Local News Archives for 2020-08

THE CASE FOR IN-PERSON EDUCATION by Senator Max Wise

 

Students, teachers, parents, and school administrators across the Bluegrass have officially undertaken the 2020 school year's significant challenges.

 

We, members of the Kentucky General Assembly, continue to hear from constituents across the state who have expressed the concerns and frustrations with what 2020 has brought. None have been more prevalent than those related to our children's education. As we all continue to do the best we can in less than ideal circumstances, we want Kentucky to know that we hear your voices.

 

First, let us take a moment to acknowledge and appreciate everyone's work within the education system. Educators and others have had to adjust with each curveball this unprecedented year has thrown. 

 

With the arrival of COVID-19, students found their school year cut short in the spring. Throughout the following months, education professionals were tasked with the great responsibility of learning to live in a COVID-19 world. They deserve commendation for doing that. They sought guidance from medical professionals and asked for needed directives from the state. In late June, requested guidance was finally provided to them. School districts did a spectacular job of developing plans that prioritized what health professionals—such as those at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)—have argued is the best interest of our kids; safely returning them to school. 

 

As you may know, a "recommendation" from the Governor and potential "consequences," reported by the Kentucky Department of Education abruptly threw a wrench in districts' well-thought-out reopening plans. This came as a disappointment to many school districts where there was overwhelming support to return to some in-person learning.

 

Despite confidence in implementing CDC health guidelines and in-person or Non-Traditional Instruction (NTI) options provided to families, most Kentucky school districts were compelled to move forward with virtual learning only.

 

The Governor has stated, "We should not experiment with our kids." I agree and remain concerned about the hypothesis that NTI is in students' and families' best interests. I am troubled by some of the discoveries this experiment has brought so far.

 

In Kentucky's largest school district, Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS), the experiment with NTI began with about 4,500 students not making contact in week one. As the year ended, around 600 students had not been heard from since schools closed. Problems have persisted into the new school year. On August 26, JCPS experienced online disruptions. Some included profanity, smoking, and even pornographic images. To mitigate this problem, JCPS now has to transition to a new platform for NTI. As if the disruption of COVID-19 in the education of our kids is not enough, JCPS students had their first week cut short as the district dealt with the issue.

 

That is not the only issue districts are facing. The second-largest school district in the state, Fayette County Public Schools, experienced the effects of laptop shortages when it found itself 12,000 computers short of meeting demand. The fact of the matter is that without adequate access to NTI, a student cannot learn at all.

 

The technological divide is mostly present in more rural areas of our state. A lack of access to the internet has left some students behind. Districts are doing the best they can, but it is alarming to hear from struggling parents and guardians about how their child's only connection to their teacher is stored on a flash drive. However, on the bright side, we are seeing communities come together for our kids like never before. Churches and organizations like Kentucky Farm Bureau are providing Wi-Fi hotspots for families to access the internet. I want to give a special acknowledgment to a partnership in Russell County—a county I am blessed to represent—where the district has worked with Duo-Broadband to establish hotspots in that area. Duo Broadband has previously donated $10,000 to the Russell County School District for technology upgrades. There are numerous other examples across the state of private entities stepping up to the plate for Kentucky students. We are grateful for each of them.

 

To continue, it is important to recognize the struggles parents and guardians are facing. Without childcare, they are left to scramble to find care for their children so that they can work to put food on their table. Counterintuitive to our goal of protecting our most vulnerable, some are left no other option but to rely on grandparents or other elderly family members for childcare. Some are finding elderly guardians ill-prepared to provide students the educational support they need when completing class materials during the school day. Parents are struggling to make sure their children do not fall behind by trying to provide that support after they return from work.  I am concerned at the level of feedback from my constituents expressing the challenges they are facing.

 

Our response to this pandemic's saddest side-effect is the irreparable harm it is doing to our kids. The trajectory of their lives is being altered. When the CDC and the AAP encourage the safe return to school, it is not a recommendation they make lightly. Schools serve as a vital resource for our kids. Beyond education, they provide an emotional, social, and even physical haven.

 

One of the most challenging testimonies legislators have heard during the ongoing 2020 Interim Session was from childcare providers who shared that reported child abuse cases are down over 25%. Professionals will tell you that it is not because less abuse occurs, but because signs of it are not being identified by the teachers and school staff who are trained to recognize and report it.

 

Recognizing Kentucky's one size fits all school recommendations' unintended side effects is the first step in acknowledging there is a better approach. That approach was already well-vetted by school districts across the state and reviewed by the Kentucky Department of Education. It implemented the CDC's safety guidelines that required masks, hand sanitizer stations, traffic flows in the halls, and even bus seating. Many districts designed staggered school schedules that would have had some students on Mondays and Tuesday and others on Thursdays and Fridays. Wednesdays would be an NTI day and a day to sanitize the school. Plans also rightfully considered the concerns of families who may be vulnerable to COVID-19 by providing NTI options. If other states in our great nation can recognize the value of a more targeted approach to addressing this health crisis, and if European governments are fully embracing a return to school, so can Kentucky. 

 

While Kentucky has taken as a statewide approach to addressing COVID-19, states such as Colorado, Nevada, and even Illinois has found value in a more targeted approach. Colorado has trusted local municipalities to make decisions based on local data. Nevada has taken a county-by-county approach. Illinois developed a regional approach. This has enabled those states to have local responses based on local data.
 

Furthermore, European countries have correctly understood the negative impacts of students not being in school. Each has refused the blanketed approach taken in Kentucky and has chosen to rely on safety precautions, allowing students to receive the educational experience they deserve while dealing with outbreaks in a targeted manner. 

 

Unfortunately, Kentucky has the reluctance to acknowledge that Jefferson County and Cumberland County are not the same. When a single county in Kentucky accounts for 17% of the state's population, but 41% of COVID-19 cases, it is unjust to apply the same standard to students in counties with far fewer cases.

 

I hope that we can reassess our approach because an unwillingness to do so only harms our kids. This virus is with us, but we have to adapt and learn to live in a COVID-19 world. There is no logical basis to believe that the virus's spread will be any different on September 28 when the Governor said schools might reopen for in-person learning. Cases exist now, and they will likely exist then. Other states and other countries have recognized this reality. They have returned their kids to school with an abundance of caution. It is time Kentucky joins them. The world's future belongs to our kids, so we have a moral obligation to prepare them for it adequately. The Kentucky legislature still stands ready to work with officials to do what is best for Kentucky students.

 

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RUSSELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CONDEMNS FORMER DRAGWAY FOR INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


On Monday afternoon, the Russell County Fiscal Court met and voted for condemnation of property for industrial development, which passed by resolution 20-08.

 

The property in questions was the former county airport which was used for a drag strip for many years. The property is located at 100 Airport Road in Jamestown. 
 

 

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9 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN RUSSELL; 1 DEATH IN CASEY CO.


Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Casey. We have experienced a total of 62 deaths resulting in a 3.1% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 19 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 185 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.3% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 67% of ICU beds and 26% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 61 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 6; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 3; Green: 17; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 13; Russell: 8; Taylor: 5; and, Wayne: 1. In all, we have released 78.6% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,993 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 364 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 63 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 30 today: Adair: 3; Cumberland: 1; Green: 4; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 5; Russell: 9; Taylor: 3; and, Wayne: 2. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.022. This means our total case count is projected to double every 31.73 days.

 

NEW CASES INCLUDE:

  • Adair: An 81-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 65-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: An 87-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Russell: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: An 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we report today is 67-year-old male from Casey who was not a nursing home resident.

 

We released more cases today that we added. We certainly hope that continues. Though, we did add 30 cases today. Our growth rate still projects our total cases to double in just over 31 days.

 

Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,993 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 48,462 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 48,396 statewide plus 66 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.


 

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SYNERGY FOOD GROUP POSSIBLY COMING TO COLUMBIA

 
The City of Columbia would like to announce that Synergy Food Group will hopefully be locating in our community in the immediate future. 
 
“We are pleased to announce Synergy’s intent upon funding approval to locate their next site in our town,” said Mayor Pamela Hoots.
 
Synergy Food Group is headquartered in Mufreesboro,Tennessee. They have SQF certified production facilities located in Georgia, North Carolina, Arkansas, Iowa, and Nebraska.
 
One of their food products includes pot pies. The pot pies come in various flavors and have won awards. Flavors include: Chicken Cordon Bleu, Broccoli Cheese, Beef Shepherd’s pie, and others. “The company offers shelf stable meals and is currently serving several venues, including senior centers and schools across the United States” said Hoots.
 
“The group has ties to south-central Kentucky,” said Hoots. Synergy’s managing member, Greg Durrett, is a Green County native and his brother, Barry, also works in the company. Their father was a former sheriff of Green County and former county judge.
 
“We have been working with Synergy for approximately one year,” said Hoots. “We are pleased that they have chosen Columbia, KY to be considered for their next location.”
 
In comments, Greg Durrett said, “We are excited for the prospect to be in south-central Kentucky where our family’s roots continue to be. We appreciate the work of the Mayor and the City of Columbia to bring jobs to Columbia.”
 
The project is dependent upon approval of funding application and more details will be announced soon.
 

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RUSSELL CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY

 
There is a Russell County Boil Water Advisory on Shaw Tiller Road due to a water main break. Boil all water used for drinking and cooking purposes for at least 3 minutes until further notice.
 

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381 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 3 MORE DEATHS....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 31, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Monday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“I’m a big believer that our world can be much better than it is right now,” the Governor said. “That’s why I do this. I think my kids deserve a better Kentucky and a better world than they’re growing up in. We have an opportunity based on coming together to defeat the crisis of the moment, to build a better Kentucky that has fewer crises now and in the future.”

 

Overdose Awareness Day
Today, Gov. Beshear recognized International Overdose Awareness Day, a global event held on Aug. 31 each year to bring awareness to the overdose epidemic, reduce the stigma of drug-related deaths and acknowledge the grief of family and friends left behind.

 

“Awareness is the key to survival during most medical emergencies; and that’s certainly true in the case of a drug overdose,” the Governor said. “If you find a loved one has overdosed, or even a complete stranger, knowing how to react could mean the difference between life and death.”

 

Those needing access to naloxone or more resources on how to respond to an overdose can find more information on the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy’s webpage.

 

The Governor also spoke about one overdose victim and his family’s struggle in the aftermath of his untimely death.

 

“As Attorney General I filed more lawsuits against opioid distributors and manufacturers than anyone else in the country. My friend Emily, who leads Fed Up in Kentucky, lost her son TJ right before he was going to deploy with our National Guard,” the Governor said. “There’s so much pain out there, and somebody may make a bad decision at the start, but by the time an overdose happens typically someone has been suffering from an addiction that we cannot treat as a bad decision. We have to treat it as the disease that it is, knowing that it is preventable, knowing that all of us can step in to either try to help an individual suffering from it, or hopefully be there with the training necessary to protect them in that worst case scenario.”

 

Gov. Beshear said he promised Emily he would continue to seek to provide resources to help people overcome addictions while also holding unscrupulous drug companies responsible.

 

Gov. Beshear noted that public health officials say that since the start of the pandemic in the U.S., they are seeing the largest number of overdose deaths since 2017.

 

Kentuckians struggling with substance use disorders, either themselves or within their families, can call 833-8KY-HELP (833-859-4357) to speak with a specialist about treatment options and available resources.

 

A live specialist will help locate everything from medication-assisted treatment to faith-based care, and walk through all the variables, such as location and cost. Callers can speak to a specialist from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (EDT), Monday through Friday. During non-business hours, callers may leave a message and the call center staff will get back in touch with them.

 

Gov. Beshear said the Governor’s Mansion will be lit up with purple lights this evening to honor the lives lost to overdose deaths.

 

‘The Fast 4 at 4’
Gov. Beshear on Monday highlighted a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

  1. Today, the Governor reminded voters they now can go to www.GoVoteKy.com to request an absentee ballot for the Nov. 3 general election, if they are concerned about COVID-19 and voting. “Make sure your vote is counted,” Gov. Beshear said. “This is how you have a voice for this country, for this commonwealth, for your county, for your community.” Gov. Beshear encouraged all Kentuckians to make a plan to vote, either by mail, in person during early voting or in person on Election Day.
  2. Gov. Beshear also reminded Kentuckians that the state issued a travel advisory in July that recommends people avoid visiting states with coronavirus case positivity rates of 15% or higher. Among the states currently exceeding that threshold, according to data from Johns Hopkins, are South Carolina, North Dakota, Iowa, Alabama and Nevada. Anyone returning to Kentucky after visiting these places is asked to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  3. Gov. Beshear asked Kentuckians to take advantage of the free COVID-19 testing available at sites throughout the commonwealth. “While much of the country has fallen behind on testing, we have stayed ahead,” the Governor said. “We need your help to continue to do that. The resources are out there to make sure that you are safe and to make sure you’re keeping others safe.” For information on more than 200 testing sites, click here.
  4. Jim Gray, Secretary of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC), on Monday announced funding for access roads to spur development at industrial parks in Warren, Barren and Fulton counties.


“The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet is proud to be part of Team Kentucky and to have a role in preparing the ground for new, job-creating industrial sites,” Secretary Gray said.

 

The projects are:

  • In Warren County, KYTC is committing $500,000 from its Industrial Access Road program for a project by the Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce to extend Prosperity Drive in the Kentucky Transpark. The extended roadway will serve a new manufacturing plant being built by Crown Cork & Seal USA and open 296 additional, rail-served acres for development within the Transpark. Gov. Beshear helped to break ground for the Crown plant in February. The plant will make aluminum beverage cans.
  • In Barren County, KYTC is committing $500,000 from the Industrial Access Road program to assist the Barren County Economic Authority in developing South Cooper Industrial Park along U.S. 68 in Glasgow.
  • In Fulton County, KYTC has agreed to provide up to $146,500 to Fulton County Fiscal Court toward design and construction of a boulevard entrance to a new industrial park that is a joint venture of Fulton and Hickman counties. The site, which is in the City of Fulton, is contiguous to rail lines and less than a mile from the Interstate 69 corridor. It will be able to accommodate as many as seven small manufacturers or distribution companies, potentially providing hundreds of jobs.


For more information and to view the complete news release, click here.

 

Case Information – Monday, Aug. 31
As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Aug. 31, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 48,396 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 381 of which were newly reported Monday. Forty-three of the newly reported cases were from children ages 18 and younger, of which two were children ages 5 and under. The youngest was a 1-year-old from Madison County.

 

“We always have lower numbers on Sundays and Mondays, due to lab closures over the weekend. But the White House report for this week still has 59 of our 120 counties in the red or yellow zone,” said Gov. Beshear. “We don’t want any of our counties in either. Let’s remember how serious this is and not act like everything is normal.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 3 new deaths Monday, raising the total to 933 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Monday include a 61-year-old man from Lincoln County; a 72-year-old woman from Martin County; and a 65-year-old man from Owen County.

 

“When we make bad decisions, most often somebody else pays for it, and can pay for it with their lives,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

As of Monday, there have been at least 877,443 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 4.42%. At least 10,375 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Case Information – Sunday, Aug. 30
Due to limited reporting on the weekends, some updated information is now available from Sunday, Aug. 30.

 

As of Sunday, there were 874,597 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was at 4.54% and at least 10,355 Kentuckians had recovered from the virus.

 

For a detailed look at coronavirus case information from Sunday, Aug. 30, click here.

 

Kentucky Enhanced VINE
Today, Gov. Beshear, who formerly served as Kentucky’s attorney general, announced more than $500,000 in grant funding will build an expansion of services for crime victims in the commonwealth.

 

“We must continue to create more victim-centered services to help our fellow Kentuckians move forward after their darkest days,” said Gov. Beshear. “This system is another step in the right direction in creating more services focused on victims and survivors and connecting them with the support and information they deserve.”

 

He said the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet has awarded the Kentucky Department of Corrections $551,000 in federal Victims of Crime Act grant funding for significant enhancements to be made to the Victism Information and Notification Everyday (VINE) system, the state’s victim notification program.

 

“VINE offers timely and potentially life-saving notifications via email and phone about an offender in custody,” Gov. Beshear said. “With the new funding, VINE also will help victims locate services they might need, provide alerts via text message and create a unified database.”

 

Some of the key features of Kentucky Enhanced VINE include:

  • Voice-driven phone system for victims to search via voice prompts for a faster and more intuitive means of service.
  • A heightened emphasis on confidentiality and security with the option of creating a password protected user account and a “quick escape” feature to quickly exit the application.
  • Users now can create a personalized watch list, allowing them to gain updated information for more than one offender at a time.
  • Users can search for service providers by ZIP code or county as well as by type of service.

 

The new platform will take several months to complete, and Enhanced Vine is expected to launch September 2021.

 

For more information and to view the complete news release, click here

 

Child Care Guidelines
Eric Friedlander, Secretary of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, spoke Monday about changes to the emergency regulations relating to child care, which aim to balance the safety and health of our children, caregivers and the public.

 

“We also recognize our children’s need to learn and socialize and the essential role of child care for working parents. It is good that everyone is now recognizing the importance of child care,” Secretary Friedlander said. “It has been a difficult time for child-care providers. CARES Act funding has resulted in over $67 million going to Kentucky child-care providers.”

 

In unveiling “Journey to a New Kentucky: Changes to Child-Care Facilities Guidance,” Secretary Friedlander said the department was offering a plan to address increasing capacity and the pre-existing shortages of registered and certified providers, while continuing to enforce child care standards.

 

Among the provisions in the new guidance:

  • Help for parents to meet needs of nontraditional instruction (NTI) days by aiding background checks on providers and ensuring staffers are: masked; using proper hygiene; enforcing health checks and small groups; and have a plan is in place for when someone tests positive for COVID-19.
  • Expanding the maximum number of allowed children to 15 for licensed child-care facilities.
  • Certified homes, licensed infant and 1-year-old classrooms may return to typical group sizes.
  • $2,500 startup incentive bonus through the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act to encourage new providers.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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35 New COVID-19 Cases in 10-County Lake Cumberland District; No New Deaths....

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 61 deaths resulting in a 3.1% mortality rate among known cases.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 18 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 181 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.2% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 67% of ICU beds and 26% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 17 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 3; Casey: 4; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 3; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 4; and, Taylor: 1. In all, we have released 76.7% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,963 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 396 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 81 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 35 today: Casey: 2; Cumberland: 1; Green: 3; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 22; and, Russell: 1. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.022. This means our total case count is projected to double every 31.34 days.

 

The new cases include:

  • Casey: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 87-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 99-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 93-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic

 

If you carefully review the numbers above, Russell seems to be off by one. That is because a case was mis-assigned to Russell yesterday and was re-assigned appropriately today.

 

We are glad for no new deaths and for the decrease in hospitalizations. However, we did add 36 new cases today, several of which were from the nursing home outbreak in Pulaski.

 

Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,963 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 48,100 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 48,032 statewide plus 68 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.

 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

 

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AREA ARREST 8-31-20

Mary Petrey age 18 of Columbia was arrest by Officer Dean with the Columbia Police Department just after 3 a.m. this morning.

Petrey was charged with Assault, 4th Degree (Domestic Violence) Minor Injury.

 

Bo Stancil age 39, of Columbia was taken into custody by Deputy Keith with the Adair County Sheriff’s Office just before midnight, on charges of Possession of a Handgun by a Convicted Felon and Persistent Felony Offender 1.

