Local News Archives for 2020-10

COLUMBIA CITY COUNCIL MEETING NOV. 2


The Columbia City Council will hold a Special Called Meeting at 6pmCT on Monday, November 2, 2020 in City Hall, 116 Campbellsville Street, Columbia, KY. Per recommendation of the CDC and Social Distancing Requirements, the meeting will NOT be open to the public, but will be held as a special video teleconferencing meeting that will be broadcast to the public. Citizens are encouraged to watch the meeting live on YouTube via the following link: youtu.be/-OSKXIVzwmo.

 

AGENDA

  • Call to Order
  • Roll Call
  • Opening Prayer 
  • Pledge Of Allegiance To The American Flag 
  • 1st Item: Motion to approve minutes of October 5, 2020 Special Called Meeting.
  • 2nd Item: Motion to consider request for additional funding from Cemetery Board to be used to repair some dilapidated monuments. 
  • 3rd Item: Motion to consider name change request from local VFW for the Roadside Park.
  • Mayor's Announcements
  • Council Comments
  • Motion To Adjourn

 

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8 of 10 Counties in Lake Cumb. District in "Red Critical Phase of Community Spread....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 6.1%.

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 81 deaths resulting in a 1.81% mortality rate (about 1 in 55) among known cases. This compares with a 1.39% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.53% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 41 cases in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 41 on 10/31/2020. We have had a total of 344 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.69% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.72%. The latest state data shows that 68.88% of ICU beds and 29.32% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,476 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.14% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 42 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 4; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 2; Green: 4; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 3; Russell: 8; Taylor: 8; and, Wayne: 2. In all, we have released 85.2% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 2 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 583 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/30/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 585.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Places of Worship.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 40 today: Adair: 10; Casey: 5; Clinton: 2; Green: 1; McCreary: 12; Pulaski: 2; Taylor: 6; and, Wayne: 2. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 46.41 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/28/2020 when we added 91 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

8 of our 10 counties are now in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, McCreary, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. The other 2 are in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread, Green, and Pulaski.

 

This was another record-breaking week. This was the highest week of new cases for both the state and Lake Cumberland. Last week we added 440 new cases, this week 444. While this week was one of the sharpest increases in new cases for the state, our numbers are much closer to last week’s. So that much, at least, is good. We do have 79 more active cases this week compared to last Saturday. We are also still at our highest number of hospitalized cases, 41. We experienced 1 death this week.

 

Won’t you please, do your part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces?

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,476 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 107,595 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 107,219 statewide plus 376 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

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1,986 New COVID-19 Cases in KY; 9 More Deaths....


FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 31, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday reported the second highest number of new daily COVID-19 cases since the pandemic began. Today’s case numbers are also the highest ever reported on a Saturday.

 

“This is now the single largest week of new COVID-19 cases by almost a thousand and we still have one day to go. We need your help,” said Gov. Beshear. “Be sure tonight that you are safe in how you are trick-or-treating. And make sure you are following the red zone recommendations so the entire community can come together to better protect those around you.”

 

Kentuckians should celebrate Halloween in their own neighborhoods, staying six feet apart from people outside of their households, wearing face coverings (Halloween masks do not count as face coverings) and frequently using hand sanitizer or washing their hands. Candy should be provided in individually wrapped bags placed on a porch, driveway or table.  

 

Case Information 
As of 3:00pmCT on Saturday, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,986
  • New deaths today: 9
  • Positivity rate: 6.10%
  • Total deaths: 1,485
  • Currently hospitalized: 964
  • Currently in ICU: 236
  • Currently on ventilator: 117


Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Bell and Warren.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 77-year-old man from Pike County; a 76-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 61-year-old man from Lee County; a 71-year-old woman from Montgomery County; a 76-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 90-year-old man from Henderson County; a 95-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 54-year-old woman from Daviess County; and a 69-year-old man from Lewis County.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH), noted yesterday that red county guidance should be combined this weekend with Halloween guidance throughout most of the commonwealth, where more than half of counties are reporting cases of at least 25 persons per 100,000 residents.

 

“Please enjoy this full-moon evening, when we get an extra hour due to the shift away from daylight-saving time. If you choose to go out, avoid crowds,” said Dr. Stack. “If you are around others, please, maintain a safe social distance, wear a face covering and practice hand hygiene, whether you’re preparing treats to pass out or picking up treats that have been distributed following healthy Halloween guidelines. This is our most effective barrier to spreading infection until there’s a vaccine.”

 

More Information
See KDPH’s Halloween guidance: in English (full guidanceone-pagerslide) and in Spanish (full guidanceone-pagerslide). In partnership with Gov. Beshear, RadioLex also recorded safe Halloween public service announcements in EnglishSpanishPersianKoreanJapaneseFrench and Chinese.

 

To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

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78 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT....

 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 6.19%.
 
Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 81 deaths resulting in a 1.83% mortality rate (about 1 in 55) among known cases. This compares with a 1.4% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.54% morality rate at the national level.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 41 cases in the hospital. This is 9 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 41 on 10/30/2020. We have had a total of 344 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.75% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.74%. The latest state data shows that 68.88% of ICU beds and 29.32% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,436 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.12% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 59 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 11; Casey: 4; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 2; Green: 2; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 6; Russell: 4; Taylor: 14; and, Wayne: 8. In all, we have released 85% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 16 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 585 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/30/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 585.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Places of Worship.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 75 today: Adair: 11; Casey: 14; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 5; Green: 6; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 4; Taylor: 14; and, Wayne: 8. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 44.49 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/28/2020 when we added 91 cases.
 
Today’s new cases include:
  • Adair: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 99-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Casey: An 88-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: An 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 75-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: An 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 52-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: An 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: An 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: An 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: An 82-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: An 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: An 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the numbers may appear that we are off by 1 today. This happened because a Clinton case that wasn’t entered correctly yesterday was corrected today.

 
Unfortunately, with our recent large spike in new cases comes increases in hospitalizations. We just broke our previous high (39) and presently have 41 of our positive COVID-19 patients in the hospital. We are also at our highest level of active cases at 585. Finally, 8 of our ten counties are now in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. The other 2 are in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread, McCreary, and Pulaski.
 
Friends, these are very alarming local numbers. Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,436 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 105,606 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 105,242 statewide plus 364 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 
 
For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.
 

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1,941 New COVID-19 Cases; 15 More Deaths in Ky....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 30, 2020) – On Friday, Gov. Andy Beshear asked Kentuckians to make a plan now for a safe Halloween, as COVID-19 cases rise across the commonwealth and the nation.

 

“Remember, the more cases, the more people in the hospital, the more people in the ICU and the more people who die,” said Gov. Beshear. “It’s time for a coordinated community effort with everybody on board. Now is the time for leadership, not for excuses.”

 

To view the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH) Halloween guidance visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Gov. Beshear and KDPH commissioner Dr. Steven Stack also reminded community leaders, schools, businesses and residents in the state’s hardest hit areas to follow the Red Zone Reduction Recommendations. Thursday’s 68 red zone counties should follow the recommendations Monday, Nov. 2, through Sunday, Nov. 8.

 

“We absolutely must double down in terms of applying caution,” said Dr. Stack. “With nearly 70 counties now in the red zone, I am pleading with you to observe both Halloween and Red Zone Reduction Recommendations. Lives and livelihoods literally depend on all of us doing our part.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Friday, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,941
  • New deaths today: 15
  • Positivity rate: 6.19%
  • Total deaths: 1,476
  • Currently hospitalized: 974
  • Currently in ICU: 241
  • Currently on ventilator: 121

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 88-year-old woman from Clark County; an 83-year-old man from Daviess County; two men, ages 39 and 89, from Fayette County; an 82-year-old man from Greenup County; a 68-year-old man from Hancock County; two men, ages 66 and 67, from Jefferson County; a 75-year-old woman and a 71-year-old man from Knott County; an 84-year-old man from Laurel County; a 91-year-old man from Lee County; an 86-year-old woman from Montgomery County; a 69-year-old man from Pike County; and an 67-year-old woman from Washington County.

 

Gov. Beshear reminds Kentuckians to light their homes and businesses green to show compassion for those lost to COVID-19.

 

The top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Hardin, Warren and Campbell.

 

Week in Review
To read more on this week’s updates, including those on new red zone recommendations, community weekly case reduction plans, surge testing, Virginia Moore beating cancer and Thursday’s 68 red zone counties, visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

More Information
See KDPH’s Halloween guidance: in English (full guidance, one-pager, slide) and in Spanish (full guidance, one-pager, slide). In partnership with Gov. Beshear, RadioLex also recorded safe Halloween public service announcements in English, Spanish, Persian, Korean, Japanese, French and Chinese.

 

To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

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88 New COVID-19 Cases in Lake Cumberland District; Russell & Adair Remain in Red Critical Range of Community Spread...

 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 6.04%.
 
Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 81 deaths resulting in a 1.86% mortality rate (about 1 in 54) among known cases. This compares with a 1.41% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.56% morality rate at the national level.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 32 cases in the hospital. This is 2 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 37 on 10/24/2020. We have had a total of 334 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.66% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.84%. The latest state data shows that 70.93% of ICU beds and 28.69% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,361 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.09% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 71 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 6; Casey: 4; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 1; Green: 4; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 2; Russell: 8; Taylor: 33; and, Wayne: 10. In all, we have released 85.1% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 17 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 569 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/29/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 569.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Places of Worship.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 88 today: Adair: 11; Casey: 14; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 6; Green: 3; McCreary: 12; Pulaski: 12; Russell: 10; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 10. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 44.21 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/28/2020 when we added 91 cases. Today’s new cases include:
 
  • Adair: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 26-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 8 Months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 72-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 8 Months-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

A close look at the numbers may appear that we are off by 1 today. This happened because we removed 1 historic case from Pulaski as not a case.
 
We are at our highest level of active cases at 569. Seven of our ten counties are now in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. The other 3 are in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread, Green, McCreary, and Pulaski.
 
Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,361 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 103,627 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 103,305 statewide plus 322 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 
For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.
 

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AREA ARREST 10-30-20

Skylor Turner age 30, of Columbia was arrested by Deputy Perkins of the Russell County Sheriff’s Officer Thursday afternoon at 4. Turner was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth), Drug Paraphernalia – Buy-Possession, Operating Motor Vehicle Under the Influence, Failure to Wear Seat Belts and Failure of Non-Owner Operator to Maintain Required Insurance.

He was lodged into the Russell County Detention Center…

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 10/30/20

Russell County 10 new cases Thursday. We had 8 cases released from isolation. We now have 61 active cases which 56 are on self-isolation and 5 are hospitalized, 2 at Russell County Hospital and 3 in Somerset. The new cases today are females ages 16, 33, 41,48,71,75 and males ages 11,23,24,32.

 

Adair County 11 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 6 cases. We have 90 active cases with 87 in home isolation and 3 in area hospitals.

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19 New COVID-19 Deaths Including 68-Year-Old Adair Co. Man & 58-Year-old Russell Co. Man...

 

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 29, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear urged every Kentuckian in 68 red zone counties to up their game in the fight against COVID-19 and follow nine recommendations beginning Monday, Nov. 2, through Sunday, Nov. 8, to reduce the spread of COVID-19 as cases flare in those areas.

 

“This is a type of outbreak where we can’t deny our way out of it, we can’t rationalize our way out of it, we can’t try to find excuses for not following the guidance,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Schools, businesses, community leaders and Kentuckians in red zone counties – published every Thursday afternoon on kycovid19.ky.gov – should follow the below recommendations the upcoming week.

 

Red Zone Reduction Recommendations:

  • Employers should allow employees to work from home when possible
  • Government offices that do not provide critical services need to operate virtually
  • Reduce in-person shopping; order online or pickup curbside as much as possible
  • Order take-out; avoid dining in restaurants or bars
  • Prioritize businesses that follow and enforce the mask mandate and other guidelines
  • Reschedule, postpone or cancel public events
  • Do not host or attend gatherings of any size
  • Avoid non-essential activities outside your home
  • Reduce overall activity and contacts, and follow existing guidance, including the 10 Steps to Defeat COVID-19

 

The Governor said that new White House guidance suggests “current transmissions are linked to home gatherings,” where Americans are not as likely to wear masks around people from outside of their household. With broad community spread and transmission in the state, the Governor said it is crucial that communities work together to follow these new recommendations on top of existing requirements.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Thursday, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,821
  • New deaths today: 19
  • Positivity rate: 6.04%
  • Total deaths: 1,461
  • Currently hospitalized: 969
  • Currently in ICU: 234
  • Currently on ventilator: 120

 

The Governor noted this is the highest number of new cases ever reported on a Thursday, and the third-highest number of new cases ever reported in a single day.

 

The top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Hardin, Kenton and Warren. 

 

Today’s red zone counties are listed here, alphabetically and by incidence rate.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 68-year-old man from Adair County; a 75-year-old man from Calloway County; a 93-year-old man from Casey County; an 81-year-old man from Daviess County; a 65-year-old man from Fayette County; two women, ages 83 and 88, and two men, ages 88 and 90, from Jefferson County; a 73-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 72-year-old man from Lee County; a 61-year-old woman from McLean County; an 80-year-old woman from Meade County; a 71-year-old man from Muhlenberg County; a 68-year-old woman from Rowan County; a 58-year-old man from Russell County; a 68-year-old woman from Shelby County; an 87-year-old woman from Warren County; and an 89-year-old woman from Whitley County.

 

Gov. Beshear reminds Kentuckians to light their homes and businesses up green to show compassion for those lost to COVID-19.

 

Unemployment Insurance Updates
Amy Cubbage, the Governor’s general counsel, today talked about a new way of reporting unemployment insurance (UI) claims. In order to best serve those claimants who have been waiting the longest, the cabinet is now sorting claims by date of filing.

 

Cubbage said that Labor Cabinet Secretary Larry Roberts, at the Governor’s direction, has requested from the U.S. Department of Labor (US DOL) the ability to waive the obligation to obtain repayment of mistakenly-paid benefits that may have occurred after the federal government changed their eligibility guidance.

 

“We have not heard back from U.S. DOL but remain hopeful we will be allowed some flexibility on these overpayments,” Cubbage said. “If granted, we will be able to provide significant relief to many Kentuckians.”

 

As a part of a project to upgrade the UI computer system to be more user-friendly, there are some upcoming dates the system will be down for claimants. Kentuckians will not be able to file a claim or claim benefits during these planned outages: Friday, Nov. 6, and Saturday, Nov. 7; Thursday, Nov. 26, through Saturday, Nov. 28; and briefly after business hours on Dec. 15.

 

Cubbage also warned Kentuckians to be on the lookout for email scammers using this fake account: PUA@unemployment.usdol.gov. She said scammers are trying to obtain personal information and shared tips to avoid the scam:

  • Never respond to an email unless it is from a ky.gov domain and is clearly marked as coming from a Kentucky Office of Unemployment Insurance (OUI) employee.
  • Know that you will never be asked to click on a link in an email from OUI.
  • Know that unless you initiate contact with U.S. DOL you should not receive any emails from U.S. DOL about your claim.

 

Fast 4
Today, Gov. Beshear highlighted significant support for Eastern Kentucky families.

  • Two new projects at the Pikeville Medical Center (Pike County) and the King’s Daughters Health System (Boyd County) have been selected for more than $8 million in funding through the Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Pilot grant program. To read the full release, click here.
     
    “These grants will bring real improvements to the lives of our people in Eastern Kentucky. My administration knows that health care is a basic human right, and it has never been more important than now, as we battle this global health pandemic,” said Gov. Beshear, who has made improving Kentucky’s health a central initiative of his administration. 

     
  • Kentucky has received the largest Appalachian Regional Commission investment in a single state in decades, totaling more than $36.5 million. The funding supports 34 projects to improve economic diversification in Kentucky’s 54 Appalachian counties. To read the full release, click here.
     
  • Gov. Beshear announced that the section of U.S. Highway 460 from the intersection with Kentucky Highway 80 at Beaver, near Elkhorn City, to the Virginia state line is set to officially open to traffic Nov. 16. To read the full release, click here.
     
  • Gov. Beshear congratulated Colby Hall, the new executive director of Shaping Our Appalachian Region. Hall, a native of Somerset and a University of Kentucky graduate, will guide the agency, which is focused on moving the Appalachian region forward through entrepreneurship and innovation.

 

The Governor celebrated Nova Steel’s $70 million investment for a steel tube manufacturing facility expected to create 110 full-time jobs at the Kentucky Transpark in Bowling Green. The Governor reminded Kentuckians to follow the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s guidance for a safe Halloween and highlighted a few Kentuckians who are masking up and sharing their photos with the #MaskUpKY hashtag.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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US 127 CLOSED NOV. 4TH & 5TH....

 
Due to the renovation of Wolf Creek Dam by the United States Corps of Engineers and BCI Construction USA, INC, US127 will be completely closed from 10:00 AM until 11:00 AM on Wednesday, November 4, 2020 and Thursday, November 5, 2020. Alternate routing utilizing US127, KY90, KY61, the Cumberland Parkway, and KY55 is suggested for these periods. Future closures are pending. 
 

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Case Count Increases by 92 in 10-County District; LCDHD Advises Against Any Social Gathering....

 
 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 6.07%.
 
Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 81 deaths resulting in a 1.9% mortality rate (about 1 in 53) among known cases. This compares with a 1.42% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.57% morality rate at the national level.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 30 cases in the hospital. This is 1 less than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 36 on 10/24/2020. We have had a total of 332 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.77% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.9%. The latest state data shows that 71.56% of ICU beds and 27.54% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,273 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2.05% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 36 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 6; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 1; Green: 2; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 5; Russell: 6; Taylor: 1; and, Wayne: 4. In all, we have released 85.2% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 56 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 552 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/28/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 552.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Recreation.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 92 today: Adair: 12; Casey: 8; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 16; Green: 3; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 23; Russell: 8; Taylor: 12; and, Wayne: 5. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 44.09 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/28/2020 when we added 92 cases.
 
Today’s new cases include:
  • Adair: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 82-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: An 84-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is released, 10/15/20
  • Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is released, 10/18/20
  • Pulaski: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: An 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: An 88-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 80-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Russell: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: An 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: An 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: An 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

After 3 days of lower cases than last week, we shattered our all-time new case high. On 10/22/20, we added 80 cases; today, 92. It is telling to note that it took Lake Cumberland 168 days before 1% of its population had tested positive for COVID-19. It has only taken us 56 days to get to 2%. Of course, we do not know how many additional people have had the disease but was never tested.
 
Over the last several weeks many area groups have asked us to review their plans for “community events” such as festivals, parades, firework shows, holiday events etc. Without fail, these groups share with us plans that align with the Governor’s guidance. Almost equally without fail, these events fail to unfold as planned and consistent social distancing and masking does not take place. Therefore, the health department will no longer review these types of event plans. It will be the health department’s standing policy that we advise against any such social gathering. While we do not have the authority to prevent these types of events, we can no longer spend our time reviewing plans that consistently fail during execution. We will simply direct such “event planners” to the state’s guidance. Of course, we will continue to work with businesses, long-term care facilities, schools etc. to put together prevention and post-exposure COVID-19 plans.
 
6 of our counties remain in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Clinton, Cumberland, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. The other 4 are in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread, Casey, Green, McCreary, and Pulaski.
 
Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,273 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 101,775 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 101,494 statewide plus 281 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 
For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19.
 

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CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 10-29-20

Russell County 8 new cases Wednesday. We had 6 cases released from isolation. We now have 59 active cases which 55 are on self-isolation and 4 are hospitalized. The 4 hospitalized are all in Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital.

 

Adair County 12 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 6 cases. We have 85 active cases with 82 in home isolation and 3 in area hospitals.

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Gov. Beshear: Communities Must Work Together to Stop Spread of COVID-19....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 28, 2020) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear said community leaders, schools, businesses and families listed in red zone counties each Thursday on kycovid19.ky.gov should follow new recommendations the following Monday through Sunday to stop the spread of COVID-19 in their communities.

 

“It takes an entire community to protect the most vulnerable, to keep our schools open and to keep our economy running,” said Gov. Beshear. “What we need to see is that when a county hits red, everybody comes together in a coordinated effort.”

 

When a county gets out of the red zone, schools can reopen, businesses have more flexibility, nursing homes can accommodate visitors and Kentuckians are able to enjoy more activities with loved ones. Most important, fewer people get sick or die from COVID-19.

 

“This will not just protect nameless, faceless people somewhere in Kentucky. It will protect the people you see every day,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

“This is the worst our incidence rate map has ever looked and every indication would suggest that it’s going to get worse before it gets better,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “This is a human problem.

 

A global problem. Everyone wants it to be over. But if we get cavalier about it, it’s like being at a casino – the house always wins. The virus is the house. When everyone flaunts the guidelines, they don’t work.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Wednesday, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

 

  1. New cases today: 1,864
  2. New deaths today: 14
  3. Positivity rate: 6.07%
  4. Total deaths: 1,442
  5. Currently hospitalized: 927
  6. Currently in ICU: 235
  7. Currently on ventilator: 110

 

The top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Hardin, Nelson, Pike, Kenton and Warren. A list of today’s 64 red counties can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 83-year-old man from Boyd County; an 80-year-old man from Breathitt County; a 61-year-old woman from Christian County; a 95-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 93-year-old woman and a 91-year-old man from Henderson County; an 87-year-old woman and three men, ages 70, 80 and 81 from Jefferson County; two women, ages 80 and 82, from Kenton County; a 64-year-old woman from Knox County; and an 85-year-old woman from Lee County.

 

Gov. Beshear reminds Kentuckians to light their homes and businesses up green to show compassion for those lost to COVID-19.

 

The Governor said the White House recommends keeping mask mandates in place, ensuring physical distancing, avoiding public crowds and private gatherings and ensuring that retail establishments are complying with guidelines. The Oct. 25 White House COVID-19 report said “current transmissions are linked to home gatherings” and that family members and friends may be asymptomatic but still contagious.

 

Surge Testing Begins
The Governor announced a new testing project today with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as the state sees record-high numbers of new COVID-19 cases. Up to 200 tests tomorrow and 300 tests each day after are available to Kentuckians at the Kentucky Exposition Center – Lot C in Louisville, from Oct. 29-31 and Nov. 2-6.

 

An additional testing location in Lexington will be announced soon and will open Nov. 16. Kentuckians can expect PCR test results within two or three days. Each patient receiving a test gets a pack of five cloth face coverings provided by HHS. Kentuckians can register for a test now here.

 

“Go vote early and get your COVID-19 test all at the same time,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Long-Term Care Facilities Update
Cabinet for Health and Family Services Secretary Eric Friedlander updated Kentuckians on the state’s long-term care facilities. By the end of this week, approximately 330,000 Kentucky-sponsored surveillance COVID-19 tests will have been administered in long-term care facilities. Residents and staff in red counties are tested twice a week; those in orange counties are tested weekly.

 

“Thank you to long-term care staff members for your continued hard work and dedication,” said Secretary Friedlander. “Thanks to our residents, families, loved ones, providers, vendors and all who help support these very Kentuckians who hold such a special place among all of us.”

 

Secretary Friedlander said at Thomson-Hood Veterans Center in Wilmore, the largest facility operated by the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs, 54 veterans are currently positive and tragically, 11 have been lost to COVID-19. Twenty-three staff are currently positive.

 

The Cabinet for Health and Family Services is providing surveillance testing: Twice a week, PCR testing is being administered and on top of that, facilities are using Binex antigen testing for rapid results. Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs Strike Teams have been deployed, staffed by health professionals from several states and representing the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

 

“We have to do our part. We have to wear our masks. We have to follow the guidelines. That’s the best way we can give back to our veterans and protect them,” said Secretary Friedlander.

 

Fast 4
Today, Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman celebrated 2,500 nominees for Kentucky Teacher of the Year Awards, including middle and high school teacher honorees, Christopher McCurry, from Lafayette High School (Fayette County) and Laura Peavley from Westport Middle School (Jefferson County), and 2020 Kentucky Teacher of the Year Donnie Piercey from Stonewall Elementary School (Fayette County).

 

Next, she announced that Kentuckians now have the ability to complete the GED program virtually through Kentucky Skills U at no cost.

 

“You will remember in January, we announced the Free GED Program. I am proud to announce 1,032 people successfully earned their GED during the first six months of 2020. That is 1,032 Kentuckians bravely taking control of their future by furthering their education,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “As a teacher, I cannot begin to tell you what a big deal this is. I know the difference a high school diploma or a GED can make in a person’s life and future.”

 

The Lieutenant Governor, a former civics teacher, reminded Kentuckians they have six more days to vote. Voters can visit govoteky.com to find the status of an absentee ballot, ballot drop box locations, local polling places, sample ballots and more. Finally, Lt. Gov. Coleman said wearing a mask is not only a way to prevent yourself from catching the virus, it’s a way to prevent others from catching the virus. It is a patriotic act and a tangible show of love for your neighbors.

 

Virginia Moore Update
In a video update, American Sign Language interpreter Virginia Moore shared the wonderful news that she is now cancer-free. She reminded all Kentuckians to get regular cancer screenings.

 

“Team Kentucky’s kindness lifted me up and gave me the strength to go through this. It was overwhelming and just remarkable,” Moore said. “Let’s take that kindness and support and give it to everyone out there who is battling the coronavirus.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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COUNTY & CITY PROCLAIM TODAY FIRST RESPONDERS DAY....

 

Adair County Judge Exec. Gale Cowan & Columbia Mayor Pam Hoots sign proclamations declaring October 28th, 2020 as National First Responders Day....

 

 

 

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ADAIR CO. JUDGE'S OFFICE CLOSED DUE TO COVID-19...

 
The Adair County Judge’s Office was closed today (Wednesday) and will be closed tomorrow (Thursday). Judge Gale Cowan was notified late Tuesday night that someone in the office for a meeting on Monday morning ended up testing positive for COVID19. Judge Cowan said even though the Adair Annex is closed to the general public, they are continuing with county business and at times it is necessary for people to be in their offices by appointment. Everyone in the office was social distancing and wearing a mask, but she says she still wants to be on the safe side and close until the area can be fogged/disinfected on Thursday. Phone lines are being transferred to Judge Cowan's cell phone so if you need something, please call the office number 270-384-4703. Email questions or concerns to: adairjudge@duo-county.com.
 

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Reward Offered in Arson of Burkesville City Hall....

 
Louisville, KY - The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Louisville Field Division today announced the reward offered for information leading to the arrest of the individual(s) responsible for the recent arson fire of Burkesville City Hall. 
 
ATF is offering rewards of up to $5,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest and conviction of person(s) responsible for the October 25, 2020 arson of Burkesville City Hall located at 214 Upper Street in Cumberland County, Kentucky, at approximately 6am, Central Daylight Time. ATF is conducting the investigation with assistance from Kentucky State Police, Burkesville Police Department, Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office, Kentucky State Fire Marshal’s Office, Cumberland County Emergency Management, and the Burkesville Fire Department. 
 
ATF is requesting anyone with information to contact ATF at 1-270-393-4755 or the ATF tip line 1-888-ATF-Fire / (888) 283-347 or send a txt to 63975. Information can also be sent to ATFTips@atf.gov, through ATF’s website at .
 
Tips can also be sent anonymously via the reportit® app using ATF Louisville Field Division as the location. It is available through the Google Play Store, Apple App Store, and at www.reportit.com.
 
ATF is the lead federal law enforcement agency with jurisdiction involving violent crime investigations involving arson and arson-for-profit and conducting fire scene examinations. More information about ATF and its programs is available at www.atf.gov.
 

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National Prescription Drug Take Back Day Successful...

 
The Adair County Sheriffs Office has collected approximately 87 lbs of prescription medication over the last year in partnership with the Drug Enforcement Agency.
 
The purpose of the program is to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of old prescription medicine while educating the public about the potential for abuse of medication.
 
This year, alongside Troopers from KSP Post 15, the Adair County Sheriffs Office collected approximately 205lbs of pills.  On Sunday, Oct. 25th at 10:00pmCT,  Sheriff Josh Brockman turned over the prescription meds to KSP POST 15 to be transported to a designated drop-off point for proper disposal.   
 
 
 

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COVID-19 Case Count Increases by 59 in Lake Cumb. District; Adair Has 10 More & Russell 8 More Cases....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.97%.

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 81 deaths resulting in a 1.94% mortality rate (about 1 in 52) among known cases. This compares with a 1.43% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.59% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 31 cases in the hospital. This is 2 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 35 on 10/20/2020. We have had a total of 326 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.8% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.97%. The latest state data shows that 69.02% of ICU beds and 27.61% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,181 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 63 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 6; Casey: 2; Clinton: 11; Cumberland: 2; Green: 3; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 17; Russell: 6; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 7. In all, we have released 86.2% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 4 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 496 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/24/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 505.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Places of Worship.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 59 today: Adair: 10; Casey: 5; Clinton: 9; Cumberland: 2; Green: 2; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 11; Russell: 8; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 4. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 44.79 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/22/2020 when we added 80 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 71-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: An 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: An 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close review of the data will appear to be off by 1 tonight. This is because 1 case from yesterday was removed as not being a case.

 

We are happy we released 4 more cases today than we added new one. However, our hospitalizations went up by 2.

 

7 of our counties remain in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. The other 3 are in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread, Casey, McCreary, and Pulaski.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,181 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 99,881 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 99,637 statewide plus 244 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

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RUSSELL SPRINGS MAN ARRESTED FOR CRIMINAL MISCHIEF & OTHER CHARGES...

 

Gabriel Eden, 41, was taken into custody by Officer Antle with the Russell Springs Police Department Tuesday evening. Eden was charged with Criminal Mischief 2nd degree, Terroristic Threatening, 3rd degree and Menacing. He was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 10-28-20

 

Russell County reported 8 new cases Tuesday. We had 6 cases released from isolation. We now have 57 active cases with 53 on self-isolation and 4 cases hospitalized, all in Somerset. The new cases are females ages 45, 51,54,62,89 and males ages 44, 46, 61.

 

Adair County reported 10 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday. We released 6 cases. We have 79 active cases with 75 in home isolation and 4 in area hospitals.

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18 New COVID-19 Deaths & 1786 New Cases; Kentuckians in Red Zones Asked to Prepare Weekly Reduction Plan

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 27, 2020) – On Tuesday, the Governor said that community, long-term care and school leaders and administrators, as well as Kentucky families in red zone counties, should prepare a weekly COVID-19 reduction plan based on each Thursday’s incidence rate map.

 

Thursday’s red zone map, published on kycovid19.ky.gov, provides communities and families time to plan and accommodate the new red zone reduction recommendations and other existing guidance, including for schools, the following week (Monday through Sunday).

 

The Governor said schools already follow the Thursday map for when a county enters the red zone.

 

“If you’re in a red county, anything you don’t need to do, don’t. Stay home as much as possible,” Gov. Beshear said. “Schools shouldn’t be the only ones that are taking these steps. When you coordinate these two responses, the schools and the community together, we can get the best result.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Tuesday, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,786
  • New deaths today: 18
  • Positivity rate: 5.97%
  • Total deaths: 1,428
  • Currently hospitalized: 913
  • Currently in ICU: 233
  • Currently on ventilator: 115

 

The top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Kenton, Hardin and Pike. A list of today’s red counties can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 99-year-old woman from Christian County; a 79-year-old woman from Henderson County; a 70-year-old woman from Hopkins County; three women, ages 79, 82 and 86, and five men, ages 62, 62, 70, 88 and 93, from Jefferson County; two men, ages 96 and 97, from Jessamine County; a 76-year-old man from Nicholas County; a 72-year-old man from Ohio County; two women, ages 77 and 91, from Scott County; and a 72-year-old woman from Wayne County.

 

Gov. Beshear reminds Kentuckians to light their homes and businesses up green to show compassion for those lost to COVID-19.

 

Louisville Firefighter’s COVID-19 Battle Shows Importance of Masks
Today, Kelly Alexander, the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s chief of staff, spoke about her 40-year-old husband Josh’s harrowing battle with COVID-19. Prior to COVID-19, Josh was extremely healthy and loved hiking and the outdoors. With COVID-19, he couldn’t even talk without being short of breath or suffering from a coughing attack. Thankfully, Josh is now out of the hospital and at home, but he is not out of the woods yet. He still is fighting pneumonia in both lungs. 

 

“The coronavirus affects everyone differently. But one thing is certain. This is not something you want to spread to others and it is not something you want to watch your loved ones suffer from,” said Alexander. “These are not just numbers. These are people. These are husbands, mothers, fathers, family, friends, and neighbors.”

 

Due to work schedules, Alexander was not exposed and has been away from her home since early in October.

