to Pulaski.

 

The deaths we report today are: a 77-year-old male from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; a 64-year-old male long-term care resident from Wayne who had been hospitalized; a 76-year-old male from Wayne; and an 89-year-old female long-term care resident from Wayne.

 

After a few weeks of declining cases, last week saw an increase in the new case rate at both the state and local level. This week, Lake Cumberland added 1,007 new cases, last week, 789. We also broke our all-time one-day new case record on 12/30/20 adding 301 new cases. Last Saturday, we were at 867 active cases, today, 908. Twelve deaths occurred this week. Hospitalizations also remain high.

 

We have had 34 cases tie back to Christmas gatherings so far. We had 43 cases tie back to Thanksgiving gatherings. Please realize that large family gatherings are not safe. In fact, any situation that encourages gathering is not safe. Until the vaccinate is largely available, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 13,882 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 274,678 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 273,971 statewide plus 707 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

COLUMBIA APARTMENT FIRE DEC. 31ST


The Columbia Fire Department responded to a residential Tri-plex fire on Thursday, December 31, 2020 at 3:17pmCT. The property, at 325 Bomar Heights, is owned by Grider Properties and occupied by Elizabeth Harrison. Upon arrival, one apartment was engulfed in fire. Firefighters were able to contain the fire to the one apartment.  
 

There were 24 firemen on the scene for 1.5 hours.

 

75 COVID-19 Deaths in KY the Past 3 Days....


FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 2, 2021) – In the first COVID-19 update of the new year, Gov. Andy Beshear said the state’s elevated positivity rate is likely due to some labs and public testing sites being closed over the holiday, which increases the percentage of tests conducted in medical settings where patients are experiencing symptoms and suspect they have the virus.

 

“Every day we are reminded how fragile the progress we have made in defeating this virus really is,” Gov. Beshear said. “We will wait and watch closely over the coming days and weeks to gauge the impact the holidays may have had on our recent success in slowing new case growth. With more vaccines arriving in 2021, we have a new sense of hope but right now we must all continue to do our part to stop this virus, including wearing a mask and avoiding large in-person gatherings.”

 

Case Information – Jan. 2
New cases: 1,470
New deaths: 22
Positivity rate: 10.79%
Total deaths: 2,698
Currently hospitalized: 1,635
Currently in ICU: 428
Currently on ventilator: 211

 

Top counties with the most positive cases on Jan. 2 were Jefferson, Pike, Fayette, Kenton and Hardin. View details of those reported lost to the virus on Jan. 2.

 

Case Information – Jan. 1
New cases: 3,124
New deaths: 14
Positivity rate: 10.32%
Total deaths: 2,676
Currently hospitalized: 1,671
Currently in ICU: 423
Currently on ventilator: 216

 

Top counties with the most positive cases on Jan. 1 were Jefferson, Fayette, Oldham, Christian and Boone. View details of those reported lost to the virus on Jan. 1.

 

Case Information – Dec. 31
New cases: 4,145
New deaths: 39
Positivity rate: 9.89%
Total deaths: 2,662
Currently hospitalized: 1,627
Currently in ICU: 432
Currently on ventilator: 224

 

Top counties with the most positive cases on Dec. 31 were Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Boone, Oldham and Daviess. View details of those reported lost to the virus on Dec. 31. Thursday was the third highest day of new reported COVID-19 cases.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, testing locations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and vaccine information, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

AREA ARREST 1-1-21

 

 

Jarred Harrison age 20, of  and Kristina Cooper, 24, both of Columbia, KY were taken into custody by Officers Foster and Cravens with the Columbia Police Department just before 3 a.m. this morning. Both were charged with Theft by Unlawful Taking or Disposition Shoplifting under $500. They were lodged in the Adar County Regional Jail.

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