 

 

 

 

 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 8-31-20

Russell County 2 new cases Sunday, a 56 year old male and a 93 year old male. The 93 year old male is hospitalized. One of the cases Saturday was changed from Russell County to a neighboring county to correct the report. We now have 33 active cases which 30 are on self-isolation and 3 are hospitalized, 1 at UK, 1 at VA in Lexington and 1 at Somerset.

 

Adair County NO new cases of COVID19 to report Sunday. We released 3 yesterday. We have 17 active cases with 16 in home isolation. We do now have 1 in an area hospital.

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462 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 9 MORE DEATHS...


FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 30, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Sunday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“With today’s 462 new positive cases of COVID-19, this last week has been our single largest week ever for new cases of COVID: 4,503. It brings our total number of cases to date to 48,032,” the Governor said. “That means we have to do better. With this number of cases we see more people hospitalized, we see sadly more people being lost. So please wear your mask, please make good decisions. This is a time when this virus is spreading aggressively.”

 

Case Information
As of 3 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 30, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 48,032 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 462 of which were newly reported Sunday.

 

79 of the newly reported cases were from children age 18 and younger, of which 13 were children ages 5 and under. The youngest is two months old.

 

“We have almost 80 of today’s cases being kids 18 and under,” the Governor said. “That’s a lot of school-age kids, so please be careful.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 9 new deaths Sunday, raising the total to 930 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

“That’s nine more families who are suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The deaths reported Sunday included an 82-year-old man from Lincoln County; a 66-year-old woman from Russell County; a 71-year-old man from Green County; an 80-year-old woman from Calloway County; an 83-year-old man from Harlan County, a 75-year-old man and an 87-year-old woman from Casey County; and an 82-year-old man and a 90-year-old woman from Fayette County.

 

“This being the single highest week for new cases: Do your best. We can’t be tired, we can’t give up,” Gov. Beshear said. “We have to bring it every week, because this virus is going to continue to take people we love. So, Mask Up Kentucky. Let’s beat COVID-19.”


Due to limited reporting on Sundays, some information is unavailable until Monday.

 

“What might be considered in Kentucky a ‘trifecta of holidays’ begins this coming Friday,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “Enjoy watching the fillies on Oaks Day this Friday. Watch the Kentucky Derby, the 146th Run for the Roses, on Saturday. And, enjoy the entire Labor Day weekend. Just do it in ways that keep you and others safe. Stay Healthy at Home as much as you can.
 

When you go out in public, please practice social distancing, wear a mask whenever you are near others, and wash your hands often. If we all do these things, we have a much better chance for safer, healthier fall and winter holidays with family and friends. These changes to our routines make an immense difference and save lives. Together, Team Kentucky can get through this.”


For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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2 NEW COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT; 22 NEW CASES

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 2 new deaths today (Saturday). We have experienced a total of 61 deaths resulting in a 3.2% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 20 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 179 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.3% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 67% of ICU beds and 26% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 20 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 5; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 3; Pulaski: 3; and, Taylor: 6. In all, we have released 77.2% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,928 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 378 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 82 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 22 today: Casey: 2; Cumberland: 1; Green: 5; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 7; Russell: 3; Taylor: 2; and, Wayne: 1. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.022. This means our total case count is projected to double every 32.47 days.

 

The new cases include:

  • Casey: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic

 

The 2 deaths we report today are a 75-year-old male from Casey and 66-year-old female from Russell. Neither were nursing home residents. Our mortality rate at 3.16% remains high compared to the state (1.94%) and national (3.07%) averages.

 

In terms of new cases, this was the state’s second highest week, but it was our highest week. Last week we added 216 new cases, this week 267. As far as active cases, we, again, had our worst week. Last week we had 266 active cases, this week, 378. We also experienced the most deaths this week at 8. Last week at this time we had 24 hospitalized cases, this week 20. However, death accounts for the difference, and that is not how we like to see our hospitalization numbers go down.

 

Since the onset of the outbreak, we have had 4 people in their 50’s to die. We have had 30 individuals in their 50’s to be hospitalized; 9 in their 40’s; 11 in their 30’s; 5 in their 20’s; 1 in their teens, and 2 under 10 (the remaining 120 have been 60 or older). I point these numbers out to dispel the myth that only “old people” get sick.

 

We currently have 50 active cases that are either tied to the schools or are school age children. It is of great concern how much returning to in-person instruction could impact the spread of COVID-19 in our communities.

 

Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,928 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 47,635 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 47,577 statewide plus 58 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.

 

 

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32 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT & 4 DEATHS

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 4 new deaths today (Friday). We have experienced a total of 59 deaths resulting in a 3.1% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 23 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 178 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.3% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 66% of ICU beds and 27% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 21 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Clinton: 3; Green: 2; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 2; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 1. In all, we have released 77.1% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,906 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 378 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 81 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 32 today: Adair: 2; Casey: 3; Clinton: 3; Green: 5; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 8; and, Taylor: 5. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.023. This means our total case count is projected to double every 29.9 days.

 

The new cases include:

  • Adair: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is hospitalized, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is hospitalized, awaiting info
  • Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is released, 8/21/20
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

If you look at the above numbers closely, you’ll notice the table is off one for Russell and Pulaski. This is because one existing case originally assigned to Russell ended up being a Pulaski case.

 

Unfortunately, we have to report 4 deaths today: an 87-year-old female nursing home resident from Casey; a 77-year-old female nursing home resident from Green; a 71-year-old male nursing home resident from Green; and, an 80-year-old female nursing home resident from Pulaski. Our mortality rate at 3.10% of known cases is well above the state’s mortality rate of 1.95% and slightly above the nation’s at 3.07%.

 

Our total number of active cases grew by 7 today to 378. Our hospitalizations grew by 1 to 23. Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,906 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 46,827 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 46,757 statewide plus 70 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.

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825 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 3 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 29, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“Unfortunately, today, I’m reporting the fourth-highest number of positives for COVID-19 that we’ve reported since our first case on March 6,” said Gov. Beshear. “Thankfully, our positivity rate is still below five at 4.59%.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Saturday, Aug. 29, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 47,577 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 825 of which were newly reported Saturday. There were 145 newly reported cases of children age 18 and younger, with 15 being five years old or younger. Two among those age 5 and under were just 8 months old.

 

The Governor implored Kentuckians to “please do your part, live for your fellow human being and understand that we are all connected and that your decisions truly matter.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 3 new deaths Saturday, all of whom were from Lincoln County. The total of Kentuckians now lost to the virus is 921.

 

“That’s one county grieving three losses of its own. That’s three more families who are suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The deaths of the Lincoln Countians reported Saturday include an 86-year-old woman and 81-and 94-year-old men.

 

Even though it’s not for a few more days, “now is the time to consider how you will celebrate Oaks, Derby and Labor Day in a way that allows you to share time with others while respecting the required masking and social distancing protocols,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health.

 

“As you may recall, as the number of new cases was leveling off months ago, Memorial Day and the Fourth of July resulted in celebrations and mingling. A noticeable spike in the number of positive COVID-19 cases followed. Then, the mask mandate went into effect and Kentuckians took extra care in social distancing and avoiding visits to other states known as ‘hot spots.’ This successfully plateaued our new weekly cases,” Dr. Stack said.

 

He cautioned, “If the running of the Oaks, the Kentucky Derby and Labor Day activities reflect other summer holidays, though, cases will spike again and Kentucky will have a setback to the progress we have made by working together.

 

Please, let’s show we can learn from the other holidays. Let’s not slip and lose progress against our fight against the coronavirus.”

 

As of Saturday, at least 871,811 tests had been administered. The COVID-19 testing positive rate, based on a seven-day rolling average, taking into account total positive tests reported by laboratories divided by total tests reported by labs, stood at 4.59%. The number of Kentuckians who have recovered stood at 10,328.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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792 COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 8 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 28, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Friday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“We still have a whole lot of cases in Kentucky which means a number of people get sick and we lose a number of people, too,” said Gov. Beshear. “The good news is our positivity rate continues to decline. If we keep wearing these masks and we keep doing the work, we can get this to a manageable level to get our kids back in school and get back to more of our old lives.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Friday, Aug. 28, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 46,757 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 792 of which were newly reported Friday. One hundred and fourteen of the newly reported cases were from children ages 18 and younger, of which 27 were children ages 5 and under. The youngest was a 1-month-old from Green County.

 

“We’ve got to come together to defeat this virus,” said Gov. Beshear. “Make sure that you take a little time to take care of yourself and your family so when we have to go through some of these tough things or make tough decisions, we can react like the great people that we are.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 8 new deaths Friday, raising the total to 918 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Friday include a 69-year-old woman from Barren County; a 94-year-old woman from Carroll County; an 85-year-old woman and an 86-year-old man from Christian County; a 78-year-old woman from Scott County; a 58-year-old woman from Taylor County; a 73-year-old man from Union County; and a 92-year-old man from Warren County.

 

“Again, it’s been a hard month. It’s going to probably be an even harder September,” said Gov. Beshear. “Make sure that you’re praying for these families.”

 

As of Friday, there have been at least 860,738 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 4.50%. At least 10,266 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

Week in Review
To read more about this week’s updates, including those on requesting an absentee ballot, completing the 2020 census, the state’s travel advisory, testing sites, evictions, fall sports, price-gouging, the Eastern Kentucky Veterans Center, #MaskUpKY, PPE donations, information about COVID-19 cases in schools, expanded internet service, the P-EBT program, commutations, the Team Kentucky Fund, CDC testing guidelines, the Auburn wastewater treatment plant expansion, three new economic development projects and Rocky Adkins’ father’s recovery from COVID-19, visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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TORNADO WATCH UNTIL 7PMCT

 
...TORNADO WATCH IN EFFECT UNTIL 7pmCT (8pmET)
THIS 
EVENING...
 
 
A band of thunderstorms associated with the remnants of former Hurricane Laura will move through the area this evening. In addition to brief torrential rainfall, outflow winds gusting to 40 mph will be possible, along with the threat for brief, small tornadoes. The threat from these storms will diminish before sunset.
 

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OP-ED: Bipartisan Election Agreement Puts Kentuckians' Health First

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 28, 2020) – In the midst of a global health pandemic caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19), as a Democratic Governor and a Republican Secretary of State we have proven that we can put partisanship aside to make our elections safer for our people.

 

We know that working across the aisle to reach a bipartisan agreement, regardless of where you live from Washington, D.C. to Frankfort, Kentucky, during any year, certainly an election year, is all too rare.

 

We don’t always agree, but we have no disagreement when it comes to protecting the health of Kentuckians during this pandemic, while making sure they are able to exercise their patriotic duty to vote.

 

On Aug. 14, we announced an agreement to give Kentuckians more options to vote safely leading up to and on Election Day, Nov. 3, 2020.

 

We put politics aside – there was no political “horse-trading.” We knew we had to get this right for the people of Kentucky.

 

This was not the first time we’ve worked together for Kentucky’s benefit. Earlier this year when the coronavirus was intensifying in the commonwealth, we jointly delayed party primaries and then quickly reached an agreement to allow those concerned about their health to vote absentee.

 

The result of our agreement, we had near record turnout. We had the commonwealth’s highest primary turnout in 12 years – with both Democrats and Republicans taking advantage of voting options that helped to keep them safe.

 

We believe the primary was largely successful because we worked together in a bipartisan fashion. That bipartisanship not only led to a better product, with concerns on both sides accommodated, but it also showed all voters that our new election rules were fair, legitimate and credible.

 

The plan was not perfect, but we learned from that experience. 

 

Our plan for the general election keeps the best of what worked in the June primary, especially giving voters options to safely cast their votes, and it makes improvements where necessary, including pushing for more in-person voting locations and faster election results.

 

During this pandemic, Kentuckians will have more than just 12 hours to vote at one polling place on Election Day. 

 

Our plan includes: 
 

Expanded absentee voting – Kentuckians who are concerned about in-person voting due to the coronavirus can request an absentee ballot online at www.GoVoteKy.com or through other methods, all of which require voter identity verification. Voters can return their ballots by mail, or put them in drop boxes we’re distributing, a first for our state. 

 

Early in-person voting – In order to reduce lines and further social distancing, we’re offering three weeks of early in-person voting, including Saturdays, also a first for our state.

 

Election Day voting – While not every precinct will be open on Election Day, because, for example, some of our regular voting locations are nursing homes, Kentuckians are stepping up to serve as poll workers so that we can open as many locations as possible. Our plan requires every county to have at least one vote center, where anyone from that county can go vote, regardless of his or her precinct – another reform for our state.

 

Finally, Kentuckians who are unable to get a photo ID to vote due to the pandemic – whether because of risk of exposure to COVID-19, or because their clerk’s office was closed – can sign a document explaining this concern, present non-photo ID and cast their ballots.

 

We know that there is still a lot of work ahead, including educating Kentuckians on their options and working with local election officials on the implementation.

 

With all the options available for Kentuckians to vote safely, we are confident that we will see high voter turnout in November, just as we saw in our primary.

 

In June, we created a national model both for how to enable people to vote safely and for how leaders should work together.

 

To forge the framework for a safe, successful and historic general election, we have already overcome the largest impediment – partisanship.

 

– Governor Andy Beshear and Secretary of State Michael Adams

 

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SPECIAL CALLED RUSSELL CO. FISCAL COURT MEETING AUG. 31ST

 

There will be a Special Called Russell County Fiscal Court Meeting on Monday, August 31, 2020 at 10:00amCT.

 

AGENDA:

  • Executive Session for possible litigation - Per KRS 61.810 if needed OR Open Discussion 
  • Action Taken as a Result of Executive Session or Open Discussion
  • Adjourn

 

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50 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT & 1 NEW DEATH...

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Taylor. We have experienced a total of 55 deaths resulting in a 2.9% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 22 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 175 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.3% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 64% of ICU beds and 27% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 24 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Casey: 4; Cumberland: 2; Green: 6; Pulaski: 9; Russell: 2; and, Taylor: 1. In all, we have released 77.3% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,874 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 371 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 81 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 50 today: Adair: 2; Casey: 2; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 2; Green: 12; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 16; Russell: 2; Taylor: 2; and, Wayne: 5. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.024. This means our total case count is projected to double every 28.7 days.

 

NEW CASES: 

  • Adair: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 58-year-old female who is hospitalized, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 8 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 5 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 92-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 88-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Russell: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we reported today was a 58-year-old female from Taylor County. Our mortality rate is now at 2.93% of known cases.

 

We added 50 new cases today. We are on track for this to be our largest week of growth since the onset of the outbreak. Currently, our new case rate of 10.17 per 10,00 is considerably higher than the state growth rate at 6.62 per 10,000. Our total cases are projected to double at just over every 28.7 days. We currently have 22 cases in the hospital, which is 5 less than yesterday.

 

Currently, most of our new cases are tied back to long-term care and residential facilities, followed by businesses. Places of worship and schools are now tied for third place. Thirty-eight of our active cases are school age (18 or younger). Imagine how much spread could have occurred in the schools if they had been meeting face-to-face and/or these children were not in isolation. Then imagine all those exposed children bringing the virus home, and then the family members taking it to work and church.

 

Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,874 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 46,074 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 45,978 statewide plus 96 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.

 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.

 

 

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CORONA VIRUS UPDATE FOR 8-28-20


Russell County reported 2 new cases on Thursday. A 52 year old female and a 70 year old male who are both on self-isolation. We had 2 cases released from isolation. We have 32 active cases: 29 are on self-isolation and 3 are hospitalized (2 in Somerset and 1 in Lexington at UK).

 

Adair County also reported 2 new COVID19 cases yesterday. 0 Released. We have 23 active cases, all on home isolation. We have no one in the hospital at this time.

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AREA ARRESTS 8-28-20


An Adair County man was arrested on Drug and other charges early this morning.
 

Rayne Jones, 19, of Columbia, KY was arrested around 2:30 this morning. He was charged with Fleeing or Evading Police, 1st Degree (on foot), Public Intoxication-Controlled Substance (Excludes Alcohol), Disorderly Conduct 2nd Degree, Wanton Endagerment-1st Offense Police Officer, Resisting Arrest, Assault 3rd-Peace Officer-Communicable Bodily Fluid and Criminal Mischief 3rd Degree. He was lodged into the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

 

An Albany woman was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center yesterday just after 12 noon on several charges including Assault.
 

Bethany Harding, 28, was charged with Operating a Motor Vehicle under the Influence of Alcohol/Drugs .08 1st Offense, Failure of Non-Owner Operator to Maintain Required Insurance 1st Offense, Improper Registration Plate, Assault 3rd Degree – Police Officer or Probation Officer, Disorderly Conduct, 2nd Degree and a Probation Violation for Felony Offense.

 

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2 WISCONSIN RESIDENTS ARRESTED IN RUSSELL CO.


Russell County Sheriff Derek Polston reports the arrest of 2 individuals both on felony warrants and one being wanted for 2 years out of the State of Wisconsin.
 

The Sheriffs Office, along with help from Kentucky State Trooper Billy Begley and the Russell County Attorneys Office, located Josh Tampbell, 38, formerly from the state of Wisconsin, on local Felony Warrants for Theft by Unlawful taking over $500, Criminal Mischief 1st and Criminal trespassing 3rd degree.


Also located was Kerstin Ohrmundt from Wisconsin who had been on the run for 2 years in a felony probation violation.
 

Both were arrested and lodged in the Russell County Jail.

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JULY 2020 UNEMPLOYMENT RATES

 
FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 27, 2020) - Unemployment rates rose in 109 Kentucky counties between July 2019 and July 2020, fell in 10 and stayed the same in Carlisle County, according to the Kentucky Center for Statistics (KYSTATS), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet.
 
Oldham County recorded the lowest jobless rate in the Commonwealth at 4.2 percent. 
 
Magoffin County recorded the state’s highest unemployment rate at 15.3 percent. 
 
Russell County's jobless rate was 6.8%, up from 6.1% in June; Adair County had a 6.5% unemployment rate, up from 5.2% in June.
 
Other jobless rates in the Lake Cumberland District in July include:
  • Casey 5.1%
  • Clinton 5.2%
  • Cumberland 4.6% (the lowest in the district)
  • Green 4.9%
  • McCreary 7.4%  (the highest in the district)
  • Pulaski 7.0%
  • Taylor 5.5%
  • Wayne 6.4%

 

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RUSSELL CO. CLERKS OFFICE CLOSING AT NOON AUG. 28TH

 

 

 

The Russell County Clerks office will be closing at noon on Friday, August 28, 2020 for system upgrading. They are sorry for any inconvenience.