 

Corrections Update
J. Michael Brown, secretary of the Executive Cabinet, reminded Kentuckians that from the outset of the pandemic, all correctional facilities enhanced sanitation and hygiene, suspended visitation to keep staff and inmates safe and initiated staff screening for COVID-19 symptoms every day upon entry. Inmates were provided with additional free phone calls and emails to keep them connected to family and friends. He also shared that cloth masks for inmates and staff were provided in early April and have been supplemented to ensure the inmates have a fresh one available at all times. When a positive staff or inmate case has occurred, the correctional facility has worked with the Kentucky Department for Public Health to conduct contact tracing, run additional tests and separate the prison population into distinct housing units if necessary.

 

Currently, there are 263 active inmate cases and 20 active staff cases in state prisons. There have been 1,164 total inmate cases and 194 total staff cases; sadly, 13 inmates and two staffers have died of COVID-19.

 

Remembrance
Today, Gov. Beshear recognized Bobby Rorer, a husband, father, grandfather and Kentucky World War II veteran tragically lost to COVID-19. Bobby was one of the residents at the Thomson-Hood Veterans Center in Wilmore, where he passed away separated from his family.

 

“Bobby was a hero to our people, joining the army at just 16 years old after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. He never met a stranger. He loved getting out, meeting new people and sharing stories. So much so that after retiring from a long career in government and volunteerism, Bobby could often be found at Walmart daily where he would go to just sit and talk to people. They even offered him a greeter position,” said Gov. Beshear. “Most of all, he will be missed by his wife Dana, whose name he called during his final days. Dana, we are praying for your entire family.”

 

Fast 4
Today, Rocky Adkins, senior advisor to Gov. Beshear, highlighted $6.6 million in Appalachian Regional Commission grants for 13 projects in central and eastern Kentucky communities that will update infrastructure, bolster education, spur economic development and diversification, improve workforce training, improve health care and build a better Kentucky.

Adkins also celebrated nearly $13 million in funding from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet to 14 cities and 29 county fiscal courts. The awards will fund 196 projects repairing and improving streets and roads across the commonwealth. To learn more about these two funding announcements, see the full releases here and here.

 

Next, Adkins shared that AgriTech company AppHarvest has begun construction on its third high-tech greenhouse in Central Appalachia, this time in Berea. The project will create 60-full time jobs. He also noted that UPS is re-opening its facility in Harlan County, which will bring back 20 jobs that left the county in 2016.

 

Finally, Adkins implored Kentuckians to wear masks around people from outside their household, including while they vote. Masks are more crucial than ever as the weather gets colder and families spend more time indoors. Wearing a mask is the number one thing people can do to save lives and to get their counties out of the red zone.

 

“It’s your time to have your voice. It’s your time to play your part by voting,” said Adkins. “And put your mask on while doing it. Let’s whip this terrible virus.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Fatal Collision Claims Life of Marion Co. Man....

 
Springfield, KY (October 27, 2020) - On Monday, October 26th, 2020 at approximately 5:28 AM, Kentucky State Police Post 15 received a call from Washington County Dispatch requesting assistance on a single vehicle collision that had resulted in a fatality. Preliminary investigations indicate that Timothy Jones, age 54 of Lebanon, KY was operating a north bound 2007 Honda Civic on Makers Mark Rd, when he lost control and the vehicle caught on fire. Jones was pronounced deceased by the Washington County Coroner. This collision remains under investigation by Trooper Weston Sullivan.
 

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1 New COVID-19 Death in Lake Cumberland District; 55 More Cases....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.84%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today. We have experienced a total of 81 deaths resulting in a 1.97% mortality rate (about 1 in 51) among known cases. This compares with a 1.44% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.6% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 29 cases in the hospital. This is 3 less than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 35 on 10/20/2020. We have had a total of 323 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.84% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.05%. The latest state data shows that 70.05% of ICU beds and 27.73% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,122 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.97% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 58 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 11; Casey: 3; Clinton: 10; Cumberland: 5; Green: 3; McCreary: 3; Russell: 7; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 6. In all, we have released 85.9% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 4 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 500 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/24/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 505.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Places of Worship, and Family.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 55 today: Adair: 13; Casey: 3; Clinton: 6; Cumberland: 6; Green: 3; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 7; Russell: 2; Taylor: 5; and, Wayne: 7. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 44.67 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/22/2020 when we added 80 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: An 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 47-year-old male who is released, unknown
  • Cumberland: An 18-year-old male who is released, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: An 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: An 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we report today is a 72-year-old female from Wayne who had been hospitalized. Our local mortality rate remains high compared to the statewide mortality rate.

 

Today some new recommendations came out from the Governor’s Office for counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread. These include:

  • Employers allow employees to work from home when possible
  • Non-critical government offices to operate virtually
  • Reduce in-person shopping; order online or curbside pickup
  • Order take-out; avoid dining in restaurants or bars
  • Prioritize businesses that follow and enforce mask mandate and other guidelines
  • Reschedule, postpone, or cancel public and private events
  • Do not host or attend gatherings of any size
  • Avoid non-essential activities outside your home
  • Reduce overall activity and contracts, and follow existing guidance, including 10 steps to defeat COVID-19.

 

Seven of our counties are in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Russell, Taylor, & Wayne. The other 3 are in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread, Casey, McCreary, & Pulaski. We are happy we released 4 more cases today than we added new one. We are also pleased our hospitalizations dropped by 3.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,122 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 98,079 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 97,866 statewide plus 213 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

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RED ZONE COUNTY RECOMMENDATIONS....

 
The following counties in the 10-county Lake Cumberland District are in the Red Zone: Russell, Adair, Green, Metcalfe, Taylor and Clinton counties. Red zone counties are those with 25 or more average daily cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 residents.  
 
Governor Andy Beshear's Red Zone Reduction Recommendations:
 
  • Employers should allow employees to work from home when possible
  • Government offices that do not provide critical services need to operate virtually
  • Reduce in-person shopping; order online or pickup curbside as much as possible
  • Order take-out; avoid dining in restaurants or bars
  • Prioritize businesses that follow and enforce the mask mandate and other guidelines
  • Reschedule, postpone or cancel public events
  • Do not host or attend gatherings of any size
  • Avoid non-essential activities outside your home 
  • Reduce overall activity and contacts, and follow existing guidance, including the 10 Steps to Defeat COVID-19.

 

The Governor said when a county turns red, we are already asking schools to go virtual, we ask for sports to pause and we restrict visitation in long-term care facilities.
 

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LOCALCORONA VIRUS UPDATE 10-27-20

 

Adair County 13 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 11 cases. We have75 active cases with 71 of those in home isolation and 4 in area hospitals.

 

Russell County 7 cases released from isolation Monday. We now have 55 active cases which 51 are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized. All 4 cases hospitalized are at Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital. The new cases are 48 and 84 year old males who are self-isolated.

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Gov. Beshear: Kentuckians, Communities Urged to Follow New Red Zone Reduction Recommendations to Stop COVID Spread, Protect One Another

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 26, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear reported 953 COVID-19 cases in Kentucky and issued new red zone reduction recommendations to stop COVID-19 spread and protect Kentuckians in the 55 counties currently in the red zone.

 

The Governor said today marked the highest number of new cases ever reported on a Monday as cases are at an all-time high across the country and in the commonwealth. Hospitalizations and deaths are also increasing nationally and in Kentucky. New red zone recommendations provide direction on how communities can come together to defeat COVID-19.

 

“Every Kentuckian in a red zone county needs to work together to protect one another by following these recommendations,” Gov. Beshear said. “Now is not the time to give up – this is a time when more people are going to be at risk. It is a time when we need everyone to do better.”

 

Red zone counties are those with 25 or more average daily cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 residents. Red zone counties are updated daily on the incidence rate map on kycovid19.ky.gov. The Governor said when a county turns red, we are already asking schools to go virtual, we ask for sports to pause and we restrict visitation in long-term care facilities.

 

Red Zone Reduction Recommendations:

  • Employers should allow employees to work from home when possible
  • Government offices that do not provide critical services need to operate virtually
  • Reduce in-person shopping; order online or pickup curbside as much as possible
  • Order take-out; avoid dining in restaurants or bars
  • Prioritize businesses that follow and enforce the mask mandate and other guidelines
  • Reschedule, postpone or cancel public events
  • Do not host or attend gatherings of any size
  • Avoid non-essential activities outside your home
  • Reduce overall activity and contacts, and follow existing guidance, including the 10 Steps to Defeat COVID-19

 

“This isn’t too much to ask to keep your neighbors and your loved ones alive,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

“It is not a good time to be out in public. This is the most dangerous it has been in eight months,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “The risk of you getting infected in the state of Kentucky has never been higher.”

 

The Governor reminded Kentuckians of existing actions and guidance his administration has taken to protect Kentuckians, including: a mask mandate; Healthy at Work requirements for bars and restaurants, businesses and retail, health care, employers, childcare and indoor and outdoor arenas; a travel advisory and an order limiting private gatherings to 10 people or less. The administration has also implemented guidance to help long-term care facilities, correctional institutions, colleges and universities, K-12 schools, sports groups and published the 10 Steps to Defeat COVID-19.

 

Case Information – Monday, Oct. 26
As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 953
  • New deaths today: 3
  • Positivity rate: 5.84%
  • Total deaths: 1,410
  • Currently hospitalized: 858
  • Currently in ICU: 253
  • Currently on ventilator: 112

 

The top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton and Floyd. A list of the red counties can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 75-year-old man from Garrard County; a 73-year-old woman from Graves County; and a 54-year-old man from Lewis County.

 

Gov. Beshear reminds Kentuckians to light their homes and businesses up green to show compassion for those lost to COVID-19.

 

The Governor said unfortunately there have been eight total COVID-19 deaths from the Thomas-Hood Veterans Center in Wilmore. Ten patients from the facility are currently in the hospital, 51 still have symptoms and four have recovered. There have been 49 total staff cases at the facility, and 26 of those staffers have recovered.

 

Case Information – Sunday, Oct. 25
Due to limited reporting on the weekends, some updated information is now available from Sunday, Oct. 25. As of Sunday, the positivity rate was 5.81%.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Gov. Beshear Announces more than $3.6 Million in Grants for Eastern Kentucky Communities; Russell County Awarded Over $539,000........

 

Russell County's Grant total is $510,000. See below for list of roads to be resurfaced.

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 26, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced $3,690,902 million in Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) grants for seven projects in Eastern Kentucky communities that will update infrastructure, bolster education, spur economic development, improve health care and build a better Kentucky.

 

The Department for Local Government (DLG) administers the grant funding. Communities receiving funds are Booneville, Hazard, Morehead, Mount Vernon and Somerset.

 

Gov. Beshear also announced nearly $4 million in funding from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) to a dozen communities for improvement of local streets and roads.

 

“These projects will improve the lives of people in Eastern Kentucky. They also further illustrate my administration’s commitment to the region and our promise to protect the commonwealth’s economy despite the challenges posed by COVID-19,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are grateful for the leaders who made these projects possible and for ARC’s continued commitment to Kentucky.”

 

“These seven projects are invaluable for Eastern Kentucky,” said Department for Local Government (DLG) Commissioner and Gov. Beshear’s ARC Representative Dennis Keene. “They will provide critical improvements and important investments while we work to provide real opportunity in every community across the commonwealth.”

 

Booneville
Booneville will use $1,000,000 in ARC funds to replace 1,160 water meters throughout the city. These upgrades will allow officials to provide more accurate, remote readings that will prevent revenue and water loss.

 

“I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for helping us set these goals and giving us funds to make it better here for the citizens of Owsley County,” said Booneville Mayor Nelson Bobrowski.

 

Hazard
The Challenger Learning Center of Kentucky, located in Hazard, will use $800,000 in ARC funding for the Moon, Mars and Beyond Gateway to Tomorrow project, which will generate excitement about STEM careers and NASA’s “Return to the Moon by 2024” missions. The project includes an interactive science center, an outreach program in schools for students who cannot travel to the center, virtual programs and the establishment of a Moon, Mars and Beyond Facilitation Team. Upon completion, the project will create two jobs and will include 1,875 students.

 

“On behalf of the Challenger Learning Center of Kentucky Board of Directors and staff, I would like to thank Gov. Beshear and the Appalachian Regional Commission for this grant award, which is an investment in the future of the Challenger Learning Center,” said Challenger Learning Center Executive Director Tom Cravens. “ARC was the Challenger Learning Center’s first investor when the Center originally opened in 1999, and we appreciate this grant, which will kick off the third decade of this innovative STEM learning Center.”

 

Teach for America Appalachia, located in Hazard, will use $500,000 to recruit, train and retain K-12 teachers for underserved areas in eastern Kentucky by offering new training opportunities and incentives. The project will recruit 290 teachers and plans to retain at least 250 past their initial two-year contract. This project would serve 15 school districts within 12 Appalachian counties.

 

“Because of the Appalachian Regional Commission and this administration’s profound belief in our students and communities, we are so grateful to be the recipients of this Appalachian Regional Commission grant,” said Teach for America Appalachia Executive Director Stephanie Devine. “The grant will allow us to launch bold initiatives that will change the face of education in Appalachian Eastern Kentucky.”

 

Morehead
Morehead State University (MSU) will use $622,902 in ARC funding to improve research capabilities and academic instruction in space systems engineering and astrophysics. MSU will use the funding to install a 12-meter satellite-tracing antenna for research, student training and to support NASA missions. It also will make them one of only four Deep Space Network (DSN) stations worldwide as a part of NASA’s DSN. They will also replace the “Star Theater,” which is the most important asset for science education, outreach and training at the MSU Space Science Center. Upon completion, this project will ensure MSU can attract and train students at all grade levels for STEM careers and will cement its legacy of graduating qualified, workforce-ready engineers and physicists.

 

“Morehead State University is pleased to have the support the ARC and the Governor in furthering the development of our Space Science Center, as well as the development of STEM-based education in Kentucky,” said MSU President Dr. Jay Morgan.

 

Mount Vernon
Rockcastle Regional Hospital and Respiratory Care Center Inc. will use $360,000 in ARC funding for the Tech Ready Apprentices for Careers in Kentucky (TRACK) Apprenticeship Program, which was developed by the Kentucky Department of Education’s Office of Career and Technical Education and the Kentucky Labor Cabinet. The program will train 36 apprentices, 12 per year over a three-year period. Participants include high school students who are interested in becoming State Registered Nurse Aides (SRNA). These students will work in the hospital’s ventilator care unit and receive training about caring for ventilator-dependent patients.

 

“The ARC’s support of our apprenticeship program will give new nursing assistants an experienced mentor right from the start of their career,” said Rockcastle Regional Hospital CEO Stephen Estes. “It will allow us to foster a new generation of nurses for the benefit of our patients now and in the future.”

 

Somerset
The Southeast Kentucky Economic Development Corporation (SKED), located in Somerset, will use $108,000 in ARC funding for the Eastern Kentucky Economic Development Branding Initiative. The program will fund the development of new branding, stock photo production and websites for Rockcastle, Rowan, Whitley and Boyd counties. Upon completion, this program will help create 50 jobs and leverage $10 million in new private investment.

 

“We would like to thank Gov. Andy Beshear and DLG Commissioner Dennis Keene for supporting SKED’s application for $108,000 in ARC funds for our economic development branding initiative,” said SKED Executive Director Brett Traver. “Through this project we will work to reposition these communities’ images to help them attract new business and industry to the region.”

 

The Center for Rural Development, located in Somerset, will use $300,000 in ARC funding for the Coal Impacted Skills Training (CIST) Program, which will provide training opportunities to displaced, unemployed and underemployed workers in 35 counties impacted by the decline of the coal industry and COVID-19. Training opportunities will include essential work skills, help desk customer service and specialized workforce training in high-growth industries like allied health, commercial trucking and additive manufacturing. The program is expected to train 260 workers and provide a more ready workforce in growing industries.

 

“On behalf of our board and staff, we would like to thank the Appalachian Regional Commission, Commissioner Keene and the Department for Local Government for the Coal Impacted Skills Training award the center just received,” said Center for Rural Development President and CEO Lonnie Lawson. “This award will allow us to increase education, knowledge, skills and the health of our residents, enabling them to work and succeed in Appalachia.”

 

Transportation Awards
Also today, Gov. Beshear announced nearly $4 million in funding from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) to a dozen communities for improvement of local streets and roads.

 

“One way we make a better Kentucky is by empowering our local governments to improve and maintain the local traffic routes their citizens use every day,” Gov. Beshear said. “Smoother pavement, repaired road beds, improved drainage – simple things by themselves but highly important to the people who use them every day.”

 

The funding – $3,963,809 – will reimburse 10 counties (including Russell County) and 3 cities for work such as pavement repair, resurfacing and drainage ditching on roadways that were rated in poor condition. The projects were submitted for funding consideration from local officials. In each case, KYTC district engineers assessed road conditions to determine the most critical needs based on factors such as safety, economic impact and traffic volumes. A list of the awards is here.

 

Russell County has been awarded over $500,000 to resurface the following roads:

  • Resurface Withers Rd CR 1439 0.166 - $16,600.00
  • Resurface Puncheon Camp Rd CR 1041 1.473 - $74,700.00
  • Resurface Ray Mann Rd Sect. 1 CR 1250 0.785 - $53,950.00
  • Resurface Riverview Dr CR 1822 0.597 - $62,250.00
  • Resurface Little Indian Dr CR 1824 1.020 - $95,450.00
  • Resurface Kauffman Rd CR 1252 0.382 - $39,425.00
  • Resurface Phelps Acres CR 1317 0.980 - $66,400.00
  • Resurface Selby Branch Rd CR 1304 1.292 - $85,075.00
  • Resurface HemlocK Dr CR 1445A 0.545 - $45,650.00


TOTAL MILES: 7.240
GRANT AWARDED: $539,500.00

 

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7 Counties in Lake Cumb. District in Red Critical COVID-19 Range....


Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.63%.

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 80 deaths resulting in a 1.97% mortality rate (about 1 in 51) among known cases. This compares with a 1.45% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.61% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 32 cases in the hospital. This is 1 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 318 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.82% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.08%. The latest state data shows that 70.05% of ICU beds and 27.73% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,067 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.95% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 36 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 4; Casey: 3; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 2; Green: 1; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 2; Russell: 5; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 8. In all, we have released 85.6% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 1 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 504 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/24/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 505.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Places of Worship, and Family.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 35 today: Casey: 1; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 2; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 9; Russell: 2; Taylor: 13; and, Wayne: 3. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 42.45 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/22/2020 when we added 80 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Casey: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Cumberland: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
  • McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

Pulaski went back into the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread, joining Casey and McCreary. All other counties in our district are in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. One little bit of good news is that we released 1 more case than we added new cases. Let’s hope that the last 6 weeks of acceleration drops off this week.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,067 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 97,143 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 96,942 statewide plus 201 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

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BURKESVILLE CITY HALL FIRE SUNDAY MORNING....


Burkesville City hall was damaged by fire Sunday morning.

 

The City of Burkeville suffered fire damage to the city building in the early morning hours yesterday. According to Neal Poindexter with WKYR, an alarm sounded at 5:45 a.m. at Burkesville City Hall.

 

Arson is suspected in the blaze. Investigators were on scene Sunday morning and will be retuning today.

 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 10-26-20


Russell County 2 new cases Sunday. We had 5 cases released from isolation. We now have 60 active cases which 57 are on self-isolation and 3 cases are hospitalized at Somerset. The new cases today are a 21 year old male and a 37 year old female who are both self-isolated.

 

Adair County NO NEW COVID19 CASES TO REPORT SUNDAY! We released 4 cases. We have 73 active cases with 66 in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals.

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KY Sets Record for Highest Number of COVID-19 Cases in a Week Since Pandemic Began.....

 

FRANKFORT, KY (Oct. 25, 2020) – On Sunday, Gov. Andy Beshear said Kentucky unfortunately has set a new record for the highest number of new COVID-19 cases in a week since the pandemic began, with 9,335 positive cases this week.

 

The previous highest week of COVID-19 cases was Oct. 5-11, when the commonwealth reported 7,675 new cases. Today also marks the highest number of new cases ever reported on a Sunday, with 1,462 cases.

 

“Since March 6, Kentuckians have been fighting COVID-19, yet we are facing the highest number of cases ever reported on a Sunday, and the highest week of new cases. We must do better,” Gov. Beshear said. “We all know the steps we need to take to stop the spread of this virus – wear a facial covering, wash your hands, stay 6 feet apart and limit gatherings and travel – let’s all do these simple things to protect each other.”

 

Yesterday, the Governor said he will be talking Monday about new recommendations to counties that are in the red zone, those with 25 or more average daily cases per 100,000 residents. The Governor plans to hold 4 p.m. briefings Monday through Thursday this week to update Kentuckians on COVID-19 and necessary next steps.

 

Case Information
Due to limited reporting* on Sundays, some information will be delayed until Monday. As of 1:30pmCT on Sunday, Oct. 25th, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,462
  • New deaths today: 3
  • Positivity rate: Reported Monday*
  • Total deaths: 1,407
  • Currently hospitalized: 841
  • Currently in ICU: 231
  • Currently on ventilator: 106

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are Jefferson, Elliott, Kenton, Fayette, Warren, Bullitt and Shelby.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 87-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 74-year-old woman from Grayson County and an 83-year-old man from Spencer County.

 

Gov. Beshear reminds Kentuckians to light their homes and businesses up green to show compassion for those lost to COVID-19.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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PUBLIC NOTICE: ADAIR CO. POLL WORKER TESTS POSITIVE FOR COVID-19

 
The following is a Publc Notice received from the Adair County Judge Exec.'s Office last Tuesday, Oct. 20th:
 
Adair County Clerk Lisa Greer was notified on Tuesday, Oct. 20th of an Election Poll Worker that tested positive for COVID-19. We have said from the beginning that we would be transparent and up front with the citizens of our community. This worker was NOT in the Adair Annex building on Tuesday, Oct. 20th and the building is cleaned every morning before opening and every evening after closing, as well as during the day.  Any workers who were in direct contact with this poll worker has been sent for testing and must have a negative test result before returning to work.  
 
This is the reason we take the steps we do, to hopefully stop the spread to others if or when someone is exposed. Poll workers are wearing the KN95 masks and are behind a plexiglass shield. Disinfecting spray and bleach water are used multiple times a day to sanitize and hand sanitizer is on sight for anyone to use.
 
Close contact to a positive person is considered to be within 6 feet for more than 15 minutes. If anyone was in close contact with a positive patient, you will be contacted by the Lake Cumberland District Health Department. 
 

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WEEKEND ARRESTS 10/25/20

 

Jakob Jones, 25, of Somerset was arrested on Saturday afternoon by KSP for Possession of Methamphetamine and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Fleeing or Evading Police (on foot), Resisting Arrest, and Failure to Appear.

 

Lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

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3 COVID-19 Deaths Last Week in Lake Cumberland District; At Peak Number of Cases....

 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.63%.
 
Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 80 deaths resulting in a 1.98% mortality rate (about 1 in 51) among known cases. This compares with a 1.82% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.62% morality rate at the national level.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 31 cases in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 317 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.86% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.19%. The latest state data shows that 70.05% of ICU beds and 27.73% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,032 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.93% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 49 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 2; Casey: 7; Clinton: 5; Green: 2; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 9; Taylor: 5; and, Wayne: 10. In all, we have released 85.5% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 5 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 505 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/24/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 505.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Places of Worship, and Family.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 54 today: Adair: 5; Casey: 3; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 3; Green: 5; Pulaski: 10; Russell: 3; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 5. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.017. This means our total case count is projected to double every 41.97 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/22/2020 when we added 80 cases.
 
Today’s new cases include:
  • Adair: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 55-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 7-year-old female who is released, 10/12/20
  • Clinton: A 3-year-old female who is released, 10/12/20
  • Cumberland: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

This has been a very challenging week. After 5 weeks of having a slower growth rate of new cases, our district average once again exceeds that of the state average. Today, we are at our peak number of active cases, 505. At 31, we are 2 away from equaling our record number of hospitalized cases. Remember, the last time we were setting records like this, we were experiencing 3 nursing home clusters. Our present situation is community-spread. Also, we had 3 deaths this week. Obviously, with more cases comes more death and more hospitalizations.
 
At both the state (8,788) and local level (440), this was the highest week of new cases since the onset of the outbreak. Also, we have 83 more active cases today at 505 that we did last week. We continue to have 7 of our 10 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread.
 
We saw a lot of cases this week tied to school sports, church related events, and social events like weddings.
 
We can save lives and hospitalizations if, while we await a vaccine, we follow the guidance. Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,032 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 95,682 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 95,480 statewide plus 202 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 
For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.
 
 

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Drug Trafficking Search Warrant Results in Arrest of 5 Russell Co. Residents....

 

According to Russell County Sheriff Derek Polston, the warrant was issued at 6:30pmCT on Saturday night at 1771 Jericho Road where there have been numerous complaints involving drugs and and large amounts of traffic in that area of the county.

 

 

  1. Zachary Meece, 26, of - Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (Drug Unspecified) and Possession of a Controlled Substance Not in Proper Container
  2. Sarah Elizabeth Cox, 40, of Russell Springs - Possession of Methamphetamine and Drug Paraphernalia
  3. Zachary Antle, 25, of  - Possession of Marijuana
  4. Rebecca Bennett, 57, of Russell Springs - Possession of Methamphetamine & Marijuana, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia
  5. Brandon Estes, 40, of Russell Springs - Assault 4th Degree (Domestic Violence with No Visible injuries)

 

The arrests are the result of the ongoing battle to stop the sale of illegal drugs in Russell County by the RCSO. Deputy Kenny Perkins is the investigating officer. He was assisted at the scene by Chief Deputy Jerry Melton, Deputies Clint Pace and Ron Golden, K-9 “Yogi”, and Constable Jenny Luttrell. The investigation is continuing and the case will be presented to a Russell County Grand Jury.
 

Sheriff Polston reminds all Russell County residents that if you suspect illegal drug activity in your neighborhood, please contact the Drug/Wanted Persons Tip-Line at 270-343-8116. All callers will remain anonymous.

 

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1738 New COVID-19 Cases in KY; 8 More Deaths....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear said Saturday he is excited to be out of quarantine, but today’s COVID-19 report is, “in a word, frightening.” The Governor said this is Kentucky’s highest day of newly reported cases by a significant amount, except for the one day when a backlog of cases from Fayette County was added.

 

“This is exploding all over the country. Yesterday was the highest amount of cases ever reported in a single day in the United States,” Gov. Beshear said. “We've got to do better, and on Monday we'll be talking about new recommendations to counties that are in the red. We've got to tamp down these cases. The more cases, the more people that end up in the hospital and the more people die.”

 

Case Information
As of 2:00pmCT on Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,738
  • New deaths today: 8
  • Positivity rate: 5.63%
  • Total deaths: 1,404
  • Currently hospitalized: 840
  • Currently in ICU: 208
  • Currently on ventilator: 107

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Elliott, Shelby and Kenton.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported eight new deaths Saturday, bringing the total number of Kentuckians now lost to the virus is 1,404.

 

“That’s eight additional families who are suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear. “Do what it takes to protect your neighbor, to protect their life. That's what we're fighting for now – life and death.”

 

The deaths reported Saturday include a 69-year-old woman from Lee County; a 70-year-old man from Lincoln County; a 71-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 89-year-old man from Jessamine County; an 86-year-old man from Greenup County; an 89-year-old man from Henderson County; a 71-year-old man from Jefferson County and a 79-year-old man from Harlan.

 

“We’re all tired of COVID-19 and the problems it has brought,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “People are hurting, whether from the virus itself or the impact it has had on the rest of our lives. It’s all worse, though, when we don’t do simple things like wearing masks and socially distancing. As October comes to a close, please be kind to each other and remember that we help each other, and ourselves, when we focus on defeating the virus rather than arguing with each other.”

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED 10/23/20

 
As of 2:35 p.m. on Friday, October 23, 2020 the Adair County boil water advisory for customers from 610 Campbellsville Road to 1125 Campbellsville Road and all side roads in between has been lifted by the Division of Water. This means your water is safe for human consumption. You no longer have to boil your water.
 

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1457 New Cases; 16 More Deaths; Masks Crucial As Cases Rise Across KY....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 23, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Friday said Kentuckians must wear masks to prevent further spread of the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) as cases rise across Kentucky and the rest of the United States.

 

“This week has been a tough week, with three out of the five highest days for new COVID-19 cases,” said Gov. Beshear. “This virus is everywhere. It is in your community. We need every community doing what it takes to defeat it.”

 

The Governor will finish his two-week quarantine tomorrow morning. The First Family has recently tested negative for the virus four times. 

 

“Wear a mask. It saves lives. I’ve now tested negative four straight times after sitting in the passenger seat next to someone driving who was infectious with COVID,” said Gov. Beshear. “I was wearing a mask. He was wearing a mask. That shows you that it works.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Friday, Oct. 23, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,457
  • New deaths today: 16
  • Positivity rate: 5.34%
  • Total deaths: 1,396
  • Currently hospitalized: 819
  • Currently in ICU: 205
  • Currently on ventilator: 97

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Hardin and Barren.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 69-year-old woman from Boyd County; two women, ages 77 and 84, from Daviess County; a 71-year-old woman from Fayette County; three women, ages 84, 101 and 102, and three men, ages 73, 76 and 84, from Jefferson County; a 64-year-old man from Knott County; an 87-year-old woman from Lee County; an 84-year-old woman from Leslie County; a 75-year-old woman from Logan County; an 86-year-old woman from Marshall County; and an 80-year-old man from Todd County.

 

Week in Review
This week the Governor announced the Healthy at Home Utility Relief Fund, highlighted how the state is preparing for a surge in COVID-19 cases, shared that the White House is saying Kentuckians in red or orange counties shouldn’t have gatherings at all beyond their immediate families and encouraged families to plan for a safe Halloween. For more on this week’s updates, visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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57-Year-Old Adair County Woman Dies From COVID-19; 80 New Cases in Lake Cumb. District....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.3%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Adair. We have experienced a total of 80 deaths resulting in a 2.05% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.5% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.66% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 26 cases in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 308 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.88% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.33%. The latest state data shows that 69.95% of ICU beds and 28.89% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 3,908 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.87% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 39 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 8; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 4; Russell: 6; Taylor: 14; and, Wayne: 6. In all, we have released 85.2% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 40 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 498 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/22/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 498.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Places of Worship, and Medical Facilities.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 80 today: Adair: 15; Casey: 1; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 6; Green: 3; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 12; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 6. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 43.75 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/22/2020 when we added 80 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 92-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 7 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 76-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 70-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we report today is a 57-year-old female from Adair County. We are saddened by this death and the large number of hospitalizations we currently have in our district, 26.

 

Unfortunately, for the second day in a row, we broke our all-time single-day new case record. Today we are reporting 80 new cases. We still have 7 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread. We are also at the highest number of active cases in our district since the on-set of the outbreak, 498.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 3,908 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 92,491 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 92,299 statewide plus 192 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

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AREA ARRESTS 10-23-20

 

A Columbia man was arrested on several charges yesterday in Russell County by KSP including Escape charges…

 

Brandon Frausto, 26, was taken into custody by KSP Trooper Harper last evening. He was charged with Escape 2nd Degree, Escape 3rd Degree, Assault 2nd Degree (Police Officer), Operating on a Suspended or Revoked License and Possession of Marijuana. Frausto was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

Jerry Pitcock, 57, of Burkesville, KY was arrested by Deputy Walters with the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office yesterday afternoon. Pitcock was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth), Operating a Motor Vehicle under the Influence Substance, Operating a Vehicle with Expired Operators License and Failure to Produce Insurance Card.

 

 

 

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ADAIR COUNTY INDICTMENTS - 10/22/20

 

An Adair County Grand Jury has returned several indictments. To read them, click on following link:  https://ridingthewave.com/assets/files/ADAIR-COUNTY-INDICTMENTS-OCT-2020.pdf

 

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1330 New Cases; 17 More Deaths; More Kentuckians Hospitalized Not Than Ever Before.....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 22, 2020) – As we get closer to Halloween, Gov. Andy Beshear said many kids, including his own, are very excited about the holiday. He encouraged Kentucky families to make plans now for how to celebrate safely as COVID-19 cases rise across the commonwealth.

 

Kentucky is in the red zone for cases, according to the White House. There are more Kentuckians hospitalized with COVID-19 now than ever before.

 

“Remember, the CDC doesn’t think we ought to be trick-or-treating at all. I know kids are going to do it. I know how excited our kids are to do it, so please make your plan on how you are going to follow these steps to do it safely,” said Gov. Beshear. “It’s a sacrifice, but I’d like to think it’s a small sacrifice to better protect our people, our children and our seniors.”

 

The Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH) has shared guidance online to help people choose fun, low-risk Halloween activities. Among the suggestions:
 

  • At all events and activities, wear a face covering, sanitize hands often and maintain six feet of distance from others.
  • Place individually wrapped candy outside on the porch, driveway or table.
  • If you plan to trick-or-treat, do so in family groups in your own neighborhood and avoid congregating in large groups.
  • Consider safer alternatives to trick-or-treating, including virtual Halloween costume contests, drive-by costume or car decorating contests with judges who are social distancing or a Halloween movie or game night at your home with your family.