 

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ADAIR COUNTY GRAND JURY INDICTMENTS 09/27/20

 

 

 

An Adair County Grand Jury has returned numerous indictments (listed below), OR click on link to read entire indictments.... https://ridingthewave.com/assets/files/ADAIR-INDICTMENTS-AUG-27-2020.pdf

 

  1. Christopher Belcher, 40, Columbia, KY - Assault 1st degree and Tampering with Physical Evidence.
  2. Donald Gene Brockman, 52, Mannsville, KY  - Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Possession of Marijuana and Drug Parphernalia, Persistent Felony Offender 1st & 2nd degree, Possession of a Handgun by a Convicted Felon, Disregarding a Stop Sign, and Public Intoxication.
  3. Andrea Gaskin, 39, Jamestown, KY - Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Parpharnalia, Persistent Felony Offender, Public Intoxication, and Endangering the Welfare of a Minor.
  4. Bo James Stancill, 39, Campbellsville, KY - Possession of a Handgun by a Convicted Felon and Persistent Felony Offender.
  5. Christpher Dickson, 21, Columbia, KY - Possession of Methamphetamine 3rd or Subsequent Offense and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
  6. Joanna Logsdon, 31, Columbia, KY - Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of a Controlled Substance 2nd degree (Buprenorphine).
  7. James Drew Griffith,  34, Columbia, KY - Possession of Meth, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Public Intoxication.
  8. Lewis Joe Burton, 57, Danville, KY - Possession of Methamphetamine 3rd or Subsequent Offense, DUI, and Operating Vehicle on a Suspended/Revoked License.
  9. Joseph Lynn, 52, Liberty, KY - Possession of a Handgun by a Convicted Felon, Operating on a Suspended/Revoked Operators License, Failure to Maintain Insurance, No Registration Receipt, and No Registration Plates.
  10. Patrick James Rowe, 34, Jamestown, KY - Theft of Mail Matter, and Persisent Felony Offender.
  11. Christopher M. Corbin, 36, Columbia, KY - Possession of Meth, Possession of a Controlled Substance 2nd degree (Buprenorphine), Prescription Controlled Substance Not in Proper Container, and DUI 2nd Offense.
  12. Jonathan Dickson, 24, Columbia, KY - Possession of Methamphetamine 3rd or Subsequent Offense, Possession of a Handgun by a Convicted Felon, Tampering with Physical Evidence, Persistent Felony Offender, Rear License Not Illuminated, Operating on a Suspended/Revoked License, Resisting Arrest, and DUI.
  13. Derek Otterson, 31, Columbia, KY - Possession of Methamphetamine and Marijuana, Possession of a Handgun by a Convicted Felon, 3 counts of Wanton Endangerment 2nd degree, Resisting Arrest, Terroristic Threatening 3rd degree, Disorderly Conduct, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Menacing.
  14. Adrian Stotts, 38, Columbia, KY - Receiving Stolen Property over $500 and Persistent Felony Offender.

 

INDICTMENTS ARE LEGAL ACCUSATIONS AND DO NOT DETERMINE GUILT OR INNOCENCE.

 

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775 COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 8 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 27, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Thursday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“I know, at this point in our battle against COVID, the weeks can be really long. What I’d ask is, keep it up. Keep wearing the masks,” said Gov. Beshear. “All the experts say it’s working, not just in general, they say it’s working here in Kentucky.”

 

‘Fast 4 at 4’
Gov. Beshear began today’s briefing highlighting a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

  1. Today, Gov. Beshear announced three new economic development projects – in 3 different regions of the commonwealth – that will bring 258 jobs and $32.65 million in investment to Kentucky.

    “Even with COVID-19 and significant short-term unemployment, we are seeing long-term investments in the commonwealth that are going to create jobs long after this pandemic is over,” said Gov. Beshear. “We have a chance to emerge stronger and to make sure when we move out of COVID, we don’t crawl, we don’t walk – we run.”

     
    • Clermont Distilling Co. plans to construct a new distillery in Bullitt County. Phase I of the project will comprise a $13.4 million investment creating 22 Kentucky-resident, full-time jobs, paying an average $56 per hour, including benefits. These jobs include management and operations positions.

      The distillery will be located right off Interstate Highway 65 at the Clermont/Bardstown exit, on 15 acres alongside Kentucky Highway 245 leading to Bardstown.

      “This is great news for Kentucky’s signature bourbon industry,” said Gov. Beshear. “I want to thank Lee and his team for recognizing that paying good wages strengthens families and communities.”

      Company leaders expect to begin construction on the distillery in spring 2021 with the potential for significant future expansion.

      “As a fifth generation Kentuckian, our family has deep ties to the bourbon industry through various bloodlines. This project brings us great excitement to have our new distillery joining the iconic Kentucky Bourbon industry. The land chosen for Clermont Distillery had been held by the same family for over 90 years and became available for purchase at the most perfect time,” said Clermont Distilling founder Lee Wilburn.

       
    • Separately, a $7 million investment by HVAC Distributing LLC in Graves County will increase the company’s presence in the region with a new warehousing location in the Hickory Industrial Park and the creation of 175 full-time jobs.

      “We welcome this new location as the latest in a key industry in Kentucky that has become more important than ever in this pandemic,” said Gov. Beshear.

      The distributor of heating, ventilation and air conditioning products plans to expand to a 100,000-square-foot spec building to meet growing demand and reduce shipping time and costs. HVAC Distributing handles products for well-known brands such as MRCOOL and GeoCool.

      “We are truly thankful for this opportunity that allows us to adapt quickly to growing market demand across our industry,” said Jason Ingram, managing member of HVAC Distributing.

      The company is among the more than 540 logistics and distribution facilities located throughout the commonwealth, which employ nearly 75,000 people.

       
    • The Governor also announced Danieli Corp. plans to open a 61-job facility in Ashland in one of the buildings on the former AK Steel campus.

      “This area has been hit hard. We’ve seen closings of a number of plants. This project, actually in one of those former plants, is an exciting new opportunity that shows that there is not just hope, but there is a future reality with new and good jobs,” said Gov. Beshear.

      Danieli, an Italian-owned company employing more than 10,000 people globally, will refurbish, remanufacture and repair steel mill equipment in Ashland.

      The new operation is scheduled to open in late 2021.

       
  2. Gov. Beshear announced today the City of Auburn and Logan County Fiscal Court officially broke ground on the Auburn wastewater treatment plant expansion.

    The upgrades will better serve Champion Petfoods USA Inc. and make Auburn more attractive to future investors.

    Using a $1.5 million Community Development Block Grant from the Department for Local Government, the expansion will provide the first updates to the plant in roughly 30 years. It will encourage greater economic growth, residential expansion and industry development in the area.

    “There is no more important a time to encourage economic development projects across the commonwealth,” said Gov. Beshear. “As we work to rebuild our economy while continuing to keep Kentuckians safe from COVID-19, we must continue to invest in our infrastructure to make our communities even more attractive to future investors.”

     
  3. Today, the Governor reminded voters they now can go to www.GoVoteKy.com to request an absentee ballot for the Nov. 3 general election, if they are concerned about COVID-19 and voting. He encouraged all Kentuckians to make a plan to vote, either by-mail, in-person during early voting or in-person on Election Day.

    “Please vote. You can request an absentee ballot right now. If you’re nervous about COVID, if you live with somebody like I do who has a pre-existing condition, if you’re around people who are susceptible, go to govoteky.com and request one,” said Gov. Beshear. “If you believe you haven’t been heard, your opportunity is voting.”

     
  4. Finally, Gov. Beshear asked Kentuckians to take advantage of the free COVID-19 testing available at sites throughout the commonwealth.

    “We have to keep it up on testing,” said Gov. Beshear. “It’s so important. If we want to do the things we want to do, we have to prevent COVID’s spread. Not all the testing spots we have are being filled.”

    For information on more than 200 testing sites, click here.

 

Rocky Adkins’ Father Back Home after Battling COVID-19
Today, Rocky Adkins, senior advisor to Gov. Beshear and a former state representative, shared that his father, Jess Adkins, 84, is home after contracting COVID-19 and spending two weeks in the hospital and one week at Cardinal Hill for rehabilitation.

 

“I want to take this opportunity to thank all of the front line workers in Kentucky. I’m happy to report that yesterday, my dad was able to return home,” said Adkins. “My son Brandon, who tested positive also, is doing great and has not had any serious side effects. I’m proud of both of these fellows. They remind us we need to check on our neighbors. I’m thoroughly convinced that if not for my son watching out for him, my dad probably would have lost his life.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 45,978 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 775 of which were newly reported Thursday. 130 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 18 and younger, of which 14 were children ages 5 and under. The youngest was a 2 month old from Jefferson County.

 

“We’re tracking again about what we’ve seen the last several weeks,” said Gov. Beshear. “Did you ever think we’d be to the point where 775 wouldn’t sound abnormal? It means that we do have to push to have fewer cases, but it does show that we are doing a lot of testing.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 8 new deaths Thursday, raising the total to 910 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Thursday include an 84-year-old man from Allen County; an 84-year-old man from Barren County; an 80-year-old woman from Green County; a 70-year-old man from Hardin County; a 90-year-old man from Lewis County; a 74-year-old man from Madison County; an 89-year-old woman from McCracken County; and a 75-year-old man from Warren County.

 

“Let’s make sure that we light our homes up green, we ring our bells. There’s an amazing woman who works in the Secretary of State’s office that walks in the rotunda every day, rings her bell 120 times, one for each county, making sure that she is paying homage to the loss that is out there everywhere,” said Gov. Beshear. “Let’s make sure we continue to do the same.”

 

Rocky Adkins added, “Even as my dad returned home yesterday, there are 910 people who aren’t returning home.”

 

As of Thursday, there have been at least 848,937 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 4.80%. At least 9,731 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

“There are still some out there claiming kids don’t get the virus or transmit the virus. Here’s what I’d tell them: there are 130 kids 18 and under on today’s report,” the Governor added.

 

“That’s a trend we have to pay attention to. Today we’re reporting 11 high school-aged kids in Warren County. 11 kids in one county alone. I hope that contact tracing is going fast, because that school system is open.”

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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LCDHD: 1 NEW DEATH IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT; 76 NEW CASES

 
Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Green. We have experienced a total of 54 deaths resulting in a 3% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 27 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 172 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.4% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 64% of ICU beds and 27% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 22 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Casey: 3; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 1; Green: 4; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 3; Russell: 3; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 1. In all, we have released 78.1% of our total cases.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,824 cases since the onset of the outbreak.
 
Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 346 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 71 are asymptomatic.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 76 today: Adair: 4; Casey: 4; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 2; Green: 20; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 12; Russell: 11; Taylor: 9; and, Wayne: 4. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.026. This means our total case count is projected to double every 27.35 days. The new cases include:
 
  • Adair: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 75-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 75-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 1 month-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 101-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 80-year-old female who is deceased, expired
  • Green: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 96-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is released, 8/23/20
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 7 months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: An 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: An 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 56-year-old female who is hospitalized, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we report today is an 80-year-old female nursing home resident from Green County. Our mortality rate is now at 2.96% of known cases.
 
We added 76 new cases today. Our previous one-day new case record was 55. Our growth rate is now 1.026 meaning cases are projected to double at just over every 27 days. We currently have 27 in the hospital, the most since the onset of the outbreak. Over 30 of our new cases were long-term care residents. As this is our most high-risk demographic, this increases the odds that the strain on our hospitals will rise.
 
The health department is nearing our capacity to respond effectively, meaning, if this level of increase continues, we will not have enough staff or hours in the day to complete effective contract tracing. Contact tracing is where we track down everyone who is a close contact to a case and quarantine them if they are high-risk. This slows the spread of the disease by “removing” those who are at high-risk of becoming a positive case from interacting with the public.
 
Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,824 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 45,345 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 45,230 statewide plus 115 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.
 
 
 

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KSP INVESTIGATE FATAL COLLISION INVOLVING A PEDESTRIAN IN CLINTON CO...

 
 
 
 
Albany, KY. (August 26, 2020) –  Kentucky State Police investigated a single -vehicle fatal collision on KY 558 approximately 7 miles northeast of Albany on Wednesday around 11:12 a.m. CT.
 
The preliminary investigation indicates a 2000 Jeep being operated by 41-year-old Jason Gilbert of Albany, KY was traveling West on KY 558.  81-year-old Donna Irwin of Albany was attempting to cross the road when she entered the path of Gilbert's vehicle. Gilbert was unable to stop striking Irwin. Donna Irwin was transported to Clinton County Hospital by Clinton County EMS where she was pronounced deceased by the Clinton County Coroner.
 
Gilbert and a passenger, Sierra Malloy of Albany, KY were both wearing their seatbelts and were not injured.    
 
Sergeant Randall Honeycutt investigated the collision. He was assisted by other members of Kentucky State Police, the Clinton Co Sheriff’s Office, EMS, Emergency Management and Albany Fire Department.
 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 8-27-20

 

Russell County we had 11 new cases Wednesday. We had 3 cases released. We now have 32 active cases which 30 are on self-isolation and 2 are hospitalized in Somerset.

 

Adair County had 4 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. No releases. We have 21 active cases all in home isolation. We have no one in the hospital at this time.

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AREA ARREST 8-27-20

A Russell Springs woman was arrested early this morning on drug and other charges…

 

Latisha Bunch age 31 was taken into custody by Trooper Begley with the Kentucky State Police just before 1:30 this morning on the charges of Trafficking in Legends Drugs 1st Offense, Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession, PMT Unlicensed Operator to Operate Motor Vehicle and Public Intoxication – Controlled Substance (Excludes Alcohol) she was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

Brandon Bratcher age 26 of Monticello, was also taken into custody by Trooper Begley on Drug and other charges before 1:30 this morning. Bratcher was charged with Operating on a Suspended Operators License, Failure of Owner to Maintain Required Insurance, Possession of Marijuana, Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession and Serving Parole Violation Warrant. He was also lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.

 

Chandall Webb age 30, of Somerset was taken into custody by the Russell County Sheriff’s Office just after 10 last night on several charges. Deputy Perkins arrested Webb for Operating Motor Vehicle Under Influence of Alcohol/Drugs .08 – 1st Offense, No Operators-Moped License, Failure to Wear Seat Belts, Possession of Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth) Possession of Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense Heroin, Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Drug Unspecified) Possession of Controlled Substance, 2nd Degree – Drug Unspecified.  

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696 New COVID-19 Cases in KY; 7 more Deaths

 

Gov. Andy Beshear on Wednesday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“We want to try and emerge from COVID as whole as we can be, and it’s going to be hard,” the Governor said. “We have got to work as hard as we can every day to be as close to whole as we can.”

 

‘Fast 4 at 4’
Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman began today’s briefing highlighting a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

  • The Lieutenant Governor provided an update Wednesday on the Team Kentucky Fund.

“Because of this partnership, not only are we able to immediately help Kentuckians, we are also able to help them in the long run,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said. “I want to thank Community Action for your help and for everyone who has donated $5, $10, $15 to help their fellow Kentuckians.”

 

To date, $3,545,027 has been donated to the Team Kentucky Fund. Lt. Gov. Coleman noted that through the state’s partnership with Community Action Kentucky, for every $1 given to the Team Kentucky Fund, $1.70 goes to Kentuckians in need.

Team Kentucky Fund top categories: electric: $101,952.49; food: $123,209.34; mortgage: $102,287.30; rent: $410,290.74; for a grand total: $789,658.77.


Lt. Gov. Coleman said 2,421 vouchers had been issued that aided 1,032 households.

 

Those wishing to support the Team Kentucky Fund can do so at donate.ky.gov. To apply for assistance, go to teamkyfund.ky.gov.

 

  • Today, the Lieutenant Governor encouraged all Kentuckians to make a plan to vote in the upcoming general election. Thanks to a bipartisan agreement between Gov. Beshear and Secretary of State Michael Adams, Kentuckians can go to www.GoVoteKy.com right now to request an absentee ballot for the Nov. 3 general election, if they are concerned about COVID-19 and voting.

 

  • “The sooner you request your ballot, the better,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said. “I would recommend as soon as you get your ballot, you fill it out and send it back in and that will help fight any worry that you may have leading into this election.”

 

  • Lt. Gov. Coleman again spoke about the importance of every Kentuckian taking time to fill out a U.S. Census form, stressing the once-per-decade count’s link to funding for schools and child welfare.

 

  • “Many schools across Kentucky have started back this week in some form or fashion and it is really important to remember that as we fill out the census, we are provided funding based on those census numbers. One of the areas that we support with that is public education,” she said. “Please keep in mind that for those that believe we need more and better resources in our schools, make sure that you fill out the census and move us up the line.”

 

  • Today, Lt. Gov. Coleman thanked educators, students and staffers across the commonwealth for making nontraditional-instruction (NTI) days work as most districts begin the school year with remote learning.

 

  • “I know so many teachers across Kentucky have missed being able to hug those kids and welcome them into their classroom,” she said. “I hope everyone got off to a great first day or first week of school and continues to mask up Kentucky.” 
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Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Aug. 26, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 45,230 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 696 of which were newly reported Wednesday. One hundred and fourteen of the newly reported cases were from children ages 18 and younger, of which 22 were children ages 5 and under. The youngest was a 1-month-old from Fayette County.

 

“We hope people out there are making good decisions, especially those that are in charge of our youth. I know this is a difficult time, but we need to be wise,” the Governor said. “We need to make sure that we make decisions based on science and on what’s in the best interest of those we serve and not just based on complaints.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 7 new deaths Wednesday, raising the total to 902 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Wednesday include an 89-year-old woman from Boone County; an 81-year-old woman from Graves County; a  79-year-old woman from Greenup County; two men, ages 50 and 89, from Jefferson County; a 91-year-old woman from Oldham County; and an 83-year-old man from Whitley County.

 

“The virus doesn’t care that we get tired or frustrated, it doesn’t care if we want to go back to our lives, it is just as aggressive, it is just as deadly and it is killing people we know,” Gov. Beshear said. “So it’s up to us to be strong and resilient enough.”

 

As of Wednesday, there have been at least 839,454 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 4.64%. At least 9,691 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

CDC Testing Guidelines
Today, Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, offered analysis and insight on new coronavirus testing guidelines issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

“I would encourage you to still follow our guidance here in Kentucky,” Dr. Stack said.

 

“I want to be a little more explicit about the CDC’s sudden change saying those who have had direct and high-risk exposure to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 should not get tested,” said Gov. Beshear. “That’s reckless. It contradicts everything that we have learned about this virus. It’s inexplicable. I mean come on, it’s common sense. Let’s make sure we’re doing the right thing in Kentucky.”

 

 

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Dr. Stack also said the administration is now sharing the weekly reports for the White House Coronavirus Task Force, which can be found on the main Team Kentucky COVID-19 webpage.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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3 More Locations Offering WiFi Access for Adair Students

 
There are 3 additional locations that have available outdoor WIFI access for Adair County students to use for virtual learning.  
 
Thank you for your help.
 
Vanessa L. Burton?
Administrative Asst. to Academic Dean
Office (270) 384-2476
 

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Monticello Man Arrested on Felony Drug Charges....


On Monday, August 24, 2020 at 7:20pmCT while investigating a complaint, Adair County Chief Deputy Justin Cross made contact with Justice Stamper, age 21, of Monticello, KY on Liberty Rd.  

During the investigation it was found that Stamper was in possession of methamphetamine. He was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail on charges of possession of a controlled substance 1st degree (methamphetamine) and possession of drug paraphernalia.

 

The Adair County Sheriffs Office was assisted by Columbia Police Department Officers.
 

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Two Vehicle Collision Results in one Fatality

 

Russell Springs (August 26, 2020) On Tuesday August 25th, at approximately 3: 21 PM Troopers from Kentucky State Police Post 15 responded to a two vehicle fatal collision that occurred at the junction of US 127 South and West Drive in the city limits of Russell Springs. Preliminary investigations indicate that 58 year old Connie Lawson of Windsor, KY was operating a 2003 Chevy Cavalier on West Drive when she then made a left hand turn on to US 127 pulling into the path of a southbound 2014 Jeep Cherokee being operated by 41 year old Larimie Richardson of Russell Springs, KY.

 

Lawson and a passenger in her vehicle, 76 year old Marie Lawson of Windsor, KY were transported to the Russell County Hospital then airlifted to the University of Kentucky Hospital. A passenger, Garnetta Campbell, age 56 of Windsor, KY was transported to Russell County Hospital where she was pronounced deceased by the Russell County Coroner. All occupants in the Lawson vehicle were not wearing a seat belt. Richardson was wearing a seat belt and not injured.


This collision remains under investigation by Trooper Jason Warinner.

 

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RUSSELL CO. MAN ARRESTED ON METH & OTHER CHARGES

 

Joshua Bell, 40, of Jamestown, KY was arrested by KSP on Tuesday evening for Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Possession of Marijuana and Drug Paraphernalia, No Insurance, No Registration Receipt, No Registration Plates, and Driving on a DUI Suspended License. Bell was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
 

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ADAIR FISCAL COURT MEETING RECAP

 

The Adair Fiscal Court met on Tuesday afternoon. Jim Leib has details....

 

 

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LCDHD COVID-19 UPDATE 08/25/20

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 53 deaths resulting in a 3% mortality rate among known cases.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 18 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 163 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.3% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 64% of ICU beds and 26% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 14 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 1; Cumberland: 1; Green: 3; Pulaski: 5; Taylor: 1; and, Wayne: 3. In all, we have released 80.2% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,748 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This has resulted in us reaching out to over 10,096 contacts (a rough average of 6 contacts per case).

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 293 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 53 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 37 today: Adair: 2; Casey: 3; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 3; Green: 5; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 12; Russell: 4; and, Taylor: 3. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.021. This means our total case count is projected to double every 32.66 days.

 

NEW CASES:

  • Adair: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 71-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 4 months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is released, asymptomatic

 

Our growth rate is picking up again. We added 23 more new cases today than we released cases that are no longer contagious. Our total cumulative cases are now projected to double every 33 days. Considering that 3.03% of our cases die and 9.32% of our cases end up hospitalized, this is a frightening scenario. Lake Cumberland’s mortality rate, by the way, is between the nation’s mortality rate (3.09%) and the state’s (3.03%); and, our hospitalization rate is consistent with the state average of 9.98%.

 

As if those numbers are not concerning enough, we are yet to feel the community impacts of schools reopening to in-person instruction. Noting that several area schools are using the 7-day average incidence rate per 100,000 as part of their metrics to determine if schools should be open to in-person instruction, we have no counties currently in the “green – on track” category; only one in the “yellow – community spread” category (Wayne); seven in the “orange – accelerated spread” category (Adair, Case, Clinton, McCreary, Pulaski, Russell, and Taylor); and, two in the “red – critical” category (Cumberland and Green).

 

Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,748 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 44,642 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 44,568 statewide plus 74 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).

 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

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INJURY ACCIDENT ON HWY 127 IN R.S.

 
A 2-vehicle accident occurred this (Tuesday) afternoon in front of Lakeway Motor Sales on Hwy 127 (in the Middletown area) in Russell Springs. Law enforcement, fire dept. and other emergency agencies responded to the wreck and a helicopter was on-scene to fly the injured out. The roadway was shut down for some time. Sources say it is a possible fatal accident. Kentucky State Police are investigating the accident and the WAVE will have more details as they are made available.
 

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688 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 10 MORE DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 25, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Tuesday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

‘Fast 4 at 4’
Gov. Beshear is beginning his briefings with the “Fast 4 at 4,” which will highlight a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

  • Today, the Governor reminded voters they now can go to www.GoVoteKy.com to request an absentee ballot for the Nov. 3 general election, if they are concerned about COVID-19 and voting. 

 

“If we believe we are patriots and doing our patriotic duty, certainly we ought to be voting,” the Governor said.
 

  • Gov. Beshear encouraged Kentuckians to spread the word about the most important action we all can take to fight the coronavirus, by using the social media hashtag #MaskUpKY to model good behavior.

 

“The federal government says it’s working. State government says it’s working. All the public health officials all the way up and down say it’s working,” Gov. Beshear said. “So it’s easy: Just wear a mask. If you refuse to, just know that you could be spreading it to someone else. Regardless of how you feel about it, everyone else is willing to go through the discomfort. Why won’t you?”

 

  • The Governor spoke about efforts to ensure Kentucky continues to have enough personal protective equipment (PPE) for our health care workers and others.

 

“When someone walks into a COVID wing in a hospital, look how much they have on,” the Governor said. “That ought to tell us when there’s a large crowd, that means there’s likely COVID-19 there. Why would we walk into it when we see what it takes to be safe?”

 

In particular, Gov. Beshear highlighted some recent donations, which are key to keeping Kentuckians safe. He said uniform and equipment company Galls, which has a Kentucky headquarters in Lexington, has donated 37,500 isolation gowns with a value of $130,000. Michigan-based Dow Chemical Co., meanwhile, has donated 2,000 isolation gowns valued at $8,000.

 

  • Information about COVID-19 cases related to schools is being collected and is posted online.

 

“This is a highly contagious, aggressively spreading virus. We need to be very very careful, and this is one of the reasons I still don’t think it’s safe for schools to open before Sept. 28,” Gov. Beshear said. “It’s just very important when it’s our kids’ health that’s on the line that we have this at a place that where if we’re going to put 15, 20 or 30 kids potentially in a room and expose one adult to all of them in some way or another that we want to make sure we have this under the best control that we can.”

 

To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

‘Last Mile’ Internet Service
Today, Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman announced a plan to allocate $8 million to provide “Last Mile” internet service to all Kentucky students from kindergarten through 12th grade.

 

“COVID-19 has not only created new and unique challenges we must confront, it has brought to surface issues that have been plaguing our communities for generations. These underlying issues disproportionately affect communities of color and Kentuckians who live in poverty,” the Lieutenant Governor said. “One of these issues is lack of access to high-speed internet.”

 

Lt. Gov. Coleman noted that as schools have transitioned to using more nontraditional-instruction (NTI) days, it has broadened the educational gap for many communities. She said before the pandemic, approximately 90% of Kentucky’s K-12 students had internet access. That has grown to 95% over the past five months.

 

“We have to do better for the remaining 5% of students who do not have internet access in their homes,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said.

 

The Lieutenant Governor said the $8 million in federal Cornavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act funding will help reduce the monthly cost for low-income parents to pay for internet access for their K-12 child. A request for proposalse is being sent out with a goal by Sept. 15 of identifying providers that can supply high-speed internet service for all Kentucky K-12 students in low-income homes at no more than $10 per month for the next two to three school years.

 

Students currently without internet access from low-income homes will be eligible to have the full $10-per-month cost paid through the next school year. Students with internet access from low-income homes will be eligible to have nearly all of the monthly cost paid through the federal Lifeline program for the next two or three school years.

 

The “Last Mile” internet service includes wireless options like hotspots connected to a student’s cellphone, satellites and fixed wireless capabilities. It also includes wired options like traditional services from a cable, telephone or utility company.

 

Details will be posted to the Kentucky Department of Education website early next week.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 44,568 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 688 of which were newly reported Tuesday. 96 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 18 and younger, of which 12 were children ages 5 and under. The youngest were two 8-month-olds.

 

“This continues to grow the percentage of kids testing positive, and we know not as many kids are being tested. But with people going back to sports, go get your kid tested,” the Governor said. “Don’t show up to a big group activity if they haven’t been tested in the last couple of weeks. Please make sure they get tested.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 10 new deaths Tuesday, raising the total to 895 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Tuesday include an 81-year-old man from Bell County; a 59-year-old man from Daviess County; an 89-year-old man from Jefferson County; three women, ages 80, 84 and 85, from Lewis County; an 87-year-old woman from Logan County; an 84-year-old man and a 92-year-old woman from Scott County; and a 79-year-old man from Webster County.

 

“When you’ve got a loved one that’s just in the hospital, just in the hospital with COVID-19, you are scared to death. When they go to the ICU, you almost lose hope. And when they are on the ventilator, you are thinking and making decisions that no one should have to,” the Governor said. “So let’s make sure that we don’t partake in actions that would result in any family being in this situation.”

 

As of Tuesday, there have been at least 831,302 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.07%. At least 9,594 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Pandemic Benefits
Eric Friedlander, secretary of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, spoke Tuesday about the Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer (P-EBT) program.

 

Since late May, Kentucky families with students who normally receive free or reduced-cost meals at school have been eligible for financial assistance to replace those meals through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) P-EBT program, part of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act.

 

“About 173,000 students in Kentucky’s public and private schools have been approved for these benefits,” Secretary Friedlander said. “They’ve received a preloaded P-EBT card, and cardholders have been able to shop for food at local groceries, Amazon.com and Walmart.com.”

 

However, Secretary Friedlander said more than 115,000 eligible Kentucky households have not applied for the P-EBT benefits they deserve.

 

Secretary Friedlander said the deadline to apply for the P-EBT program is Monday, Aug. 31, benefind.ky.gov.

 

“There is no cost to the recipient, and families who receive P-EBT benefits will not have to pay back the benefits,” Secretary Friedlander said. “These benefits are not taxable.”

 

Commutations
On Tuesday, Gov. Beshear and J. Michael Brown, secretary of the Governor’s executive cabinet, once again announced the commutation of sentences for hundreds of medically vulnerable inmates and inmates who are nearing the end of their sentence in an effort to reduce the chances of spreading the coronavirus.

 

Secretary Brown said all of those receiving a commutation had been screened to ensure they had not been convicted of violent crimes or sex offenses.

 

The Governor noted that this is the latest round of commutations aimed at protecting inmates and staffers. Three previous rounds of commutations by Gov. Beshear covered 1,235 inmates, under the same criteria announced today. As of July 6, 2020, the total number of inmates released was 1,171.

 

“I believe the last round of commutations was fairly successful at getting people back in society and making sure they are healthy, and we are looking for the same here,” Gov. Beshear said. “I wish each of those individuals a better life moving forward, one that is constructive, one that they can find purpose in, whether that be faith, family or a good job. Let’s help make sure we can work with these individuals and give second chances.”

 

Secretary Brown said the latest commutations followed the same guidelines as the last.

 

“Today’s signed executive order has 646 individuals receiving commutation from the Governor,” Secretary Brown said.

 

He noted that 121 of the commutations are for inmates who are medically vulnerable, according to guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and with less than five years left to serve of their sentences. Another 525 are inmates who have less than six months left to serve.

 

“The Governor’s actions today are taken to ensure that all Kentuckians, including those behind bars and the hardworking staff of corrections officers and deputy jailers, are given a chance to be healthy and safe in this fight against COVID-19,” Secretary Brown said.

 

“On Aug. 26, 2019, the Department of Corrections had 24,200 inmates. Today, we have 19,689,” said Secretary Brown. “That’s a reduction of 4,511 in our prison system. That’s good for everyone in the commonwealth.”

 

Evictions
On Monday, Gov. Beshear announced new rules to provide protections and clarity surrounding evictions during the coronavirus crisis. Landlords now must give tenants 30 days’ notice of an intent to evict for nonpayment of rent and work to come to an agreement during that time.

 

At the same time, Gov. Beshear said his administration is dedicating $15 million of federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act money to create a Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund that will provide relief to eligible landlords.

 

Read the Governor’s full executive order.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

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ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED 08/25/20

 
 
 
As of 10:16 a.m. on Tuesday, August 25, 2020 the Columbia-Adair Utilities District Boil Water Advisory for customers on Little Cake Road, Tree Top Lane, Avery Rooks Road, and Neat Hollow Road has been lifted by the Division of Water. This means your water is safe for human consumption. You no longer have to boil your water.
 

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FIRE DESTROYS COLUMBIA LANDMARK...

 
The Columbia Fire Department responded to 516 Burkesville Street on Sunday night to a vacant house fire at property owned by the City of Columbia. The call came in at 9:48pmCT; the house was totally engulfed upon firefighters arrival and was a total loss. The origin of the fire is still being investigated. 18 firemen were on the scene for 2 hours and 15 minutes. 
 
 

 

 

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ADAIR CO. FISCAL COURT MEETING AUG. 25TH

 
The Adair County Fiscal Court will meet in regular session on Tuesday, August 25, 2020 at 4:00 P.M. CT in the basement of the Adair County Annex building located at 424 Public Square, Columbia, KY 42728. The public is invited to attend. Masks are required due to Governor’s emergency executive order. 
 
ACTION ITEMS ON THE AGENDA:
  • PART TIME HIRE-911
  • SIMPSON COUNTY JAIL CONTRACT
  • JUDICIAL CENTER PARKING LOT STRIPE & SEAL

 

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373 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 4 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 24, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Monday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“Let’s start where we need to start – by remembering that we’re going to get through this and we’re going to get through it together,” the Governor said. “We need to make sure we’re not at a point in time, kind of like right at the beginning of the summer, where we let our guard down and we just get tired of doing what it takes, we want to go back to our normal life and this virus ultimately spikes.”

 

‘The Fast 4 at 4’
Gov. Beshear on Monday introduced “The Fast 4 at 4,” which will highlight a variety of issues of importance to Kentuckians and the commonwealth.

 

On Monday, he reminded voters they can now go to www.GoVoteKy.com to request an absentee ballot for the Nov. 3 general election, if they are concerned about COVID-19 and voting.

 

“Voting is the bedrock principle of this democracy,” said Gov. Beshear. “The way that you are heard is to make sure you vote, and there are going to be more ways to vote now than ever before.”

 

The Governor asked all Kentuckians to remember to fill out the U.S. Census forms, which in addition to being mandated by the U.S. Constitution is crucial to states for funding.

 

He also reminded Kentuckians that the state issued a travel advisory in July that recommends people avoid visiting states with coronavirus case positivity rates of 15% or higher. Among the states currently exceeding that threshold, according to data from Johns Hopkins, are Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas, Nevada and Idaho. Anyone returning to Kentucky after visiting these places is asked to self-quarantine for 14 days.

 

Finally, Gov. Beshear asked Kentuckians to take advantage of the free COVID-19 testing available at sites throughout the commonwealth.

 

“There are testing options all over Kentucky,” the Governor said, “and there are options close to you. If you are going to engage in new activities or haven’t been tested in a while, please get tested.”

 

For information on more than 200 testing sites, click here.

 

Case Information – Monday, Aug. 24
As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Aug. 24, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 43,899 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 373 of which were newly reported Monday. 68 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 18 and younger, of which 14 were children ages 5 and under. The youngest was only 7 months old.

 

“The normal beginning of a school year has us all feeling the same things: We want to get over this, we want to get our kids out of the house. And I, at least, am seeing a change that goes beyond the ‘When to return to school?’ debate,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’re seeing more people trying to get out of quarantine when the health department has recommended it. Those feelings are natural but they’re harmful. This is a war. Whether we win or lose depends on the number of battles that we win. Let’s pick it up because lives depend on it.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 4 new deaths Monday, raising the total to 885 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Monday include a 74-year-old man from Harlan County; an 82-year-old man and a 94-year-old woman from Jefferson County; and a 71-year-old woman from Marion County.

 

“We’ve been able to push our mortality rate almost a percentage point lower than the national average,” said Gov. Beshear. “But we had more deaths announced last week than in any week where we’ve been battling this virus.”

 

As of Monday, there have been at least 822,904 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 4.77%. At least 9,544 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Case Information – Sunday, Aug. 23
Due to limited reporting on the weekends, some updated information is now available from Sunday, Aug. 23.

 

As of Sunday, there were 821,828 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was at 4.76% and at least 9,524 Kentuckians had recovered from the virus.

 

Evictions
Gov. Beshear on Monday issued a new executive order to provide protections and clarity on the issues surrounding evictions during the coronavirus crisis. The Governor suspended evictions as the pandemic took hold. Gov. Beshear said the new executive order protects tenants and provides relief for eligible landlords.

 

“As this battle has taken many months, we now face three major concerns: one, wanting to make sure that people aren’t out on the street; two, wanting to make sure that these landlords aren’t bankrupted or aren’t being treated unfairly; and three, making sure that as people come out of this that they don’t have so much debt from their housing situation that they can’t ever dig out,” the Governor said. “We want a fair system that tries to address all three of these.”

 

Under the new order, landlords must give tenants 30 days’ notice of an intent to evict for nonpayment of rent. During that time, the landlord and tenant must meet and confer on a possible agreement. In addition, no penalties, late fees or interest can be charged related to nonpayment of rent from March 6 through the end of the year.

 

At the same time, Gov. Beshear said his administration is dedicating $15 million of federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act money to create a Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund.

 

The fund will reimburse eligible landlords for missed rent payments and pay some advance rent to keep tenants in their homes. Kentuckians will be able to submit applications Sept. 9. More information about eligibility and how to apply will be forthcoming.

 

“Kentuckians cannot be Healthy at Home without a home,” said Gov. Beshear. “We want to help get people in a place where they’re not only still in their homes, but they’re not going to owe five or six months of rent when they come out of this.”

 

The Governor also pointed to other programs helping Kentuckians pay rent, including the Team Kentucky Fund, the Louisville/Jefferson County Eviction Prevention COVID-19 Relief Fund and the Kentucky Housing Corporation Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) program, which is awaiting funding through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

 

Kentuckians seeking legal assistance can contact the Kentucky COVID-19 Legal Helpline or call toll-free: 833-540-0342. The service is sponsored by Kentucky’s Access to Justice Commission and the four Kentucky civil legal aid programs, AppalReD Legal Aid, Kentucky Legal Aid, Legal Aid of the Bluegrass and Legal Aid Society.

 

Lawyers who want to volunteer to provide direct legal assistance to Kentuckians in need during the pandemic can visit Together Lawyers Can.

 

Fall Sports Update
Gov. Beshear on Monday said the decision to allow fall sports to resume in the commonwealth comes with a heavy burden of responsibility from school and athletic officials entrusted with keeping student-athletes and others safe.

 

Last week, the Kentucky High School Athletic Association (KHSAA) voted 16-2 to allow practices to begin today for the fall sports of cross county, field hockey, football, soccer and volleyball. Regular season games will begin Sept. 7, with football starting Sept. 11.

 

“Let me start by saying we’re not going to overturn that decision, and it’s not because I think it’s a good decision or a wise decision,” the Governor said. “But if we’re going to defeat this virus, we need people other than me all over Kentucky taking responsibility to make good and wise decisions.”

 

The Governor highlighted recent reports about athletes facing cardiac problems after COVID-19 infections. Dr. Curt Daniels, a cardiologist who is the director of the adolescent and adult congenital heart disease program and a professor of clinical internal medicine in pediatrics at Ohio State University and Nationwide Children’s Hospital, reported a study that found 10-13% of athletes with coronavirus had developed mild cases of myocarditis, which is inflammation of heart muscle.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, reinforced the Governor’s message about sports and provided an update Monday about COVID-19 infections in young people.

 

“We’ve hit a new plateau, but if we take off from this level, it gets out of control much more quickly,” said Dr. Stack. “I hope that in Kentucky we can be more successful with youth sports than other places, but the outlook is not good. There’s a lot we don’t know about this disease. We don’t know some of the more silent but really serious harms that this disease causes.”

 

Price-Gouging Update
For a third time, Gov. Beshear signed an executive order prohibiting price gouging, extending consumer protections outlined in previous orders. This order will remain in effect for the duration of the state of emergency.

 

“The order protects Kentuckians from those who would take advantage of the pandemic by charging inflated prices for goods – goods like hand sanitizer, soap, cleaners and disinfectants,” said La Tasha Buckner, the Governor’s chief of staff and general counsel.

 

Eastern Kentucky Veterans Center
Today, Gov. Beshear said nine veterans and one staff member at Eastern Kentucky Veterans Center (EKVC) in Hazard have tested positive.