 

The full KDPH Halloween guidance is available in English and Spanish; a one-page summary is also available in English and Spanish.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the KDPH, also updated Kentuckians that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now defines a “close contact” as someone who was within 6 feet of an infected individual for a total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period. The CDC previously defined a “close contact” as someone who spent at least 15 consecutive minutes within six feet of a confirmed coronavirus case. 

 

“In the state of Kentucky, if you have a high-risk exposure, we’re going to expect you to quarantine. That’s how we keep the disease low,” said Dr. Stack. “And the sad irony in this is when people disregard this, that’s when the problem gets bigger and bigger and more and more people are affected by the interventions we have to take. So if you get a call, I really urge you to follow the great example set by the First Family.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,330
  • New deaths today: 17
  • Positivity rate: 5.30%
  • Total deaths: 1,380
  • Currently hospitalized: 800
  • Currently in ICU: 214
  • Currently on ventilator: 105

 

The top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Nelson, Hardin, Warren and Barren.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two women, ages 69 and 74, from Allen County; a 73-year-old man from Fayette County; two women, ages 60 and 78, from Greenup County; a 65-year-old woman from Hancock County; a 64-year-old woman from Hardin County; a 52-year-old man from Henderson County; a 95-year-old woman and an 84-year-old man from Jefferson County; an 87-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 93-year-old woman from Knott County; a 77-year-old woman from Lee County; a 76-year-old man from McCracken County; a 63-year-old man from Nicholas County; an 87-year-old man from Rockcastle County; and a 96-year-old man from Scott County.

 

The Governor implored all Kentuckians to take the virus seriously and shared three examples of other states dealing with preventable surges in cases and deaths. He said there is still time to prevent Kentucky from going the direction of Florida, Utah and Wisconsin.

 

Fast 4
Today, First Lady Britainy Beshear celebrated the news that Humana has partnered with Coverings for Kids to donate 100,000 reusable masks to our schools.

 

“This incredible display of support for our students and school staff comes at a crucial point in our fight with this virus,” said the First Lady. “Thank you for your commitment to getting these masks to our areas that need them the most right now.”

 

Kentuckians who want to get involved with this initiative should contact their local school district and visit firstlady.ky.gov/coveringsforkids.

 

The First Lady also encouraged all Kentucky families to follow the 10 Steps to Fight COVID-19, including answering the call from contact tracers and quarantining if necessary to prevent the spread of the virus, just as her family is doing.

 

She shared ideas for a safe and fun Halloween, including decorating your house, getting out on a walk or drive around your neighborhood to look at other people’s decorations, carving pumpkins and getting your kids involved in handmade holiday crafts and treat-making. Tag the First Lady in your Halloween fun by using the hashtag #HealthyHalloweenKY on your photos.

 

She highlighted Kentuckians who have been masking up to protect themselves, their families and their communities.

 

Finally, the First Lady shared the good news that today, the First Family tested negative for COVID-19 for the fourth time since a possible exposure on Oct. 10. They continue to remain in quarantine.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY 10/22/20

 
Date Issued: 10/22/2020
Time Issued: 3:30 P.M.
 
A BOIL WATER ADVISORY is in effect for consumers from 610 Campbellsville Road to 1125 Campbellsville Road and all side roads in between and Grant Lane. The advisory has been issued due to main line leak. Following such an event, the potential exists for bacteriological contamination of the water supply therefore this Boil Water Advisory has been issued as a precautionary measure. Until further notice, boil all water used for drinking and cooking, bringing the water to a rolling boil for 3 minutes before using. For more information concerning the Boil Water Advisory, contact Lennon Stone at Columbia Adair Utilities District, 270-384-2181.
 
 

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ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED 10/22/20

 
As of 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, October 22, 2020 the Adair County boil water advisory for customers from 911 Milltown Church Road to 3374 Milltown Church Road, Atkins Road and Corbin Richard Road has been lifted by the Division of Water. This means your water is safe for human consumption and you no longer have to boil your water.
 

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Record Breaking Day with 76 New Coronavirus Cases in Lake Cumberland District...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 4.99%.

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 79 deaths resulting in a 2.06% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.5% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.67% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 26 cases in the hospital. This is 6 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 301 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.86% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.39%. The latest state data shows that 70.15% of ICU beds and 28.77% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 3,828 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.83% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 35 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 4; Clinton: 6; Green: 3; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 12; and, Taylor: 6. In all, we have released 86% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 41 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 458 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/21/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 458.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Places of Worship, and Medical Facilities.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 76 today: Adair: 13; Casey: 4; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 1; Green: 5; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 6; Russell: 9; Taylor: 23; and, Wayne: 8. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 45.25 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/21/2020 when we added 76 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 88-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is released, 10/21/20
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 76-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

Unfortunately, we broke our all-time single-day new case record. Today we are reporting 76 new cases. The last record, 75, was supplemented by 3 significant nursing home clusters. Our new record is without this. So, most of our current spread is “community-spread”.

 

Also, our hospitalized cases is again getting high at 26. On a bright note, while we still have 7 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread, Pulaski did drop into the “yellow-community-spread” range.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 3,828 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 91,142 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 90,996 statewide plus 146 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

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Adair County School System Coronavirus Update....


From Adair County School Superintendent Dr. Pamela Stephens:

 

 

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A NANCY MAN WAS ARREST BY THE RCSO ON SEVERAL CHARGES YESTERDAY

 

Harold Morrow age 56, was taken into custody last night just before 9 by Deputy Wine with the Sheriff’s Officer and charged with Alcohol Intoxication in a Public Place (1st and 2nd Offense), Terroristic Threatening, 3rd Degree, Disorderly Conduct, 2nd Degree and Menacing.

 

He was lodged into the Russell County Detention Center…

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ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY 10/21/20

 
Date Issued: 10/21/2020
 
Time Issued: 8:30 A.M.
 
A BOIL WATER ADVISORY is in effect for consumers from 911 Milltown Church Road to 3374 Milltown Church Road, Atkins Road and Corbin Richard Road. The advisory has been issued due to main line leak. Following such an event, the potential exists for bacteriological contamination of the water supply therefore this Boil Water Advisory has been issued as a precautionary measure. Until further notice, boil all water used for drinking and cooking, bringing the water to a rolling boil for 3 minutes before using. This advisory will remain in effect until the situation has been corrected and test results have shown the water to be of an acceptable quality. For more information concerning the Boil Water Advisory, contact Lennon Stone at Columbia Adair Utilities District, 270-384-2181.
 

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KSP To Participate in DEA Take Back Program....

 

 

WHAT: National Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) Take Back Program

 

WHEN: Saturday, October 24, 2020, 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 

 

WHERE:  All KSP Post locations* (link below)

 

WHY: The annual DEA Take Back Day event allow citizens to safely dispose of unused medications providing an opportunity to prevent drug addiction and overdose deaths in their local communities. All citizens who drop off medications should contact post upon arrival and wear proper personal protective equipment (PPE). A trooper will meet them outside and collect their medication for immediate storage and disposal.

 

http://kentuckystatepolice.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/POST-TAKE-BACK-LOCATIONS-2020.pdf 

 

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RUSSELL CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED 10/21/20

 
The Boil Water Advisory on McQueary Ridge Road and Wilson Town Road in Russell County has been lifted. You no longer have to boil your water.
 

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1,487 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 21 NEW DEATHS....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Wednesday said the White House is saying Kentuckians in red or orange counties shouldn’t have gatherings at all beyond their immediate families.

 

The Governor noted Kentucky already has guidance limiting to 10 or fewer people gatherings such as backyard barbecues and house parties, but the recommendation from the White House this week goes even further.

 

“There is so much spread at family gatherings, events at the house, as well as weddings and funerals,” the Governor said. “At the very least, we need people to be a lot more cognizant of the dangers of these gatherings, especially when people aren’t wearing masks the whole time.”

 

The Governor said one wedding resulted in 44 cases, one funeral caused seven cases and one coffee gathering resulted in eight cases and two deaths. While weddings and funerals will continue, the Governor said more Kentuckians need to step up and follow the rules to make them safer.

 

The Governor said the guidance is timely because today he reported the highest number of cases ever reported on a single day, aside from the day when he reported a significant backlog of cases from Lexington.

 

“The difference between where we are now and where we were in March is that now we know how to stop the spread,” said Gov. Beshear. “It’s like being in the challenge of your lifetime, it’s like being in a war – except you know 100% how to win. The question is, are you going to execute the plan to win?”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,487
  • New deaths today: 21
  • Positivity rate: 4.99%
  • Total deaths: 1,363
  • Currently hospitalized: 794
  • Currently in ICU: 203
  • Currently on ventilator: 94

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Hardin, Kenton, Boone, Fayette, Elliott, Hopkins, Laurel, Pike and Madison.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 81-year-old man from Adair County; a 65-year-old woman from Boyd County; a 91-year-old woman from Christian County; a 69-year-old man from Clark County; a 52-year-old man from Clinton County; a 74-year-old woman from Daviess County; an 84-year-old Kentuckian (gender unknown), two women, ages 84 and 89, and two men, ages 84 and 93, from Henderson County; four women, ages 70, 82, 85 and 86, and two men, ages 63 and 83, from Jefferson County; two women, ages 42 and 77, from Madison County; a 76-year-old woman from Marion County; and a 57-year-old man from Todd County.

 

Update on Veterans
Gov. Beshear updated Kentuckians about state veterans homes. At Thomson-Hood in Wilmore, today there are 71 positive veterans, 13 hospitalized, one recovered and one in the COVID unit in-house. Unfortunately, six COVID-positive veterans have died. Thomson-Hood is the only one of Kentucky’s four state veterans long-term care facilities with active cases. There were two COVID-positive veteran deaths at EKVC in Hazard before that outbreak was resolved and there are no active cases there. There are no active cases at Western Kentucky Veterans Center in Hanson or at Radcliff Veterans Center in Radcliff.

 

The Governor also recognized Matt Coleman, a veteran and small-business owner in Louisville, who immediately made arrangements to donate his plasma after surviving the coronavirus, knowing it contains COVID-19 antibodies that may help others fight the disease.

 

Update on Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund
On Aug. 24, the Governor directed $15 million in federal CARES Act dollars to support the Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund, which began accepting applications Sept. 8.

 

Since opening, the fund has received 5,305 applications from tenants, 3,709 of which have submitted all required documents and are ready to be reviewed.

 

“We estimate we will utilize most of the CARES funds allocated to this program assisting Kentuckians who have submitted the 3,709 completed applications. This includes projected assistance for 1 or 2 months of future rent,” said Gov. Beshear. “Therefore, we will be closing the application portal at teamkyhherf.ky.gov. Should other CARES Act or future stimulus funds become available, we may well begin taking applications again.”

 

The Governor said there are several other resources in the commonwealth helping Kentucky families pay their rent, including the Team Kentucky Fund and at least five other funds that are listed at teamkyhherf.ky.gov. Legal assistance is also offered to Kentuckians through the Kentucky COVID-19 Legal Aid Helpline at 833-540-0342 or visit www.kycovidlegalhelp.org/.

  

Remembrance
The Governor also paid tribute to another Kentuckian lost to COVID-19: Ed Pantoja, 84, of Louisville. He was a husband and father of three and led a very active lifestyle.

 

“His son shared Ed was incredibly healthy, running 20 miles a week and working out daily at the gym. Those who knew Ed loved him,” said Gov. Beshear. “From those who worked at restaurants he frequently visited, to his gym buddies and the tenants who rented from him, they all found a friend in Ed. And his family loved him most of all. He had created a beautiful family with his wife of 60 years. They just celebrated the milestone anniversary in January together, not knowing it would be their last.”

 

Ed’s son asked that the Governor share his father’s story and emphasize the importance of wearing a mask, not only to protect your own life, but also the lives of those you love.

 

Fast 4
First, Gov. Beshear announced that Eastern Kentucky, home to AppHarvest’s first state-of-the-art, high-tech greenhouse, can expect to see over 300 new jobs created in the years ahead, following today’s unveiling of the agritech company’s 60-acre, 2.76 million-square-foot operation in Morehead.

 

“We want Kentucky to emerge as a national leader in agritech, and this incredible high-tech greenhouse marks an important step in creating new jobs and setting up the commonwealth for a better future,” Gov. Beshear said. “Like many around Morehead and throughout the state, I have looked forward to this announcement for some time. I am thrilled the facility is up and running and work on a second operation is already underway. I can’t wait to see what’s next for AppHarvest in Kentucky."

 

For more information and to view the full news release, click here.

 

Next, the Governor highlighted that the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet has awarded more than $780,000 to fight fraud and price-gouging and improve access to courts through the U.S Department of Justice’s Coronavirus Emergency Supplemental Funding Program. Read more.

 

Last, he implored Kentuckians to wear masks and asked that they vote early if at all possible to decrease lines and crowding on Election Day.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Gov. Beshear Announces More than $780,000 in Funding for Public Safety Agencies in Fight against COVID-19.....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced more than $780,000 in federal funding has been awarded to Kentucky public safety agencies and offices to help protect Kentuckians, including seniors, against scams and fraud and to respond to price gouging during the fight against the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

“Kentuckians have been resilient during this pandemic, but unfortunately there are criminals who have targeted our people, particularly our seniors and those facing financial difficulty during this already difficult time,” said Gov. Beshear. “This funding provides resources to our law enforcement and public safety agencies to take forceful action to stop predators and protect Kentuckians.”

 

Gov. Beshear and the Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet announced the U.S. Department of Justice’s (USDOJ) Coronavirus Emergency Supplemental Funding Program (CESF) awarded the grant funding to the Kentucky Office of the Attorney General (OAG) and the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy (DPA).

 

Attorney General’s Office of Consumer Protection Enforcement Unit
In his former role as Attorney General, Gov. Beshear worked to protect Kentuckians against fraud and scams. He has continued those efforts as Governor. Beginning with the first COVID-19 case in Kentucky in early March, Gov. Beshear signed an executive order prohibiting price gouging, which he has continued to renew during the pandemic.

 

To bolster anti-price gouging efforts, the Governor said the Attorney General’s Office of Consumer Protection Enforcement Unit has been awarded $540,323 to hire one staff attorney, one paralegal and one investigator to address rampant COVID-related consumer fraud, scams and price-gouging complaints.

 

Funds also will be used to develop a mobile application for consumers to report price gouging, scams or other fraudulent activity related to the coronavirus pandemic.

 

In the application, the Office of the Attorney General wrote that after the Governor issued an Executive Order on March 7, 2020, to protect Kentuckians from price gouging, the office began receiving many price-gouging complaints, which grew exponentially over the course of the coronavirus emergency and by August, the office had received more than 4,624. The Governor said these funds should help the office protect more Kentuckians from price gouging and seek justice for those already harmed. 

 

Attorney General’s Office of Senior Protection
As the former Attorney General, Gov. Beshear continues to make fighting back against scammers a priority.

 

On Monday, the Governor published a Charitable Giving Guide that advises Kentuckians how to verify legitimate charities and avoid charity scams, which can increase during the Christmas season and as the tax year draws to an end. The Governor said that Kentuckians already are facing the greatest challenge of our generation with COVID-19, and that the guide helps Kentuckians ensure their hard-earned dollars are used to help their neighbors and are not stolen by scammers. To read more click here.

 

Gov. Beshear said with the grant, his administration is supporting the Office of the Attorney General in doing more to stop scams through the grant program.

 

The Attorney General’s Office of Senior Protection has been awarded $144,136 to hire a dedicated investigator to address a dramatic expansion in financial fraud and exploitation targeting Kentucky’s senior population in the wake of COVID-19. In addition, the office will launch a targeted education and awareness campaign, the “Senior Justice Initiative,” to combat COVID-19 fraud targeting seniors.

 

As part of the application, the Office of the Attorney General indicated that they have seen an alarming increase in the number of senior victims and amount of financial fraud in Kentucky during COVID-19. The office said in July, they saw a 2,354% increase in financial fraud reported to the Office of Senior Protection and those who fell victim to financial exploitation and fraud during the COVID-19 pandemic have overwhelmingly been Kentuckians who are ages 60 or older. Increases in online shopping and online banking scams during COVID-19, combined with the effects of social isolation and loneliness created by the pandemic have added to the ability of scammers to successfully lure victims into these scams.

 

Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy
The Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy (DPA) has been awarded $102,270 to launch a pilot project in Hardin County to address adverse effects of COVID-19 on indigent clients.

 

Justice and Public Safety Cabinet Secretary Mary Noble said COVID-19 has affected indigent clients’ access to the court system and to legal counsel with some in-person services temporarily halted to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

 

“This grant funding is instrumental as we work to adjust to a new normal within the court system and how legal services are being provided electronically. DPA’s pilot program could reinvent the criminal legal system for the long-term and propel our state forward as we work to win against this pandemic,” said Noble.

 

DPA said the funds will be used to implement a pilot project to address systemic pandemic-created constitutional barriers that have arisen due to the global coronavirus outbreak. Chief Regional Circuit Judge Kelly Mark Easton and Hardin County Jailer Josh Lindblom both were consulted prior to the submission of the grant funds request. Both agree with the need for enhanced technology in all courtrooms in the county to protect the health and constitutional rights of justice-involved persons and are in support of the pilot project.

 

This project will:

  • Identify constitutional issues related to access to courts and counsel during the pandemic;
  • Enhance access to courts through electronic means, both for in-custody and out-of-custody clients; and
  • Create guidelines and recommendations for short-term and long-term solutions that must be implemented to better prepare the criminal legal system moving forward.

 

For additional information and to apply for CESF grant funding visit the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet’s website.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov and the state’s response to COVID-19 at kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

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Tennessee Man Lodged in Russell Co. Jail Following Drug Arrest.....

 

Randall Wayne Bartley, 48, of Crossville, TN was arrested by Burkesville Police on Tuesday afternoon for Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of a Controlled Substance 2nd Degree (Drug Unspecified), and Resisting Arrest. He was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

 

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Russell County Man Arrested for Unlawful Imprisonment & Assault......

 

49-year-old James Tudder of Russell Springs, KY was arrested earlier this month and booked into the Russell County Detention Center this (Wednesday) morning. Tudder is charged with Unlawful Imprisonment 2nd Degree, Assault 4th Degree (Minor Injuries), and Criminal Mischief 3rd Degree.

 

 

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ONE NEW COVID-19 DEATH IN ADAIR COUNTY; 54 NEW CASES IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT...

 

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 4.97%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Adair. We have experienced a total of 79 deaths resulting in a 2.11% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.5% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.67% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 20 cases in the hospital. This is 2 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 292 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.78% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.44%. The latest state data shows that 68.4% of ICU beds and 27.7% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 3,752 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.8% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 57 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 14; Casey: 2; Clinton: 7; Green: 4; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 9; Taylor: 9; and, Wayne: 3. In all, we have released 86.8% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 4 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 417 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/18/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 428.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Places of Worship, and Medical Facilities.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 54 today: Adair: 11; Casey: 2; Clinton: 8; Cumberland: 4; Green: 3; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 4; Russell: 4; Taylor: 8; and, Wayne: 8. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 44.66 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 08/26/2020 when we added 75 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Adair: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is released, unknown
  • Clinton: A 46-year-old female who is released, unknown
  • Clinton: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 64-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 20-year-old female who is hospitalized, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Wayne: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we report today was an 81-year-old male from Adair who had been hospitalized. Our area mortality rate is still 2.11% (or just over 1 in 50). This is high when compared to the state average of 1.5%.

 

We continue to have 7 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread: Adair, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. Our other 3 counties, Casey, McCreary, and Pulaski, are in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 3,752 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 89,655 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 89,544 statewide plus 111 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

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SENATOR MAX WISE: 2020 BALLOT MEASURES

 

The deadline to request a ballot for expanded absentee voting has passed, and in-person early voting is now underway. Most people have few questions about who is on their ballot, but several people have contacted me with questions regarding what the two ballot measures on this year's ballots are. If approved by Kentucky voters with a simple majority, the ballot measures would be added to our state constitution.

 

In Kentucky, if 60 percent of lawmakers from the state House and Senate pass a proposed amendment, it is placed on the ballot of the next general election in which members of the state legislature are up for election. If a simple majority approves the proposed amendment of those voting, it is ratified into the state constitution.

 

Look on the back of your ballot. You will find the two amendments that the Kentucky legislature has approved and submitted to the Commonwealth’s voters for their ratification or rejection. The amendments are printed in full. Your options are to either vote yes to ratify the amendment or no to reject it.

 

Constitutional Amendment 1, also known as “Marsy’s Law,” was Regular Session 2020's (RS 2020) Senate Bill 15. The bill was championed by my friend and colleague State Senator Whitney Westerfield. Constitutional Amendment 2 was RS 2020’s House Bill 405. Representative Jason Nemes was the primary sponsor of that bill.  I encourage you to read these amendments' full language before casting your vote and submitting your ballot. The language of the amendments is detailed and lengthy. With that in mind, I want to provide you a summary of these ballot measures to help you better understand them. I also want to share with you why I am supportive of both.

 

Constitutional Amendment 1 asks voters if they favor creating a new section of the Constitution of Kentucky relating to crime victims. This "Crime Victims' Bill of Rights" aims to ensure that crime victims are notified, present, and heard at a proceeding; have the safety of themselves and their family considered in bail or release decisions; be notified of release or escape of the accused; and receive restitution from the person who committed the criminal offense. 

I proudly voted in favor of Marsy’s Law. Kentucky is one of only 15 states that does not currently provide constitutional rights for crime victims. The accused are afforded numerous rights while victims are left with few statutory rights at all. For those that do exist for crime victims, there is little ability to enforce them. Victims deserve dignity and respect within the judicial system. Marsy’s Law would help ensure that they are not silenced or forgotten.

 

There are several examples of misinformation related to Constitutional Amendment 1. First, Marsy’s Law does not, in any way, infringe on your 2nd Amendment rights and is not a part of a “red flag” effort. You may have heard one example of such misinformation related to Marsy’s Law. Despite the hyperbole in opposition to this amendment, it does not impact your right to defend your home against intruders. Furthermore, Marsy’s Law does not change the presumption of innocence. In fact, it strengthens and reaffirms that protection. With the overdue ratification of Marsy’s Law into the Constitution of Kentucky, there will be no change to our federal or state due process standards. The rights of the accused are protected in America, and rightfully so. This constitutional right cannot be taken away.

I invite you to visit victimsrightsky.com to find accurate information on Constitutional Amendment 1. After your own review, I encourage you to join me in support of Kentucky crime victims by making Kentucky the latest state to include a Crime Victims Bill of Rights in our state constitution.

 

Constitutional Amendment 2 asks if voters are in favor of changing the terms of Commonwealth's attorneys from six-year terms to eight-year terms, beginning in 2030; changing the terms of judges of the district court from four-year terms to eight year terms beginning in 2022; and requiring district judges to be licensed attorneys for at least eight years beginning in 2022.

 

I voted in favor of submitting it to Kentucky voters for ratification or rejection. Our state is long overdue in the redistricting of judicial districts. With the lack of uniformity in terms of Commonwealth's attorneys and district judges, it has proven difficult for the Supreme Court of Kentucky and the General Assembly to ensure each region's needs are met. By marrying the two terms and making their elections coincide, both positions will be filled at the same time. Furthermore, the eight years as a licensed attorney requirement will provide that candidates for the job are adequately prepared to take on the many and growing demands placed on holders of this position.  I encourage you to read the amendment closely before making your decision to vote yes or no.

 

No matter what your vote on these measures or who you plan on voting for in the 2020 General Election, be informed and make your voice heard. There are very few excuses for not voting this year. Early voting locations are now accessible in your county, and you can find details on these locations and in-person Election Day locations at sos.ky.gov. Our Republic is dependent on an informed and engaged citizenry. Please vote on or before November 3.

 

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Note:  Senator Max Wise (R-Campbellsville) represents the 16th District which encompasses Adair, Clinton, Cumberland, McCreary, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne Counties.  He is the chairman of the Education Committee; as well as co-chairman of the Education Assessment and Accountability Review Subcommittee. Senator Wise is also a member of the Senate Economic Development, Tourism, and Labor Committee; the Health and Welfare Committee; the Veterans, Military Affairs, and Public Protection Committee; the Public Assistance Reform Task Force; the Budget Review Subcommittee on Economic Development and Tourism, Natural Resources and Environmental Protection, and the Budget Review Subcommittee on Transportation.  For a high-resolution .jpeg of Senator Wise, please visit: https://legislature.ky.gov/Legislators%20Full%20Res%20Images/senate116.jpg

 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE

 

Adair County: 11 new COVID19 cases to report last evening. We released 14 cases and sad to report 1 new death. We have 64 active cases with 60 of those in home isolation and 4 in area hospitals.

 

Russell County: 4 new cases Tuesday; 9 cases released from isolation; 53 active cases (51 are self-isolated and 2 are hospitalized). The new cases are females ages 45, 66, 68 and a 37-year-old male.

 

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RSPD REPORTS DRUG ARREST

 

On Friday, October 16, 2020 Russell Springs Police Officer Lucas Justice initiated a traffic stop on a vehicle near the intersection of Hwy 127 and Hwy 80. Consent to search the vehicle and it’s contents was granted. Upon a search of the vehicle, Officers located suspected methamphetamine, marijuana, and drug paraphernalia. 

 

Yvonne Roy of Somerset, KY was placed under arrest for Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (Methamphetamine), Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of Marijuana, and Tampering with Physical Evidence.

 

Officer Lucas Justice was assisted on scene by Russell Springs Police Department Sgt. Bobby Pritchard and Officer Nathan Antle.

 

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1,312 COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 16 MORE DEATHS; POSITIVITY RATE OVER 5% FOR THE FIRST TIME.....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 20, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Tuesday said as COVID-19 cases continue to increase, the state is beginning to prepare for a fall and winter surge in cases.

 

The First Family all tested negative for COVID-19 again today.

 

Today marks the 4th-highest number of daily COVID-19 cases reported in the commonwealth, including the day a backlog in cases was reported. This is also the first time since August that the state’s positivity rate has been higher than 5%.

 

“Today’s report is grim. It is grim because it shows that we are not just continuing in our third escalation, but this one is probably now the second most worrisome escalation we have seen surpassed only by that original March increase,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The Governor announced that due to this escalation, the commonwealth has renewed state surge preparations, including reviewing plans about the capacity in hospitals, examining possible hotel options, if needed, as well as the use of state parks. The state is also ensuring operational plans are in place to stand up a field hospital, if necessary.

 

“Our cases continue to go up, our hospitalization continues to go up and we continue to see more people in the ICU. And if we can’t get everybody’s buy in and we can’t get more people doing the right thing each and every day, my concern is that we are going to experience a real surge that we must avoid,” said Gov. Beshear. “But if we’re going to face it, I want you to know that we are spending our time getting prepared.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,312
  • New deaths today: 16
  • Positivity rate: 5.08%
  • Total deaths: 1,342
  • Currently hospitalized: 776
  • Currently in ICU: 202
  • Currently on ventilator: 96

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Laurel, Boone, Nelson, Christian and Pike.

 

Those lost to the virus today include a 56-year-old woman from Bell County; a 73-year-old man from Boyd County; an 86-year-old woman from Daviess County; two women, ages 96 and 97, from Fayette County; an 82-year-old woman from Hopkins County; four women, ages 67, 74, 76 and 80, from Jefferson County; a 92-year-old woman and three men, ages 64, 94 and 96, from Jessamine County; an 89-year-old man from Marshall County; and a 78-year-old man from Muhlenberg County.

 

The Governor also paid tribute to another Kentuckian lost to COVID-19, 89-year-old Rev. Robert L. Boyd of Cadiz, who is remembered as a hero and veteran. Rev. Boyd was a pastor of 35 years, a boxer, farmer and historian. Gov. Beshear said Rev. Boyd was a family member of one of the Governor’s security detail. The Governor said family was everything to Rev. Boyd. He was a beloved father, grandfather, great-grandfather, brother, uncle, cousin and friend. So many who will carry his strength and encouragement in their hearts loved him, the Governor said.

 

Fast 4
Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman today reminded Kentuckians to vote in the General Election coming up Tuesday, Nov. 3. She asked people to follow the 10 steps to defeat COVID-19, including staying home when you are sick and prioritizing your mental health. She also celebrated Kentuckians who use #MaskUpKY and #MaskUpKentucky hashtags on social media.

 

In discussing the need to prioritize mental health during the pandemic, Lt. Gov. Coleman focused on preventing youth suicide. She said suicide is the second leading cause of death for people ages 10-24 in the United States claiming 100 young people each week.

 

“I’m challenging you to participate in the I Won’t Be Silent Challenge. This is the Jason Foundation’s challenge to raise the national conversation about the silent epidemic of youth suicide,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said. “Suicide is 100% preventable, and it’s all of our responsibility to put an end to it.”

 

Visit iwontbesilent.com to learn about the warning signs of suicide and how to help someone in need. For those contemplating suicide, please reach out to the Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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70 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT...

 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 4.62%.
 
Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 78 deaths resulting in a 2.11% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.5% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.68% morality rate at the national level.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 18 cases in the hospital. This is 3 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 289 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.82% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.5%. The latest state data shows that 71.24% of ICU beds and 27.57% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 3,698 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.77% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 79 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 15; Casey: 1; Clinton: 4; Green: 1; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 22; Russell: 16; Taylor: 13; and, Wayne: 3. In all, we have released 86.5% of our total cases.Active (Current) Cases: We released 9 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 421 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district's 10 counties. On 10/18/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 430.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Places of Worship, and Family.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 70 today: Adair: 8; Casey: 13; Clinton: 4; Green: 6; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 7; Russell: 11; Taylor: 6; and, Wayne: 11. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 45.86 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 08/26/2020 when we added 75 cases. 
 
Today's new cases include:
  • Adair: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 80-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Casey: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 94-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 82-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 62-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
 
We have a report of an unconfirmed Adair death. We will confirm if so and report it tomorrow.
 
We are still seeing very high numbers of new cases. In fact, we now have 7 counties in the “redcritical” range of community-spread: Adair, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. Our other 3 counties, Casey, McCreary, and Pulaski, are in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread.
 
From a public health perspective, it is discouraging to see so much social gatherings, along with the limited social distancing and masking. If our present mortality and hospitalization rates hold, and if we continue to experience around 50 cases per day, that will translate to an average of 1 death and almost 4 hospitalizations per day. If you are not consistently masking, social distancing, and avoiding crowds, is what you are doing worth contributing to 1 area death and around 4 area hospitalizations every day? I cannot help but wonder where our compassion for our fellow man is. In a few months, a vaccine should be becoming available. Surely, we can all make some small sacrifices between now and then.
 
Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 3,698 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 88,357 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 88,247 statewide plus 110 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.
 
Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor's Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 
Find additional information at:
• LCDHD COVID-19 Site: https://www.lcdhd.org/info-tools/health-assessments-andstatistics/health_report_card/covid19-state-wide-outbreak/
• Kentucky COVID-19 Site: https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19
• CDC COVID-19 Site: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html
• For a Summary of COVID-19’s Impact on Kentucky Long-term Care Facilities:
https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/dph/covid19/LTCupdate.pdf
 

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RUSSELL CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY 10/20/20

 
There is a Boil Water Advisory on McQueary Ridge Road, a section of Wilsontown Road, and Selby Hopper Road in Russell Springs, KY due to a water main break. Boil all water used for drinking & cooking purposes for at least 3 minutes until further notice.
 

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Adair Co. Sheriffs Office Seizes Over 5 ounces of Crystal Meth with Street Value Over $15,000.... 

  
On Friday night, October 16, 2020 at 10:39pmCT, Deputy Joey Keith & K-9 Deputy Josh Durbin initiated a traffic stop on a 2007 Volvo, 9 miles east of Columbia on KY 80. During the stop, deputies suspected there were illegal drugs in the vehicle. K-9 "Nitro" had a positive hit indicator for illegal substances, therefore a search was conducted. Located was over 5 ounces of suspected crystal methamphetamine with a street value of over $15,000, marijuana, drug paraphernalia and cash. 
 
Arrested were George Tom Polston, 58, of Columbia, KY and Walter Thomas, 67, of Russell Springs,KY on the following charges: 
  • Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (Methamphetamine)
  • Possession of Marijuana and
  • Possession of Drug Paraphernalia 
  • Trafficking in Methamphetamine

Polston was also charged with Failure to Wear Seatbelt and Possession of Marijuana. Both were lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.  

 
The Adair County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by Kentucky  State Police. 

 

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Russell Co. Woman Arrested Following Early Morning Residential Break-in.....