 

The Governor said the cases were confined to one hallway unit and the veterans’ cases were traced to one transport aide, who has left the hospital and is recovering at home.

 

Out of an abundance of caution, all veterans who have tested positive have been sent to Appalachian Regional Healthcare. The hospital has agreed to keep the veterans until either a negative test or 14 days have passed. EKVC is testing all veterans in that unit today, and the rest of the veterans in the facility tomorrow and Wednesday.

 

Some of the steps being taken to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 include: putting up a barrier between the two hall ways; consistent staffing; deep/terminal cleaning of the rooms; ongoing audits and re-training on all infection control procedures and personal protective equipment usage; cancellation of all non-essential appointments; continued testing and working closely with both the local health department and the Department for Public Health.

 

Remembrance
Gov. Beshear on Monday spoke about the loss of lifelong Carter County resident Rob Perry, who died last week at age 56 of COVID-19.

 

Chris Perry, Rob’s brother, is a state park manager and shared his brother’s story, stating “these past four weeks have been the worst of my life, not being by his side and not having the ability to say a proper goodbye.”

 

Chris said his brother was a devoted father, husband, son and brother, as well as a preacher dedicated to his community. He leaves behind his wife, Tawana, children, Tyler and Destiny, and his 80-year-old mother, Sonja.

 

Rob Perry’s family is asking that everyone honor his life by wearing a mask and maintaining social distance.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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DEADLINE FOR AGRICULTURE COST-SHARE PROGRAM SIGN-UPS IS AUG. 28TH

 
 
The deadline for submitting applications for agriculture cost-share programs in Adair County is Friday, August 28th 2020. The Kentucky Ag. Development Board has approved $191,000 for the County Ag Investment Program and $30,000 for the Youth Ag Incentives Program. For more information or an application, stop by the Adair County Extension Office at 409 Fairground Street in Columbia or call 270-384-2317.  
 

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ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY 08/24/20

 
Date Issued:  8/24/2020
Time Issued:  5:45 A.M.
 
 
A BOIL WATER ADVISORY is in effect for Adair County consumers on Little Cake Road, Tree Top Lane, Avery Rooks Road, and Neat Hollow Road. The advisory has been issued due to main line leak. Following such an event, the potential exists for bacteriological contamination of the water supply therefore this Boil Water Advisory has been issued as a precautionary measure. 
 
Until further notice, boil all water used for drinking and cooking, bringing the water to a rolling boil for 3 minutes before using. This advisory will remain in effect until the situation has been corrected and test results have shown the water to be of an acceptable quality. 
 
For more information concerning the Boil Water Advisory, contact Lennon Stone at Columbia Adair Utilities District, 270-384-2181.
 

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Two People Arrested on Felony Drug Charges Following Traffic Stop....


On Friday, August 21, 2020 at 11:47pmCT, Adair County Sheriffs Deputy Joey Keith initiated a traffic stop on a 2005 Dodge car for speeding on KY 55 north. During the traffic stop and roadside interview, Deputy Keith began to suspect that there were illegal substances in the vehicle. A roadside search was conducted and methamphetamine along with marijuana was located and the occupants were arrested.  
    
The driver, 49-year-old Tyler Bernard of Russell County, was arrested and charged with Speeding, Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (methamphetamine), Tampering with Physical Evidence, and Promoting Contraband 1st degree.
 
A passenger, 34-year-old Kenneth Whittle of Adair County, was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (methamphetamine) and Possession of Marijuana. Both men were lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.  
 
Deputy Keith was assisted by K-9 Deputy Josh Durbin and Chief Deputy Justin Cross.
 

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AREA ARREST 8-24-20

 

Hayden Vanarsdale,18, of Columbia was arrested Sunday afternoon at 12:30 p.m. by officer Burton with the Columbia Police Department. Vanarsdale was charged with Possession of Marijuana, Possession of a Controlled Substance 3rd Degree – Drug Unspecified, Terrorist Threatening, 3rd Degree and Public Intoxication-Controlled Substance (Excludes Alcohol).


Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE...

 

Adair County had 3 new cases to report Sunday with 4 cases being released. We have 16 active cases in Adair County with all 16 in home-isolation.

 

Russell County reported no new cases on Sunday, 1 case has been released from isolation. We now have 19 active cases in Russell County with 17 on self-isolation and 2 hospitalized in Somerset.

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KYTC Joins National Effort to Combat Impaired Driving Over Labor Day Holiday...

 
FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 21, 2020) – This Labor Day weekend, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) is joining the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and law enforcement across the nation in reminding drivers to “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.”
 
“It’s been a tough year for all Kentuckians and I want us to have a great Labor Day Weekend,” said Gov. Beshear. “But to keep each other safe, I’ve got to ask you two things. First, please celebrate safely – follow precautions at bars, restaurants and tourist attractions and limit social gatherings to 10 people or fewer. Second, please get home safely. Drive sober or plan a ride with someone who is to protect yourself and everyone on the road.”
 
While law enforcement officers patrol for impaired drivers year-round, NHTSA says impaired driving-related crashes tend to increase during the Labor Day holiday period.
 
“If you are under the influence of any substance and choose to get behind the wheel, you put everyone on the road in danger, including yourself,” said KYTC Secretary Jim Gray. “No matter the occasion, always plan for a designated driver.”
 
There were more than 4,700 total collisions involving an impaired driver in Kentucky last year, resulting in more than 2,200 injuries and 138 deaths.  During the Labor Day holiday weekend, there were 56 crashes involving an impaired driver, resulting in 30 injuries and two deaths.
 
“Impaired driving is 100 percent preventable,” said KYTC Office of Highway Safety Acting Executive Director Jason Siwula. “Drivers must understand that drugs and/or alcohol not only hinder your ability to drive, but also affect your judgment about whether you can or should drive. You may think you’re fine, but impairment slows judgment, coordination and reaction times.”
 
According to NHTSA, impaired driving fatalities typically spike during holidays. To prevent such tragedies, the KYTC recommends the following:     
 
  • Before festivities begin, plan a way to safely get home at the end of the night;
  • If impaired, use a ride-booking company or taxi, call a sober friend or family member, or use public transportation to get home safely;
  • If you see an impaired driver, safely pull over and contact law enforcement. You may dial the KSP toll-free line directly at 1-800-222-5555 or call 911.
  • If you know people who are about to drive or ride while impaired, take their keys and help them make other arrangements to get them safely to where they are going.
  • Wear a seat belt! It is not only the law, it is the best defense against an impaired driver. Buckling up helps prevent injury and death if involved in a crash.


“We want all Kentuckians to enjoy the upcoming Labor Day holiday,” said Siwula. “All we ask is that you make smart choices and celebrate responsibly.”

 
For more information on drunken driving visit https://www.nhtsa.gov/risky-driving/drunk-driving.  For more information on drug-impaired driving visit https://www.nhtsa.gov/risky-driving/drug-impaired-driving.
 

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ADAIR COUNTY SCHOOLS KICK OFF 2020 SCHOOL YEAR VIRTUALLY TODAY...

 

The Adair County School System kicks off the new school year virtually today! 
 

 

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467 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 9 MORE DEATHS...


FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 23, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Sunday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“We remain in a plateau with our number of new cases, which is positive, but we have to see those numbers steadily decline,” Gov. Beshear said. “All of your sacrifices are working, and we must all continue to be patient and do our part to drive those numbers down.”

 

Case Information
As of 2:00pmCT on Sunday, Aug. 23, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 43,529 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 467 of which were newly reported Sunday. Seventy-nine of the newly reported cases were from children ages 18 and younger, of which 15 were children ages 5 and under. The youngest was 3 days old.

 

“We are seeing a steady number of coronavirus cases among the young in Kentucky, and make no mistake: Youth is not a guarantee of a good outcome against this virus,” the Governor said.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 9 new deaths Sunday, raising the total to 881 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

“That’s nine more families that are suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The deaths reported Sunday included a 63-year-old man from Johnson County; a 63-year-old man from Shelby County; two men from Lewis County, ages 73 and 78; a 72-year-old man from Knox County; a 77-year-old woman from Oldham County; and an 88-year-old woman from Scott County. Green County lost two residents, a 90-year-old woman and a 91-year-old man.


Due to limited reporting on Sundays, some data is unavailable until Monday.

 

“The mask mandate, group restriction to 10 or less and other steps implemented in July have made a positive impact,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health. “Based on the number of new cases, Kentucky concludes this week at the end of a new and elevated four-week plateau.”

 

He noted, “While this is good news, we remain in a difficult  place and Kentucky could quickly begin a rapid escalation. 

 

“These are difficult times without simple solutions,” continued Dr. Stack. “Through their actions, local leaders have an obligation to keep the virus under control to reduce the risk of medical harm to their students, staff, and larger communities.

 

“Please, socially distance greater than six feet. Wear a mask at all times when in public and around others. Wash your hands often. Check for signs of infection and get tested if ill. Cooperate with contact tracing if you are called. If we do these things, we can contain the coronavirus and get back to more of the activities we miss,” urged Dr. Stack.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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KY AG DEVELOPMENT BOARD APPROVES FUNDING FOR R.C. CONSERVATION DISTRICT....

 
The Kentucky Agricultural Development Board approved over $2.6 million for agricultural diversification and rural development projects across the commonwealth at its monthly board meeting.
 
The Russell County Conservation District was approved for up to $7,500 in Russell County funds to administer DAR with a $75 cost for bovine, $100 cost for equine and $60 cost for small animals for Russell County producers. For more information, contact Jennifer Hardwick at 270-343-3343 or jennifer.hardwick@ky.nacdnet.net.
 

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2 COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT; 40 NEW CASES...

 

 


Deaths: We are sad to report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 53 deaths resulting in a 3.2% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 20 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 158 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.5% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 66% of ICU beds and 27% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 8 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 1; Casey: 1; Cumberland: 1; Green: 2; McCreary: -1; Taylor: 2; and, Wayne: 2. In all, we have released 80.8% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,661 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This has resulted in us reaching out to over 9,632 contacts (a rough average of 6 contacts per case).

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 266 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 67 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 40 today: Adair: 1; Casey: 5; Cumberland: 1; Green: 2; Pulaski: 24; Russell: 1; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 2. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.02. This means our total case count is projected to double every 34.76 days.
 

The new cases include:

Adair: A 57-year-old female who is released, 5/10/20
Casey: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Green: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info

Pulaski: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 88-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is who is self-isolated, awaiting info

Pulaski: A 90-year-old male who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, awaiting info
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is released, 8/07/20


If you look closely at the numbers, you will see McCreary’s released cases as -1. We listed someone in error as released yesterday that we had to add back today. So, we released 9 today, and added one back, for a net released today of 8.

 

The two deaths we announced were a 91-year-old male and a 90-year-old female, both nursing home residents from Green County. This week tied for our most deaths, six.

 

We have two very large nursing home outbreaks occurring in our district right now, one in Green and one in Pulaski County. Our hearts and prayers go out to those residents, families, and staff members. I can’t imagine the stress, anguish, and pain they are going through.

 

We have 62 more active cases today than last Saturday, this despite having released 148 cases this week. Thus, community spread is still happening as we are adding more new cases than we are releasing recovered cases. Last Saturday, we had 26 cases hospitalized and today, 20. However, patient death accounts for much of the difference. This week, our new case rate once again exceeds that of the state’s new case rate. While the state’s new case rate seems to have plateaued for the moment, Lake Cumberland had its larges week of growth since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,661 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 43,126 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 43,066 statewide plus 60 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.

 

 

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814 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 8 MORE DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 22, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“We are seeing our positivity rate go down, which means if we’re patient, we can find the right time to do things safely and that’s what I want us to be able to do,” said Gov. Beshear. “Now is the time when we determine if we can open schools safely, if we can get back to doing so many things we care about; so do your part.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Saturday, Aug. 22, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 43,066 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 814 of which were newly reported Saturday. Seventeen of the newly reported cases were from children age 5 and younger. School has resumed within the past several days in some areas of the commonwealth. Among children ages 6-18, 93 have tested positive or were identified as “probable” for having tested positive for COVID-19.

 

“A hundred and ten kids 18 and under on today’s report – we continue to see far too many,” said the Governor.

 

“And in many of the places hardest hit for kids, they’re looking at opening schools this Monday or very soon.”


Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 8 new deaths Saturday, raising the total to 872 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

“That’s eight additional families who are suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The deaths reported Saturday included a 60-year-old man from Perry County; two 73-year-old women, one from Bell County and one from Garrard County; a 78-year-old woman from Oldham County; a 64-year-old man and an 84-year-old woman from Lewis County; an 81-year-old man from Scott County; and an 88-year-old woman from Jefferson County.

 

“An unfortunate consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic has been people avoiding care for both acute and chronic illness unrelated to the virus,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health.

 

“Don’t ignore caring for your health,” Dr. Stack said. “If you’re having chest pains or signs of stroke, for example, don’t let fear of contracting the virus stop you from seeking care. And, as this is Immunization Awareness Month, please make plans now to get your flu shot. We need to do all we can to avoid what’s being referred to as the ‘Twindemic,’ a flu season that’s projected to be very active at the same time as we continue to battle the coronavirus.”

 

As of Saturday, at least 819,265 tests had been administered. The COVID-19 testing positive rate, based on a seven-day rolling average, taking into account total positive tests reported by laboratories divided by total tests reported by labs, stood at 4.84 %. The number of Kentuckians who have recovered stood at 9,502.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by 

county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

 

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REQUEST FROM RUSSELL CO. SCHOOLS....

 

As you know, we are experiencing a delay in receiving chromebooks for our students. The chromebooks were ordered first of June but we are now expecting a mid to late September ship date. To the extent that families answered phones or communicated with teachers we have surveyed families (students) to find out who already has a device they can use/share with siblings, etc. We are distributing all of the chromebooks, Ipads/laptops that we currently have to families that do not have a device but we are running short. I’m emailing to ask if any businesses/individuals/churches have a laptop/tablet/desktop that they would like to donate to a student to please contact me at michael.ford@russell.kyschools.us
 
Also, if your church or business offers open wifi, and would not care to be listed on a “directory” for parents please let me know. The list will be advertised. 
 
Thank you ALL for supporting Russell County Schools (students).
 
Michael A. Ford

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785 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES IN KY; 8 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 21, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Friday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“We have stopped the exponential growth and escalation of this virus, but we still have to fight every day, wear masks and stay six feet apart so we can get this thing on the decline and open more things safely,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Friday,  Aug. 21, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 42,265 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 785 of which were newly reported Friday. Seventeen of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger.

 

“Ninety-seven of today’s cases are kids under 18,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’ve got to protect all of our children.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 8 new deaths Friday, raising the total to 864 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Friday include a 49-year-old man from Clark County; a 92-year-old woman from Green County; a 92-year-old woman and a 71-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 78-year-old man from Lewis County; a 56-year-old man from Madison County; a 77-year-old woman from Montgomery County; and a 63-year-old woman from Taylor County.

 

“It’s going to be a hard month. Let’s make sure we don’t do things that are going to spread this virus because ultimately, they do take a real human toll,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

As of Friday, there have been at least 803,198 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.18%, unchanged from yesterday. At least 9,448 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Week in Review
For more information on this week’s updates, including those on CARES funding for Western Kentucky, Central Kentucky and Northern Kentucky local governments; a new testing partnership with UK HealthCare; federal funding for public safety agencies; funding for new transit vehicles; the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment; correctional facilities; unemployment assistance; testing expansion with Kroger; the 2020 census; Meals on Wheels; the Kentucky State Fair opening day; Immunization Awareness Month and more go to governor.ky.gov/news.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Kidnapped Juvenile Located; 2 Tennessee Men Arrested in Adair Co.


On August 21, while acting on a tip from The Cumberland County Sheriff, Scott Daniels, Officers with the Columbia Police Department located a female juvenile previously reported missing from Colorado.


Upon further investigation the female, age 13, had been allegedly kidnapped in Colorado and was believed en route to Tennessee at the time she was located with two males. 

Arrested on local charges was Zachariah Minix, 21, of Morristown, Tennessee who has been charged with custodial interference and rape 1st degree. Also charged was Ethen Harville, 21, of Morristown, Tennessee. Harville has been charged with unlawful imprisonment. Both men were lodged in the Adair Regional Jail after apprehension by CPD  Officers Jamie Cole and Jordan Dean. They were assisted by Adair Deputy Joey Keith and Cumberland County Sheriff Scott Daniels. 

The Bowling Green office of the FBI was contacted and is continuing the investigation with Colorado authorities with further charges pending.
 

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KSP Conducts Death Investigation McCreary County


Whitley City, Ky. (August 21, 2020)- On Wednesday, August 19, 2020 shortly after 7:00 pm,  Kentucky State Police, London were sent to investigate a fatal train accident in the Revelo Community of McCreary County.

 

The initial investigation is that a train from Norfolk Southern had hit a pedestrian that was walking on the railroad tracks. The victim was identified as Chastity J. Atwell, 48 years old of Whitley City, KY. The victim was pronounced deceased at the scene by the McCreary County Coroner. The victim has been sent to the State Medical Office in Frankfort for an autopsy.

 

Trooper Keegan Bray is continuing the investigation. He was assisted by State Police personnel, the McCreary County Sheriff's Office, Pine Knot Fire Department, McCreary County EMS and the McCreary County Coroner’s Office.

 

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Gov. Beshear: Kentucky's Application for Additional Federal Unemployment Assistance Approved

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 21, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear announced Friday that the state’s application to bring in additional federal money to aid unemployed Kentuckians has been accepted.

 

“COVID-19 has caused the loss of millions of jobs across the nation, and unfortunately Kentucky is no exception,” the Governor said. “I am committed to fighting for every dollar to help our people survive this global pandemic and our workforce return to full strength.”

 

The Governor said Kentucky is the first state in the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Region 4 to be approved through the agency’s Lost Wages Program to give $400 to unemployment insurance claimants.

 

“This program will allow about 80,000 Kentuckians receiving at least $100 a week unemployment benefits for the weeks of July 26-Aug. 15 to receive an additional payment of $400, if they are unemployed or partially unemployed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Gov. Beshear said. “The $400 will apply to all programs: traditional UI, the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program and the extended benefits programs.”

 

The Governor noted the federal government originally provided an additional $600 to those facing job loss. That program ended without a replacement by the U.S. Congress. Then on Aug. 8, President Donald Trump signed a memorandum seeking to extend some additional benefits to Americans whose jobs have been harmed or eliminated by the global pandemic.

 

Gov. Beshear noted that most of the states approved for the program – including Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico and Utah – have chosen to fund the program solely with federal dollars, meaning recipients will receive $300.

 

“We have decided to provide an extra $100 using CARES Act money. Kentucky’s portion will be approximately $8 million per week, for a total of $24 million over the three-week initial grant period,” Gov. Beshear said. 
 

While the application is approved, reconfiguring the computer systems to pay the $400 is likely to take about two weeks. Therefore, benefits recipients should not expect the payments until sometime in early September.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 8-21-20

In Russell County 2 new cases Thursday. No one released. The 2 new cases are a 38 year old female and a 20 year old male who are both on self-isolation. We now have 20 active cases which 17 are on self-isolation and 3 hospitalized, 2 in Somerset and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County with 2 new cases yesterday with one person being released. We have 9 active cases with all 9 in home isolation.

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ADAIR COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MET LAST NIGHT...

Adair County School Board met last night.