 
 
On Monday, October 19, 2020 at approximately 5:09amCT, the Adair County Sheriffs Office responded to a home invasion call in the Cane Valley community of Adair County. Upon arrival, deputies spoke to the residents and learned they had awaken to find a female in their residence. Deputies got a description of the suspect who had already fled the scene. While searching the area, a vehicle was discovered parked in the vicinity that was not registered to the area.  A search for the owner led authorities to 32-year-old Doris Carol Roy of Russell Springs. Roy was brought to the Sheriffs office for an interview and ultimately admitted to unlawfully entering the Cane Valley residence.  
 
Roy was arrested at 2:24pmCT on Monday afternoon and charged with 1st Degree Burglary and Theft of a Firearm. She was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail by Deputy Joey Keith who investigated the home invasion. Keith was assisted by Deputy Brandon Hitch.

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 10-20-20

 

Russell County reported 11 new cases on Monday. We had 16 cases released from isolation. We now have 58 active cases (56 are self-isolated & 2 cases are hospitalized). The new cases are females ages 14, 37,53,62,77. The 62 year old female is hospitalized. Also, males ages 24, 30, and 34,35,82,83. The 82-year-old male is hospitalized.

 

Adair County reported 8 new COVID19 cases on Monday. On a better note, we released 15 cases. We have 68 active cases with 64 of those in home-isolation and 4 in area hospitals.

 

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RC SCHOOL BOARD MET LAST NIGHT IN THEIR REGULAR MONTHLY MEETING...


The Russell County School Board met last night in regular session for the month of October. Superintendent Michael Ford shares with WAVE listeners what took place... 

 

 

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9 More COVID-19 Deaths in KY; Death Toll now 1,326.....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 19, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Monday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“We’re going to get through this together, what appears to be our third escalation,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’ve got to come together to do what it takes to defeat this virus. As for me and my family, we are over a week into quarantine, trying to answer the call and set an example. That’s our duty as Kentuckians and as Americans.”

 

Gov. Beshear continues to conduct news conferences remotely as he and his family self-quarantine in the Governor’s Mansion after they were potentially exposed to COVID-19 on Oct. 10 by a member of the Governor’s security detail.

 

The Beshear family continues to test negative, feels well and will remain in quarantine until cleared by the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH).

 

‘The Fast 4 at 4’
Gov. Beshear on Monday highlighted a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

  1. Charitable Giving Guide
    The Governor is taking action to help protect Team Kentucky by publishing a Charitable Giving Guide that advises how to verify legitimate charities and avoid charity scams, which can increase during the Christmas season and as the tax year draws to an end.

    “As we have faced the greatest challenge of our generation with COVID-19, we have seen so many compassionate Kentuckians step up to help others,” Gov. Beshear said. “Team Kentucky always answers the call when another person needs assistance, which could make us a target for charity scams. Those happen year round, but tend to peak around the Thanksgiving and Christmas giving season. The Charitable Giving Guide will help Kentuckians ensure their hard-earned dollars are used to help their neighbors and are not stolen by scammers.”

    For more information and to view the full news release, click here.

     
  2. Expansion Brings Jobs
    Today, Gov. Beshear congratulated TOPY America Inc., a steel wheel manufacturer for the North American passenger car and light truck markets, on completing a $38 million renovation at its Frankfort operation, a project positioning the company and its employees for success in the years ahead.

    “For 35 years, TOPY America has been a vital part of the Frankfort community, providing stable jobs and quality products that families depend on,” Gov. Beshear said. “We are proud to see the company make this major reinvestment, take a big step forward in efficiency and modernization, and work to secure the future of its business and employees. Now more than ever, as we build a better Kentucky, companies need to reposition themselves for long-term success. I look forward to the years ahead for TOPY and the jobs, wages and families it supports here in Frankfort.”

    For more information and to view the full news release, click here.

     
  3. Healthy at Home Utility Relief Fund
    The Kentucky Public Service Commission is ending its moratorium on disconnections for nonpayment for the utilities it regulates on Oct. 20. To ensure there are protections when that begins, the Governor signed an executive order today that ends the statewide moratorium on disconnections for nonpayment on Nov. 6, but takes additional steps to help Kentuckians.

    The executive order designates $15 million in federal COVID-19 relief funds for the Healthy at Home Utility Relief Fund, which will provide relief for Kentuckians at risk of natural gas, water, wastewater or electric service disconnection.

    The order will also require utilities to create a payment plan for residential customers that runs no less than six months. It will continue to waive late fees on utility bills for residential customers through Dec. 31, 2020.

    “Customers will apply through Community Action of Kentucky, but the funds will go directly to the utility. Community Action administers the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program or LIHEAP and is accustomed to assisting Kentuckians in paying their utility bills,” said Gov. Beshear. “While this is a difficult time for many Kentuckians, this is another resource for our families.”

    Kentuckians can find additional assistance paying for utilities through the funds and organizations listed here.

     
  4. Mask Up, Kentucky!
    Gov. Beshear continued to emphasize the importance of everyone wearing face coverings, calling it the single most important thing all of us can do to fight COVID-19.

    Gov. Beshear also encouraged Kentuckians to spread the word on social media using #MaskUpKY and #MaskUpKentucky hashtags. Kentuckians who use the hashtags will receive a #TeamKY mask if their post is featured as part of the Governor’s daily 4 p.m. news conference.

     

Case Information – Monday, Oct. 19
As of 4 p.m. Oct. 19, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 88,247 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 647 of which were newly reported Monday. There were 81 newly reported cases from children up through age 18, of which 18 were 5 and under. The youngest was just 4 months old.

 

“This is our highest number of cases that we’ve ever seen on a Monday,” said Gov. Beshear. “At a time when we need cases to be going down, when more people are going to be going inside, when our kids are going back or will be back in school, we need to do better. If we want to keep doing some of the activities that we’re doing now, we need to keep doing better.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 9 new deaths Monday, raising the total to 1,326 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Monday include an 82-year-old man from Franklin County; a 73-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 58-year-old man from Lincoln County; a 73-year-old man from Marshall County; an 83-year-old woman from Mercer County; an 85-year-old man from Owen County; a 70-year-old woman and a 93-year-old man from Todd County; and a 72-year-old man from Wayne County.

 

“We do more work to confirm that COVID-19 was a contributing factor to these deaths than just about any other state. This disease is devastating to each and every one of these families,” said Gov. Beshear. “This virus is real and it is cruel.”

 

As of Monday, there have been at least 1,819,333 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.97%, and at least 17,229 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Case Information – Sunday, Oct. 18
Due to limited reporting on the weekends, some updated information is now available from Sunday, Oct. 18.

 

As of Sunday, there were 1,808,639 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was at 4.56% and at least 17,196 Kentuckians had recovered from the virus.

 

For a detailed look at coronavirus case information from Sunday, Oct. 18, click here.

 

Update from Lt. Gov. Coleman
Today, Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman updated Kentuckians on the K-12 School COVID-19 Dashboard and celebrated schools that are stepping up to help Team Kentucky defeat a once-in-one-hundred-year pandemic.

 

“There are 1,570 schools that have reported data at least one day, which is 41 more schools that have newly reported since last week. But that means there are still 162 schools in the state that have never reported in the three weeks since we made this information public,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “Thank you to our education leaders across the state who are doing the right thing. Kentucky families need that kind of effort and commitment from every education leader.”

 

Update from Dr. Stack
On Friday evening, the Kentucky Department for Public Health, an agency of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, announced an initial, comprehensive draft plan for distributing the COVID-19 vaccine to local health departments and health care organizations.


The first shipment of the vaccine is anticipated for delivery in late 2020 or early 2021 to Kentucky from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Defense.

 

Today, Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health, shared new details from that plan, including the phases for distribution outlined in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Framework for Equitable Allocation of COVID-19 Vaccine.

 

“Initially, we’ll have to target certain populations to get the vaccine out as quickly as possible to the people who need it most,” said Gov. Beshear. “As we go forward in months from there, we’ll have progressively larger quantities of vaccine, and then we’re cautiously hopeful that by the time we reach the end of next year, everybody who has wanted the vaccine will have had the chance to have one.

 

To learn more about each phase, see page 44-45 of the state’s draft COVID-19 vaccination plan.

 

Gov. Beshear said the timetable for making a safe coronavirus vaccine available to Kentuckians ultimately is dependent on how quickly one is developed and mass produced for distribution.

 

Dr. Stack also reminded Kentuckians of the new way KDPH is calculating the state’s positivity rate.

 

“Remember, today we are changing to the calculation of laboratory positivity rate using electronic lab reports only,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Finally, Dr. Stack updated Kentuckians on the KDPH’s travel advisory, which recommends that travelers quarantine for 14-days after visiting states with a positivity rate equal to or greater than 15%.

 

The states currently on that advisory are: Iowa (50.58%), Nevada (37.16%), South Dakota (36.37%), Idaho (29.63%), Wisconsin (24.30%), Wyoming (20.22%), Nebraska (18.03%), Kansas (17.41%), Mississippi (16.93%), Alabama (16.60%) and Utah (15.44%).

 

Remembrance
Today, the Governor shared the story of Ruthie Martinez, a beloved wife, mother, grandmother and teacher, who passed away from COVID-19. Ruthie was only 49. She lived and taught in Lexington, and was called a “warrior” by Principal Hale of Winburn Middle School.

 

“We spoke to Ruthie’s husband of 28 years, Miguel, who shared his wife was the most loving person and she always managed to find the good in people,” said Gov. Beshear. “He laughed remembering she once said ‘I don’t know why, but the kids who sometimes act up always love me!’ and he said it was because of her warm and supportive smile.

 

“Miguel said his wife was a terrific teacher and an amazing human being. She will be missed by him, their children and her grandchildren, as well as the students she impacted and all of those who loved her so much.”


More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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KSP Cancel 'Safe Trick or Treat', Announce Virtual Option

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 19, 2020) – For the past 15 years, the Kentucky State Police (KSP) ‘Safe Trick or Treat’ drive-through event has been a holiday tradition in Frankfort. Annually, it draws nearly 1,000 people in a two-hour time span, where KSP volunteers dress up in costumes and hand out candy and treats. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and out of concern for safety, KSP made the tough decision to cancel the event for the first time. The agency is encouraging children (and pets) to showcase their Halloween costumes by entering the ‘KSP Virtual Halloween Costume Contest’.

 

“It’s something that we look forward to every year,” says KSP Lieutenant Josh Lawson. “The concept was created by a former cadet class as a community outreach project and has become a staple in the Community.”

 

The ‘KSP Virtual Halloween Costume Contest’ is for kids 17 and under and pets. The contest will be made up of three categories that include ‘Most Creative’, 'Funniest’, and ‘Scariest’ for each age group.

 

Additionally, there will be a ‘Best Pet Costume’ that will be judged by a local veterinarian and a ‘People’s Choice Award’ that will be determined by the entry that receives the most likes on Facebook, regardless of age or category.

 

The Kentucky State Police Professional Association (KSPPA) is sponsoring the contest and providing prizes to all the category winners. Children five and under have the chance to win a stuffed Trooper Teddy Bear, children 6-12 and teens 13-17 can win a treat/goody basket and the best pet costume will be awarded a pet store gift package. The people’s choice award winner will receive a KSP shirt, hat and treat basket.

 

“We encourage everyone across the state to enter,” adds Lawson. “The positive aspect of going virtual is that we can reach children outside of our local Franklin County area and hopefully create some fun and excitement for them.”

 

To enter, participants must submit a photo of their Halloween costume via email to kspsocialmedia@ky.gov. Participants must include the contest category they are entering (i.e: most creative, funniest, or scariest) and their age category.
 

Participants must submit their photos by October 31, 2020 at 5:00 PM (ET).

 

By submitting a photo, participants must confirm they have read and agree to our Terms and Conditions (http://kentuckystatepolice.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/KSP-Contest-Terms-and-Conditions.pdf?fbclid=IwAR2jDgkXMvnc9Qcaazin_C7TJ9KOM-KLRE0OVUz3SYPxc2dvhzEoYRfVEn0) and their child’s profile will be available to view online. All submissions for entries to the KSP Virtual Costume Contest must be made by the parent or guardian (over 18 years of age) of that child to allow reproduction of the image on KSP social media. No entry may contain defamatory content.

 

KSP encourages the public to visit its Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/KentuckyStatePolice/to see and vote on the costume contest entries. All the winners will be announced on November 4, 2020 on the KSP Facebook page.

 


 

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ADAIR CO. SCHOOL BOARD MEETING OCT. 22


AGENDA

OCTOBER 22, 2020

REGULAR SCHOOL BOARD MEETING

ADAIR CO. BOARD CONFERENCE ROOM

6:00 P.M.

 

 
 
**Meeting called to order**

 

  ***Superintendent Dr. Stephens and Adair County Board Members will open the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance***

 

   ***Prayer***

 

   1.       APPROVAL OF AGENDA

 

   2.       APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDA

 

 

CONSENT AGENDA

 

    3.      APPROVAL OF MINUTES

 

    4.      APPROVAL OF TREASURER’S REPORT

 

    5.     APPROVAL OF PAYMENT OF BILLS

 

    6.     ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF PERSONNEL ACTION

 

------------------------------------

 

REGULAR AGENDA

 

    7.     SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT

 

    8.     PUBLIC COMMENTS

 

    9.    APPROVAL OF MONTHLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS – Renae Smith

 

  1. APPROVAL TO ADD PROCEDURE 09.14 AP.24 RELEASE/INSPECTION OF STUDENT RECORDS TO THIRD PARTY - Wes Irvin

 

   11.   BUILDINGS & GROUNDS UPDATE – Steve Burton

 

   12.   APPROVAL OF PURCHASE OF 2 NEW SCHOOL BUSSES 1:) THROUGH KISTA (66 PASSENGER)  2.) 30 PASSENGER HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE BUS PARTIALLY FUNDED BY WHAS CRUSADE FOR CHILDREN, (GRANT) $40,000 - Steve Burton

 

   13.   APPROVAL OF DESIGN CHANGE FOR PRESS BOXES - Steve Burton

 

   14.    APPROVAL TO ADVERTISE TO BID FOR LEGAL SERVICES

 

   15.    APPROVAL TO ADVERTISE FOR AGENT OF RECORD REGARDING GENERAL LIABILITY, FLEET, ETC., FOR ADAIR COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION

 

   16.    ADJOURNMENT

 

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Important Letter to Bluegrass Cellular Customers, Community, & Friends

At Bluegrass Cellular, we have always put our customers at the heart of our business. Since we launched the first wireless company in Kentucky 29 years ago, we’ve had an ongoing commitment to service and reliability and bringing world-class communications services to our customers. Over the past several years, we have partnered with Verizon to bring 4G LTE services to some of the most rural parts of the state. As we looked at the resources required to take our wireless network to the next level, it became clear that Verizon had the best capabilities and the commitment to evolve Bluegrass Cellular’s vision of world-class wireless service in these communities. It is with this in mind that we are announcing that Bluegrass Cellular will be joining the Verizon family. 

 

Verizon is the nation’s most awarded network and provides a best-in-class customer experience. This move will give our customers access to new network advances like 5G, more options in devices, tablets and wearables, and more choices in international calling and roaming options. All with the same flexibility and control you have come to expect from Bluegrass Cellular.

 

You don’t need to take any action at this time. We are working closely with Verizon to ensure a smooth and seamless transition. Once the acquisition closes later this year or in early 2021, you’ll receive information regarding the array of services that will be available to you from Verizon. For information and updates, you can always visit us at www.bluegrasscellular.com.

 

At Bluegrass Cellular, we have taken great pride in playing an important role in connecting our community. We are confident that Verizon will continue to be the same good neighbor that we’ve been and will carry on our tradition of providing crucial and reliable wireless connectivity to our rural communities.

 

Thank you for your support over the years, 

Bluegrass Cellular

 

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2-Vehicle Accident Sends Both Drivers to the Hospital...


On Thursday, October 15, 2020 the Adair County Sheriff’s Office responded to the junction of Edmonton Road and Lampton Lane to a 2-vehicle injury accident. 

A preliminary investigation determined that a 2004 Chevrolet Silverado, being operated by Savon Stapp of Columbia, was traveling south. Stapp failed to stop at the stop sign and traveled into the path of a 2017 Lincoln traveling east, being operated by Laura Burress of Columbia. 

Adair EMS transported both drivers to T.J. Health Columbia for treatment of injuries. 

Deputy Derek Padgett investigated the collision. He was assisted on the scene by Adair County Fire Department, Adair County EMS and Kentucky State Police.

 

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AREA ARREST 10-19

Sandra Stacy age 52, of Liberty was arrested by Officer Harper with the Kentucky State Police just after 4:30 yesterday afternoon. Stacy was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance, 3rd Drug Unspecified, Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession, Endangering the Welfare of a Minor, Possession of Marijuana, Improper Equipment, No Registration Plates and No Registration Receipt. She was lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.  

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 10-19-20

 

Russell County 4 new cases Sunday. We had 4 cases released from isolation. We now have 63 active cases which are all on self-isolation. The new cases today are 22 and 69 year old females and 63 and 70 year old males who are all self-isolated.

 

Adair County 5 new COVID19 cases yesterday. We released 10 cases. We have 75 active cases with 72 of those in home isolation and 3 in area hospitals.

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812 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES; 5 MORE DEATHS....

 

 

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Sunday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“Once again, we are seeing our case numbers growing instead of shrinking and we must do better,” Gov. Beshear said.

 

“All of the things that we want to do, like fully reengaging our economy and getting our children back to in-person instruction, is dependent on everyone taking this virus a lot more seriously. Mask up, maintain social distance, wash your hands frequently, keep gatherings to no more than 10 people and avoid traveling to virus hotspots. We can get where we need to be but only together as Team Kentucky.”

 

Case Information
As of 1:00pmCT on Sunday, Oct. 18, 2020 Gov. Beshear announced at least 87,607 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 812 of which were newly reported Sunday. 116 of the newly reported cases were from children up through age 18, of which 28 were 5 and under. The youngest was just 1 month old.

 

The Governor announced 5 more deaths on Sunday, bringing the death total to 1,317. The reported deaths included a 76-year-old man from Boyd County; a 73-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 67-year-old man from Greenup County; a 91-year-old woman from Lincoln County; and a 91-year-old woman from Marion County.

 

“That’s 5 more families grieving another loved one lost to the coronavirus,” the Governor said. “Let’s remember to light our houses and businesses up green to show them we care and ring bells at 10 a.m. to honor these Kentuckians taken from us too soon.”

 

“As presented over the course of the past week, starting tomorrow, Kentucky will use COVID-19 PCR tests that are sent electronically to calculate the statewide test positivity rate,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “PCR tests are the most reliable test for finding active disease in those currently infected and more than 90% of all COVID-19 tests currently performed in Kentucky are PCR tests.”

 

Dr. Stack reiterated the four main benefits of using electronically reported PCR tests to calculate the positivity rate: automated collection of data, a more stable data stream, filtered for the past seven days and a quick turnaround on testing results.

 

“We are in a once-in-a-century global pandemic. Lives are continuing to be affected and lives are being lost to this virus,” said Dr. Stack. “Each Kentuckian has to do their part to limit the spread: socially distance, wear masks and practice good hand hygiene.”

 

Due to limited reporting on Sundays, some information will be delayed until Monday.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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SHARP INCREASE IN COVID-19 CASES IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT...

 
 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 4.7%.
 
Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 77 deaths resulting in a 2.14% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.51% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.71% morality rate at the national level.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 17 cases in the hospital. This is 5 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 283 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.88% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.59%. The latest state data shows that 71.84% of ICU beds and 28.47% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 3,592 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.72% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 20 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 3; Clinton: 4; Green: 3; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 4; and, Wayne: 2. In all, we have released 86.1% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 14 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 423 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/17/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 423.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Medical Facilities, and Places of Worship.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 34 today: Adair: 2; Casey: 1; Clinton: 4; Green: 6; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 4; Russell: 5; Taylor: 5; and, Wayne: 5. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 47.87 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 08/26/2020 when we added 75 cases.
 
Today’s new cases include:
  • Adair: A 74-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 87-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Clinton: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 76-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
 
It has been a difficult week. We have had a sharp increase in new cases. We presently have our highest number of active cases at 423 (an increase of 81 over last week). This is also the highest number of active cases at the state level. There were 3 COVID-19 related deaths this week. There are 17 COVID-19 cases presently in area hospitals. I shared a story earlier in the week how the COVID-19 beds in Danville’s hospital are all full. I hope this isn’t an omen for what is to come here locally.
 
For the first time, we have 6 of our 10 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread: Adair, Clinton, Green, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. Cumberland County is also very close to the mark. Only Casey is in the “yellow-community-spread” range. Cumberland, McCreary, and Pulaski are in the “orange-accelerated” range.
 
Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 3,592 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 86,894 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 86,797 statewide plus 97 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 

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PUBLIC NOTICE FROM ADAIR CO. JUDGE'S OFFICE....

 
The Adair County Annex Building will continue to run at limited to half-staff next week, October 19-24, 2020. The building will be closed to the general public EXCEPT VOTERS. All offices will be staffed and business will continue.  However we ask that anyone who will, to utilize the drop boxes provided.  Drop boxes for absentee ballot and Sheriff’s Office for property taxes are located in the foyer of the annex.  County Clerk drop box for all other items is located out on the sidewalk beside the mailboxes. Dropbox for County Attorney and Child Support is located in the side door of the building closest to the jail.
 
Early Voting will continue in the basement of the Adair Co. Annex.
 
COUNTY ATTORNEY/CHILD SUPPORT:
Due to the building being closed, any payments for child support or payments  to the county attorney’s office  may be placed in the  drop box  which is on the side door (beside the jail) and marked for these offices. Please contact 270-384-3216 for the county attorney’s office or 270 384-5932 for the child support office. We will be working and available to assist. Adair District Court will be in session.  
 
SHERIFF’S OFFICE:
We ask that anyone who will to mail your property taxes to Adair Co. Sheriff, 424 Public Square, Suite 20, Columbia, KY  42728 or place your payment in the drop box in the foyer of the Annex Building. If you want a receipt, please include a self-addressed stamped envelope with your payment. If you need a vehicle inspection or other assistance, please call 270-384-2776 for assistance.
 
PROPERTY VALUATION ADMINISTRATOR:
If you need assistance from the PVA office, please call 270-384-3673 for assistance.
 
COUNTY JUDGE EXECUTIVE:
If you need assistance from the Judge’s Office please call: 270-384-4703.  
 
COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICE:
We are extremely low staff due to several employees being quarantine, but if there is any way to help you we are committed to help make this possible. 
 
If you have a transfer, expired tags, or expired handicap placard, you can come to the third window on the side of the Annex from the Jail and form a line on the side walk we have one employee that will be working the walk up window.
 
EXPIRED TAGS: PLEASE HAVE THE FOLLOWING AVAILABLE
  • One of the following available for the vehicle/s you are needing renewed:
    Postcard mailed from state
    Plate number
    VIN number 
  • Proof of insurance, must be a paper copy cannot be on your phone, we have to have the hard copy.  If you can, call your insurance carrier ahead of time and have them to do one of the following:
    Fax: 270-384-4805
    Email: Lisa.Greer@ky.gov

 

VEHICLE TRANSFERS
  • Please have the back of the title filled out as completely as possible. Example is provided.
  • If the seller is not with you, their name has to be notarized and notary ID included 
  • Insurance card: Must be hard copy; cannot be on the phone. You may call your insurance carrier ahead of time and have them fax: 270-384-4805 or email: Lisa.Greer@ky.gov
     
HANDICAP PLACARDS
If they are expired, a new doctor’s form will be needed due to the State changing from 2 years to 6 years. One is free & the second is $10. Forms will be available up front in the foyer for pickup. Once you have the doctors form, you may come to the window to receive your placards.
 
IF YOU HAVE A DEED OR DOCUMENT TO BE RECORDED, PLEASE BRING TO 3RD WINDOW
 
TITLE SEARCHES:
Please contact Sheila Hayes to see if the very back room is available: 270-384-2801
 

If you are only needing to renew your tags and they are not expired please do the following:

  • In an envelope put your postcard, (or plate number), insurance card, phone number, and check in the drop off box out front or leave them at the first desk in the lobby. We will process and return in the mail. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO PAY THE $2 POSTAGE DUE TO US BEING SHUT DOWN. 
  • You may also go online at Drive.Ky.Gov and renew plates that are not expired 
  • You may also go to Taylor, Russell, or Green County. I have contacted them to help us during this time. Hopefully after this week we will be back open. 
 
Again, all offices will be staffed and ready to assist anyone needing us. It may take us longer than normal, but we will get everyone taken care of. We appreciate everyone’s patience and understanding during these difficult times.

 
Gale B. Cowan
Adair County Judge Executive
 

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1,295 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES IN KY; 12 NEW DEATHS.....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 17, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“This is the fourth highest day of positive COVID-19 cases. This is also the highest Saturday that we’ve ever had,” said Gov. Beshear. “Things are not moving in the right direction; they continue to escalate. This virus is our enemy, not each other.”

 

Case Information
As of 3 p.m. Oct. 17, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 86,797 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 1,295 of which were newly reported Saturday. One hundred and sixty-two of the newly reported cases were from children up through age 18, of which 27 were 5 and under. The youngest was just 7 days old.

 

“These cases are all over the place. On top of that, all of our other numbers are going the wrong way, too. More Kentuckians hospitalized and in the ICU than ever,” said Gov. Beshear. “We know what it takes to stop these numbers from escalating. People’s lives depend on it.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 12 new deaths Saturday. The total number of Kentuckians now lost to the virus is 1,312.

 

“That’s 12 additional families who need our support,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The deaths reported Saturday include a 95-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 59-year-old man from Pulaski County; a 71-year-old man from Union County; a 90-year-old woman from Whitley County; an 85-year-old man from Boyd County; a 77-year-old woman from Boyd County; an 82-year-old woman from Daviess County; a 94-year-old man from Henderson County; an 85-year-old man from Hopkins County; a 79-year-old woman from Jessamine County; a 91-year-old man from McLean County; and a 73-year-old woman from Jefferson County.

 

“October is on pace to be our highest ever number of coronavirus cases reported within a month,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “We’re in the midst of an escalation in cases and our hospitalizations are increasing now, too.

 

As the holidays approach, it’s imperative to limit further spread. Practice social distancing, wear a face covering and practice good hand hygiene to reduce your chances of contracting COVID-19.”

 

As of Saturday, at least 1,794,634 tests had been administered. The COVID-19 testing positive rate, based on a seven-day rolling average, taking into account total positive tests reported by laboratories divided by total tests reported by labs, stood at 4.62%. The number of Kentuckians who are known to have recovered was at least 17,155.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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60 New COVID-19 Cases in 10-County Lake Cumberland District; Russell & Adair Added 8 New Cases Friday...

 

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 4.94%.

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 77 deaths resulting in a 2.16% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.52% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.72% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 12 cases in the hospital. This is 1 less than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 277 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.79% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.65%. The latest state data shows that 73.41% of ICU beds and 27.35% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 3,558 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.7% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 45 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 8; Cumberland: 1; Green: 1; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 12; Taylor: 11; and, Wayne: 8. In all, we have released 86.3% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 15 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 409 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 09/02/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 411.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Medical Facilities, and Places of Worship.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 60 today: Adair: 8; Casey: 1; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 4; Green: 3; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 11; Russell: 8; Taylor: 13; and, Wayne: 7. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 47.25 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 08/26/2020 when we added 75 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Clinton: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 39-year-old female who is released, 9/07/20
  • Cumberland: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is released, 7/03/20
  • Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is released, 8/16/20
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 67-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 8 months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is released, 10/05/20
  • Wayne: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We are continuing to see cases on the rise. Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 3,558 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 85,627 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 85,506 statewide plus 121 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

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1,319 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 4 MORE DEATHS IN KY....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 16, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Friday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“Our COVID report today adds to a tough week,” said Gov. Beshear. “We need to buckle down; we need to wear masks; we need to follow that rule of no gatherings above 10 people at our homes. We need to social distance and we shouldn’t play politics with this virus. It is real. It doesn’t matter if there’s an election a couple of weeks away.”

 

He also shared that he, the First Lady and their children, Will and Lila, are all still feeling great. They continue to test negative for COVID-19 and have been keeping a positive attitude about their quarantine, enjoying the extra time with each other and their dog, Winnie.

 

“We are going to continue quarantining, as asked by the Department for Public Health, because that’s what everybody else is asked to do in this same situation,” said Gov. Beshear. “We want to set a good example.”

 

The member of the Governor’s security detail who tested positive for COVID-19 is still experiencing mild symptoms, but doing well.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Friday, Oct. 16, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 85,506 COVID-19 cases in Kentucky, 1,319 of which were newly reported Friday. There were 189 newly reported cases from children up through age 18, of which 36 were children 5 and under. The youngest was only 7 days old.

 

“Another piece of unfortunate news: We have a COVID-19 outbreak at the Little Sandy Correctional Complex. We’ve had 17 inmates and two staff test positive. We will be testing the entire facility, and we will be using the protocols that we first used at Green River to successfully stop an outbreak that had occurred there.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 4 new deaths Friday, raising the total to 1,300 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

“My faith tells me I have to treat my neighbor as myself, and that means I have to protect my neighbor, whether I know them or not,” said Gov. Beshear. “My rights stop where they could be harmed. Let’s do the right thing and let’s follow our values.”

 

The deaths reported Friday include a 77-year-old woman from Adair County; a 51-year-old man from Bullitt County; and two women, ages 86 and 94, from Madison County.

 

As of Friday, there have been at least 1,773,349 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.70%, and at least 17,018 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Week in Review
For more information on this week’s updates, including those on one Kentucky teenager’s battle with COVID-19, the importance of quarantine after potential exposure, the Team Kentucky Fund, $2.8 million in grants for Recovery Kentucky Centers, Volkswagen Mitigation Settlement funding for sustainable transportation, early voting, the importance of schools reporting COVID-19 data, a change in the way the state calculates its positivity rate, $37 million in Victims of Crime Act funding, the Buckle Up, Phone Down highway safety campaign, the Kentucky Children’s Health Insurance Program, the Recognizing Inspirational School Employees Awards, the importance of getting tested for COVID-19 regularly, the recognition of a Kentucky sailor killed at Pearl Harbor, the Kentucky Fresh Harvest greenhouse opening in Lincoln County, National Protect Your Hearing Month and the virtual ribbon cuttings for new fitness centers at three Kentucky schools, visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Dairy Operations in Adair & Russell Counties Approved for On-Farm Energy Grants....

 
 
FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 16, 2020) –The Kentucky Agricultural Development Board (KADB), chaired by Gov. Andy Beshear, approved $56,205 in nine on-farm energy efficiency projects across seven counties in the commonwealth at its monthly board meeting.
 
“Kentucky farmers continue to improve their operations, pushing to become more sustainable, more efficient and more cost-effective, which is especially important during COVID-19,” Gov. Beshear said. “Our hard-working farmers and producers are key to building a better Kentucky, with healthy citizens and a robust economy.”
 
“COVID-19 has resulted in additional stress on Kentucky’s farmers and producers,” said Dorsey Ridley, Executive Director. “These energy grants will help to lower energy costs and hopefully allow for some the opportunity to invest those savings back into their operations.”
 
The On-Farm Energy Efficiency Incentives Program provides funds that allow Kentucky farm families to increase energy efficiency of existing equipment or facilities. The program provides 50% reimbursement of the actual cost of a qualified energy project, up to $10,000 in state funds, plus $150 for a third-party energy audit. Permissible items include, but are not limited to, energy audits, energy efficient farm building components and on-farm energy upgrades.
 
Adair County
2 Adair County dairy operations were approved for a total of $3,891 in state funds. B and B Dairy was approved for $2,596 in state funds to install energy efficient fans in its barns. Gregory Burton of Milky Way Dairy was approved for $1,295 in state funds to replace two fans on his operation.
 
Floyd County
Four Petal Farm LLC, a horticulture operation, was approved for $10,030 in state funds to install a solar array.
 
Grayson County
Edward Harper of South Poultry was approved for $6,150 in state funds to install tunnel fans for his barns.
 
Ohio County
Nathaniel Daugherty, owner of a poultry operation, was approved for $10,150 in state funds to replace tunnel ventilation fans and sidewall fans in his barns. 
 
Russell County
2 Russell County dairy farms were approved for a total of $14,071 in state funds. Brently West of Brently West Dairy was approved for $8,770 in state funds to install a variable speed controlled vacuum pump. Ross E. Russell of Russell Way Holsteins was approved for $5,301 in state funds to install a new plate cooler on his operation.
 
Warren County
Sumner Dairy LLC was approved for $1,763 in state funds to install energy efficient LED lighting in its barn. 
 
Webster County
Seebree Poultry LLC was approved for $10,150 in state funds to add insulation to the barn ceiling and replace air heaters with a radiant tube system.
 
The On-Farm Energy Efficiency Incentives Program is a competitive program. All applications are reviewed on a triannual basis and scored by a committee comprised of representatives from the KADB, the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and the Environment, USDA Rural Development and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. Application and guidelines for the KADB’s On-Farm Energy Efficiency Incentives Program are available online at ag-energy.ky.gov. The final 2020 deadline to apply for energy grants is Dec. 18.
 
For more information, contact Stefanie Osterman, County Programs Manager, at (502) 782-1763 or Stefanie.Osterman@ky.gov. 
 

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AREA ARREST 10-16-20


Yvonne Roy, 39, of Somerset was arrested by officer Justice with the Russell Springs Police Department just after 3 this morning. She was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth), Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession, Possession of Marijuana and Tampering with Physical Evidence.

 

Justin Vaughn, 39, of Russell Springs was arrested by Deputy Pace with the Russell County Sheriff’s Office around 2:30 this morning. He was charged with Assault, 4th Degree (Domestic Violence) minor injury.

 

Both were lodged into the Russell County Detention Center…

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 10-16-20

Russell County 11 new cases Thursday. We had 5 cases released from isolation. We now have 40 active cases which are all on self-isolation. The new cases are females ages 14, 30,40,41,4548,72,79 and males ages 7, 36, 43 who are all self-isolated.

 

Adair County had 8 new COVID19 Cases to report yesterday. We also released 8 cases. Sad to report a new death that occurred yesterday in Adair Co from the Corona Virus. We have 81 active cases with 80 of those in home isolation and 1 in an area hospital.

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JAMESTOWN CITY COUNCIL MET LAST NIGHT

Jamestown City Council held the regular monthly meeting for the city leaders last night

 

Mayor Nick Shearer spoke with WAVE NEWS and gave details of what took place... 

 

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KSP Charges Green County Man With Child Sexual Exploitation Offenses...


Greensburg, Ky. (September 17, 2020)  On Thursday, October 15, 2020, the Kentucky State Police Electronic Crime Branch arrested Robert Allen, 46, on charges related to child sexual abuse material.

 

Mr. Allen was arrested as the result of an undercover Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) investigation. The KSP Electronic Crime Branch began the investigation after discovering the suspect uploading images of child sexual exploitation online.  

 

The investigation resulted in the execution of a search warrant at a residence in Greensburg on October 15, 2020. Equipment used to facilitate the crime was seized and taken to KSP’s digital forensic laboratory for examination. The investigation is ongoing.

 

Mr. Allen is currently charged with one count of possession of matter portraying a sexual performance by a minor, a class D felony.

 

The Kentucky Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force is comprised of more than twenty-six local, state and federal law enforcement agencies. The mission of the ICAC Task Force, created by the United States Department of Justice and administrated by the Kentucky State Police, is to assist state and local law enforcement agencies in developing a response to cyber enticement and child sexual abuse material investigations. This support encompasses forensic and investigative components, training and technical assistance, victim services, prevention and community education. The ICAC program was developed in response to the increasing number of children and teenagers using the internet, the proliferation of child sexual abuse material, and the heightened online activity of predators searching for unsupervised contact with underage victims.

 

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1260 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 20 NEW DEATHS....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 15, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Thursday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“Today’s COVID report is not good news,” said Gov. Beshear. “We keep reiterating that we have to do better and we have to wear masks and we keep seeing high numbers that highlight how important that is.”

 

‘The Fast 4 at 4’
Thursday, Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman highlighted important news for Kentuckians.

 

  1. Kentucky Fresh Harvest
    Today, Kentucky Fresh Harvest opened its Stanford greenhouse that will produce snacking tomatoes. The $20 million investment will create 75 full-time jobs for Lincoln County and is another step toward establishing Kentucky as a national AgriTech leader.

    “As a rural Kentuckian, it gives me pride that these jobs of the future are being created in my backyard,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “As we build a better Kentucky, access to a good paying job is a top priority and our administration is working hard to keep this promise.”

     
  2. Census
    Lt. Gov. Coleman emphasized that today is the last day to complete the 2020 Census.

    “We have said many times, this is a huge deal. Your participation in the census dictates critical items for the next 10 years like Kentucky’s representation in Congress and federal funding for roads, schools, housing and social programs,” said the Lieutenant Governor.

    Kentuckians can: complete the Census at 2020Census.gov until 5:59 am EDT Friday, Oct. 16; click here to respond by phone in 13 languages; or mail in their census, postmarked today.

     
  3. Protect Your Hearing Month
    Lt. Gov. Coleman highlighted that October is National Protect Your Hearing Month. Learn more about protecting your hearing at kcdhh.ky.gov or by calling 502-573-2604.

    “It is estimated that 1 in 5 Americans – 700,000 Kentuckians – have hearing loss. Sadly, many of these cases are preventable,” the Lieutenant Governor said. “I cannot bring up this subject without talking about Virginia. Team Kentucky is with you.”

     
  4. MaskUpKY
    Finally, Lt. Gov. Coleman reminded Kentuckians that wearing a mask is the most important thing they can do to protect themselves, their families and their community.

    “We appreciate the fact that so many are willing to keep everyone safe by wearing masks,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 84,195 COVID-19 cases in Kentucky, 1,260 of which were newly reported Thursday. There were 168 newly reported cases from children up to age 18, of which 29 were children 5 and under. The youngest was only 5 months old.

 

“We just can’t ignore it. We can’t pretend like it’s not here,” said Gov. Beshear. “We can’t allow the fact that we are inconvenienced make us pretend that the virus isn’t with us and isn’t deadly.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 20 new deaths Thursday, raising the total to 1,296 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Thursday include an 86-year-old man from Bracken County; a 71-year-old woman from Christian County; four women, ages 82, 88, 92 and 100, from Daviess County; two women, ages 74 and 96, from Greenup County; two women, ages 92 and 97, and a 74-year-old man from Henderson County; two women, ages 49 and 84, and a 64-year-old man from Jefferson County; an 88-year-old woman from Knott County; an 80-year-old man from Pulaski County; a 72-year-old woman from Scott County; an 81-year-old man from Webster County; and an 85-year-old woman and a 73-year-old man from Whitley County.

 

“Today is a really hard day. The individuals lost today and their families need our help, need our green lights, and need our bells at 10 a.m. every morning,” said Gov. Beshear. “I can’t tell you how painful it is to read 20 entries. We are going to have a lot more days like this if we don’t do better about wearing masks, about social distancing and about following the rules.”

 

As of Thursday, there have been at least 1,751,264 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.94%, and at least 16,928 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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RUSSELL COUNTY SCHOOLS RETURN TO VIRTUAL LEARNING MONDAY....

 

According to R.C. School Supt. Michael Ford, Russell County Schools will go back to 100% virtual for all students beginning Monday, October 19, 2020. Students will attend in person tomorrow (Friday).  If you have concerns about your child attending tomorrow, please call your child’s school.

 

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KSP investigates 3-Vehicle Collision that Injured Adair Co. Man....

 
 
Columbia, KY (October 15, 2020) - Trooper Clint Bale is investigating a collision that occurred on Wednesday, October 14th, 2020 at approximately 4:12pmCT, 4 miles north of Columbia on Campbellsville Road. Donald Travis, 58, of Elizabethtown, KY was operating a 1995 Peterbilt Semi south bound on Campbellsville Road when he struck a 2003 Hyundai passenger car, being operated by Nehemiah Baldwin, 21, of Columbia, KY. Baldwin was at a complete stop waiting for a 2012 Toyota, being operated by Lynn Waskosky, 47, of Columbia to make a left hand turn. Due to the weight shift in the trailer he was hauling, Donald Travis was unable to avoid the collision causing Nehemiah Baldwin to strike the Waskosy vehicle.
 
All parties involved were wearing seat belts. Baldwin was transported by Adair County EMS to TJ Health Columbia for treatment of non-life threatening injuries. Travis and Waskosy were not injured. Tpr. Bale was assisted at the scene by Adair EMS.
 

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R.C. WOMAN ARRESTED ON THEFT CHARGES AT AMAZON FULFILLMENT CENTER....

 

35-year-old Jaedee Warner of Jamestown, KY was arrested by the Taylor County Sheriff's Office on theft charges on Wednesday evening.

 

Deputy Jonathon Leigh was dispatched to the Amazon Fulfillment Center in reference to a theft investigation.Through the investigation it was determined that Jaedee Warner had stolen approximately $2100 from the Center while employed there the last few weeks. Warner was arrested and taken to the Taylor County Detention Center and charged with Theft by Unlawful Taking over $500. 

 

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2-Vehicle Collision Claims Life of Adair Co. Woman....

 

Kentucky State Police is investigating a 2-vehicle fatal collision that occurred on Wednesday, October 14, 2020 at approximately 3:51pmCT. The preliminary investigation indicates that Lisa Cooper, age 46 of Columbia, KY was operating a 2012 Toyota Camry, east bound on KY 900 when she crossed into the oncoming lane striking a westbound 1989 International log truck, being operated by 63-year-old Tommy Cape of Columbia.

 

Cooper was not wearing her seat belt and was pronounced deceased at the scene by the Adair County Coroner. Cape was belted and treated for minor injuries by Adair EMS.

 

The collision is under investigation by Sergeant Adam Likins. He was assisted on the scene by ACSO, Adair County EMS, and the Adair County Fire Department.

 

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AREA ARRESTS 10-15-20

 

Gary Lattimer, 51, of Albany, KY was charged with Disorderly Conduct 2nd Degree and Terroristic Threatening 3rd Degree on Wednesday afternoon. He was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

Latisha Burton, 42, of Jamestown, KY was arrested by the RCSO Thursday morning for Operating a Motor Vehicle Under the Influence of Alcohol/Drugs/Etc. Burton was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.


 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 10-15-10

There was a big jump in numbers in the Lake Cumberland District on Wednesday…

 

Russell County 13 new cases Wednesday. We had 2 cases released from isolation. We now have 44 active cases which are all on self-isolation. We have now moved from orange zone to red zone. The new cases are females ages 9, 12, 13,14,37,58, and 70 and males ages 4, 6,35,43,48 and 48.

 

Adair County didn’t release the new numbers but will be doing so later this morning.

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Taylor County Juvenile Arrested for Breaking Into Vehicles....

 

On Wednesday, October 14, 2020 at approximately 2:00 A.M. Campbellsville Police began receiving complaints of numerous vehicle break-ins in and around the downtown area. During the investigation it was determined that 2 different vehicles along with a UTV had also been stolen.  

 

With the assistance of the Taylor County Sheriff’s Office, Kentucky State Police, and Campbellsville Fire, Campbellsville Police was able to apprehend a male juvenile at approximately 9:00 A.M. Wednesday morning.  

 

The juvenile was arrested and charged with Criminal Mischief 1st degree, Criminal Mischief 3rd degree, Theft by Unlawful Taking (More than $10,000), Theft by Unlawful Taking (More than $500 but Less than $10,000), Theft by Unlawful Taking (Under $500), Resisting Arrest, Leaving the Scene of an Accident, Terroristic Threatening 3rd degree, and Receiving Stolen Property (Under $500). The juvenile was lodged in the Adair County Detention Center.

 

Investigating Officers:  Corporal Ryan Jewell, Josh Morgan, and Officer Elliott Taylor

 

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4-Year-Old Adair County Child who Wandered Off Found Uninjured.......

 
At 1:52PM Central Time on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 the Adair County E-911 Center received a call of a missing 4 year old female child from a residence in the 6900 block of Greensburg Road. The child had last been seen in the back yard of the residence where she was in care of her grandmother.  It was suspected that the child had walked off with 2 dogs as they had been in the yard playing. After a brief unsuccessful search for the child, the grandmother called 911.  
 
Within minutes of the initial call the first arriving units began hasty searches of the suspected travel pathways.  Responders arriving spread out to assigned tasks and deployed equipment to assist in the search. Numerous members of the community came to aid in the search on foot and with UTV/ATV’s. K-9 officers Matt and Nitro were on scene and assisting in the woods and fields. The terrain was mixed between woodland with steep grades and waterways to cropland.  
 
As the search continued it was determined that the dogs had returned to the residence without the child. This of course was cause for concern given the lay of the land and the age of the girl. Thankfully at 2:44PM on Tuesday a Deputy Sheriff notified dispatch that the child had been located on Roy Garrison Road. The Deputy was with a volunteer searcher who had located the child hiding behind an air conditioning unit at a residence on Roy Garrison Road. 
 
The child was not injured and was now safe. As the crow flies the child was located 0.37 miles from the point last seen but the actual travel path could have been around a mile. With the large number of spontaneous volunteer searchers dispersing quickly it was difficult to determine the amount of people and equipment that assisted in the search.  One prior law enforcement volunteer on scene estimated more than 50 searchers were involved. First responders from Adair County Sheriff Office, Columbia City Police, Adair EMS, Breeding Fire Department Technical Rescue Team, Columbia - Adair County Fire Department, Adair County Emergency Management and 2 Drone Pilots skilled in search were also on scene.  A mention must be made of our skilled dispatchers at Adair County E-911 who handled the initial call, multiple agencies radio traffic, other emergency calls and managed to provide 9 pages of call notes specific to this incident.    
 
A simple statement or press release is unable to communicate the gratitude I have for everyone that came to the aid of this 4 year old girl today. Thank you to all!  
 
Mike Keltner 
Director,
Adair Co. Emergency Management
107 N High Street
Columbia, KY 42728

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Today is Largest Increase in Cases with 1,346; Seven New COVID-19 Deaths

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 14, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Wednesday updated Kentuckians on the commonwealth’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) as the state posted the largest regular one-day increase in recorded cases.

 

Gov. Beshear continues to conduct news conferences remotely as he and his family self-quarantine in the Governor’s Mansion after they were potentially exposed to COVID-19 late Saturday afternoon through a member of the Governor’s security detail.

 

The Beshear family tested negative yesterday and will remain in quarantine until cleared by the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH).

 

‘The Fast 4 at 4’
Gov. Beshear on Wednesday highlighted a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

  1. Support for Crime Victims
    Today, Gov. Beshear and the Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet announced more than $37 million in grant funding to 133 crime victim service providers across Kentucky. The funds are part of the Victims of Crime Act program, known as VOCA.

    “Victims of violent crime have faced horrific events most of us cannot even imagine, and it is imperative that we provide them with the resources needed to transform their lives,” the Governor said. “VOCA is the only federal grant program supporting direct services to victims and survivors of all types of crimes as they walk the path to recovery.”

    Gov. Beshear said the Governor’s Mansion will be lighted up with purple lights tonight in honor of domestic violence victims and survivors. For more information and to view the full news release, click here.

     
  2. Buckle Up, Phone Down
    Gov. Beshear on Wednesday spoke about a new highway safety campaign.

    “Our Kentucky Office of Highway Safety is partnering with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to drive home a safety message: Buckle Up, Phone Down,” the Governor said. “We’re convinced these two simple actions will save lives on our roadways.”

    He said an awareness campaign will spread this message and more information is available by visiting kyhighwaysafety.com.

     
  3. Vote!
    Yesterday marked the beginning of early in-person voting in Kentucky ahead of the Nov. 3 General Election. Gov. Beshear continues to encourage all eligible voters to make a plan to cast a ballot, either by sending in a previously requested absentee ballot, voting early in person or in person on the day of the election.

    “Remember, there are three weeks to vote early, before Election Day, and there are even Saturday hours,” the Governor said. “Pick a time. Make a plan of when you’re going to go vote.”

    More information is available on the state’s online Voter Information Portal.

     
  4. Mask Up Kentucky!
    Gov. Beshear also stressed the continued importance of everyone wearing face coverings, calling it the single most important thing all of us can do to fight COVID-19.

    He spoke Wednesday about the Capitol’s onsite nursing staffers and a security officer who, along with Rocky Adkins, the Governor’s senior advisor, helped create a masked jack-o-lantern that greets people at the Capitol.

    “We appreciate your dedication to ensure we stay healthy at work, and they have fun while doing it,” the Governor said.

    Gov. Beshear also encouraged Kentuckians to spread the word on social media using #MaskUpKY and #MaskUpKentucky hashtags. Kentuckians who use the hashtags will receive a #TeamKY mask if their post is featured as part of the Governor’s daily 4 p.m. news conference.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 83,013 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 1,346 of which were newly reported Wednesday. 171 of the newly reported cases were from children up to age 18, of which 34 were age 5 and under. The youngest was just 2 months old.

 

This was the most coronavirus cases reported in Kentucky in a single day that didn’t include a backlogged set of cases, as happened recently when some Fayette County case numbers were added.

 

“I’ve said this should be a wake-up call or maybe a jolt or shock to the system, but everybody ought to be concerned and everybody ought to be doing the right thing,” the Governor said. “Let’s push the complacency out and let’s get the urgency back in.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 7 new deaths Wednesday, raising the total to 1,276 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Wednesday include a 76-year-old man from Boyd County; a 76-year-old man from Bullitt County; a 49-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 78-year-old man from Franklin County; an 82-year-old woman from Henderson County; a 76-year-old man from Jefferson County; and an 81-year-old man from Webster County.

 

The Governor also said two Kentucky veterans who were at the Thomson-Hood Veterans Center in Wilmore were among those who died from COVID-19.

 

“They were at the Lexington VA,” he said. “Those are now the second and third veterans in our nursing homes who we have lost. It’s another reason to make sure we’re doing everything we can to stop the spread of this virus.”

 

As of Wednesday, there have been at least 1,718,621 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.72%, and at least 16,756 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

KCHIP Sign-Up and RISE Awards
Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman spoke Wednesday about health care for children as well as awarding excellence in education.

 

“We believe health care is not a privilege, an add-on to sweeten a job offer, a luxury or a convenience. Health care is a right for every Kentuckian,” the Lieutenant Governor said. “That is especially true for children.”

 

She urged eligible families to sign up for the Kentucky Children’s Health Insurance Program, or KCHIP, by visiting kidshealth.ky.gov or calling 877-KCHIP-18, or 877-524-4718.

 

Lt. Gov. Coleman, who also serves as secretary of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, also spoke Wednesday about Kentucky’s participation in the U.S. Department of Education’s RISE Award, which stands for Recognizing Inspirational School Employees.

 

The award honors classified school employees who provide exemplary service to students.

 

“We are asking for nominations from parents, students, schools, school districts and non-profit organizations,” she said. “We are looking for nominees who demonstrate excellence in leadership, commitment and community involvement.”

Nominations can be made by visiting education.ky.gov. The deadline for nominations is Oct. 16.

 

Finally, Lt. Gov. Coleman thanked everyone who has participated in First Lady Britainy Beshear’s Coverings for Kids program, which provides school districts across the commonwealth with a supply of face masks for students. She noted that while the program is ending at the end of October, there is still time to take part.

 

For information and instructions on making masks, visit firstlady.ky.gov/coveringsforkids.

 

Dr. Stack Update
Dr. Steven Stack, KDPH commissioner, provided more detailed information Wednesday about the state of the coronavirus in the commonwealth and testing issues.

 

He encouraged residents to take advantage of more than 300 testing locations throughout the commonwealth, which can be found at kycovid19.ky.gov. Dr. Stack also highlighted new partnerships in some areas that need service.

 

“One of the central missions of public health is to try to help make sure underserved and disadvantaged individuals have access to health care just like everybody else,” Dr. Stack said.

 

The new testing sites include: Purchase District Health Department, serving McCracken, Ballard, Carlisle, Hickman and Fulton counties, at PurchaseHealth.org; Ashland-Boyd Health Department, serving Boyd, Greenup, Carter and Lawrence counties, at ABCHDKentucky.com; the Kentucky River Health Department, serving Lee, Wolfe and Owsley counties at KRDHD.org; and Lincoln Trail Health Department, serving Hardin, Meade, LaRue, Nelson, Marion, Washington, Breckinridge and Grayson counties at LTDHD.org.

 

Dr. Stack also reminded everyone that, beginning next week, Kentucky will change the way it calculates the positivity rate. Going forward, Kentucky will use COVID-19 PCR tests that are sent in electronically to make the calculation.

“PCR tests are the gold standard – those are the most reliable – for finding active disease in currently infected people,” Dr. Stack said.

 

Dr. Stack said there were four main benefits to moving to using the PCR tests to calculate the positivity rate: automated collection of data, a more stable data stream, filter for the past seven days and a quick turnaround on testing results.

 

Gov. Beshear emphasized that the change will not take place until next week to give everyone – hospitals, state officials, media and citizens – enough time to analyze and ask questions about the move before it happens.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Tennessee Man Sentenced in Adair Circuit Court on Rape & Other Charges Involving a Minor.....

 
October 14, 2020 – On Tuesday, October 13, 2020 Samuel Joseph Hicks, 41, of Maryville, Tennessee appeared in Adair Circuit Court for final sentencing on several felony offenses. Hicks had previously pled guilty as charged to the Class B Felony offense of First-Degree Unlawful Transaction With a Minor, as well as the Class D Felonies of Third-Degree Sodomy; Third-Degree Rape; and two (2) counts of Prohibited Use of an Electronic Device to Induce a Minor to Engage in Sexual Activity. Judge Judy Vance Murphy sentenced Hicks to serve 12 years and 6 months in prison for the crimes, which was the sentence that had been recommended by Commonwealth’s Attorney Brian Wright at the time Hicks entered his guilty plea. 
 
The investigation into the case was led by Kentucky State Police Trooper Billy Begley and Detective Marvin Blakey, who are both assigned to KSP Post 15 in Columbia. Trooper Begley received information in December 2018 that Hicks was communicating with a fourteen-year old child in Adair County using the social media application “Snapchat”, and that Hicks had traveled from Tennessee to Adair County to meet the child and to engage in sexual acts with the child. Although Hicks’ identity was not immediately known to the officers, they were able to monitor additional communications between Hicks and the child’s cell phone and apprehended Hicks when he made a second trip to Adair County to again meet the child. KSP Trooper Clint Bale and Adair County Sheriff’s Deputy Joey Keith assisted in the apprehension of Hicks when he returned to Adair County. 
 
Wright commended Trooper Begley and Detective Blakey for their determination to identify the perpetrator in this case and for their hard work that contributed to the successful prosecution of Hicks. Additionally, Wright reminds persons in the community to be vigilant in monitoring the use of social media applications by children. Wright added that the investigation of this case began when members of the child’s household discovered messages on the child’s phone between the child and Hicks. Social services was notified and the Kentucky State Police was contacted to investigate the case. 
 
Under the terms of the plea agreement, Hicks will be required to serve at least eight-five percent of the 12 ½ year sentence (i.e., over 10 years) before he is even eligible for parole and he will further be subject to a period of post-incarceration supervision for at least 5 years after he is released from custody on this sentence. A violation of the conditions of that post-incarceration supervision could result in Hicks being required to serve additional time in custody. 
 
Commonwealth's Attorney Brian Wright said "I would prefer to put persons who sexually victimize minors in prison for 20 years or longer, but this spares a young child from testifying about some of the worst and most embarrassing days of her life in a courtroom full of strangers." Wright added that cases like this require prosecutors to balance the child victim's mental health with the benefits of lengthier sentences, saying "Under Kentucky law, even a maximum sentence in this case would be eligible for parole in no more than twenty years." Additionally, the guilty plea avoids any potential for appeal and ensures a significant punishment for Hicks. Upon Hicks’ release from custody he will be required to register as a sexual offender for life. 
 

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39 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT; NO NEW DEATHS....

 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 4.37%.
 
Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 75 deaths resulting in a 2.23% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.55% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.75% morality rate at the national level.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 15 cases in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 273 hospitalizations resulting in a 8.11% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.66%. The latest state data shows that 69.1% of ICU beds and 28.4% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 3,367 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.61% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 31 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 3; Clinton: 5; Green: 2; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 2; Russell: 5; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 6. In all, we have released 87.3% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 8 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 352 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district's 10 counties. On 09/02/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 411.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to which where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Places of Worship, and Family.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 39 today: Adair: 5; Clinton: 8; Cumberland: 1; Green: 4; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 6; Russell: 5; Taylor: 1; and, Wayne: 7. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.013. This means our total case count is projected to double every 54.85 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 08/26/2020 when we added 75 cases. 
 
Today's new cases include:
  • Adair: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 72-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We have one unconfirmed report of a death in Clinton County. Once that is confirmed, we will report it.
 
We are still experiencing high instances of new cases, so, please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 3,367 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 81,807 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 81,691 statewide plus 116 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.
 
Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor's Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE FOR 10-14-20

 

Russell County reported 5 new cases on Tuesday. We had 5 cases released from isolation. Russell Co. now has 33 active cases which are all on self-isolation. The new cases are: 17, 22, 58, 70, and 74-year-old males.

 

Adair County reported 5 new COVID-19 cases on Tuesday. We released 3 cases. Adair Co. has 77 active cases with 76 of those in home-isolation and 1 in an area hospital.

 

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ADAIR COUNTY FISCAL COURT MEETING RECAP....

 

The Adair County Fiscal Court met in the regular monthly meeting Tuesday night. Jim Lieb spoke with County Judge Gayle Cowan following the meeting..... 
 

 

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Adair County Schools Going Virtual Rest of the Week....


From Adair County School Superintendent Dr. Pamela Stephens:


After our second day of double digit numbers in our student body, we decided to return to Virtual Instruction for the remainder of this week. Our hope is to return to Face-2-Face Instruction early next week.
 

Below you will find the numbers per school for both students and staff. Of our 41 students quarantined and 6 positive cases, we have 18 virtual students and 29 Face-2-Face.

               
    Students           Students            Staff               Staff
  Quarantined    Positive Cases    Quarantined   Positive Cases
ACHS:      14                   5                    0                     0
ACMS:       7                    0                    0                     0
ACES:       13                   0                    4                     1
ACPC:   __7                     1                    0                     2__
                  41                     6                   4                     3
 
Our county number is currently 46.1 and with the continued climb of positive cases, it seems our risk has greatly increased. It is important to know that we are NOT out for 10 days. We are able to social distance within the classrooms and with everyone wearing a mask, we will be able to return to F-2-F classes as soon as the numbers stabilize. Adair County has been hit hard with increased numbers over the past week.  
 
Our information will be posted on the Adair County School website Wednesday. This will help our community to see the numbers that are directly related to our school community.
 

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ADAIR COUNTY VOTING LOCATIONS & TIMES


NO REGULAR PRECINCTS WILL BE OPEN ON ELECTION DAY; ONLY THE VOTING CENTERS LISTED. 

 

WHEREVER YOU DECIDE TO VOTE,

BRING PROOF OF ID. 
(Driver’s License, picture ID, or other proof of ID)

 

PLEASE FOLLOW CDC GUIDELINES WHEN VOTING!

 

ADAIR COUNTY VOTERS WILL BE ABLE TO VOTE USING ONE OF THE FOLLOWING OPTIONS…..

 

EARLY IN-PERSON VOTING - ALL PRECINCTS

 

When:  October 13 - November 2

 

Times:  Monday-Friday: 8:00am-4:00pmCT; Saturdays (Oct.17, 24, & 31, 2020): 8:00am-12:00pmCT      
          

Location: Adair County Annex Basement,  424 Public Square, Columbia KY (same building that has offices of Adair Co. Judge Exec., Adair Co. PVA, Adair Co. Clerk, Adair Co. Sheriff, Adair Co. Attorney and Child Support)


Any registered Adair County Voter may vote at the Adair Annex at any of the times listed above, regardless of your normal precinct.

 

ELECTION DAY - Tuesday, November 3, 2020 - Polls will be open from 6:00am-6:00pmCT.

 

You may vote at any of the 4 locations regardless of your “normal” precinct. Normal precincts will NOT be open!  

 

ALL Precincts will VOTE at the following Locations:
 

  1. Trinity United Methodist Church
    2252 Campbellsville Road, Columbia
  2. V.F.W. Building
    500 Greenhill Road, Columbia
  3. Jim Blair Center (Christian Life Center)
    901 Hudson StreetColumbia
  4. Adair County Annex Basement
    424 Public Square, Columbia


If you have requested an Absentee Ballot, they may me mailed or dropped off in the Ballot Box in the front foyer of the Adair Annex building. Ballots must be postmarked by Nov. 3, 2020 or returned in the Drop-Off Box by 6pmCT on Nov. 3rd.


QUESTIONS? Call the Adair County Clerk’s Office at 270-384-2801 OR email: Lisa.Greer@ky.gov.

 

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776 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES; 14 MORE DEATHS....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 13, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Tuesday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

Gov. Beshear continues to conduct news conference remotely as he and his family quarantine in the Governor’s Mansion after they were potentially exposed to COVID-19 late Saturday afternoon through a member of the Governor’s security detail.

 

“We are striving to have a positive attitude, given that really so little is being asked of us. And if it prevents others from being exposed to this virus, we are more than willing to do it,” the Governor said.

 

The Beshear family will be tested regularly and will remain in quarantine until cleared by the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH).

 

“My entire family tested negative today,” Gov. Beshear said. “We know it can take a while for the virus to manifest, and so we will be tested – I believe on Friday – again, but that was at least good to see.”

 

‘The Fast 4 at 4’
Gov. Beshear on Tuesday highlighted a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

  1. Transportation Improvements
    Gov. Beshear and other state leaders on Tuesday announced $8.5 million in transportation funding to replace about 170 buses and support other efforts to expand reliable and sustainable transportation in Kentucky.

    The funding will go toward the purchase of cleaner emission transit buses in areas of Kentucky challenged with meeting federal air quality standards.

    The funds are part of the $20.3 million awarded to Kentucky under the Volkswagen Environmental Mitigation Trust. That was part of $100 million secured by then-Attorney General Beshear after filing suit against the automaker for deceiving Kentucky consumers.

    “We held Volkswagen accountable for deceiving consumers and now we are using those funds to build a better Kentucky with safe, reliable transportation to help Kentuckians get to work, to the doctor and to the grocery store,” said Gov. Beshear. “This funding will reduce pollution to create cleaner air and improve transportation options in four regions of the commonwealth.”

    For more information and to view the full news release, click here.

     
  2. Supporting Recovery Centers
    Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced $2.8 million for 14 Recovery Kentucky centers across the commonwealth to help ensure safe, stable housing for those recovering from substance use disorder.

    Through Community Development Block Grant CARES Act funding, each center will be eligible for approximately $200,000 to offset costs incurred due to the coronavirus. Funds also help ensure centers can continue services while protecting residents and staff from COVID-19.

    “Everyone should have access to safe, stable housing,” said Gov. Beshear. “As Kentuckians recover from substance use disorders, we must ensure their safety and well-being, especially during this pandemic.”

    For more information and to view the full news release, click here.

     
  3. Early Voting Begins
    Today marked the beginning of early voting in Kentucky ahead of the Nov. 3 General Election. Gov. Beshear continues to encourage all eligible voters to make a plan to cast a ballot, either by sending in a previously requested absentee ballot, voting early in person or in person on the day of the election.

    “Remember, there are three weeks to vote early, before Election Day, and there are even Saturday hours,” the Governor said. “Pick a time. Make a plan of when you’re going to go vote.”

    More information is available on the state’s online Voter Information Portal.

     
  4. Mask Up Kentucky!
    Gov. Beshear also stressed the continued importance of everyone wearing face coverings, calling it the single most important thing all of us can do to fight COVID-19.

    “This is our greatest and most important tool for getting back to everything we want to do,” the Governor said. “Do the right thing: Mask up.”

    He also encouraged Kentuckians to spread the word on social media using #MaskUpKY and #MaskUpKentucky hashtags. The Governor also highlighted a new contest: Kentuckians who use the hashtags will receive a #TeamKY mask if their post is featured as part of the Governor’s daily 4 p.m. news conference.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 81,691 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 776 of which were newly reported Tuesday. 111 of the newly reported cases were from children up to age 18, of which 22 were age 5 and under. The youngest was just 1 month old.

 

“We’re going to watch this trend through this week, because we’ve been on this escalation and we want to watch to see if we are seeing any stabilization,” the Governor said.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 14 new deaths Tuesday, raising the total to 1,269 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Tuesday include a 76-year-old man from Daviess County; an 88-year-old man from Fayette County; two women, ages 74 and 87, and three men, ages 82, 88 and 82, from Henderson County; an 87-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 96-year-old man from Jefferson County; 91-year-old woman from Laurel County; two woman, ages, 68 and 95, from Madison County; a 59-year-old woman from McLean County; and a 90-year-old man from Montgomery County.

 

“The tough part about today’s report is we’ve lost 14 additional Kentuckians,” the Governor said. “It’s a big number, and these days are hard when we’ve had this amount of loss.”

 

As of Tuesday, there have been at least 1,706,551 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.59%, and at least 13,986 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Back to School Update
Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman spoke Tuesday about the K-12 school COVID-19 self-reported data dashboard, which went live Sept. 29.