Jim Liebe was there for WAVE NEWS and spoke with Dr. Stephens following the meeting... 

 

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JAMESTOWN CITY COUNCIL MET THURSDAY NIGHT

Jamestown City Council had a lengthy meeting last night.

Mayor Nick Shearer tells WAVE NEWS what took place...

 

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726 COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 14 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 20, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Thursday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“Today’s report is good news and bad news. This virus is still out there and still aggressively spreading,” said Gov. Beshear. “But our positivity rate is now down to 5.18%, which is headed in the right direction.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 41,626 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 726 of which were newly reported Thursday. Twenty of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger.

 

“Let’s make sure we make the right decisions to keep our cases low. Let’s make sure we wear our masks and stay six feet apart,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 14 new deaths Thursday, raising the total to 856 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Thursday include a 66-year-old man from Barren County; a 95-year-old woman from Clay County; two men, ages 81 and 88, from Fayette County; an 88-year-old woman from Gallatin County; a 55-year-old man from Graves County; an 84-year-old woman from Harlan County; a 77-year-old woman from Hopkins County; an 89-year-old man from Jackson County; a 57-year-old man from Marion County; a 96-year-old woman from Oldham County; a 65-year-old woman from Pulaski County; and a 76-year-old man from Warren County. One family asked for their loved one’s demographics not to be shared.

 

“We are announcing 14 new deaths today. That’s 38 deaths in just three days. We have to understand that this is not just real, this virus takes lives from us,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

As of Thursday, there have been at least 794,282 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.18%. At least 9,388 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Census Update
Today, Cabinet for Health and Family Services Secretary Eric Friedlander reminded Kentuckians of the importance of completing the 2020 census at 2020census.gov or by calling 844-330-2020. Kentuckians most comfortable in a language other than English can find multilingual census phone numbers here. At last count, 66.2% of Kentuckians have completed their census questionnaires. The deadline to submit once-per-decade census forms is Sept. 30, 2020. 

 

“Our hospitals, health care providers, social service agencies, housing authority and other organizations receive grant funding based on the number of people and the demographics of the population they serve. Let's not leave their supplemental funding on the table,” said Secretary Friedlander. “Furthermore, congressional and state legislative seats are based on population, which means if we don’t complete the census, we threaten our ability to be heard in Washington and here in Frankfort.”

 

Department of Aging and Independent Living Update
Today, Secretary Friedlander updated Kentuckians on the accomplishments of the Kentucky Department of Aging and Independent Living (DAIL) since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

“For Kentucky’s 900,000 plus seniors ages 60 and up who live independently in our communities, nutrition has often been an issue,” said Secretary Friedlander. “For some of these vulnerable Kentuckians, it’s been a matter of transportation. For others, it’s been about not having enough money to pay for basic needs. For still others, they have had difficulty preparing meals. None of this is what we want for our seniors.”

 

DAIL has served 2.1 million meals to seniors in fiscal year 2020, and specifically, 1.4 million meals since March.

 

“DAIL has provided senior center meals and home-delivered meals thanks to the passage of the Older Americans Act in 1965. For some, this is their only meal of the day,” said Secretary Friedlander. “This is one of those success stories that should make us all proud to be Kentuckians.”

 

Secretary Friedlander highlighted that senior meals are another program supported by census completion.

 

“Federal funding for senior meals is based off of our census numbers. Let’s ensure Kentucky has increased funding to feed seniors as we are one of the fastest aging states in the nation,” said Secretary Friedlander.

 

Kentuckians who are interested in supporting seniors in their communities can reach out to local senior centers to volunteer to deliver meals. Kentuckians ages 60 and older who need meals may call the Aging and Disability Resource Center at 877-925-0037.

 

Kentucky State Fair Opening Day
Today, the Governor thanked the members of the Kentucky State Fair Board for their hard work to design a fair that would keep many traditions alive while also ensuring the safety of Kentuckians. The participants-only Kentucky State Fair opens today and runs until Saturday, Aug. 29. Today, the fair featured 4-H and FFA youth showing dairy cows and goats.

 

“Although this year’s fair looks different, it continues to highlight Kentucky’s premiere agriculture and equestrian industries,” said Gov. Beshear. “With nearly 76,000 farms and over 240,000 horses in the commonwealth, the state fair has a long history of celebrating the best Kentucky has to offer.”

 

For more information on the fair’s schedule and COVID-19 precautions, visit the fair’s website.

 

Immunization Awareness Month
August is Immunization Awareness Month, and today Gov. Beshear reminded Kentuckians of the importance of keeping themselves and their families up to date on vaccinations. The Governor shared an informational video on the topic as well, from Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, which can be viewed here.

 

“One of the things that happened while we were all sheltering at home this spring and early summer was a big decline in vaccinations among Kentuckians,” said Gov. Beshear. “The rates have come back up as families feel safe going back to their physicians’ offices, but we’re still quite a bit behind where we need to be. And we’re about to enter into flu season, when getting our annual flu shot is vitally important to keeping our immune systems strong.”

 

When people get vaccinated, they not only protect themselves from a disease, but they also prevent themselves from spreading it to others who may be more vulnerable, including infants, seniors and people with compromised immune systems.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, also recently encouraged Kentuckians to keep their vaccinations up to date and especially urged them to get a flu shot this fall, citing the need to maximize hospital capacity in case of a COVID-19 surge.

 

“Get your flu shot. We need everyone to do this. We have to keep influenza as suppressed as we possibly can,” said Dr. Stack. “In a bad year with influenza, our hospitals are strained just keeping up with flu patients.”

 

Remembrance
Gov. Beshear on Thursday spoke about the life of one of the Kentuckians lost to the coronavirus.

 

Huey Cornelius and his wife raised their four children in Lexington.

 

“Dad was an educator, a principal, a coach, a class president, a neighbor, a Sunday School teacher, an insurance salesman, a friend, a classmate, an uncle, a brother, a grandpa, a husband and my father,” his son Brance Cornelius said.

 

Huey Cornelius, 81, died last Tuesday after falling ill with the coronavirus three weeks earlier. Brance said his father had no underlying health issues. “No heart attacks, no strokes, no diabetes, no bypasses,” he said. “He was an active 81-year-old.”

 

Brance said his mother also tested positive for COVID-19 but quickly recovered. He asked Gov. Beshear to share their story in the hope that Kentuckians will honor his father by doing everything they can to keep each other safe and prevent other families from enduring such a painful loss.

 

“Our father touched so many lives. He held several positions, but mostly that of educator and insurance agent. If we would have been allowed to have a funeral, the number would be in the hundreds,” Brance said. “Instead, we will mourn with our immediate family, that is, until it is safe to celebrate his life and legacy with those who loved him.”

 

Unemployment Assistance
Gov. Beshear announced yesterday that the state is applying for additional unemployment insurance assistance from the federal government. On Aug. 8, President Donald Trump signed a memorandum seeking to extend some additional benefits to Americans whose jobs have been harmed or eliminated by the global pandemic.

 

“This program will allow all Kentuckians receiving unemployment benefits for the weeks of July 26-Aug. 15 to receive an additional payment of $400 if they are unemployed or partially unemployed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Gov. Beshear said. “The $400 will apply to all programs: traditional UI, the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program and the extended benefits programs.”

 

For more information, read yesterday’s full release.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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KY 206 in Adair County to be Reduced to 1 Lane Beginning Monday

 
SOMERSET, Ky. (Aug. 20, 2020) – The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) advises motorists that beginning Monday, Aug. 24, KY 206 in Adair County will be reduced to one lane in two locations as crews perform bridge deck restorations.
 
Work will be performed at mile point 13.5 (Barnett Creek Bridge) located between Ellis Road and Pellyton West Road. In this location lane widths will be reduced to 11’ 6”. In addition, crews will also be performing work at mile point 14.7 (Spruce Pine Creek Bridge) between Drake Road and Pellyton West Road. Lane widths at this location will be reduced to 9’ 6”.
 
Temporary traffic signals are in place on the east and west bound approaches for the lane closures.
 
Work is expected to be completed in approximately four weeks. The duration of work may be adjusted for inclement weather or other unforeseeable delays. Drivers should expect delays and are encouraged to allow extra time in reaching their destination.
 
For Kentucky’s latest traffic and travel information, visit goky.ky.gov or navigate traffic by downloading the free Waze app at www.waze.com. Motorists can also access traffic information for the District 8 counties at www.facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8 and at www.twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8.
 

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AREA ARREST 8-20-2020

Local police report two arrest overnight on Drug related and other charges…

 

Kristina Cooper age 24, of Virginia was arrested by Officer Foster with the Columbia Police Department just before 3 a.m. this morning. Cooper was charged with 2 counts of Promoting Contraband – 1st Degree, Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession, Possession of Open Alcohol Beverage Contain in Motor Vehicle Prohibited and served a warrant from another police agency.

 

Bobby Morrison age 43, of Columbia was arrested by Trooper Bale of the Kentucky State Police just after midnight last night. Charges included Operating Motor Vehicle under the Influence Alcohol/Drug – 1st Offense, Operating Vehicle with Expired Operators License, Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth), Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession and Assault, 4th Degree (Domestic Violence) Minor Injury.

 

Both were lodged into the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

A Russell County Woman was arrest on theft charges yesterday morning. Rachel Tarry age 30, of Russell Springs was taken into custody by the Russell County Sheriff’s Office yesterday morning around 9:30. Tarry was charged with Theft by Unlawful Taking or Disposition Shoplifting. Tarry was also lodged into the Adair County Regional Jail.

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 8-20-2020

Russell County had NO new cases on Wednesday, We had 1 case released yesterday from isolation. We now have 18 active cases which 15 are on self-isolation and 3 are hospitalized, 2 at Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital in Somerset and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County also had NO new cases yesterday, we have 8 active cases with 7 in home isolation and 1 in an area hospital.

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1 New COVID-19 Death in 10-County Lake Cumberland District; 21 New Cases

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Pulaski. We have experienced a total of 48 deaths resulting in a 3.1% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 21 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 154 hospitalizations resulting in a 10.1% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 65% of ICU beds and 27% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 22 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 1; Casey: 2; Clinton: 2; Green: 1; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 1; Taylor: 2; and, Wayne: 5. In all, we have released 85.1% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,528 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This has resulted in us reaching out to over 9,170 contacts (a rough average of 6 contacts per case).

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 180 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 49 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 21 today: Casey: 1; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 1; Green: 2; Pulaski: 7; Taylor: 6; and, Wayne: 1. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 46.21 days.

 

The new cases include:

  • Casey: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated
  • Clinton: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated
  • Clinton: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 81-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic


The death we are reporting today was a 65-year-old female from Pulaski. Our hospitalizations remain at 21 with an average age of 60. Among our hospitalized cases, we have a 19-year-old, a 21-year-old, two patients in their 30s, two in their 40’s, and two in their 50’s.

 

We are happy we released more cases than we added. We so hope this downward trajectory will continue even as several area schools reopen to in-person instruction. Along that line, we are happy, to report no new clusters in any area schools.

 

Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,528 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 40,962 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/19/20 (this includes 40,926 statewide plus 36 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). 

 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.


 

 

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655 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 12 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 19, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Wednesday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“The COVID-19 death toll is more than in several wars that we have fought,” the Governor said. “I hope that we are committed to doing what it takes and making smart decisions to keep this virus on the decline. Not just so we can reopen businesses and schools, but so we can have fewer people die.”

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, urged people to remain vigilant in protecting themselves and others.

 

“I know people are tired and want to get back to their normal lives. We are not here to separate people from their schools, jobs and social activities, but we cannot rationalize our way out of this. There’s a bad disease out there. We have no vaccine, cure or treatment. When it hits people it hits them hard, it causes hospitals to overcrowd and it takes lives,” Dr. Stack said. “We want to inspire you to do the right thing. Please listen to the public health professionals, here and around the nation. Every single one of us is saying the same thing: Wear masks, wash your hands, social distance.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Aug. 19, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 40,926 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 655 of which were newly reported Wednesday. Fifteen of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger, including a 12-day-old baby in Jefferson County.

 

“Of the 655 new cases, 91 – which is 14% – are kids 18 years and younger,” the Governor said.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 12 new deaths Wednesday, raising the total to 830 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Wednesday include an 82-year-old woman and an 86-year-old man from Barren County; a 79-year-old woman from Butler County; a 78-year-old man from Garrard County; a 75-year-old woman from Harlan County; a 58-year-old woman from Hart County; a 72-year-old man from Letcher County; an 81-year-old woman and a 91-year-old man from Logan County; an 82-year-old man from Mercer County; a 62-year-old man from Oldham County; and a 42-year-old man from Warren County.

 

“I don’t remember two days where we had this many deaths back-to-back, and it’s the result that we talked about earlier, that when you have 3,000 cases a week, the deaths follow a couple weeks after,” the Governor said. “We’re at that point now.”

 

As of Wednesday, there have been at least 785,138 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.41%. At least 9,331 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Unemployment Assistance
Gov. Beshear announced Wednesday that the state is applying for additional unemployment insurance assistance from the federal government. On Aug. 8, President Donald Trump signed a memorandum seeking to extend some additional benefits to Americans whose jobs have been harmed or eliminated by the global pandemic.

 

“Originally the federal government provided an additonal $600 for those on unemployment in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic,” the Governor said, noting that that benefit ended without being renewed by Congress.

 

The Governor said that on Thursday the Labor Cabinet will file an application for the Lost Wages Assistance Program that is being operated through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

 

“This program will allow all Kentuckians receiving unemployment benefits for the weeks of July 26-Aug. 15 to receive an additional payment of $400 if they are unemployed or partially unemployed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Gov. Beshear said. “The $400 will apply to all programs: traditional UI, the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program and the extended benefits programs.”

 

He said only seven states – Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico and Utah – had been approved for the program and all have chosen to fund the program solely with federal dollars, meaning recipients will receive $300.

 

“We have decided to provide an extra $100 using CARES Act money. Kentucky’s portion will be approximately $8 million per week, for a total of $24 million over the three-week initial grant period,” Gov. Beshear said. “We believe this will make us the first state to apply that plans to fund the full $400 promised in the President’s memorandum.”

 

He cautioned that while FEMA should approve the application in 48-72 hours, reconfiguring the computer systems to pay the added $400 is likely to take about two weeks. Therefore, benefits recipients should not expect the payments until sometime in early September.

 

More Than $8 Million Approved in CARES Act Reimbursements for Local Governments
In collaboration with the Department for Local Government (DLG), today, Gov. Beshear announced 18 Central Kentucky governments were approved for $8,194,518 in reimbursements from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act for local governments with expenses related to COVID-19.

 

“Our local governments have been lifelines in our communities during the COVID-19 pandemic, which is why this funding is so important,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are grateful for their hard work and dedication to keeping Kentuckians safe.”

For more information, read the full release.

 

New Testing Update
Gov. Beshear announced Wednesday that the state’s partnership with Kroger to provide free, drive-through testing is being extended in Lexington.

 

The testing will be done at Bluegrass Community & Technical College, 500 Newtown Pike.

 

“We know there have been testing shortages in this area, and so let’s make sure we fill up all of those appointments,” the Governor said.

 

To register and find more information on the testing, click here.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT COVID-19 CASE COUNT INCREASES BY 19

 
According to the Lake Cumberland District Health Dept., the total case count has increased by 19: Casey: 1; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 1; Green: 3; and, Pulaski: 13. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 47.6 days. Adair and Russell counties had no new cases to report on Tuesday evening.
 
NEW CASES INCLUDE:
  • Casey: 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 81-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

We are happy to report no new deaths and that we released 3 more cases as recovered than we added new cases. However, our hospitalizations went up by 1.
 
We unfortunately must report another long-term care outbreak, this time in Pulaski. Also, one of the private schools in our district that had already opened to in-person instruction a few days ago has already had to shift to virtual instruction due to a COVID-19 cluster. That particular school hopes to be able to return to in-person instruction in a couple of weeks.
 
Our hopes and prayers go out to everyone who is suffering during this pandemic. Not only the positive cases and those who have lost loved ones; but the staff at the medical facilities and residential facilities who are having to work so hard; the businesses that have suffered financial loss; the children who have missed in-person instruction; and, the general population who has had to endure the restrictions and frustrations related to this pandemic. We in public health are frustrated, too, and long for all of this to be over. We so look forward to the day a vaccine is developed.
 
Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,507 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 40,342 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/18/20 (this includes 40,299 statewide plus 43 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.
 
For more statistics and local data go to:  LCDHD COVID-19 Information.
 

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AREA ARRESTS 8-19-20

 

A Columbia man was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center on Domestic Violence and other charges early this morning. Thomas Doughty, 35, was taken into custody by Officer Trevor Foster for Assault, 4th Degree (Domestic Violence) with Minor Injuries; Assault, 4th Degree (Child Abuse); Endangering the Welfare of a Minor; Criminal Mischief 2nd Degree; and Criminal Abuse Third Degree – Child 12 or Under.

 

Luis Martinez Cruz, 20 of Russell Springs, KY was arrested by Trooper Scott of the Kentucky State Police last evening. Martinez was charged with Strangulation 1st Degree, Assault 4th Degree (Domestic Violence), and Criminal Abuse 3rd Degree. Martinez was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

Autumn Thompson, 30 of Burkesville, KY was taken into custody by Deputy Daniels with the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office overnight. Thompson was charged with Hindering Prosecution or Apprehension – 2nd Degree and Criminal Mischief 2nd Degree.

 

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627 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 12 MORE DEATHS....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 18, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Tuesday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“We can’t tell you how long we’re going to be fighting it, but we’re going to get through it and we’re going to win,” the Governor said. “To do it and to do it right, we’re going to have to listen to and follow some wisdom such as this Chinese proverb: ‘One moment of patience may ward off great disaster. One moment of impatience may ruin a whole life.’

 

“We are all desperate to get back to our old lives. But if we are not patient, we put the lives of other people on the line, we put the health of our economy on the line. And we potentially threaten what we love the most – our children – and their wellbeing. At a time like this, our patience is being tested. My question is, are we going to pass that test?”

 

Gov. Beshear also spoke about his recent orders and guidance on openings for schools and businesses. He noted that the decisions he and others in his administration have made are based on public health and pegged to information provided by the White House. The Governor noted that for the week of Aug. 8-14, the White House listed 20 Kentucky counties in the “red” zone, meaning there is a positivity rate of 10% or higher. Dozens more are in the 5-10% positivity rate “yellow” zone.

 

“If you add the red and the yellow counties, you are close to if not over 50% of an entire state,” the Governor said. “That’s exactly the reason that we took the actions on bars and restaurants and reduced gatherings to 10 or fewer, Dr. (Deborah) Birx said we have to do it statewide. She said, ‘I can hand you this report, but when you have this many counties that are in the red and the yellow zone, you have statewide community spread that is uncontrolled – uncontrolled spread of COVID-19.’ That doesn’t mean we can’t get it under control, it just means it takes some time and we have to be patient.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 40,299 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 627 of which were newly reported Tuesday. 14 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger, including a 1-month-old from Pike County.

 

“Today, this is about what we have seen on other Tuesdays, going back three or four weeks. We are announcing 627 new cases; 76 of which are in Kentuckians 18 years or younger,” the Governor said. “I believe, again, first we’ve got to plateau, then we can get on that downward slope. Then we’re going to be in a much safer place to do things.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 12 new deaths Tuesday, raising the total to 830 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths include a 44-year-old woman from Carter County; a 67-year-old woman from Daviess County; an 89-year-old man from Graves County; two women, ages 72 and 83, and two men, ages 72 and 80, from Jefferson County; a 67-year-old woman from Letcher County; a 75-year-old woman from Oldham County; a 72-year-old woman and a 73-year-old man from Perry County; and an 84-year-old woman from Washington County.