 

“The dashboard provides an opportunity for school districts, local health departments and health care providers to work together for a safe return to in-person classes for every child,” the Lieutenant Governor said. “Each community has actionable information that helps keep Kentucky open for business and on a path to a sustained return to in-person classes – which is what we all want for our kids.”

 

Lt. Gov. Coleman, who also serves as secretary of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, noted that all schools are required to report positive COVID-19 cases each weekday. Local health departments collect this information and transmit it to the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH), where it goes through a verification process.

 

“All of this data can be found for your school, your community, and the entire commonwealth at kycovid19.ky.gov,” she said.

 

The Lieutenant Governor said that currently there are 1,732 schools in the database. At last report, there were nearly 800 students and more than 130 students in quarantine. Unfortunately, she also said more than 200 schools have failed to provide the required information.

 

“That is unacceptable and irresponsible,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said. “It jeopardizes the health of your students, school staff, their families and your community.”

 

She encouraged all districts to make the reporting a top priority.

 

Dr. Stack Update
Dr. Steven Stack, KDPH commissioner, provided more detailed information Tuesday on the state of the coronavirus in the commonwealth.

 

He pointed to the latest monthly report on Kentucky provided by the White House, which are posted on kycovid.ky.gov, that shows the coronavirus worsening across most of the commonwealth. It assigns each county a color – green, yellow, orange or red – depending on the incidence rate.

 

“If you look where the red is, the red is a lot more common in the rural communities now,” Dr. Stack said. “And there are many more red counties than there were in the weeks prior.”

 

Dr. Stack also said that beginning next week, Kentucky will change the way it calculates the positivity rate. He said that going forward, Kentucky will use COVID-19 PCR tests that are sent in electronically to make the calculation.

 

“PCR tests are the gold standard – those are the most reliable – for finding active disease in currently infected people,” Dr. Stack said. “More than nine in 10 of our tests are PCR tests. So we are only going to look at the PCR tests. They are the most accurate and are far and away the largest proportion of the tests.”

 

Dr. Stack went into great detail about the change and said there were four main benefits to moving to using the PCR tests to calculate the positivity rate: automated collection of data, a more stable data stream, filter for the past seven days and a quick turnaround on testing results.

 

Gov. Beshear emphasized that the change will not take place until next week to give everyone – hospitals, state officials, media and citizens – enough time to analyze and ask questions about the move before it happens.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Armed Robbery Occurred Monday at Campbellsville Business....

 
On Monday, October 12, 2020 at 8:50pmET, Campbellsville Police responded to the Dollar General Store located at 1325 East Broadway in Elmhurst Plaza in reference to an armed robbery. It was determined that an unknown male entered the store while brandishing a handgun and demanded money. After taking an undetermined amount of cash, the suspect fled the store. The suspect is described as a black male, approximately 5’6” to 5’8” tall with a slender build. If you have any information on the robbery, please contact Campbellsville Police at 270-465-4122.  Det./Sgt. Nelson Bishop is the investigating officer.
 

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58-Year-Old Dies from COVID-19 in Russell County; Cases Increasing Sharply in Lake Cumberland District....

 
 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 4.16%.
 
Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Russell County. We have experienced a total of 75 deaths resulting in a 2.25% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.55% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.74% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 15 cases in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 269 hospitalizations resulting in a 8.08% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.56%. The latest state data shows that 71.2% of ICU beds and 28.9% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 3,328 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.59% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 37 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 10; Clinton: 3; Green: 3; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 11; Russell: 2; and, Wayne: 3. In all, we have released 87.4% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 11 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 344 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district's 10 counties. On 09/02/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 411.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to which where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Places of Worship, and Family.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 49 today: Adair: 13; Casey: 2; Clinton: 1; Green: 1; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 10; Russell: 6; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 5. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.013. This means our total case count is projected to double every 53.21 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 08/26/2020 when we added 75 cases. 
 
Today's new cases include:
  • Adair: 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: 40-year-old male who is released, unknown
  • Green: 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 71-year-old male who is released, 10/11/20
  • Pulaski: 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

A close review of the data looks like the Adair and Russell numbers are off. This is because we reassigned one case from Monday from Russell to Adair.
 
The death report today is a 58-year-old male from Russell County. Also, cases are sharply increasing. Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 3,328 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 81,044 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 80,930 statewide plus 114 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.
 
Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor's Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 
Find additional information at:
• LCDHD COVID-19 Site: https://www.lcdhd.org/info-tools/health-assessments-andstatistics/health_report_card/covid19-state-wide-outbreak/
• Kentucky COVID-19 Site: https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19
• CDC COVID-19 Site: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html
• For a Summary of COVID-19’s Impact on Kentucky Long-term Care Facilities:
https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/dph/covid19/LTCupdate.pdf
 

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AREA ARRESTS 10-13-20

 

Jeffrey Helton, 29, of Jamestown, KY was arrested by Officer Tarter with the Jamestown Police Department just after 3:00pmCT on Monday Afternoon. Helton was charged with Criminal Mischief 2nd Degree. He was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center…

 

Nathan Riddle, 43, of Burkesville, KY was taken into custody by officer Williams of the Burkesville Police Department just after 1:00pmCT on Monday afternoon. Riddle was charged with Operating a Motor Vehicle under the Influence of Controlled Substance 1st, Reckless Driving, Trafficking in a Controlled Substance (Meth) 1st Degree, 1st Offense and Drug Paraphernalia Buy/Possession. Riddle was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

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RC FISCAL COURT MEETING RECAP...

 

The Russell County Fiscal Court met on Monday evening for the regular monthly meeting. County Judge Exec. Gary Robertson spoke to WAVE News and local media following the meeting…

 

 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 10-13-20

 

According to Russell County Judge Executive Gary Robertson, Russell County had its 7th coronavirus death to occur yesterday. 7 new cases were reported on Monday. We had 2 cases released from isolation. We now have 33 active cases which are all on self-isolation. The new cases are females ages 18, 37, 41, and 64 and males ages 18, 26, and 44.

 

Adair County had 13 new COVID19 cases to report Monday. We released 10 cases. We have 75 active cases, all in home isolation.

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RUSSELL SPRINGS FIRE DEPARTMENT WAS DISPATCHED OUT MONDAY TO A STRUCTURE FIRE

The Russell Springs Fire Department was called out around noon Monday to a Structure fire on Highway 80…

 

According to Fire Chief H.M. Bottom Jeff’s Bar at 1730, West Steve Wariner Drive was on fire when someone passing by had noticed the blaze and called local dispatch. Bottom told Wave news that apparently the fire had been going for some time before anyone noticed. The bar is not opened on Monday’s so no one was at the location at the time of the fire. The cause as of this time is unknown but the investigation will continue today.

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MCCONNELL & MCGRATH TO DEBATE THIS EVENING...

 
U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell (Rep.) and Amy McGrath (Dem.) will face off in a debate this evening at 6:00pmCT on WKYT for a socially distanced encounter. The candidates will sit behind plexiglass barriers, 20-feet apart. The moderator of the debate will be WKYT’s Bill Bryant.

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FIRE AT JEFF'S BAR IN RUSSELL SPRINGS THIS AFTERNOON....

 
A Russell Springs business near the Royville community caught fire this afternoon (Monday).
 
The fire occured at Jeff’s Bar on West Highway 80. The building, owned by Jeff Pierce, sustained quite a bit of damage. The cause of fire is unknown at this time.
 

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643 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 3 MORE DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 12, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Monday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

Gov. Beshear conducted Monday’s news conference remotely as he and his family quarantine in the Governor’s Mansion after they were potentially exposed to COVID-19 late Saturday afternoon through a member of the Governor’s security detail.

 

To watch the Governor’s video message about his quarantining, click here. To view the full news release on the issue, click here.

 

The Governor and his family have tested negative and continue to feel well. The Beshear family will be tested regularly and will remain in quarantine until cleared by the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH).

 

“We’re doing great. I’m feeling great, my family feels great. We are trying to be really positive about this situation,” the Governor said. “We want to thank everybody who has sent their well wishes, not just for my health but also for the member of my security detail who tested positive. We’re all trying to do our best to get through this together.”

 

He added that the security detail member was experiencing mild symptoms but doing well.

 

Case Information – Monday, Oct. 12
As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Oct. 12, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 80,930 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 643 of which were newly reported Monday. 94 of the newly reported cases were from children up to age 18, of which 18 were age 5 and under. The youngest was just 4 months old.

 

“Today, our escalations continue. This is the highest number of cases we’ve ever had on a Monday. Remember, Sundays and Mondays usually have fewer cases than most of the rest of the week, because of the lab schedules,” the Governor said. “We’ve got to do better. We’ve got to make sure we’re following these safety practices and we’ve got to spread out the number of contacts we have in any given day and any given week.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 3 new deaths Monday, raising the total to 1,255 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Monday include a 79-year-old man from Boyd County; a 67-year-old woman from Fayette County; and a 61-year-old man from Grayson County.

 

“Let’s continue to light our houses up green until we don’t have to anymore,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

As of Monday, there have been at least 1,679,411 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.37%, and at least 13,651 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Case Information – Sunday, Oct. 11
Due to limited reporting on the weekends, some updated information is now available from Sunday, Oct. 11.

 

As of Sunday, there were 1,651,468 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was at 4.32% and at least 13,573 Kentuckians had recovered from the virus.

 

For a detailed look at coronavirus case information from Sunday, Oct. 11, click here.

 

Dr. Stack Update
Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, offered detailed information Monday about the state of the coronavirus in the commonwealth.

 

Dr. Stack highlighted a news story by WLKY about a junior at Ballard High School in Louisville who is in an intensive-care unit months after contracting COVID-19. Taylor Crites’ mother shared a social media post about her daughter’s ordeal to show the public that “children are not immune” to coronavirus. Taylor tested positive for coronavirus in June and thought she had recovered. Since then, however, she has suffered cardiac and inflammatory symptoms that her doctors say were caused by COVID-19.

 

“This is a young, healthy, athletic person who started developing symptoms for the post-inflammatory problems that happen after COVID-19,” Dr. Stack said. “So I would urge everybody, please, this is not the time to be dismissive or cavalier about it. It’s time to double our efforts and realize how much disease is in the community and how much it spreads.”

 

He also emphasized the importance of people quarantining like the first family when they are called by contact tracers about a possible exposure to the disease.

 

“We should be very grateful for the Governor here is obviously doing what he believes to be best for his family and those around them,” Dr. Stack said. “But importantly, he’s also doing what’s right for the state of Kentucky, to prevent any risk of him spreading infection should he turn positive, but also to model the good behavior that we ask of everyone else.”

 

Team Kentucky Fund Update
Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman provided an update Monday on the Team Kentucky Fund, which has provided more than $1 million to Kentuckians in need during the pandemic.

 

“This money is a lifesaver for our friends, family members and neighbors in every county in Kentucky,” the Lieutenant Governor said. “I applaud the generosity of so many Kentuckians who have given to the Team Kentucky Fund. You are displaying the Team Kentucky spirit during uncertain times.”

 

She said that, so far, 1,308 households have been helped by the fund, with the average assistance to each household being $781. Nearly two-thirds, or $675,000, has helped Kentuckians pay rent or mortgage payments. Other major areas of funding include: more than $150,000 for groceries, more than $132,000 for electric bills, more than $43,000 for natural gas, sewage, propane and waste.

 

Those who have been financially harmed by COVID-19 can visit TeamKYFund.ky.gov to apply for funding.

 

“We still have a need for applications particularly in many rural areas of the state,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said.

 

Those wishing to donate to the Team Kentucky Fund can visit donate.ky.gov to give. Each gift is tax deductible and 100% goes directly to Kentuckians.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Clinton County Man Arrested on Rape Charges......

 
Albany, KY (October 12, 2020) 38-year-old Christopher Thrasher of Albany, KY was arrested on Saturday, October 10, 2020 at approximately 5:00pmCT at his residence following an investigation led by KSP Trooper Jordan Carter. Thrasher was indicted on October 8th by the Clinton County Grand Jury and charged with Rape 1st degree, Victim under 12 years of age. Thrasher was lodged in the Clinton County Detention Center. Tpr. Carter was assisted on this investigation by Tpr. Jason Warriner.
 
 

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More Info. Released on Green Co. Man who Impersonated Police Officer & Assaulted a Female....


Gradyville, KY (October 12th, 2020) - On Sunday, October 11th, 2020 Troopers form Kentucky State Police Post 15 located and arrested George Barton, age 47 of Greensburg, KY following an assault investigation that occurred on September 3rd, 2020 at approximately 10:30pmCT, 6 miles west of Columbia on Edmonton Rd.

 

The victim stated that she was travelling west on Edmonton road when she observed blue lights coming up behind her. She pulled over even though she did not think she had made any traffic violations. She stated that a male subject approached her from an unidentified car that did not have law enforcement decals on it. When the man got to the window, he threw what is suspected to be ammonia in her face and tried to forcibly take her from the vehicle. The female fought back and suffered a head injury but was able to get free. The male subject retreated back to his vehicle and left the scene.

 

Through thorough investigation, Detective Nick Davis was able to obtain an arrest warrant on Barton for Assault 4th degree (minor injury), Impersonating a Peace Officer, Improper use of blue lights, Wanton endangerment-2nd degree, Unlawful imprisonment – 1st degree, and Terroristic threatening 3rd degree.

KSP arrested Barton at his residence on Sunday, October 11th, 2020 at approximately 1:39amCT. The KSP Special Response Team assisted because Barton had barricaded himself inside the residence. After several hours of negotiation and chemical munitions, Barton came out of his residence.
 

Barton was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

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CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 10-12

Adair County 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We had no one released today. We have 72 active cases, all on home isolation. We have no one in the hospital at this time.

 

Russell County 3 new cases Sunday. We had 5 cases released from isolation. We now have 30 active cases which 29 are on self-isolation and 1 is hospitalized at UK. The new cases are a 48 and 61 year old females and a 6 year old male who are on self-isolation.

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852 New COVID-19 Cases; 3 More Deaths.....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 11, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Sunday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

Earlier Sunday, the Governor issued a statement telling Kentuckians that he and his family are committed to setting a good example by following state and federal quarantine guidelines after they were potentially exposed to a person with COVID-19 late Saturday afternoon.

 

To watch the video message, click here. To view the full news release, click here.

 

The Governor and his family were potentially exposed through a member of his security detail who drove with the first family on Saturday and learned of a positive test later Saturday. The first family was not in contact with anyone else following exposure. 

 

The Governor and his family have tested negative, are feeling well and have no symptoms. The Beshear family will be tested regularly and will remain in quarantine until cleared by the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH). 
 

“We want to make sure we’re setting the example, and we want to make sure we’re keeping other people around us safe,” the Governor said.

 

Case Information
As of 2:00pmCT on Sunday, Oct. 11, 2020 Gov. Beshear announced at least 80,292 cases in the commonwealth, 852 of which were newly reported Sunday. Ninety of the newly reported cases were from children up to age 18, of which 23 were age 5 and under. The youngest was just 23 days old.

 

Kentucky recorded 7,675 new coronavirus cases this week, again marking the highest weekly toll of new cases. This week’s total is up by 1,549 cases over last week’s total, but it does include a backlog of cases from Fayette County that were reported Wednesday.

 

The Governor announced 3 more deaths on Sunday, bringing the death total to 1,252. The deaths reported included a 33-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 60-year-old man from Hopkins County; and a 70-year-old woman from Warren County.

 

“That’s three more families who are now grieving,” the Governor said.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of DPH, noted that congregate care settings continue to account for a large proportion of the COVID-19 deaths in Kentucky. Other settings, especially social gatherings and settings where people are in proximity to each other for extended periods of time, continue to give rise to clusters of cases.

 

Dr. Stack said: “With the disease so widespread in Kentucky now, the risk of all of us getting exposed is high if we don’t all do our part to socially distance, wear masks and practice good hand hygiene. I’ll add one other thing today – emotionally regulate yourself.

 

“By this, I mean it’s normal to miss the things we used to do with a lot of other people, like fall festivals, church services and sporting events. Acknowledge what you miss, then make a plan for what you can do,” he said.
 

“Take a drive to view the colors of the changing leaves. Take a pumpkin walk around your neighborhood. Join a COVID-19 weight loss challenge. It’s OK to acknowledge that something’s been lost, but we don’t have to wallow in the moment. And, remind yourself that a vaccine is coming and there’s reason to be hopeful.”

 

Due to limited reporting on Sundays, some information will be delayed until Monday.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Governor Beshear & Family Potentially Exposed to COVID-19.....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 11, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear issued a video statement Sunday to tell Kentuckians that he and his family are committed to setting a good example by following state and federal quarantine guidelines after they were potentially exposed to a person with COVID-19 late Saturday afternoon.

 

To watch the video message, click here.

 

The Governor and his family were potentially exposed through a member of his security detail who drove with the first family on Saturday and learned of a positive test later Saturday. The first family was not in contact with anyone else following exposure.

 

The Governor said his family and the trooper all wore facial coverings, but the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH) recommend quarantine if an individual is within six feet of a positive person for more than 15 minutes. Quarantine is used to keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others to limit possible spread.

 

The Governor and his family have tested negative, are feeling well and have no symptoms. The Beshear family will be tested regularly and will remain in quarantine until cleared by DPH.

 

The Governor will continue to provide daily COVID-19 updates virtually. 

 

Background note: The Governor and family are in quarantine, not isolation. Isolation is used to separate people infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, from people who are not infected. None of the family has tested positive.

 

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IN-PERSON VOTING BEGINS OCT. 13TH....

 
In-person voting begins Tuesday, Oct. 13th and runs thru Monday, Nov. 2nd,2020 from 8:00am-4:00pmCT and on Saturdays from 8:00am-12:00pmCT.
 
In Adair County, the early voting location is in the Adair Annex Basement. On Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 3rd, voting hours are from 6am-6pmCT in the Adair Annex basement. This will be the only location in Adair County!
 
In Russell County, early voting will be held at 3 locations: the Russell County Clerk's office, SKRECC and the LEVEE.  Saturday voting will be available at the Clerk's office only from 8:00am-12:00pmCT. On Tuesday, Nov. 3rd (ELECTION DAY), voting will be held at SKRECC and at the LEVEE from 6:00am-6:00pmCT.
 

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Green Co. Man Arrested for Impersonating Peace Officer, Unlawful Imprisonment & other Charges....

 
George Dewey Barton, 47, of Greensburg, KY was arrested early this morning (Sunday) by KSP for Impersonating a Peace Officer, 4th degree Assault, Improper Use of Blue Lights, Wanton Endangerment 2nd degree, Unlawful Imprisonment 1st degree, Terroristic Threatening 3rd degree, and Resisting Arrest. 
 
Barton was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.
 

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WEEKEND ARRESTS 10/11/20

 
  • David Wisdom, 32, of Russell Springs - arrested by CPD Saturday night for Disregarding a Stop Sign and Operating a Vehicle Under the Influence of Controlled Substances.
  • William Despain, 28, Greensburg - arrested by ACSO for DUI and Possession of Synthetic Drugs.
 
Lodged in the Adair Co. Regional Jail.

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1,002 New COVID-19 Cases in KY; 7 More Deaths.....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 10, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“The number of positive cases is increasing at a troubling pace. We’ve had multiple week-over-week increases and we are at an all-time high here in Kentucky,” said Gov. Beshear. “Don’t fool around with this virus. Take steps to protect your health and the health of others: stay at least six feet from other people, wear a mask and wash your hands often.”

 

Case Information
As of 2:00pmCT on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 79,445 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 1,002 of which were newly reported Saturday. 108 of the newly reported cases were from children 18 and younger, of which 18 were children ages 5 and under. The youngest were three children, all of whom were 3 months old.

 

“It’s past time for us to get back to the behaviors that we know curb the spread of this virus,” added the Governor. “It’s time to buckle down and treat this thing like the deadly disease that it is.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 7 new deaths Saturday. The total number of Kentuckians now lost to the virus is 1,249.

 

“That’s seven additional families who are suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The deaths reported Saturday include a 60-year-old man from Hancock County; an 87-year-old man from Carter County; a 58-year-old woman from Harlan County; a 93-year-old woman and an 89-year-old man Union County; a 91-year-old woman from Daviess County; and an 80-year-old man from Hardin County.

 

“We know 20 to 40% of people who contract COVID-19 might not even know they have it,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “This is a real danger with this virus since this large proportion of people without symptoms can be contagious and spread it to vulnerable people who get very sick.”

 

“It’s important for all Kentuckians in every community to understand this risk. If you are in a ‘green’ county on the map this week, you might be ‘yellow’ next week.

This week’s ‘yellow’ could become next week’s ‘red.’ COVID-19 is no joke. Not only is it deadly, especially among older people and those with health conditions, but increasingly, there’s evidence of lingering effects including prolonged loss of smell, difficulty breathing, fatigue, ‘brain fog’ and other issues.

 

As of Saturday, at least 1,650,148 tests had been administered. The COVID-19 testing positive rate, based on a seven-day rolling average, taking into account total positive tests reported by laboratories divided by total tests reported by labs, stood at 4.16%. The number of Kentuckians who are known to have recovered was at least 13,539.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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SUSPECTS IN CLINTON CO. DOUBLE MURDER APPREHENDED IN CALIFORNIA.....


Tompkinsville, KY (September 21, 2020) On September 20th, 2020 at approximately 3:15pmCT, Kentucky State Police Post 15 responded to a residence on White Oak Ridge Rd in the Fountain Run community in reference to two deceased males being located inside the residence with apparent gunshot wounds to the head. The victims are 20 year old Trevor Cleary of Tompkinsville, KY and 19 year old Austin Copas of Fountain Run, KY. Autopsies are scheduled to be performed. This incident remains under investigation by Detective B.J. Burton. KSP was assisted at the scene by Fountain Run PD, Monroe County Sheriff’s Department, Monroe County EMS, and the Monroe County Coroner’s Office. If anyone has any information regarding this incident contact KSP Post 15 at (800) 222-5555.


Kentucky State Police Detective B.J. Burton has obtained arrest warrants on two individuals involved in the double murder that happened on Sunday, September 20th.

 

Edward Whitledge, age 29 of Bakersfield, CA is 6’2” and approximately 188 lbs, with hazel eyes and brown hair. Whitledge has an active arrest warrant for two counts of Murder.

 

Kayla Spivey, age 28 of Hiham, TN is 5’4” and is approximately145 lbs with brown eyes and red hair. Spivey has an active arrest warrant for two counts of Complicity to Commit Murder.

 

These individuals were last seen driving a 2009 Nissan Altima, black in color, TN license plate # DP68781. KSP is asking for the public’s assistance in locating these individuals who are considered to be armed and dangerous. If anyone has any information regarding their whereabouts, we ask that you contact Post 15 at 800-222-5555 or your local law enforcement agency, do not attempt to approach or apprehend.

 

Photos are attached below.

 

 **********UPDATE***********

 

Tompkinsville, KY (October 10, 2020) On Friday, October 9, 2020 at approximately 7:15pmCT, Kentucky State Police Post 15 was notified that both suspects, Whitledge and Spivey had been located and arrested in Bakersfield, CA. Both suspects will be extradited back to Kentucky for charges listed above. 
 


 

 

 

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KSP Recognizes October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (October 5, 2020) – The month of October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, a time set aside to acknowledge domestic violence survivors and be a voice for the victims. Domestic violence is prevalent in any community, including many places in Kentucky, and affects people of different gender, age and race.

 

“Domestic violence doesn’t discriminate between socio-economic status, race or location whether you’re rural or urban. One in four women and one in seven men will be a victim of domestic violence,” says Victim Advocacy and Support Justice Program Administrator Danielle Perkins.

 

In response to the high number of crime and domestic violence victims, Kentucky State Police (KSP) employed sixteen victim advocates to provide support services and resources to crime victims across the Commonwealth. KSP is among the first state police agencies to implement this program on a statewide basis.

 

The program, called Victim Advocate Support Services (VASS), launched in the fall of 2019 with a dual purpose. Advocates administer care to crime victims, or those involved in traumatic events, connecting them with immediate resources, such as mental health services, crisis intervention or legal support. These skilled professionals also serve as liaisons between law enforcement and the victim, simultaneously helping victims navigate the system while allowing detectives to focus more on the details of the case.

 

Since the inception of the program, KSP Victim Advocates have assisted 1,058 individuals since November of 2019.

 

“We provide our victims with the support they need whether it’s assisting with a protective order, navigating the court system, providing resources with community based services or offering emotional support,” adds Perkins. “In some cases, the best thing we can do for victims is listen.”

 

One advocate is assigned to each of KSP’s 16 posts throughout the state. They work with community partners to provide fair, compassionate and sensitive treatment of victims, families and witnesses from the investigative stage of a crime through a follow-up period after the case has been adjudicated. Providing these services in the first hours following a crime is not only vital to healing, it also helps victims secure available compensation funds for out-of-pocket expenses.

 

If you or someone you know needs assistance through the VASS program, please contact your local post and request to speak to the victim advocate. To find the nearest post, visit http://kentuckystatepolice.org/post-locations/.

 

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JAMESTOWN BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED 10/09/20

 

The Boil Water Advisory for Park Avenue, Clayton Road, and all side roads including Murphy Lane in Jamestown, KY has been lifted. You no longer have to boil your water.

 

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1,059 COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 8 MORE DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 9, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Friday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“We continue to be in another escalation of COVID-19 cases here in Kentucky,” said Gov. Beshear. “This is the highest Friday in the last four weeks, and this will be our highest week ever when we finish it for number of new COVID-19 cases.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Friday, Oct. 9, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 78,456 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 1,059 of which were newly reported Friday. 114 of the newly reported cases were from children up to age 18, of which 23 were children 5 and under. The youngest was only 2 months old.

 

“These are just far too many cases. We have to do better. Folks, we really need you to wear your mask,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’ve talked a lot about enforcement this week, but the best enforcement is you, making sure that you and your family are wearing them every time you go out. If everybody takes on that enforcement, we will stop this third escalation.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 8 new deaths Friday, raising the total to 1,242 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Friday include a 90-year-old woman from Boyd County; a 73-year-old woman from Daviess County; a 76-year-old man from Harrison County; two women, ages 70 and 74, from Henderson County; an 87-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 48-year-old woman from Logan County; and a 54-year-old woman from McCracken County.

 

“We continue to see higher months of cases and higher months of deaths,” said Gov. Beshear. “We need your help. Be a good part of Team Kentucky.”

 

As of Friday, there have been at least 1,632,824 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.32%, and at least 13,417 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Week in Review
For more information on this week’s updates, including those on relaunching kynect, Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Manufacturing Month, Homeland Security grants, the Stay Close. Go Far. tourism campaign, unemployment insurance, Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Coverings for Kids, a grant to child care centers, the Team Kentucky Fund, Recognizing Inspirational School Employees Awards, the Pikeville Medical Center Healthy at School Telehealth Program and the 2020 general election in Kentucky, visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Adair Annex Closed this Weekend after COVID-19 Case in Building.....


The Adair County Annex building has had a positive COVID-19 case in the building today (Wednesday).  Most employees are NOT considered to be “close contact”, but according to Judge Exec. Gale Cowan, they wanted to inform the citizens.  

 

We, as office holders and staff, have cleaned and disinfected (on top of what we do daily) this evening to try to make the building safe, said Judge Cowan. If you are not comfortable coming into the building, please call the office you need to do business with and they will make arrangements to assist you. Cowan went on to say that they have a company coming in over the weekend to do an even “deeper cleaning” than they are able to do themselves, before voting begins next week.

 

If you need to pay your property taxes, please consider mailing them to the Adair County Sheriff’s Office, 424 Public Square, Suite 20, Columbia, KY  42728 or using the new Dropbox located just inside the Annex front doors.

 

The Adair Annex building will be closed Saturday, October 10, 2020 for deep cleaning due to COVID-19 exposure and will not be open to the public. It will reopen on Monday, October 12, 2020 at regular business hours.  
 

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LCDHD: 41 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES; NO NEW DEATHS....


Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 4.1%.
   
Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 71 deaths resulting in a 2.25% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.59% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.8% morality rate at the national level.
   
Hospitalizations: We presently have 20 cases in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 263 hospitalizations resulting in a 8.32% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.51%. The latest state data shows that 67.1% of ICU beds and 25.6% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
   
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 3,162 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.51% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID- 19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 36 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 3; Casey: 1; Cumberland: 3; Green: 2; McCreary: 10; Pulaski: 6; Russell: 3; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 4. In all, we have released 88.3% of our total cases.
       
Active (Current) Cases: We added 5 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 299 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district's 10 counties. On 09/02/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 411.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to which where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Places of Worship.
   
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 41 today: Adair: 9; Clinton: 8; Green: 3; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 9; Russell: 2; and, Taylor: 6. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.011. This means our total case count is projected to double every 62.53 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 08/26/2020 when we added 75 cases. 
 
Today's new cases include:
  • Adair: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 6 Months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 63-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 76-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 84-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic 
  • Green: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic 
  • Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
                 
We are still seeing large numbers of new cases so please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 3,162 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 77,554 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 77,455 statewide plus 99 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). 
 
Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.
 
Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor's Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 

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DROPBOX NOW AVAILABLE TO ADAIR COUNTY TAXPAYERS....


The Adair County Sheriffs Office has added a dropbox as an additional option for property taxes. The dropbox is located just inside the doors in the lobby of the Adair County Annex building. The box is secured with a lock and will be checked routinely throughout the day to retrieve tax bills. No tax bills will be left in the box overnight and the doors to the Annex are secured at the close of business.  

 

Sheriff Josh Brockman says they want to provide as many options as possible to residents for their safety and health, as well as for the safety & health of employees in the Sheriffs office and county employees throughout the building as we deal with COVID-19 in our community. The option of paying online will be available in the near future. The Sheriff says they have currently purchased software to begin accepting credit cards and are awaiting on the company to install it. 
 
Sheriff Brockman urges all Adair County residents to please mail in their property tax bills OR utilize the dropbox. If you want a receipt, please include a stamped, self-addressed envelope and one will be mailed to you. If you choose to bring in your tax bill, someone will be there to assist you, but please wear a mask when you enter the building. 

Sheriff Brockman says: “help us stay healthy so we can be here to serve you”.
 
We would like to thank Columbia-Adair County Fire Dept. for donating the dropbox. Pictured: Suzanne Rogers (right) & Laura Seeley (left), employees of the Adair County Sheriffs Office.
 

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AREA ARRESTS 10-9-20


A Nancy, KY man was taken into custody on drug and other charges just after midnight last night in Russell County.  Lonnie McCoy, 28, was arrested by Deputy Golden with the Russell County Sheriff’s Office and charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth) and Drug Paraphernalia Buy/Possession.

 

Nathan Stargell, 39, of Russell Springs was arrested just before 11:30pmCT last night by Officer Shirley with the Russell Springs Police Department. Stargell was charged with Public Intoxication-Controlled Substance (Excludes Alcohol) and Possession of Marijuana.

 

Joshua Sparks,43, of Albany, KY was arrested by Officer Justice with the Russell Springs Police Department just after 10 a.m. Thursday morning. Sparks was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth), Tampering with Physical Evidence, PMT Unlicensed Operator to Operate Motor Vehicle, Drug Paraphernalia Buy/Possession, and Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon.

 

All 3 were lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

A Louisville, KY man was arrested by KSP on Thursday in Adair County on drug and other charges. Jamie Woods, 40, was taken into custody by Trooper Harper on charges including Trafficking in a Controlled Substance, 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth), Tampering with Physical Evidence, Receiving Stolen Property (under $500) and Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession. He was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 10-9-2020


Russell County reported 2 new cases Thursday. We had 3 cases released from isolation. We now have 32 active cases, 31 are on self-isolation and 1 is hospitalized at UK. The new cases are a 45 year old male and a 47 year old female who are both on self-isolation.

 

Adair County reported 9 new COVID19 cases on Thursday. We released 3 cases. We have 52 Active cases, all in home isolation. We have 0 cases in the hospital at this time.

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RUSSELL SPRINGS CITY COUNCIL MEETING RECAP....


The Russell Springs City Council met in their regular session on Thursday evening. Mayor Eddie Thomas shares with WAVE listeners what took place... 

 

 

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884 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES; 11 MORE DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 8, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Thursday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

He also condemned an alleged plot to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.

 

“This is not an isolated incident. Here in Kentucky, I was hung in effigy just yards from where we are standing on your Capitol grounds. Another man who made threats against me and Kentucky State Police was arrested at his home, where he was making grenades,” said Gov. Beshear. “These groups are not freedom fighters, they are terrorists.

 

“They are not security forces, they are threats to our nation. So this nation and every single one of its leaders – including everyone here in Kentucky – must in one voice denounce all of these groups. Domestic terrorism is about violence and intimidation, pure and simple. There are no two sides to it. There should be no state leaders or lawmakers pandering to these violent extremists. No posing for photos, no speaking at their rallies, because wrong is wrong.

 

“I will say it again: I will not be intimidated, I will not back down and I will continue to do the right thing. We cannot allow domestic terrorism, which threatens our way of life, to be cast in terms of patriotism or applauded on any level. It is our job as the people that make up this nation to do the right thing and send the right message.”
 

‘The Fast 4 at 4’
Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman on Thursday highlighted a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

  1. Team Kentucky Fund
    Today, Lt. Gov. Coleman announced that over $1 million in aid has been given to Kentuckians through the Team Kentucky Fund, which was created by Gov. Beshear to help Kentuckians who suffered a financial loss due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    “I heard about a single mom from Wayne County. She lost her job as a data entry operator when COVID hit. She soon fell behind on her utility bills. She heard about the Team KY Fund, applied and received assistance. Her utility bills were paid, and she said it was a big relief that she didn’t have to worry about those on top of everything else.”

    Lt. Gov. Coleman thanked Community Action of Kentucky for their hard work and the Public Protection Cabinet, which is overseeing the Team KY Fund. If you have been affected financially by COVID-19, visit TeamKyFund.ky.gov to apply. If you want to help your fellow Kentuckians, visit donate.ky.gov to give. Each gift is tax deductible and 100% goes directly to Kentuckians.

     
  2. RISE Awards
    Lt. Gov. Coleman also announced the state would be participating in the U.S. Department of Education RISE Award, which stands for Recognizing Inspirational School Employees. This award is intended to honor classified school employees who provide exemplary service to students. Some examples of classified school employees are clerical and administrative staffers, food service workers, custodial, maintenance, transportation and health services staffers.

    “We all know that we have some amazing people working in Kentucky schools,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “We are asking for nominations from schools, districts, non-profit organizations, communities, parents and students. We are looking for nominees who demonstrate excellence in leadership, commitment and community involvement.”

    A selection committee will review the nominations and submit their recommendations to the Governor for submission to the Department of Education. If you would like to nominate someone, visit education.ky.gov. Nominations are due by Friday, October 16th.

     
  3. Voting
    Today, Lt. Gov. Coleman reminded Kentuckians that Election Day is right around the corner. In addition, many absentee ballots have already been received, and people can begin early voting as soon as next week.

    “Throughout 2020, we have celebrated the 100-year anniversary of women gaining the right to vote in America. As we near Election Day, I am reminded of words from Susan B. Anthony: ‘Someone struggled for your right to vote. Use it,’” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “Whether you are mailing in your ballot, dropping off your ballot or voting in person, I am encouraging everyone to have a voting plan.”

    She also directed Kentuckians toward an important resource with more information on voting this fall. “GoVoteKy.com is the place to go for all information you need this election like checking your polling location, tracking your absentee ballot or viewing a sample ballot,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman.

     
  4. Pikeville Medical Center Healthy at School Telehealth Program
    Finally, the Lieutenant Governor congratulated the Pike County School System on the Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) Healthy at School Telehealth Program. With the telehealth platform, students who are attending in-person classes and become sick will have the opportunity to be seen virtually by a PMC medical provider without having to leave school. In most cases, parents or guardians will be able to pick their sick child up from school, pick up any necessary prescription medication from a pharmacy and go directly home.

    “There is nothing more important than protecting our students, whether they are learning in person or from home. As I have said, our schools were made for this moment,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “I continue to be proud of the innovative work many school districts are doing to better serve their students. This is another instance of our schools going above and beyond to serve our children.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Oct. 8, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 77,455 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 884 of which were newly reported Thursday. One hundred and eight of the newly reported cases were from children ages 0-18, of which 32 were children ages 0-5.

 

“This is about 20 cases less than we had this day last week. It’s about 200 more than we had in the two preceding weeks before that,” said Gov. Beshear. “It gives you an idea again that even excluding some of the backlog cases that came in yesterday we are unfortunately on track to have the single largest week thus far in this epidemic.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 11 new deaths Thursday, raising the total to 1,234 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Thursday include a 62-year-old woman from Bell County; a 95-year-old woman from Boyd County; a 60-year-old woman from Bullitt County; an 80-year-old woman from Fayette County; two women, ages 63 and 85, and a 58-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 65-year-old man from Lincoln County; an 86-year-old woman and an 83-year-old man from Scott County; and a 31-year-old man from Warren County.

 

“That’s 11 Kentucky families, so please be there for them, show your empathy, be the great Kentuckians that we are. Light your homes up green because you never know who’s driving by at that part of the night or that part of the morning,” said Gov. Beshear. “That may just help them know that you’re out there and supporting them. And let’s make sure we continue to ring those bells at 10 a.m. every morning. And if you know these families, please reach out. Tell them you care about them. Tell them they’re not alone.”

 

As of Thursday, there have been at least 1,592,037 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.10%, and at least 13,113 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Elections Update
Today, Secretary of State Michael Adams provided an update on how many absentee ballots had already been requested and returned. He also shared a video about how to complete an absentee ballot for Kentuckians who had not yet voted through this method.

 

“What we wanted, the Governor and I, was to make sure we had absentee ballots available for those who need them,” said Secretary Adams. “We’ve preserved that, but we also didn’t want to over-test the system with having more absentee ballots than we can manage with our current infrastructure.

 

“Six hundred and twenty-five thousand absentee ballots, my guess is it’s going to be, that’s right in the sweet spot. That’s enough that we see that it’s working, that word is getting out, that voters who have concerns were able to utilize this effectively but it’s also not so many that it will overwhelm the system.”

 

He also covered all relevant voting deadlines for Kentuckians to remember.

 

“So again, tomorrow is the deadline to request an absentee ballot. Starting on Tuesday, the thirteenth of October, we’re going to have in-person voting available statewide six days a week. This year there’s not an Election Day, there are 19 Election Days,” said Secretary Adams. “You can go vote Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, it’s up to you. Do what’s convenient and help us space out the crowds and ensure we can have social distancing.”

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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AREA ARREST 10-8-20

Jamie Woods, age 40 of Louisville was arrested just after midnight by Trooper Harper of the Kentucky State Police on charges of Trafficking in a controlled substance, 1st Degree, 1st Offense Meth more or equal to 2 grams, Tampering with Physical Evidence, Receiving Stolen Property under $500, Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession.  He was lodged into the Adair County Regional Jail.

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CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 10-8-2020

Russell County 9 new cases Wednesday. We had 5 cases released from isolation. We now have 33 active cases which 31 are on self-isolation and 2 are hospitalized, 1 at UK and 1 at Russell County Hospital. The new cases are 9, 20,44,49,55 year old females and 47,54,74,80 year old males who are all self-isolated.

 

Adair County 7 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 2 cases. We have 46 active cases with 45 of those in home isolation and 1 in an area hospital.

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GREEN RIVER INDUSTRIAL PARK BIDS OPENED OCT. 8TH....

 
The opening of bids for the road at the Green River Industrial Park will be held Thursday, October 8th, 2020 at 2:00pmCT in the basement of the Columbia-Adair County Chamber of Commerce building on Burkesville St. in Columbia.
 

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ELDERLY LADY DRIVES INTO C-VILLE POST OFFICE....

 
On Tuesday, October 6, 2020 at 3:17pmET, Campbellsville Police responded to the U.S. Post Office on East Broadway in reference to a vehicle driving into the building. After an investigation it was determined that a 2010 Honda Accord, operated by 91-year-old Juanita P. Wells of Campbellsville, KY had mistakenly depressed the accelerator instead of the brake, causing her to drive through the front of the Post Office. No one was injured, however the Post Office sustained major damage.   
 
Agencies Involved: Campbellsville Police, Campbellsville Fire, and Campbellsville-Taylor County EMS
 
Investigating Officer:  Officer Josh Patrick
 

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RUSSELL CO. HOSPITAL SPECIAL CALLED BOARD MEETING OCT. 9TH

 
 
NOTICE
A Special Meeting has been called by the Russell County Hospital Board of Directors Chairman, Daren Johnson for Friday, October 9th, 2020 beginning at Noon in the Russell County Courthouse.  
 
AGENDA
Call to order
Adjourn to Executive session
Topic: Discussion of Personnel Matters
Close Executive session
Report from executive session and possible personnel action 
Adjourn
 
Reference: Executive Session KRS 61.810 (1)(f) 
 

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2398 NEW COVID-19 CASES REPORTED TODAY; 5 MORE DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 7, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Wednesday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“We cannot allow inconvenience to be a reason to take our eye off the ball and what we need to do for COVID. Doing the right thing is oftentimes hard,” the Governor said. “We cannot go back to normal, not in the midst of this pandemic. We will get there, but we have to stay strong.”

 

‘The Fast 4 at 4’
First Lady Britainy Beshear on Wednesday highlighted a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

  1. Breast Cancer Awareness Month
    Today, First Lady Beshear highlighted Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which is recognized nationally in October.

    “Breast cancer is one of the leading health crises for women in the United States, and unfortunately too many of us know someone who has been impacted by this disease,” the First Lady said. “One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime, and the American Cancer Society estimates that 3,800 Kentucky women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2020.”

    First Lady Beshear noted that early detection greatly reduces the risk of death and stressed the importance of mammograms for women ages 40 and older.

    “Providers are encouraging patients to continue their routine screening schedules even during the current pandemic,” she said. “Get in touch with your provider to discuss a plan to stay current on your screenings while also taking precaution against the coronavirus.”

    The First Lady said uninsured or underinsured women can receive a mammogram screening through the Kentucky Women’s Cancer Screening Program by calling 844-249-0708 or visiting the program’s webpage.

    For additional support and resources, you can contact the Kentucky Cancer Program at 877-326-1134 or by visiting KYCancerProgram.org.

     
  2. Coverings for Kids
    Back in August, First Lady Beshear and Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman launched Coverings for Kids, an initiative to collect and distribute masks for students as they return to in-person instruction.

    “Since that day, I have been so proud to see people all across the commonwealth step up in response to our call-to-action,” the First Lady said. “I haven’t been surprised though, because that’s what we do on Team Kentucky. We look out for one another, and support each other when we are in need.”

    She noted that face coverings remain the best line of defense against COVID-19 that everyone can take. The Coverings for Kids initiative is providing this crucial tool to families in need and an extra pool of resources for teachers and schools.

    “I want to extend a huge thank you to everyone that has made mask donations to their school districts,” First Lady Beshear said. “Thanks to your generosity, over 40,000 masks have been donated to Kentucky school districts.”

    With most of Kentucky schools returning to some form of in-person instruction by the end of this month, Coverings for Kids is making one last push before closing out the program Oct. 30.

    For information on how to make and donate masks to the program, click here.

     
  3. Vote!
    The First Lady urged Kentuckians to make a plan to vote, either by mail, in person for early voting or in person on Nov. 3 for the General Election.

    “Andy and I chose to vote absentee this year, and while we didn’t all get to go to the polls together, we still made a commitment to making our voices heard in this election,” she said. “I returned my ballot at a drop box, and Andy returned his through the mail. Both ways were easy and safe.”

    Registered voters have until Friday to request an absentee ballot. After that, in-person early voting begins Oct. 13. More information is available on the state’s online Voter Information Portal.

    In addition, more than 190,000 Kentuckians have had their voting rights restored because of the executive order Gov. Beshear signed days after taking office. These Kentuckians, convicted of non-violent and non-sexual felonies, who have repaid their debts to society through completed sentences, can participate fully in our democracy. Visit CivilRightsRestoration.ky.gov to check your eligibility.

     
  4. Mask Up Kentucky!
    In addition to the Coverings for Kids program, the First Lady continued to stress the importance of everyone wearing face coverings, noting that Gov. Beshear on Tuesday announced he again has renewed the state’s executive order requiring facial coverings for another 30 days.

    “Right now, as we continue to see high case numbers, it is so important to practice kindness to others and to set a good example by wearing your mask when you are out in public,” First Lady Beshear said.

    She encouraged Kentuckians to spread the word on social media using #MaskUpKY and #MaskUpKentucky hashtags. Kentuckians who use the hashtags receive a #TeamKY mask if their post is featured as part of the Governor’s daily 4 p.m. news conference.

 

Case Information
Editor’s note: Due to an upload of a significant backlog of case data from Lexington-Fayette County, the majority of today’s cases are from weeks past. The actual number of new cases today without the backlog is 926.

 

As of 3:00pmCT on Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 76,587 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 2,398 of which were newly reported Wednesday. 358 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 18 and younger, of which 38 were children ages 5 and under.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 5 new deaths Wednesday, raising the total to 1,218 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Wednesday include a 68-year-old man from Fayette County; an 80-year-old woman from Greenup County; a 65-year-old man from Harlan County; a 79-year-old man from Henderson County; and a 75-year-old woman from Whitley County.

 

“Sadly, today we have lost 5 additional Kentuckians, and we expect the next several weeks that these numbers will go up as the number of cases go up,” the Governor said. “Each one is an important individual whose family loves and misses them.”

 

As of Wednesday, there have been at least 1,568,542 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.21%, and at least 12,800 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus. Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, said the additional uploaded case data from Lexington-Fayette County did not affect today’s positivity rate.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Dr. Stack Update
Dr. Stack offered more detailed information Wednesday on the state of the commonwealth’s fight against the coronavirus. He also provided insight into the reporting of cases in Fayette County.

 

Dr. Stack said the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department, with assistance from the Kentucky Department for Public Health, has developed a way to enter more than 1,900 of Lexington’s COVID-19 cases into a state system. This will allow the state’s reported COVID-19 case numbers for Lexington to more closely align with Lexington’s cumulative case count.

 

“We are appreciative of the community’s understanding as we moved through this delay,” Dr. Stack said. “As previously stated, the delay only existed with data entry; there were no delays in contacting positive cases and close contacts in Lexington.”

 

Child Care
Eric Friedlander, secretary of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, spoke Wednesday about Kentucky’s efforts to shore up child care practitioners and facilities as they deal with the restrictions necessitated by the coronavirus pandemic.

 

“It’s been a difficult year for child care,” he acknowledged. “The coronavirus closed all licensed, certified and registered facilities and impacted children, families and employees of these facilities as well as the owners of these businesses.”

 

Earlier this year, the Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) was paid through enrollment. Programs that had to close due to COVID-19 were able to receive subsidy funds to support their program for staff salaries or fixed expenses.

 

With funding from the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, the Division of Child Care, a function of the Department for Community Based Services, offered  every licensed, certified and registered child care program in the state a sustainment stipend of $225 per child based on the program’s total capacity, which is determined by the Division of Regulated Child Care.

 

“We’re happy to report that CHFS will make a one-time grant to licensed day cares and certified homes in the amount of $130 per child,” Secretary Friedlander announced.

 

The funding will help pay employee wages; facility mortgage or rent payments; facility utility payments; facility insurance payments; the child care program’s obligated portion of employee benefit insurance; and food, personal protective equipment and cleaning materials.

 

Memorial
As he has since the beginning for the COVID-19 crisis in the commonwealth, Gov. Beshear continues to put a spotlight on the Kentuckians who we’ve lost.

 

Today he spoke about Michael Reynolds, a 58-year-old from Louisville who died Oct. 6 after battling the coronavirus.

 

“His niece, Ms. Fisher, shared that Michael could always be found spending time with his family and friends, listening to music, watching sports and shopping,” the Governor relayed. “She bragged, ‘He had the biggest and best wardrobe anyone has ever seen.’ He was known for his sense of style and for always talking about his children, grandkids, fiancé and friends. He loved them all so much.”

 

Ms. Fisher asked that we share the story of her uncle to stress the seriousness of COVID-19.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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JAMESTOWN BOIL WATER ADVISORY 10/07/20

 

The City of Jamestown has issued a boiled water advisory for Park Avenue, Clayton Road and all side roads including Murphy Lane, until further notice. Boil all water used for drinking & cooking purposes for at least 3 minutes.

 

 

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3 counties, Adair, Clinton, and McCreary in the "Red-Critical" Range of Community-Spread...

 

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 4.29%.

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 71 deaths resulting in a 2.3% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.64% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.81% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 17 cases in the hospital. This is 2 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 252 hospitalizations resulting in a 8.18% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.58%. The latest state data shows that 66% of ICU beds and 26% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 3,082 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.48% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 19 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Clinton: 2; Green: 2; McCreary: 2; and, Pulaski: 13. In all, we have released 88.5% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 25 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 284 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 09/02/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 411.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to which where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Places of Worship.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 44 today: Adair: 14; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 1; Green: 2; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 9; Russell: 2; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 3. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.012. This means our total case count is projected to double every 59.82 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 08/26/2020 when we added 75 cases.


Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 43-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We now have 3 counties, Adair, Clinton, and McCreary in the “red-critical” range of community-spread. Also, today we had a very significant cluster tied to a church revival in the Adair County area. Much of the recent increases in McCreary County were also tied back to a recent church revival. This is a reminder that in any setting where there is social gathering (churches, factories, schools, restaurants, sporting events, etc.) masking and keeping at least a 6-foot spacing is necessary to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. At the state and local level, we are experiencing a sharp increase in new cases. More cases will lead to more mortality and more hospitalizations.

 

It is difficult for me to understand why keeping a space-bubble and wearing a facial-coving are such a controversial issue during a pandemic. Surely, we in Lake Cumberland can overlook how politicians at the state and federal level have turned these simple public health practices into politically controversial issues. The simple truths are that cases are on the rise and more of our counties are drifting into the “red-critical” range of community-spread. None of us want to see another economic shut-down. None of us want to see schools closed. So, please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 3,082 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 74,277 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 74,194 statewide plus 83 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

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Despite Pandemic, LWC Achieves Record Enrollment for Fall 2020 ....

 
COLUMBIA, KY -- Lindsey Wilson College announced a record enrollment for the academic year 2020-21. The announcement was delivered via a virtual town hall presentation from LWC President William T. Luckey Jr.

 

The milestone comes as national predictions suggested enrollments at colleges and universities would sharply decrease because of the uncertainty during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

“I am stunned to announce that this fall, Lindsey Wilson College has the highest enrollment in her 117-year existence and we did that in spite of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Luckey announced. “It is an incredible accomplishment and it also makes me wonder what might have been if COVID had not hit our campus and the rest of our country and the world.” 

 

Overall enrollment numbers climbed by 106 students with total enrollment surpassing 2,700 students for the first time in the history of the college. A significant driver in the overall success of the college was a record retention rate for returning students on the Columbia campus.

 

“We are so pleased to see so many students wanting to re-enroll at the college. I think it makes a strong statement about how well we handled the transition to online learning last spring,” said Luckey.” “Clearly, our students were anxious to return to campus to see their friends and to interact with their talented faculty.”

 

This is the second consecutive year LWC has set a new record for fall-to-fall retention which will only enhance the college’s recent ascent in the U.S. News and World Report rankings for regional universities in the South.

 

“We should all share in this accomplishment,” said Luckey. “Our FYE advisors, our faculty, our residence life staff, the admissions staff and everyone from student services. So many of our staff and faculty made calls and reached out to students over the summer and during the semester while they were taking classes online. Your combined efforts made all the difference this year.”

 

The 2,735 students represent enrollment from 43 states and 37 countries. Another significant factor in the overall success of the college is also attributed to the largest ever enrollment of the college’s online and blended programs.

 

“All-in-all, I consider this to be a huge win, especially when you consider so many of the catastrophic disasters at other colleges and universities with their fall enrollment, Luckey said. “I could not be happier to see a record enrollment during a pandemic.” 
 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 10-7-20


Adair County 14 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We had no one released. We have 41 active cases with 40 of those in home isolation and 1 in an area hospital.

 

Russell County 2 new cases Tuesday. We had NONE released from isolation. We now have 29 active cases; 27 are on self-isolation and 2 cases are hospitalized, 1 at UK and 1 at Russell County Hospital. The new cases are a 20 year old male and a 28 year old female who are both self-isolated.

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1,054 COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 4 MORE DEATHS...

 

 

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 6, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Tuesday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“This story of Team Kentucky, of fighting this international pandemic and thus far doing better than most, has come down to all of us sacrificing and all of us stepping up when we need it the most,” the Governor said.

 

‘The Fast 4 at 4’
Gov. Beshear on Tuesday highlighted a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

  1. Manufacturing Month
    Today, Gov. Beshear issued a proclamation recognizing October as Manufacturing Month in Kentucky.

    “While it’s one thing to issue this proclamation, it’s another to truly recognize how profound an impact manufacturing has on Kentucky’s economy, its communities and its families,” the Governor said. “Manufacturers in Kentucky employ about 260,000 people, full-time.”

    He noted that Kentucky’s manufacturing base far outstrips the national average, with 13% of the commonwealth’s workforce employed in manufacturing versus 8.5% nationally. Kentucky is home to approximately 4,500 manufacturing facilities, from Fortune 500 companies to mom-and-pop operations.

    “We produce dryers, aerospace composites, dump truck bodies, laundry baskets, concrete blocks, duct tape, pet food, construction cranes, cars, trucks and SUVs, cheese, craft beer, railroad ties, running shorts so much more,” Gov. Beshear said.

    He noted that many of these same companies have aided the commonwealth’s coronavirus response by retooling or ramping up to produce crucially needed personal protective equipment (PPE) for Kentucky’s first responders.

    “These companies make barriers, masks, gowns, disinfectant, face shields, intubation boxes, ventilator components and, of course, hand sanitizer,” Gov. Beshear noted. “PPE producers and their employees are true heroes in this epic fight against the coronavirus.”

    The Governor said his administration continues to work to bring in new manufacturing projects to help the commonwealth bounce back stronger and better.

     
  2. Homeland Security Grants
    Today, Gov. Beshear announced the awarding of $3 million in federal grant money that will enhance safety and preparedness of 25 communities across the commonwealth.

    “If the COVID-19 pandemic has taught us anything, it’s the value of being prepared before a crisis strikes,” the Governor said. “These much-needed grants will help Kentucky communities plan for, respond to and recover from events we pray never happen.”

    The funding comes from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s State Homeland Security Grant Program, which helps local governments prepare for and counter acts of terrorism.

     
  3. ‘Stay Close. Go Far.’
    Gov. Beshear promoted Tuesday the Kentucky Department of Tourism’s newly launched campaign: “Stay Close. Go Far.”

    “As we continue to remain diligent in our fight against COVID-19, we also recognize the importance of staying connected with our families and communities,” the Governor said. “The ‘Stay Close. Go Far.’ campaign allows us to encourage safe and responsible in-state travel for Kentuckians and support our continuous efforts to place Kentucky on a path to economic recovery.”

    The Governor also asked Kentuckians to follow and use the hashtag #TravelKYroadtrip on social media to get and share trip ideas.

    For more information and to view the full news release, click here.

     
  4. Mask Up Kentucky!
    Gov. Beshear also stressed the continued importance of everyone wearing face coverings, calling it the single most important thing all of us can do to fight COVID-19.

    Gov. Beshear also announced that he again has renewed the state’s executive order requiring facial coverings for another 30 days.

    “We saw with the last escalation that we have the power to stop it if we simply do what we know works and that is wearing a mask and engaging in social distancing,” the Governor said. “If we are honest with ourselves, we know that fewer people are wearing masks right now than they were when we took steps in July on the mask mandate to stop that escalation.”

    He pointed to the latest guidance for the state from the White House, noting that it says: “Masks should be worn indoors in all public settings, and group gatherings should be limited.”


    He also encouraged Kentuckians to spread the word on social media using #MaskUpKY and #MaskUpKentucky hashtags. The Governor also highlighted a new contest. For Kentuckians who use the hashtags, they will receive a #TeamKY mask if their post is featured as part of the Governor’s daily 4:00pmET news conference.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 74,194 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 1,054 of which were newly reported Tuesday. 144 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 18 and younger, of which 21 were children ages 5 and under. The youngest was only 3 months old.

 

“We are experiencing an escalation, our third major escalation in this COVID crisis, and it is significant,” the Governor said. “Last week we had 6,126 positive cases and we are on pace to have more than that this week.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 4 new deaths Tuesday, raising the total to 1,218 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Tuesday include an 89-year-old man from Christian County; two women, ages 69 and 78, from Jefferson County; and an 85-year-old man from Henderson County.

 

“Yesterday I said more cases equal more people we lose. I want to bring that home a little bit,” the Governor said. “In the United States there is a 2.8% mortality rate for people who contract COVID. I’m proud that in Kentucky, we’ve got some great doctors and nurses and health care workers, and we’re at 1.7%, 1.1% less than the national average. But 6,126 cases of COVID-19 with the mortality rate we have would be 104 Kentuckians just from last week’s cases, we will lose. That’s just one week.”

 

As of Tuesday, there have been at least 1,552,667 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.29%, and at least 12,751 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Dr. Stack Update
Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, offered more detailed information Tuesday about the state of the coronavirus crisis in the commonwealth.

 

“We’re in a new escalation, and I’ve raised the concern that when you’re running at higher levels, you take off more quickly,” Dr. Stack said.

 

He said in addition to following the rules and guidance, Kentuckians need to fight against complacency and exhaustion.

 

Unemployment Insurance Update
Amy Cubbage, general counsel in the Office of the Governor, provided an update Tuesday on the commonwealth’s efforts to help those Kentuckians experiencing job loss during this unprecedented time.

 

“The Kentucky Office of Unemployment Insurance has paid in excess of $4.1 billion in benefits to Kentuckians, benefits for the most part that get spent at our businesses and have an economic impact multiple times more than that $4.1 billion,” she said.

 

Nonetheless, Cubbage noted that some claims have been denied or are still being processed. She noted that the rules governing unemployment insurance payouts come largely from the federal Department of Labor.

 

“The eligible claims payment rate is staying at the same level as pre-pandemic, about 80%” she said.

 

Cubbage also provided an update on the federal Lost Wages Assistance (LWA) program from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which provides an additional $400 per week for those who qualify.

 

She said Kentucky’s Office of Unemployment Insurance has paid out about $245 million in LWA benefits, covering the weeks of Aug. 1 through Sept. 5.

 

Cubbage said some have been confused by the federal program’s eligibility rules and urged anyone with questions to view new information covering frequently asked questions on the Kentucky Career Center’s webpage.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebookt, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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ADAIR CO. REAR-END COLLISION SENDS BOTH DRIVERS TO HOSPITAL....

 
On Tuesday, October 6, 2020 at approximately 7:09amCT, the Adair County Sheriff's Office responded to a 2-vehicle accident 3 miles north of Columbia on Hwy 55 (Campbellsville Road). 
 
According to the report, 46-year-old Cathy Smothers of Campbellsville, KY was operating a 2017 Nissan Rogue and was attempting to turn left into Doc's Market when another southbound auto, a 2003 Chevy truck being driven by 38-year-old William Amos Johnson of Campbellsville, KY was unable to bring his vehicle to a stop and struck Smothers vehicle in the rear end.
 
Adair County EMS treated both drivers at the scene and transported them to TJ Health Columbia. 
 
Adair County Deputy Brandon Hitch is Investigating the collision. He was assisted on scene by the Columbia-Adair County Fire Dept. and the Columbia Police Department.   

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CORONAVIRUS MESSAGE TO ALL RUSSELL CO. RESIDENTS.....

 
 
The following message is to the citizens of Russell County from Judge Exec. Gary D. Robertson:
I have just gotten off a conference call with County Judges and Mayors from all across the state. Gov.Beshear was also on the call. Our active Covid19 case numbers are slowly increasing over the past couple of weeks. I am asking for all citizens of Russell County to try to be more diligent in taking precautions when you are out in public. Please try to social distance,wear a mask when you are around other people and wash your hands as suggested by health officials. Try this for the next 2 to 3 weeks and let’s see if we can reduce our cases here in Russell County. This might keep us from having any kind of outbreak in the coming weeks. Thanks to everyone.
 

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AREA ARREST 10-6-20

 

Joseph Parham Age 24, was taken into custody by Officer Watson with the Burkesville Police Department just after midnight. Parham was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth), Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession, Operating Motor Vehicle under the Influence of a Controlled Substance – 3rd and Excessive Windshield/Window Tinting.

 

Cheyenne Wilson age 21, of Burkesville was also arrested by Officer Watson, she was charged with Public Intoxication-Controlled Substance and Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth).

 

Both were lodged into the Adair County Regional Jail.

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 10-6-20

Russell County 3 new cases Monday. We had 1 case released from isolation. We now have 27 active cases which 25 are on self-isolation and 2 cases are hospitalized, 1 at UK and 1 at Russell County Hospital. The new cases are a 35 year old male and a 29 and 74 year old females.

 

Adair County 4 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 8 cases. We have 27 current cases with 26 in home isolation and 1 in an area hospital.

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543 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES IN KY; 5 MORE DEATHS....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 5, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Monday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“Because of the increase in positive cases that we’re seeing and with the weeks that are likely ahead, we are going to need to hear and to know that we’re going to get through this and we’re going to get through this together,” the Governor said. “If the current trends continue, it will be a difficult fall and a difficult winter, but I believe that we have the opportunity to improve our situation. One of the big ways we do that is wearing a mask.”
 

‘The Fast 4 at 4’
Gov. Beshear on Monday highlighted a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

  1. National Domestic Violence Awareness Month
    Today, Gov. Beshear highlighted National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, a time set aside to acknowledge domestic violence survivors and be a voice for victims.

    “Domestic violence affects both men and women of every race, religion, culture and status,” the Governor said. “Domestic violence victimization leads to long-term and far-reaching health impacts. Children and youth exposed to domestic violence experience emotional, mental and social damage that can affect their developmental growth.”

    The Governor said that while Kentucky has made strides, the state’s rate of domestic violence remains higher than the national average. In response, the Kentucky State Police has hired 16 victim’s advocates – one for each KSP post throughout the commonwealth – to supply support services and resources to those in need. KSP’s Victim Advocate Support Services program has helped 1,058 people since launching in 2019.

    In addition, since 2018 the Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet has awarded $28.8 million to agencies addressing domestic violence statewide. Of that, more than $19 million went directly to domestic violence shelters.

    “Kentucky’s domestic violence programs and shelters are open 24/7 and are safe for survivors and their families to receive emergency shelter and supportive services,” the Governor said. “Kentucky’s 15 regional domestic violence programs provided shelter and services to nearly 23,000 survivors and their children in fiscal year 2019.”

    He added that the coronavirus threat hasn’t stopped Kentucky’s services in this crucial area.

    “COVID-19 should not be a deterrent for individuals and families in need of support,” he said. “Kentucky’s shelters never closed during the COVID outbreak and have adopted procedures to keep families safe.”

    Get help for yourself or someone else by calling 800-799-SAFE or visiting KCADV.org.

     
  2. Gov. Beshear Relaunches kynect
    Taking a major step forward in his commitment to provide quality health care to Kentuckians, Gov. Beshear announced Monday the state has reconnected kynect in order to provide easier access to health coverage and other benefits.

    Gov. Beshear said the new kynect offers expanded benefits, enhanced usability, a new mobile-friendly format and helps to ready the commonwealth for the return of the state-based exchange, scheduled for enrollment in 2021 to begin the exchange in January 202 The move is expected to save Kentuckians about $15 million a year.

    “Even as the state continues to battle the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), we have remained committed to moving the state forward on major initiatives including expanding access to health care,” the Governor said. “Every member of Team Kentucky should have health care – it is a basic human right. Now that kynect is back, it is easier for Kentuckians to access the benefits they need so they can afford to see a doctor and get the care they deserve.”

    For more information and to view the full news release, click here.

     
  3. Voting
    Gov. Beshear continues to urge Kentuckians to make a plan to vote. On Monday, he reminded Kentuckians about upcoming deadlines ahead of the Nov. 3 General Election and preparations to keep poll workers and voters safe.

    “The voter registration deadline was today, and so I hope that everybody who was not registered got out there and did,” the Governor said. “Go vote. It’s a bedrock principle of democracy.”

    The deadline to register online to vote in the 2020 General Election passed as of 4 p.m. local time Oct. 5. Registered voters have until Oct. 9 to request an absentee ballot. After that, in-person early voting begins Oct. 1 More information is available on the state’s online Voter Information Portal.

    In addition, more than 190,000 Kentuckians have had their voting rights restored because of the executive order Gov. Beshear signed days after taking office. These Kentuckians, convicted of non-violent and non-sexual felonies, who have repaid their debts to society through completed sentences, can participate fully in our democracy. Visit CivilRightsRestoration.ky.gov to check your eligibility.

    Gov. Beshear and Kentucky Secretary of State Michael Adams created a bipartisan plan that allows for multiple ways to vote. But during a pandemic, voting in person still presents challenges. On Monday, Gov. Beshear said donations have been coming in to provide poll workers across the commonwealth with the personal protective equipment (PPE) they’ll need on Nov.

    At last count, the donations for poll workers included 46,000 gloves, 160,000 masks, 13,000 gallons of hand sanitizer and 28,000 face shields.