 

“Today we’ve also lost 12 Kentuckians to COVID-19. Twelve. And when you look at this report, it’s people of a number of different ages,” Gov. Beshear said. “We haven’t had a lot of days where we’ve had double-digit deaths. What we’ve suffered from are a few every single day, which is hard, but a day when we have 12 from all over Kentucky is a difficult day.”

 

As of Tuesday, there have been at least 770,382 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.48%. At least 9,223 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Reinforcing the fact that the global health pandemic caused by COVID-19 will touch most of our lives in some way, Rocky Adkins, senior advisor to Gov. Beshear, spoke Tuesday about his father – 84-year-old Jess Adkins – who is recovering after falling ill from the coronavirus.

 

“I’m happy to report to you today that I got a call this morning from UK Medical Center that they are moving my father from the hospital to Cardinal Hill,” Adkins said. “Folks, that’s good news. And my dad is going to rehab, and after that, where we’re going to return him home.”

 

Adkins noted that his son who was helping his father also tested positive for coronavirus but is asymptomatic.

 

“I wanted to give this personal testimony today and this very personal story to hopefully reach somebody across Kentucky. First of all to tell you – by phone call or by someone – check on your neighbors. Check on your neighbor. Make sure they’re OK.

 

“Second of all, follow the guidelines. The protocols, the orders, all of these things that none of us may like, but appreciate and respect what’s being handed down,” Adkins said. “There will be time for debate on all of this, but I’m telling you for now, for Jess Adkins, for an 84-year-old man who will tell you as soon as he can to wear your mask, to wash your hands, to stay away from crowds, to social distance, all of that.”

 

100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment
Gov. Beshear and Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman on Tuesday marked the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution with a proclamation honoring those who fought to ensure that women secured the right to vote.

 

“We honor the approval of the 19th  Amendment, and recognize the contributions made by Kentucky women and men to its ratification, including Nettie Depp, a pioneer in education who will become the first woman to be presented with a statue in a place of honor in the State Capitol,” the Governor’s proclamation reads, in part. “And we resolve to remember their struggle and celebrate the history of the movement, and commit to the full equality for women.”

 

For the complete text, read the full proclamation here. After signing the proclamation, Gov. Beshear said he will give the pen he used as a gift to his daughter, Lila, as a reminder of the historic victory and advancement of women’s rights.

 

“I’m proud of our Kentucky men and women who made that historic achievement possible. In fact, in 1920, Kentucky had the highest women’s voter turnout in the nation at 57%,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “To every woman in Kentucky of voting age, this year, I challenge you to join me in beating that record set 100 years ago.

 

“We’ve made amazing strides – women can realize goals and serve in roles that previously have been far out of reach. However, we still have much further to go. We must recognize and celebrate women of color and of diverse backgrounds for us to fully be inclusive and realize our potential as a society. We must fight for equal pay for equal work. And we must continue to support young women and encourage them to follow their dreams, whatever they may be, because nothing – absolutely nothing – can or should stop a determined woman,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman.

 

In addition, the Governor was scheduled to take part in a ceremony at 8 p.m. in downtown Lexington along with Mayor Linda Gorton to dedicate a new sculpture, named “Stand.” Due to inclement weather, the event was postponed until Wednesday evening. The bronze work depicts five silhouetted images of the suffragists who fought for women’s right to vote in the early 20th century.

 

$5.7 Million in U.S. DOJ Grants to Public Safety Agencies
In collaboration with the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet, today, Gov. Beshear announced that Kentucky’s local public safety agencies and eligible local governments have been awarded more than $5.7 million in grant funding from the U.S. Department of Justice’s (USDOJ) Coronavirus Emergency Supplemental Funding Program (CESF).

 

“These funds are crucial in assisting police departments, sheriff’s offices, correctional institutions and other agencies within the criminal justice system to prevent, prepare for and respond to COVID-19,” said Gov. Beshear. “Our public safety agencies have worked tirelessly on the front lines during this pandemic and have adapted quickly to many new challenges to continue protecting our Kentucky families.”

 

For more information, read the full release.

 

More Than $9 Million Approved in CARES Act Reimbursements for Local Governments
In collaboration with the Department for Local Government (DLG), today, Gov. Beshear announced 11 Northern Kentucky governments were approved for $9,249,838 in reimbursements from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act for local governments with expenses related to COVID-19.

 

“Our local governments have been lifelines in our communities during the COVID-19 pandemic, which is why this funding is so important,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are grateful for their hard work and dedication to keeping Kentuckians safe.”

 

For more information, read the full release.

 

Kentucky Transportation Gets $3 Million in Federal Funding
Gov. Beshear also announced Tuesday that the Federal Transit Administration has awarded more than $3 million to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. The money – $3,070,671 – will go to 10 public transit agencies across the commonwealth to purchase new transit vehicles.

 

“Reliable transportation is essential to so much we do in our daily lives,” Gov. Beshear said. “For many of our fellow Kentuckians, that means public transportation. It’s how they get to work, or school, or health care appointments, or the grocery and a host of other places. This funding is an investment on their behalf.”

 

The agencies serve 41 communities around the state. The agencies will use the money to purchase 62 vehicles.

 

For more information, read the full release.

 

Dr. Stack Update
Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, provided new information on a prison testing pilot program and reporting on COVID-19 for schools.

 

Dr. Stack said a pilot program is testing wastewater at Kentucky Correctional Institute for Women in Shelby County and the Kentucky State Reformatory in Oldham County. He said university labs will test the wastewater for the presence of COVID-19 RNA, hopefully providing an early indication of an outbreak.

 

“We are committed to keeping inmates and the staff that work in correctional facilities safe. This enables us to monitor a population that is confined in an area without having to test them unless we see a warning sign in the wastewater. In this type of test, COVID-19 also shows up multiple days earlier than people become symptomatic. So there’s a lot of reason to be hopeful about this,” said Dr. Stack.

 

Dr. Stack also spoke Tuesday about reporting protocols for public and private schools. He said schools will identify new COVID-19 cases and the students and staffers involved. The school will then notify the Kentucky Department for Public Health. The individual schools also will notify their school community about new cases. Finally, the KDPH will publish school case reports, just as it does for long-term care reports. The current plan is to not publicly list names, ages or genders of positive cases matched to a school, but to report the overall positive number of cases involving educators and students.

 

“Bringing kids back to school is not an issue where public health is in any disagreement with education. It’s not easily that we recommend that schools defer in-person class. Even though at the national level there’s clearly an emphasis on getting back in school, the surgeon general himself has said that when your test positivity rate goes over 10%, it’s going to be really hard to succeed regardless of your plans in place because the disease just spreads too fast. The World Health Organization goes further and says at over 5%, you’re going to have a really hard time,” said Dr. Stack. “We’re all committed to getting kids back to school, but we’ve got to do it safely.”

 

Prison Update
J. Michael Brown, secretary of Gov. Beshear’s executive cabinet, provided an update Tuesday on efforts to fight coronavirus at the state’s prisons.

 

“Looking week over week, some of the news is positive. Some of the news is tragic,” Secretary Brown said.

 

In the last week, there have been 12 new cases of positive inmates with seven of those coming from being transfers from Louisville Metro Detention Center. During that time, there was just one new positive staff member. Unfortunately, the Department of Corrections lost its first staff member, a retiree who had returned to work part-time, to COVID, bringing the overall number of deaths from correctional facilities to 13.

 

In corrections, there have been 863 total inmate cases with 570 of those now recovered. There have been seven institutions that have never had an inmate case.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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KY 551 to be Temporarily Closed Wednesday in Adair County

 
 
 
SOMERSET, Ky. (Aug. 18, 2020) – The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) advises motorists that KY 551 will be temporarily closed to through traffic at mile point 1.8 (Butler’s Branch) as crews perform bridge maintenance on Wednesday, Aug. 19. 
 
The closure will be located between David Butler Road and Howard Dulin Road/Cundiff Cemetery Road. Traffic will detour via KY 901 to KY 1323 and reconnect to KY 551.
 
The closure will be in place starting at approximately 8 a.m. and ending by 11:00amCT.
 
The date and duration of the closure may be adjusted for inclement weather or other unforeseeable delays.
 
For Kentucky’s latest traffic and travel information, visit goky.ky.gov or navigate traffic by downloading the free Waze app at www.waze.com. Motorists can also access traffic information for the District 8 counties at www.facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8 and at www.twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8.  
 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE...

New cases of Covid-19 in the area went up as the Lake Cumberland District Health Department put out the latest numbers last night…

Russell County had 8 new cases Monday. None were released. We now have 22 active cases which 20 are on self-isolation and 2 are hospitalized, 1 in Somerset and 1 at Russell County Hospital. The new cases are a 62 year old female and a 4 year old female,36 year old male,27,54,58,52,57 year old males.

Adair County announced 9 cases were released yesterday and we have 4 new cases to report. We have 11 active cases with 10 in home isolation and 1 in an area hospital.

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RC SCHOOL BOARD MET LAST NIGHT...

The Russell County Board of Education met last night in their regular monthly meeting.

 

Superintendent Michael Ford discussed the delay in Chrome Books for students and the start of the school year…

 

 

Ford tells us other action that was taken at Monday night’s meeting…

 

 

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Gov. Beshear Announces More Than $14 Million in CARES Act Reimbursements for 23 Western Kentucky Local Governments

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 17, 2020) – In collaboration with the Department for Local Government (DLG), today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced 23 Western Kentucky governments were approved for $14,445,419 in reimbursements from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act for local governments with expenses related to COVID-19.

 

“Our local governments have been lifelines in our communities during the COVID-19 pandemic, which is why this funding is so important,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are grateful for their hard work and dedication to keeping Kentuckians safe.”

 

DLG Commissioner Dennis Keene said the reimbursements are essential for local governments.

 

“We know our local governments are experiencing decreases in revenue, making this funding even more important while we combat this virus,” said Commissioner Keene. “Our staff is working diligently to make the process simple and efficient so we can get reimbursements out the door to our cities and counties as quickly as possible.”

 

Barren County
Barren County will use $512,399 for PPE, telework supplies, cleaning materials and payroll expenses.

“I would just like to thank everyone for all the work they have been doing and continue to do with the CARES application and process,” said Barren County Judge-Executive Micheal Hale. “We appreciate the work the Department for Local Government has done thus far and are looking forward to working with them in the future.”

 

Christian County
Christian County will use $850,598 to cover payroll for first responders.

“Christian County Fiscal Court received our first installment of CARES Act Funds on August 10,” said Christian County Judge-Executive Steve Tribble. “We appreciate Executive Director of the Office of State Grants and Acting Executive Director of the Office of Federal Grants Billie Johnson for the streamlined process she has in place. The conference calls and emails on the front end of the process with DLG staff was also very helpful. We look forward to working with DLG in the future as we draw down Christian County’s funds.”

 

Logan County
Logan County will use $368,518 for payroll expenses.

“As Logan County Judge Executive, I want to say thank you to the Department for Local Government for being responsive to our questions and application and the quick turn around of the CARES Act money,” said Logan County Judge-Executive Logan Chick. “What a blessing during this pandemic that we have a professional team of people that are so helpful and responsive to county and city governments.”

 

Meade County
Meade County will use $701,414 for PPE and payroll for police officers and EMS workers.

“On behalf of the Meade County Fiscal Court, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Department for Local Government for the help with the CARES Act funding during this difficult time,” said Meade County Judge-Executive Gerry Lynn. “This funding will greatly help us get through the pandemic by offsetting expenses for our first responders and keeping our community safe.”

 

Metcalfe County
Metcalfe County will use $175,332 for PPE, food delivery and payroll expenses.

 

Ohio County
Ohio County will use $245,242 for telework supplies, PPE, sanitation materials and payroll expenses for first responders.

“The CARES Act funds are a great blessing to our county,” said Ohio County Judge-Executive David Johnston. “I want to thank Gov. Beshear for allowing local governments to decide where the need is in our communities. This has allowed us to provide for the costs put on us by this pandemic. The extra cleaning, the jobs previously done by the inmates and the extra work put on front facing public officials are but a few of the challenges facing local government during this time. The CARES Act funds helped tremendously on these and other issues.”

 

Simpson County
Simpson County will use $317,392 for payroll expenses and PPE.

 

Webster County
Webster County will use $249,139 for senior services, payroll for the sheriff’s department and public health officials.

“The CARES funds come at such a helpful time for Webster County,” said Webster County Judge-Executive Stephen R. Henry. “Because of having to use unbudgeted funds in dealing with this pandemic, this funding will keep us from making future cuts to essential services for our citizens.”

 

Arlington
Arlington will use $529 for PPE.

 

Benton
Benton will use $226,890 for public radio announcements, sneeze guards, telework supplies, emergency sick leave for employees and police payroll.

 

Bowling Green
Bowling Green will use $4,918,471 for payroll expenses for police officers and firefighters.

 

Brownsville
Brownsville will use $20,737 for sanitizing supplies and payroll expenses.

“The City of Brownsville is grateful to receive the CARES Act funding to help us comply with the CDC guidelines,” said Brownsville City Clerk and Treasurer Lori Burnett.

 

Clarkson
Clarkson will use $52,671 for PPE and payroll expenses.

“We are very excited to receive this reimbursement,” said Clarkson Mayor Bonnie Henderson. “As a small town we have been hit hard financially by the pandemic. We are thankful for this money to help us at these uncertain times.”

 

Clay
Clay will use $19,857 for PPE, the installation of glass protective shields in offices and payroll for polices officers and firefighters.

 

Elizabethtown
Elizabethtown will use $2,168,482 for payroll expenses for police officers and firefighters.

“In a time of so much financial uncertainty for city governments across the commonwealth, we appreciate Gov. Beshear and our friends on the state level for identifying and providing assistance for financial hardships on municipalities,” said Elizabethtown Mayor Jeff Gregory. “These funds will help replenish rapidly emptying coffers due to costs associated with this terrible pandemic.”

 

Franklin
Franklin will use $533,490 for first responder payroll.

 

Hodgenville
Hodgenville will use $232,833 for first responder payroll.

“The CARES money will help us pay for the PPE items purchased for our employees,” said Hodgenville Mayor Jim Phelps. “We’ve purchased iPads for our staff and council members, set up cameras to allow in person meetings to be viewed on Facebook Live and we’ve secured our utility office to protect our staff and customers. We greatly appreciate the work that Gov. Beshear and DLG has done on our behalf.”

 

Horse Cave
Horse Cave will use $97,051 for PPE, telework supplies and payroll for police officers.

“We are most appreciative to receive these funds to purchase and cover essential needs for our city,” said Horse Cave Mayor Randall Curry. “Purchase of personal protective equipment has been very much one of our greatest needs during this very trying time in city government.”

 

Glasgow
Glasgow will use $1,037,178 for equipment to enable virtual meetings, payroll for police officers and firefighters, PPE and sanitizing supplies.

 

Morganfield
Morganfield will use $132,223 for payroll expenses.

“The CARES money will be a huge help to the City of Morganfield,” said Morganfield Mayor Randy Greenwell. “We will use part of the funds to install protective equipment for our citizens and employees, as well as make many needed repairs and improvements being neglected because of the loss of income caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.”

 

Murray
Murray will use $1,391,245 for payroll expenses.

 

Tompkinsville
Tompkinsville will use $158,373 for police payroll, laptops and sanitizing supplies.

 

Uniontown
Uniontown will use $35,355 for payroll expenses for police officers.

“On behalf of the City of Uniontown I would like to thank Gov. Beshear for his support in such unprecedented times,” said Uniontown Mayor Thomas Byrd. “The money went to much needed various emergency protective equipment to keep our employees and citizens safe.”

 

Since the application was released in May, DLG has received more than 200 applications for reimbursement from city and county governments across the commonwealth that are pending approval until all documentation is submitted. In addition, 134 applications have already been approved totaling $66,601,727.

 

For additional information and to apply for reimbursement, visit DLG’s website.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov and the state’s response to COVID-19 at kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

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376 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 5 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 17, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Monday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“We are certainly in a time of crisis, and it’s one where our character and how we respond has never been more important,” the Governor said. “If crisis shows our character, is it one that yells at the checkout clerk who tells us we have to be wearing a facial covering? Is it one where if somebody is for something, we’re against it just because? Or is it one where we put the health and lives of our neighbors above our personal interests, a time where our character shows more kindness and empathy to one another than ever before, knowing we are all going through something very difficult?”

 

Case Information – Monday, Aug. 17
As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Aug. 17, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 39,691 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 376 of which were newly reported Monday. Fourteen of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger, including two 11-month-olds.

 

“54 of these cases are from people 18 or younger,” said Gov. Beshear. “Just based on that, when they might have been going back to school today or next Monday, I think the right decision was made even if it was a hard one.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 5 new deaths Monday, raising the total to 818 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Monday include an 84-year-old man from Boyd County; a 91-year-old man from Calloway County; an 87-year-old woman from Franklin County; a 63-year-old man from Henry County; and a 75-year-old woman from Oldham County.

 

“We’ve also lost 5 more Kentuckians to COVID-19. So those green lights I saw – thank you. I don’t need them half as much as these families need them, but thank you for having the strength and the perseverance to keep going. We are still being tested about our kindness and our character, and I thank you for rising to that occasion,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

As of Monday, there have been at least 760,022 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.80%. At least 9,158 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Case Information – Sunday, Aug. 16
Due to limited reporting on the weekends, some updated information is now available from Sunday, Aug. 16.

 

As of Sunday, there were 757,828 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was at 5.76% and at least 9,122 Kentuckians had recovered from the virus.

 

For a detailed look at coronavirus case information from Sunday, Aug. 16, click here.

 

New Testing Partnership
Gov. Beshear announced Monday that Kentucky’s Department for Public Health is partnering with the University of Kentucky and UK HealthCare ?to begin free drive-up COVID-19 testing for the community. Officials said the testing will begin Aug. 24 at two sites.

 

“Kentucky remains at war with the coronavirus, and a robust testing program is essential to protecting one another, fully reopening our economy and getting all of our children back in classrooms,” Gov. Beshear said. “I want to thank the University of Kentucky and UK HealthCare for stepping up with this partnership to provide the community with this free public health resource. Everyone should take advantage of these testing opportunities and be part of Team Kentucky’s push to defeat COVID-19.”

 

Beginning Aug. 24, community testing will be available in the new parking lot on College Way near the UK motor pool on the far southern edge of campus as well as on the grounds of Eastern State Hospital, which UK operates and manages for the state. The hospital is located off of Newtown Pike near the Interstate Highway 64/75 exchange. Eastern State is located at UK’s Coldstream Research Campus.

 

All testing will be available by scheduling an appointment. To receive a free COVID-19 test, an individual can register at: lexington.wildhealth.com. Testing will be seven days a week, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

 

More information on testing opportunities at more than 200 sites throughout the commonwealth can be found here.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, explained that Kentucky is one of only a few states that has been able to maintain the same COVID-19 testing capacity in recent weeks as supplies necessary to run those tests are in greater and greater demand across the country.