    “This is how our voices are ultimately heard. I want to have a record turnout here in Kentucky,” Gov. Beshear said. “If we do, we ought to make all of these changes permanent. Let’s have that record turnout.”

     
  4. Mask Up Kentucky!
    Gov. Beshear also stressed the continued importance of everyone wearing face coverings, calling it the single most important thing all of us can do to fight COVID-19.

    “This is our greatest and most important tool for getting back to everything we want to do,” the Governor said. “Do the right thing: Mask up.”

    He also encouraged Kentuckians to spread the word on social media using #MaskUpKY and #MaskUpKentucky hashtags. The Governor also highlighted a new contest. For Kentuckians who use the hashtags, they will receive a #TeamKY mask if their post is featured as part of the Governor’s daily 4 p.m. news conference.

    Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear said the rising number of cases is going to spark a response from government unless and until Kentuckians get the growth under control.

    “We cannot have repeats of last week. Last week was our single highest week in terms of positive cases,” the Governor said. “The week before had been the highest week, and we shattered that record.”

    Gov. Beshear said he would focus this week on stepping up enforcement on regulations put in place to protect Kentuckians during the coronavirus crisis. Businesses should not serve customers who refuse to wear a mask, the Governor said.

    “I think we have to do better, and we can do better,” the Governor said. “While it has been a challenge, when you look at just about any comparison across the country, Team Kentucky has done an incredible job.”

     

Case Information – Monday, Oct. 5
As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Oct. 5, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 73,158 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 543 of which were newly reported Monday. Sixty-nine of the newly reported cases were from children ages 18 and younger, of which nine were children ages 5 and under. The youngest was only 1 month old.

 

“I believe that is the highest Monday, certainly in the last four weeks and by an appreciable amount,” the Governor said.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 5 new deaths Monday, raising the total to 1,214 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Monday include a 69-year-old man from Boyd County; an 85-year-old man and two women, ages 91 and 99, from Daviess County; and a 71-year-old man from Robertson County.

 

“More cases equal more death,” the Governor said. “If we are more casual, as opposed to more urgent, we will lose more of our family and friends. It’s hard because you can’t see it, but it happens. If we aren’t strong, other people typically pay for it. Let’s be strong.”

 

As of Monday, there have been at least 1,539,707 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.69%, and at least 12,445 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Case Information – Sunday, Oct. 4
Due to limited reporting on the weekends, some updated information is now available from Sunday, Oct. 4.

 

As of Sunday, there were 1,531,072 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was at 4.76% and at least 12,178 Kentuckians had recovered from the virus.

 

For a detailed look at coronavirus case information from Sunday, Oct. 4, can be found under the daily reports section at kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Dr. Stack Update
Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, provided an updated Monday on the state of the coronavirus fight in Kentucky.

 

“We are clearly now in an escalation. There is no doubt about it,” Dr. Stack said. “We are unfortunately now on an experiment here in the state of Kentucky to prove or disprove, in a manner of speaking, if our rural state will experience the same tragedies that have unfolded elsewhere. I think one of the tragedies that plays in to this is this is something that is at least theoretically in our control if we choose different behaviors.”

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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South Kentucky RECC Extends Moratorium on Disconnects through October:..

 
In March of this year, disconnects were temporarily suspended to aid those facing financial hardships due to the COVID-19 health crisis. This moratorium on disconnects for non-payment of outstanding electric balances will be lifted across Kentucky on October 20; however, South Kentucky RECC has committed to give its members additional time and opportunity to work through establishing arrangement plans before we resume our normal business practices.
 
The co-op will not resume disconnects for non-payment until November 5. 
 
South Kentucky RECC CEO Ken Simmons says we understand that the last six months have been extremely difficult for everyone, including our members.  However, we are encouraged by an improving economy and recent signs of life returning to some sense of normalcy.   
 
“South Kentucky RECC wants to take this time over the coming days to assist members with plans to bring their electric accounts current. To that end, we have thoughtfully developed several reasonable payment options to help our members avoid interruption of electric service due to these outstanding balances. We encourage members, who have outstanding balances, to visit our website and review these options, or contact their local office and let our representatives help them.”
 
SKRECC residential members with an outstanding balance should visit the co-op’s website – www.skrecc.com – or call the co-op prior to November 1 to establish a payment plan.
 
For more information or assistance in selecting a payment option, visit www.skrecc.com or call your local co-op office or (800) 264-5112. Local office numbers are:
 
Clinton County: (606) 387-6476
McCreary County: (606) 376-5997
Pulaski County: (606) 678-4121
Russell County: (270) 343-7500
Wayne County: (606) 348-6771

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Gov. Beshear Announces Opening of KYTC Regional Driver Licensing Offices in Columbia and Jackson....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 5, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear today announced the opening of two new Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) regional driver licensing offices in Columbia and Jackson.

 

They bring to 10 the number of KYTC regional offices newly opened or reopened to handle licensing needs while adhering to Gov. Beshear’s Healthy at Work guidelines to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“We are offering essential, in-person public services while taking care to do so in a way that protects public health,” said Gov. Beshear. “Essential services include issuing, renewing and replacing operator’s licenses and official identification cards for our fellow Kentuckians who depend on them for employment, travel and emergencies.”

 

Even as KYTC regional offices open or reopen, the Governor encouraged anyone who can renew or replace credentials by mail or drop-off to do so. Those whose licenses, permits or ID cards were lost or expired – or will expire – any time from March 1 through Feb. 28, 2021 and who do not require testing may apply for renewal or replacement remotely through the circuit court clerk in their county of residence. Check with the clerk as to preferred method, such as drop-off form or mail-in form. The forms can be downloaded here. In addition, check with your circuit clerk or online at drive.ky.gov for updates.

 

In-person services at the two new offices are limited at this time to the following:

  • Replacement of a lost license, permit or identification card;
  • Issuance of a license or ID card needed for employment;
  • Issuance of a REAL ID or standard license for a new resident replacing a valid out-of-state credential;
  • Issuance of REAL ID or standard licenses for new applicants who have successfully completed Kentucky State Police driver testing;
  • Renewal of a credential (or issuance of a REAL ID) with expiration dates of March 18 to July 6, 2020, which were automatically extended for 90 days by emergency order; and
  • Issuance of a REAL ID for any resident.
     

The same services are offered at other KYTC regional driver licensing offices in Paducah, Madisonville, Elizabethtown, Frankfort, Lexington, Morehead, Somerset and Prestonsburg.

 

“With the new offices in Columbia and Jackson, we are expanding an important customer service,” KYTC Secretary Jim Gray said. “But we are doing so in a way that protects the health and safety of our customers and our employees. That includes social distancing, wearing face masks and having a sanitized work station for every customer.”

 

The new Columbia office is at 363 Office Park Drive in Columbia. The new Jackson office is at 1127 Main Street in Jackson. Both will be open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., local time.

 

Qualifying applicants may make appointments online at drive.ky.gov. A limited number of workstations will be available to serve walk-ins. To avoid gatherings in common waiting areas after checking in, applicants may be asked to wait in their vehicles and will be individually notified when to return to the issuance office to be served.

 

To maintain the safest possible environment, office employees and customers will adhere to Gov. Beshear’s Healthy at Work standards, which include wearing a mask. Social distancing will be observed. Surfaces will be cleaned and touch pad equipment sanitized after each use. The complete list of Healthy at Work requirements can be found here Healthy at Work.

 

Keep up with information from Gov. Andy Beshear and his administration about the COVID-19 pandemic at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and on the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

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Gov. Beshear Provides Easier Access to Quality Health Coverage, Benefits with New, Improved Kynect....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 5, 2020) – Taking a major step forward in his commitment to provide quality health care to Kentuckians, Gov. Andy Beshear announced Monday the state has reconnected kynect in order to provide easier access to health coverage and other benefits.

 

Gov. Beshear said the new kynect offers expanded benefits, enhanced usability, a new mobile-friendly format and helps to ready the commonwealth for the return of the state-based exchange, scheduled for enrollment in 2021 to begin the exchange in January 2022. The move is expected to save Kentuckians about $15 million a year.

 

“Even as the state continues to battle the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), we have remained committed to moving the state forward on major initiatives including expanding access to health care,” Gov. Beshear said. “Every member of Team Kentucky should have health care – it is a basic human right. Now that kynect is back, it is easier for Kentuckians to access the benefits they need so they can afford to see a doctor and get the care they deserve.”   

 

Joined by Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman, Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) officials and community partners, the Governor said the portal looks similar to the original kynect, launched in 2013, but includes new features and services.

 

The portal offers access to the national health benefit exchange; access to enrollment through the state, including Medicaid, the Kentucky Children’s Health Insurance program (KCHIP) and the Kentucky Integrated Health Insurance Premium Payment program. Qualified families can now also access SNAP food assistance benefits and family and childcare assistance programs. Additional resources include support for job training, foster care, elder care and addiction, as well as support for veterans with disabilities, immigrants and refugees, homeless Kentuckians and many more people.

 

The portal was created to bring these benefit information resources and community partners together for a better Kentucky in one location.

 

While the state is making progress, Kentucky still sees some of the worst health outcomes in the country, including ranking in the top 10 in lung cancer, diabetes, obesity and heart disease. 

 

Through kynect, “We expect more Kentuckians to get the aid they need to improve health outcomes,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said. “A healthier Kentucky leads to stronger families, better education, a better economy and a better quality of life for everyone. A better Kentucky is what we are all working toward, and kynect is helping us get there.”

 

Monday’s announcement is yet another step forward the Beshear administration has taken to support the health and well-being of Kentucky families, which has been critical during the global health pandemic.

 

CHFS Secretary Eric Friedlander said, “Kynect amplifies the reassurance we continuously receive from Gov. Beshear: Health care is a basic human right. I appreciate the hard work that went into making this new portal a reality. It is important that we can provide trusted information on how to access health care, which is Kentuckians’ first line of defense against chronic and preventable diseases and conditions in the commonwealth.”

 

Kynect, relaunched with partners collaborating to work Together for a Better Kentucky, initially started in advance of 2014 health insurance enrollment as a one-stop website for health coverage, provided options to apply for Medicaid or choose qualified health plans filed with the Kentucky Department of Insurance.

 

The CHFS site was lauded as a national model and helped to sign up over 500,000 Kentuckians in 2014. Since it was disconnected under the previous administration, more narrow information has continued to be accessible through benefind.ky.gov. This site will now be retired as all the benefits are streamlined on kynect.

 

CHFS Deputy Secretary Carrie Banahan said the new portal provides additional support for the move back to the state-based exchange.

 

“In developing the new kynect, we have taken care to gather information from people who frequently access these benefits and information,” Banahan said. “We’re talking to community partners, technology experts, assisters and others who provided input to help reimagine this version of kynect, which will better serve Kentuckians for years to come.”

 

Whether someone visits from a computer or mobile device, Kentuckians can accomplish the tasks they’ve set out to do online, without having to stand in a line to apply for benefits.

 

Kentuckians can now also track the progress of an application and see next steps after an application is completed.

 

Applicants can snap a photo of documents with a smartphone and upload it if information is requested for the application.

 

The Governor said to generate statewide awareness, a comprehensive marketing campaign has been developed that will reach every portion of the state. Familiar animated characters representing all walks of life are featured in television, print, outdoor and digital advertising.

 

Community health partners lauded the administration for streamlining benefits via kynect.

 

“In the middle of a pandemic, worrying about whether you can afford health care or put food on the table is the last thing Kentuckians need,” said Emily Beauregard, executive director of Kentucky Voices for Health. “Gov. Beshear’s decision to bring back kynect means enrolling in health insurance and other benefits will be easier than ever with the help of kynectors who are working on the ground in every county of our commonwealth. It’s a simple way to make our safety net work better for Kentuckians, just when we need it most to get through this crisis healthy and whole.” 

 

“KPCA is excited for the redesign and believes it will result in a more user-friendly portal to access health insurance coverage,” said Carol Adkins, coordinator of community engagement and outreach with the Kentucky Primary Care Association. “Our association’s certified navigators were able to participate in the virtual testing environment to explore, test and provide feedback on screens and redesign features. The new mobile app will enable Kentuckians to more easily add a kynector, update their cases and upload requested documents from their mobile devices. This upgraded process will also provide an opportunity for applicants to approve a kynector by text or email which will create a more accessible and efficient experience for those obtaining health insurance coverage and the kynectors helping them.”

 

The URL is kynect.ky.gov, and cyber-users who have bookmarked or who key in benefind.ky.gov will be directed to the new site.

 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 10-5-20


Russell County reported 1 new case Sunday, a 6 year old female who is self-isolated. We had NONE released from isolation. We now have 25 active cases with 22 on self-isolation and 3 hospitalized, 1 at UK, 1 at Danville and 1 at Russell County Hospital.             

 

Adair County also reported 1 new COVID-19 case yesterday. We released 0 cases. We have 31 active cases with 29 in home isolation and 2 in an area hospital.

 

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616 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 4 MORE DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Sunday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“I normally don’t provide an update on Sunday, but with 616 new cases today of COVID-19, we have shattered the previous weekly record, which we set just last week,” the Governor said. “This week we now have 6,126 new cases of COVID-19. We have to do better. Please, everyone, wear your mask, engage in social distancing and follow those top 10 rules that we have on kycovid.ky.gov.”

 

Case Information
As of 2:00pmCT on Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 72,617 coronavirus cases in the commonwealth, 616 of which were newly reported Sunday. 76 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 18 and younger, of which 16 were ages 5 and under. The youngest was just 5 months old.

 

Unfortunately, the Governor also announced 4 more deaths on Sunday, bringing the death total to 1,209. The deaths reported Sunday included a 69-year-old man from Harlan County; a 71-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 90-year-old man from Logan County; and an 80-year-old woman from Warren County.

 

“Four more Kentucky families have now joined those who have been grieving lost loved ones since the first COVID-19 death was reported here in March,” the Governor said. “Far, far more individuals than we would ever want to lose, more than we’ve even lost in some foreign conflicts. This is serious.”

 

“This has not been a good week,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “The president of our nation, his wife and others in the White House – one of the most secure places in the entire world – have tested positive for COVID-19. Back home, Kentucky set yet another record high week for new cases for the second week in a row. We disregard this threat at our own peril.”

 

Dr. Stack continued, “Don’t forget, there is no cure and there’s not yet a vaccine for coronavirus. Prevention through our behaviors is our main defense. Wear a mask, watch your space and wash your hands. Do these things and you, too, can save someone’s life.”

 

Due to limited reporting on Sundays, some information will be delayed until Monday.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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GOVERNOR URGES KENTUCKIANS TO LIMIT TRAVEL & GET A FLU SHOT.....

 

 

 

We are entering the third escalation of COVID-19 cases, so we all need to do our part to slow the spread of the coronavirus and save fellow Kentuckians. We have to maintain urgency. We have already lost more than 1,200 Kentuckians.
 

Please wear facial coverings and social distance. This is more important than ever as our children return to in-person classes and we try to reenergize our economy.

People also need to get their flu shot so we don’t overburden our hospitals and health care systems.

 

Kentuckians should limit travel, particularly to states that are hot spots with positivity rates above 15%, to limit transmission of the coronavirus. We have added Florida to the list as the state has lifted many restrictions and is a popular destination for many Kentuckians. The Tourism, Arts & Heritage Cabinet is encouraging Kentuckians to “Stay Close – Go Far” to stay in the commonwealth if they travel and to explore one of Kentucky’s many great attractions. The states with positivity rates above 15% are updated weekly at kycovid19.ky.gov.
 

Mask up and stay safe,

 

 

Andy

 

 

A Better Kentucky After the Pandemic

While we have been fighting this pandemic, we have also been moving forward to better Kentucky with progress in key areas including providing health care, improving infrastructure and creating jobs in every corner of the commonwealth.


Kentucky is open for business. Even with the pandemic, Kentucky is still recruiting jobs and working with existing companies to expand. Since December, the state has seen 166 new-business-location and existing-facility-expansion announcements totaling nearly $1.8 billion in planned investment with plans to create more than 6,800 new full-time jobs.

 

  • This week we announced Busche Industries Co., doing business as Xtreme Fabrication, plans to expand its existing Leitchfield facility with 25 high-paying jobs in the coming years.
  • Chapin International Inc., a manufacturer of metal compressed air sprayers, plans to locate a production operation in Mount Vernon with a nearly $5.5 million investment creating up to 100 full-time jobs.
  • Summit Biosciences Inc., a Lexington-based pharmaceutical company focused on nasal spray medicines, is expanding its operation at the University of Kentucky Coldstream Research Campus with a more than $19 million investment expected to create up to 78 full-time jobs.

 

Since March, we’ve announced more than $13 million in grants across the commonwealth for projects that improve infrastructure, encourage economic development, create training and education programs and improve hospitals and access to health care – just to name a few.

Helping Kentuckians

During this difficult time, we have taken aggressive steps to help Kentuckians.


As of late September, more than 1.6 million Kentuckians have enrolled in Medicaid, more than 1 in 3 Kentuckians. We have added over 250,000 people to receive Medicaid. In a pandemic, it is vitally important for individuals to have health care coverage, which keeps them healthier and helps pay doctors, nurses and hospitals for the services they are providing.

 

One hundred thousand Kentucky houses have access to food through SNAP benefits, which has been pivotal at a time when many people have lost jobs and children were not in school. Kentucky, through CHFS, is one of the only states, if not the only state, proactively reaching out to folks who were receiving unemployment benefits about applying for other benefits.

 

This month, we will surpass more than 2 million meals delivered to seniors across the commonwealth since the start of the pandemic.

 

Other successes during COVID include:

  • More than 1.5 million COVID tests administered, a success after limited testing in Kentucky and nationally early in the pandemic due to limited supplies.
  • Department for Public Health warehouse now has a complete stockpile with enough PPE for a 120-day surge, another success after Kentucky and most other states had trouble securing enough PPE for frontline workers early in the pandemic.
  • We set aside $300 million from the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act to reimburse local governments for expenses related to COVID-19 and are now being used to help cities and counties in every corner of the commonwealth.
  • So far, we’ve distributed more than $120 million to local governments across the commonwealth to pay for PPE, payroll for first responders, meal programs and much more.


Congress needs to pass another round of the CARES Act to help Kentuckians and our fellow Americans. Congress helped local and state governments during the Great Recession and should act again or there will be deep cuts that will slow the economic recovery – hurting more people.

Vote

Make a plan to vote. There are more opportunities and ways to vote than ever before through mail, in person during early voting or in person on Election Day. If you’re concerned about COVID-19, you can go online right now to request an absentee ballot at GoVoteKy.com.

 

Monday, Oct. 5, is the last day to register to vote. Visit GoVoteKy.com by 4 p.m. local time to register online or click here to find your county clerk's office.

 

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WEEKEND ARRESTS 10/04/20

 

  • Kevin Estes, 34, of Russell Springs, KY was arrested by KSP on Saturday morning on numerous charges including 2nd Degree Burglary, Improper Equipment, Failure to Appear, Wanton Endangerment (Police Officer), Wanton Endangerment, Fleeing or Evading Police (on foot), Escape 2nd Degree, TBUT Under $500, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Prescription Controlled Substance not in Proper Container, Possession of Methamphetamine, and DUI 3rd Offense (Aggravating Circumstance).
  • William Hall, 46, of Russell Springs, KY was arrested by KSP on Saturday morning for Giving Officer False Identifying Information, Theft of Identity, and was served a Parole Violation Warrant.
 
Lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
 
  • Jeremy Revett Boutwell, 23, of Columbia, KY was arrested on Saturday afternoon by KSP for Possession of Marijuana, No Operators-Moped License, Failure to Wear Seatbelt, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
  • Doris Anna-Carol Roy, 32, of Russell Springs, KY was arrested by KSP on Saturday night for No Registration Receipt, Failure to Produce Insurance Card, Operating on a Suspended or Revoked Operators License, and Failure to Appear. 

Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.
 
 

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COLUMBIA CITY COUNCIL SPECIAL CALLED MEETING OCT. 5TH.....

 

The Columbia City Council will hold a Special Called Meeting on Monday, Oct. 5th.....
 

 

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27 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT.....

 
 
 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 4.3%.
 
Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 71 deaths resulting in a 2.38% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.67% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.84% morality rate at the national level.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 15 cases in the hospital. This is 1 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 245 hospitalizations resulting in a 8.2% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.45%. The latest state data shows that 69% of ICU beds and 26% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 2,986 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.43% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 12 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 2; Clinton: 1; Green: 1; Pulaski: 5; and, Taylor: 3. In all, we have released 88.2% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 15 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 281 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district's 10 counties. On 09/02/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 411.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to which where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Medical Facilities.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 27 today: Adair: 4; Casey: 1; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 1; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 3; Russell: 3; Taylor: 2; and, Wayne: 5. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.011. This means our total case count is projected to double every 61.34 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 08/26/2020 when we added 75 cases. 
 
Today's new cases include:
  • Adair: An 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 46-year-old male who is released, 7/20/20
  • Clinton: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

This has been a tough week. At the state level we added more new cases than for any week since the onset of the outbreak. During Lake Cumberland’s largest week, we added 267 new cases. While we did not reach that mark, we have seen two weeks of growth, with a sharp increase this week (from 188 to 227).
 
We also have 54 more active cases this week compared to last (281 vs 227). On 09/02/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 411. Last week on Saturday we had 16 hospitalized cases, this week 15. We also experienced 2 deaths this week.
 
In short, cases are back on the rise at the state and local level, with sharp increases since last week. The more new cases, the more mortality and hospitalizations that will follow. Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 2,986 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 72,057 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 72,001 statewide plus 56 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor's Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 
Find additional information at:
• LCDHD COVID-19 Site: https://www.lcdhd.org/info-tools/health-assessments-andstatistics/health_report_card/covid19-state-wide-outbreak/
• Kentucky COVID-19 Site: https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19
 

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Highest number of Cases Ever Today at 1,275; 8 More Deaths...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 3, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). Today, he reported the highest-ever daily total and the highest-ever weekly total of new COVID-19 cases in the commonwealth.

 

“I know it's been a tough couple of days, seeing the President, the First Lady, U.S. Senators, Cam Newton and others test positive for COVID-19. But right here in the commonwealth, we now have 1,275 new cases announced today, meaning 1,275 Kentuckians have just tested positive,” said Gov. Beshear. “This is our highest number of cases ever. This is the highest number of cases per week ever and we have one more day that will add to the count, and it shows that we have to do better.”

 

Case Information
As of 2:00pmCT on Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 72,001 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 1,275 of which were newly reported Saturday. Of the newly reported cases, 166 were from children age 18 and younger, with 27 age five and younger. The youngest was just two months old.

 

“I need your help. We are seeing the coronavirus surging around the country. We are in another escalation here in Kentucky,” the Governor added. “We have got to do what it takes to stop it, and that's all of us. No more being casual; time to be urgent. We are Team Kentucky. We can beat this. We will get through it and we will get through it together.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 8 new deaths Saturday. The total of Kentuckians now lost to the virus is 1,205.

 

“That’s eight additional families who are suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The deaths reported Saturday include a 66-year-old woman and an 89-year-old man from Christian County; a 75-year-old woman from Fayette County; two men, ages 80 and 89, from Jefferson County; two women, ages 76 and 86, from Lincoln County; and a 64-year-old woman from Mercer County.

 

As of Saturday, at least 1,520,236 tests had been administered. The COVID-19 testing positive rate, based on a seven-day rolling average, taking into account total positive tests reported by laboratories divided by total tests reported by labs, stood at 4.74%. The number of Kentuckians who are known to have recovered was at least 12,121.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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2 RUSSELL COUNTY WOMEN ARRESTED ON FRIDAY....

 

  1. Nicolette Hare, 29, of Russell Springs - arrested by RSPD for Custodial Interference, Assault 2nd Degree (Domestic Violence), Criminal Mischief 2nd Degree, Non-Payment of Court Costs, Fees or Fines, 2 counts of Failure to Appear, and TBUT ($500 or More but Under $10,000).
  2. Jacquelin Moreno, 32, of Russell Springs - arrested Friday night by KSP for DUI 2nd offense, Rear License Not Illuminated and Failure to Produce Insurance Card.
 
Lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
 

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Adair County Man Arrested on Heroin & Meth Charges Following Traffic Stop....


On Friday afternoon, Columbia Police Officers conducted a traffic stop on Dillion Street which resulted in drug trafficking charges. 


The stop was initiated when the operator matched a description of a male who was known to have an active warrant. After the stop was made, a passenger in the vehicle was found to have narcotics, cash, and paraphernalia on him.

Larin Stotts, 36, of Columbia was taken into custody and charged with Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Trafficking in Methamphetamine (2 or more grams) and Trafficking in a Controlled Substance (Heroin). The operator of the vehicle was also taken into custody for an outstanding warrant.
 
CPD Officer Ethan Pike made the arrest. He was assisted on scene by Officer Evan Burton and Adair County Deputy Josh Durbin.
 

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MONTHLY ACTIVITY REPORT - SEPTEMBER 2020

 
Columbia, KY (November 2, 2020) - During the month of September 2020, there were 22 traffic accidents investigated by the State Police working in the Post 15 area in the 11 counties of Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Marion, Metcalfe, Monroe, Russell, Taylor and Washington.
 
There were 2 fatal collisions during the month of September in the Post 15 area:
  1. Tom Willett, 66, of Monroe County was killed on 09/08/2020 in Monroe County.
  2. Rontoya K. Little, 35, of Washington County was killed on 09/19/2020 in Washington County.
 
This brings our yearly fatality count to 24 compared with 23 through this same period in 2019.
 
Statewide fatality count stands at 566 compared with 584 through this same period in 2019.
 
During the month of September 2020, there were 1026 citations written, 165 courtesy notices written, 507 complaints answered, 70 motorists assisted, 65 criminal cases opened and 244 criminal arrests made.
 

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Campbellsville Accident Sends Columbia Woman to Louisville Hospital....

 
The accident occurred on Friday morning just after 9:00amET at the intersection of US 68 (Broadway), KY 210, and KY 55. After an investigation, Campbellsville Police determined that a 2016 Ford Fusion operated by 26-year-old Ryan Benningfield of Campbellsville, KY struck a 2019 Dodge Ram, operated by 31-year-old Travis Boyette of Vine Grove, KY causing the Boyette vehicle to overturn. 
 
Travis Boyette and his passenger, 36-year-old Sandra Anstead of Columbia, KY were both transported to Taylor Regional Hospital by Campbellsville Taylor County EMS. Ms. Anstead was then flown to the University of Louisville Hospital for further treatment. Benningfield was not injured. 
 
Corporal Ryan Jewell is investigating the crash. The Campbellsville & Taylor County Fire Departments also responded and assisted at the scene.

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TAYLOR CO. MAN ARRESTED AFTER FIRING SHOTS DURING ALTERCATION....

 
 
On Wednesday, September 30, 2020 at 7:35pmET, Campbellsville Police responded to Mini Mart on Lebanon Avenue after receiving a 911 call advising a male had shot at them. Once officers arrived on scene and conducted an investigation, it was determined that several individuals had gotten into an altercation at Mini Mart and 30-year-old Cory S. Williams of Campbellsville had fired a weapon during the altercation. Williams was arrested by Campbellsville Police Officer Josh Patrick and charged with Wanton Endangerment and Robbery 1st degree. He was lodged in the Taylor Co. Detention Center. No one was injured during the altercation.
 

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1,039 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 6 MORE DEATHS....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 2, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Friday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“The escalation here in Kentucky continues to get worse and we have to wear masks – all of us,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

“This week is going to shatter last week’s record for number of cases. We have to do better.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 70,727 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 1,039 of which were newly reported Friday. 151 of the newly reported cases were from children age 18 and younger, of which 33 were children age 5 and under. The youngest was only 5 days old.

 

“Folks, today’s news that the President and First Lady have tested positive for COVID-19 along with some of their advisors shows you that anybody can get this,” said Gov. Beshear. “We wish them the best and a speedy recovery, and this is an example of why we all have to be wearing masks. We all have to do our part.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 6 new deaths Friday, raising the total to 1,197 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Friday include a 68-year-old man from Boyd County; a 69-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 74-year-old man from McCreary County; a 72-year-old man from Menifee County; a 60-year-old man from Oldham County; and a 70-year-old woman from Pulaski County.

 

“The situation is getting very dangerous in Kentucky. If you care about your economy, if you care about getting your kids into school, if you care about the lives of those around you, put on your mask,” said Gov. Beshear. “Socially distance; wash your hands; follow the rules. We’ve got to be Team Kentucky right now. We need your help and I know you’re going to come through.”

 

Gov. Beshear urged people to look over and take to heart updated guidance on 10 Steps to Fight COVID-19.

 

As of Friday, there have been at least 1,507,046 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was 4.30%, and at least 12,041 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools also is being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Week in Review
For more information on this week’s updates, including those on the Gold Star Families Memorial, Summit Biosciences’ expansion, the Pandemic-Electronic Benefit Transfer program, the new COVID-19 reporting portal for schools, Xtreme Fabrication adding 25 jobs in Leitchfield, Chapin International’s expansion, the state’s personal protective equipment stockpile, the extension of driver’s license renewal by mail or drop box, a $7 million grant to support behavioral health services in Eastern Kentucky, Lexmark International winning the Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award, unemployment insurance, a $1 million grant to prevent child trafficking, the Governor’s Health and Safety Award, the Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund and guidance for a safe Halloween, visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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2 MORE COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT; CASE NUMBER INCREASES BY 42....

 

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 4.11%.


Deaths: We regreat we must report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 71 deaths resulting in a 2.43% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.71 mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.86% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.


Hospitalizations: We presently have 13 cases in the hospital. This is 1 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 240 hospitalizations resulting in a 8.2% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.62%. The latest state data shows that 68% of ICU beds and 26% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.


Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 2,926 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.4% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.


Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 29 cases today from isolation. Released cases
include: Adair: 4; Casey: 1; Clinton: 2; Green: 2; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 5; Russell: 1; Taylor: 6; and,
Wayne: 3. In all, we have released 88.4% of our total cases.


Active (Current) Cases: We added 11 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 267 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district's 10 counties. On 09/02/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 411.


Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to which where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Places of Worship.


New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 42 today: Adair: 9; Casey: 2; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 4; Green: 1; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 3; Russell: 3; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 8.


Our current new case growth rate is: 1.011. This means our total case count is projected to double every 63.54 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 08/26/2020 when we added 75 cases. 

 

Today's new cases include:

  • Adair: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 68-year-old male who is released, unknown
  • Casey: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 68-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The 2 deaths we report today are a 70-year-old female from Pulaski who had been previously released as no longer contagious but succumbed to lasting complications from the disease. The other is a 74-year-old male from McCreary.

 

Our cases have been on a rapid rise over the last few days. Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 2,926 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 69,821 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 69,728 statewide plus 93 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor's Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

Find additional information at:
• LCDHD COVID-19 Site: https://www.lcdhd.org/info-tools/health-assessments-andstatistics/health_report_card/covid19-state-wide-outbreak/
• Kentucky COVID-19 Site: https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19
• CDC COVID-19 Site: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html
• For a Summary of COVID-19’s Impact on Kentucky Long-term Care Facilities:
https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/dph/covid19/LTCupdate.pd

 

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COLUMBIA MAN ARRESTED AT WALMART ON METH CHARGES....

 
The Columbia Police Department responded to Walmart on Burksville Street in Columbia, KY on Thursday night after a report of a male inside the store behaving erratically. Officers made contact with the subject, identified as 38-year-old Derek Cowan of Columbia. After observing Cowan's behavior, Officers conducted a search of his property and found marijuana and suspected methamphetamine. Derek Cowan was arrested and charged with Possession of Marijuana as well as Possession of Methamphetamine (2nd offense).
 
Officer Trevor Foster made the arrest. He was assisted by Officers Ethan Pike and Evan Burton.
 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 10-2-2020

In Adair County, yesterday was one of our largest jumps in new cases we have had for a long time. We have 9 new COVID-19 cases to report Thursday. We released 4 cases. We have 23 active cases with 21 on home isolation and 2 in an area hospital.

 

 

Russell County 3 new cases Thursday. We had 1 case released from isolation. We now have 18 active cases which 16 are on self-isolation and 2 are hospitalized, 1 at UK and 1 at Ephraim McDowell in Danville. The new cases are 23, 52 and 57 year old females who are all on self-isolation.

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COLUMBIA PLANNING & ZONING PUBLIC HEARING OCT. 15TH

 
Please be advised the City of Columbia Planning and Zoning Board will hold a Public Hearing on Thursday, October 15, 2020 at 6:00pmCT in City Hall. 
 
The purpose of the Public Hearing is to consider the following: 
 
  1. Request for zone change from R1 (Low Density Residential) to R2 Low-Moderate Density Residential for a lot located at 614 Fairground Street (PVA Map No. 000-04-06-001.00). The purpose is to build duplexes. Property owned by Easton Bryant. 
 
The hearing is open to the public. 
 

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