 

“Test supplies are getting tight again. The demand for the tests continues to grow more quickly than the resources to provide the tests. So we are likely to be at some kind of plateau in number of tests for a while, but it’s going to be a challenge just to maintain the plateau because a lot of other states are going to compete now more intensely to try to get these resources,” said Dr. Stack. “But we’re going to work really hard to make sure we keep access to that. If we keep that, that’s just under 60,000 tests a week on average. That’s about 4.7% of the total population of Kentucky we would be testing. The White House’s initial guidelines were to test over 2%.”

 

More than $14 Million Approved in CARES Act Reimbursements for Local Governments
In collaboration with the Department for Local Government (DLG), today, Gov. Beshear announced 23 Western Kentucky governments were approved for $14,445,419 in reimbursements from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act for local governments with expenses related to COVID-19.

 

“Our local governments have been lifelines in our communities during the COVID-19 pandemic, which is why this funding is so important,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are grateful for their hard work and dedication to keeping Kentuckians safe.”

For more information, read the full release.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Paving Scheduled for Tuesday around the Square in Jamestown...

 

 

 

 

SOMERSET, Ky. (Aug. 17, 2020) – The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) District 8 Office advises motorists that Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020 crews will be performing paving operations at the intersection of U.S. 127/KY 92/KY 619 (Jamestown Square) in Russell County.

 

Work is expected to begin approximately 6 a.m. CT and will continue until paving operations are completed tomorrow afternoon. Motorists are urged to use caution when traveling through the area and to pay close attention to signage and flaggers controlling traffic.

 

The date and duration of work may be adjusted for inclement weather or other unforeseeable delays. Drivers should expect delays and are encouraged to allow extra time in reaching their destination.  

 

For Kentucky’s latest traffic and travel information, visit goky.ky.gov or navigate traffic by downloading the free Waze app at www.waze.com. Motorists can also access traffic information for the District 8 counties at www.facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8 and at www.twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8

 

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Campbellsville Man Airlifted after Motorcycle vs Tree Collision in Adair Co.....

 
On Friday, August 14, 2020 at 7:09pmCT, Adair 911 received a report of a motorcycle accident in the Knifley community of Adair County.
 
28-year-old Bradley Ratcliff of Campbellsville, KY was operating a 2004 Suzuki motorcycle traveling west on KY 76.  According to witness statements, an unknown vehicle was traveling east and crossed over the centerline. Ratcliff steered his motorcycle toward the shoulder in an attempt to avoid a collision. The motorcycle dropped off the roadway, traveled down an embankment and struck a tree. 
 
Ratcliff was not wearing a helmet. Once stabilized for transport by Adair EMS, he was airlifted from the scene to the U.K. Medical Center by Air Evac.
 
The collision is being investigated by K-9 Deputy Josh Durbin. He was assisted at the scene by Deputy Chandler Staten, Kentucky  State Police, the Knifley Fire Department, and Adair EMS.   
 

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AREA ARRESTS 8-17-20

 

Steven Harmon, 36, of Jamestown was arrested by Deputy Nathan Bradshaw with the Russell County Sheriff’s Office on Sunday afternoon. Harmon was charged with Assault, 4th Degree (Domestic Violence) Minor Injury, Assault, 4th Degree (No Visible Injury) Wanton Endangerment – 1st Degree and Strangulation 1st Degree.

 

Krista Meece, 48, of Russell Springs was taken into custody by Officer Justice with the Russell Springs Police Department on Sunday. Meece was charged with Failure to Register Transfer of Motor Vehicle, Failure of Non-Owner Operator to Maintain Required Insurance 1st Offense, Failure to Produce Insurance Card, Driving on a DUI Suspended License – 1st Offense, Possession of Marijuana and Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession.

 

Both were lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

 

Tyler Thompson, 29, of Columbia, was arrested by KSP Trooper Lunz last night and charged with Failure to Give Right-of-way to Emergency Vehicle, Booster Seat Violations, Operating Motor Vehicle Under the Influence of Alcohol – 2nd Aggravated Circumstances and Wanton Endangerment – 2nd Degree.

 

Johnathan Lawhorn, 23, of Russell Springs with arrested by Deputy Cross the Adair County Sheriff’s Office on Sunday evening. Lawhorn was charged with Assault 4th Degree (Domestic Violence) Minor Injury, Menacing and Resisting Arrest.

 

Denzel Alcorn, 24, of Russell Springs was arrested by Columbia Police Dept. Officer Burton last evening. Alcorn was charged with Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession and Possession of a Controlled Substance.  

 

They were lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

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WEEKEND ARRESTS 08-17-20

 

  • Joshua Eugene York, 33, of Russell Springs - arrested Saturday by Office Justice with the RSPD and charged with Assault 4th degree (Domestic Violence), Resisting Arrest, Disorderly Conduct, Menacing, Violation of a Kentucky EPO/DVO, and Terroristic Threatening 3rd degree.
 
Lodged in the Russell Co. Detention Center.
 
 
  • Tracy Huff, 46, Monticello – arrested Sunday afternoon by KSP for Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (Opiates), Prescription Controlled Substance Not in Proper Container, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Failure to Produce Insurance Card.
  • Austin Weller, 25, Columbia - arrested Saturday night by the ACSO for DUI, Possession of Marijuana, Reckless Driving, and 3 counts of Wanton Endangerment 2nd degree.
  • Kelsey Allen, 41, Westmoreland, TN - arrested by KSP on Saturday night for Possession of Open Alcoholic Beverage Container in Motor Vehicle, DUI, and Failure to Wear Seatbelt.
  • Preslie Anne Lawless, 24, Columbia – arrested by Columbia Police on Saturday for DUI and No Seatbelt
  • Reginald O’Connor of Columbia - arrested by KSP on Saturday for Registered Sex Offender Public Playground Restrictions.
 
These individuals were lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.
 

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390 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 3 MORE DEATHS - 08/16/20

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 16, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Sunday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“The total number of new COVID-19 cases has increased this week which shows the disease is still very active in Kentucky, but on a positive note it appears that Kentuckians have stopped the exponential growth of the virus,” Gov. Beshear said. “Team Kentucky has again shown that if we socially distance, wear masks and wash our hands, we have a better chance of continuing to reopen our economy safely and get more Kentuckians back to school and work.”

 

Case Information
As of 2:00pmCT on Sunday,  Aug. 16, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 39,315 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 390 of which were newly reported Sunday. 13 of the newly reported cases were from children age 5 and younger.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 3 new deaths Sunday, raising the total to 813 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

“That’s three more families who are suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The deaths reported Sunday were all women: a 67-year-old from Fayette County, a 73-year-old from Perry County and a 91-year-old from Franklin County.

 

Due to limited reporting on Sundays, some statistics are unavailable until Monday.

 

“In Kentucky, the mortality rate is 2.1% compared to 3.2% nationally,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “This success is a combination of accomplishments including keeping COVID-19 from spreading out of control, excellent health care and more widespread testing than many other states.”

 

Even so, Dr. Stack urged, “We can’t allow ourselves to forget that this virus spreads rapidly and is very dangerous. Let’s continue to come together as Team Kentucky to keep ourselves, our friends, families and communities as safe as possible.”

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

More Information
To read more about this week’s updates, including those on school reopening, restaurants and bars, behavioral health care, the state budget, CARES Act funding for Area Development Districts, the virtual ribbon-cutting ceremony for Abandoned Mine Lands pilot projects, CARES Act reimbursements for local governments, Volunteer Kentucky, Dr. Stack’s guidance and groundbreaking ceremonies at the Pikeville Medical Center, visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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LCDHD: COVID-19 Likely to Spread Rapidly in Schools if Students Return to In-Person Classes

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 47 deaths resulting in a 3.3% mortality rate among known cases.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 17 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 141 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.8% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 60% of ICU beds and 29% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 30 cases today from isolation (recovered). Released cases include: Adair: 5; Casey: 1; Clinton: 2; Green: 4; Pulaski: 14; Russell: 1; and, Taylor: 3. In all, we have released 82.6% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,445 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 204 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 56 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 12 today: Adair: 1; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 1; Green: 1; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 4; Russell: 1; and, Taylor: 1. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 44.46 days.
 

The new cases include:

  • Adair: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, missing info
  • Cumberland: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, missing info
  • Russell: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, missing info
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

It has been a challenging week for us and many of our community leaders as we have grappled with the decision to return to school in-person or not.

Undoubtedly, this is a complex and difficult decision with many valid variables to consider. From a purely public health perspective, we feel anything that encourages gatherings should be strongly discouraged until there is a vaccine. However, we know society will not tolerate that level of restriction.

 

Schools represent a series of difficult challenges. How do you enforce social distancing during transportation, mealtime, class exchanges etcetera? Will children be truly vigilant in wearing their face-coverings? Each school in our district has produced very well thought out re-opening plans that align with the state’s “Healthy at School” guidelines as they existed prior to the Governor shifting the guidelines to a recommendation not to return just yet to in-person instruction.

 

Will COVID-19 spread within the schools at an accelerated rate if they return to in-person instruction? Very likely it will. In fact, it is happening as we speak at many schools across our nation that have aleady reopened. Also, despite extreme, extreme measures being taken at long-term care facilities, once inside the building, in many instances, COVID-19 has spread rapidly. The “Healthy at School” guidelines are not nearly as restrictive as are the long-term care facility guidelines. We have also witnessed COVID-19 in many instances spread in environments were groups gather in confined spaces like churches, businesses, and medical facilities.

 

The question our society faces right now in terms of schools reopening to face-to-face instruction is, “Is the remedy (virtual classes to avoid the spread of COVID-19) worse than the problem (the significant chance of causing a community spike in COVID-19 cases [and the mortality and hospitalizations that would undoubtedly follow] if schools return to face-to-face instruction)?” Each community will have to answer that question for itself. Again, from a purely public health perspective, any activity that encourages social gathering should be strongly discouraged until there is a vaccine.

 

Our hospitalizations remained at 17 today. On a positive note, our total new cases for the week dropped to a 5-week low and our active cases dropped by 72 (meaning we released 72 more cases as recovered than we added new cases). Let’s not conclude that one week’s worth of data is a trend, but we are happy for the immediate downturn.

 

Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,445 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 38,976 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/15/20 (this includes 38,930 statewide plus 46 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).

 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.

 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.



 

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638 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 6 MORE DEATHS 08-15-20

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 15, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“Saturday’s COVID report unfortunately suggests this is going to be the highest week of total cases that we’ve ever had, though our positivity rate is going down a little bit,” said Gov. Beshear. “Folks, this thing is real. We are at war with it and we are going to have to be the strong, resilient and also patient Kentuckians that we are to make sure that we prevent loss of life, that we promote health and that we protect our children, that we should never, ever experiment with.”

 

Case Information
As of 3pmCT on Saturday, Aug. 15, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 38,930 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 638 of which were newly reported Saturday. Seventeen of the newly reported cases were from children age 5 and younger.

 

The Governor highlighted how more young Kentuckians are testing positive, especially in the hot spots, as the new school year approaches. “When you look at how hard children are being hit now, 322 people under the age of 18 have tested positive since the beginning of this in Warren County alone.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 6 new deaths Saturday, raising the total to 810 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

“That’s six other families who are suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The deaths reported Saturday included two men from Jefferson County, ages 71 and 85; a 57-year-old woman from Jefferson County; a 74-year-old man from Graves County; a 72-year-old man from Nicholas County, and an 89-year-old man from McCracken County.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health, said, “We all have crucial roles to play in the battle against the novel coronavirus. Now, more than ever, we have to renew our commitment to work together to protect ourselves, our friends, our families, and our communities. This week outpaced the number of new cases last week and, if we become complacent, our hard-fought containment of the coronavirus could slip from our grasp.”

 

We have to take this coronavirus seriously, Dr. Stack said. “Every person who avoids crowds, wears a face covering in public, maintains a social distance of at least six feet, and frequently washes their hands makes essential and invaluable contributions to our ability to fight this pandemic. If we all do these things consistently, we can suppress COVID-19 enough to more safely open schools and engage in many activities so important to our lives.”

 

As of Saturday, at least 754,985 tests had been administered. The COVID-19 testing positive rate, based on a seven-day rolling average, taking into account total positive tests reported by laboratories divided by total tests reported by labs, stood at 5.45%. The number of Kentuckians who have recovered stood at 9,091.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

Week in Review

 

To read more about this week’s updates, including those on school reopeningrestaurants and barsbehavioral health carethe state budgetCARES Act funding for Area Development Districts, the virtual ribbon-cutting ceremony for Abandoned Mine Lands pilot projects, CARES Act reimbursements for local governmentsVolunteer KentuckyDr. Stack’s guidance and groundbreaking ceremonies at the Pikeville Medical Center, visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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679 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 8 MORE DEATHS - 08/14/20

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 14, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Friday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“In my core, I want to get our kids back in classes. I want to get my kids back in class,” said Gov. Beshear. “My job is to tell people when I don’t believe it’s safe even if it’s unpopular. It is my job to make sure I do the very best I can for Kentuckians.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Friday, Aug. 14, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 38,298 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 679 of which were newly reported Friday. 22 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger.

 

“Today we continue to see high numbers of COVID-19 cases,” said Gov. Beshear. “At best we are at a plateau thanks to people’s wearing of facial coverings and we still need more time to reach a decline to get this state in the place we really need to be to do so many activities that we want.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 8 new deaths Friday, raising the total to 804 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Friday include an 85-year-old woman from Bell County; an 85-year-old woman from Casey County; a 63-year-old woman from Christian County; two women, ages 82 and 92, from Franklin County; a 75-year-old woman from Hopkins County; an 83-year-old woman from Jefferson County; and a 77-year-old woman from Lewis County.

 

“Those are most likely moms, grandmothers, sisters, who people have lost,” said Gov. Beshear. “Aunts, loved ones. So let’s make sure that for them we are strong, we light those green lights and we ring those bells every day at 10 a.m.”

 

As of Friday, there have been at least 743,500 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.68%. At least 9,021 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Gov. Beshear, Secretary of State Adams Finalize Plan for Safe General Election
Today, Gov. Beshear and Secretary of State Michael Adams announced a bipartisan agreement to allow Kentuckians to exercise their right to vote in the November General Election while protecting their health during the ongoing global pandemic.

 

On Friday, Secretary Adams sent Gov. Beshear a formal letter of recommendation, and the Governor issued an Executive Order that outlines procedures for the state’s General Election, to be held Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020.

 

“Secretary Adams and I were able to put partisanship aside and develop a plan for the General Election that puts the health and safety of Kentuckians first,” Gov. Beshear said. “This plan provides more time and options to vote in this General Election than ever before.”

 

“Gov. Beshear and I worked together across the partisan divide to fashion election rules that are fair to every voter regardless of party,” Secretary Adams said. “We kept the best of what worked in the June primary, especially giving voters options to safely cast their votes, and we built on that record with improvements – more in-person voting locations and faster election results.”

 

To learn more, read the full release detailing their agreement.

 

Kentucky Agricultural Finance Corporation Approves $1.3 Million in Loans
The Kentucky Agricultural Finance Corporation (KAFC) today approved $1,314,319 in seven agricultural loans for projects in the commonwealth at its board meeting.

 

“This is an area where we can lead the county but we’ve got to be innovative,” said Gov. Beshear. “We can’t just do things the way we’ve always done. This is an area where the next breakthroughs are going to be as important as in any other industry.”

 

To read more about each approved project, read the full release on KAFC’s board meeting.

 

Week in Review
To read more about this week’s updates, including those on school reopening, restaurants and bars, behavioral health care, the state budget, CARES Act funding for Area Development Districts, the virtual ribbon-cutting ceremony for Abandoned Mine Lands pilot projects, CARES Act reimbursements for local governments, Volunteer Kentucky, Dr. Stack’s guidance and groundbreaking ceremonies at the Pikeville Medical Center, visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Gov. Beshear, Secretary of State Adams Reach Agreement on General Election Procedures

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 14, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear and Secretary of State Michael Adams announced a bipartisan agreement to allow Kentuckians to exercise their right to vote in the November General Election while protecting their health during the ongoing global pandemic.

 

On Friday, Secretary Adams sent Gov. Beshear a formal letter of recommendation, and the Governor issued an Executive Order that outlines procedures for the state’s General Election, to be held Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020.

 

“Secretary Adams and I were able to put partisanship aside and develop a plan for the General Election that puts the health and safety of Kentuckians first,” Gov. Beshear said. “This plan provides more time and options to vote in this General Election than ever before.”

 

“Gov. Beshear and I worked together across the partisan divide to fashion election rules that are fair to every voter regardless of party,” Secretary Adams said. “We kept the best of what worked in the June primary, especially giving voters options to safely cast their votes, and we built on that record with improvements – more in-person voting locations, and faster election results.”

 

Gov. Beshear and Secretary Adams also worked across party lines to reach an agreement ahead of Kentucky’s primary elections, which were considered a national model and a success in the commonwealth and across the country with near record turnout while allowing Kentuckians to vote safely during the pandemic.

 

In the weeks ahead, the Governor, Secretary of State, State Board of Elections and local election officials will educate Kentuckians on the General Election plan.

 

Details of the plan include:
 

Absentee ballot by mail

  • Kentuckians concerned with contracting or spreading COVID-19 can request a ballot by mail.
  • An online portal will launch within the week to allow Kentuckians to request a ballot by mail. Ballots can be requested through the portal through Oct. 9, and through traditional means after.
  • Mail ballots must be postmarked by Election Day, Nov. 3, and received by Nov. 6.
  • Drop boxes will be available for Kentuckians to return their mail ballots if they are concerned about postal delays. County clerks will determine these locations.


Early voting

  • Beginning Oct. 13, three weeks before the election, every work day between Oct. 13 and Election Day, and every Saturday for at least four hours, every county clerk will provide a location for safe in-person voting.
  • Early voting is not absentee voting – anyone can vote early for any reason.


Election Day voting

  • County election officials will decide election sites on Election Day. The State Board of Elections, Secretary of State and Governor will approve each plan.
  • Every county will have at least one voting super-center, where everyone from the county can go to vote, regardless of his or her precinct.


Voter identification

  • Kentuckians who were unable to get a driver’s licenses or photo ID due to the pandemic because their clerk’s office was closed, or because they were afraid of exposing themselves to COVID-19, can sign a document explaining this concern and cast their ballot.


For more information on the state’s response to COVID-19 visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

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CASEY CO. TEEN DEAD FROM INJURIES SUSTAINED IN ADAIR CO. BICYCLE VS VEHICLE ACCIDENT

 

17-year-old Avel Gundorin has passed away as a result of injuries sustained in a vehicle vs pedestrian collision on Tuesday, August 11th, 2020 on Hwy East 80 in Adair County.

 

The collision occurred 4 miles east of Columbia on KY80. Upon arrival and investigation it was found that an unknown young, white male was pushing his bike in the middle of the roadway, going west toward Columbia. A 2007 Chevy pickup, operated by William Bryant, 79 of Columbia who was also traveling west, came over a small rise and struck the male who was in the roadway. The young man had no I.D. but the Adair Co. Sheriff's Office eventually discovered his identity with family members identifying him after seing a picture taken from a security camera.

 

Gundorin was flown to the University of KY Medical Center in Lexington, KY where he had been in the Intensive Care Unit since Wednesday. Again, Vundorin succumbed to his injuries earlier today (Friday).

 

 


 

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CENSUS WORKERS IN THE AREA


A Census worker (with a badge/picture ID) could possibly show up on your property. This is of major importance to our local counties. It is required by law and is confidential. We need this “people” count! Census workers are sworn federal employees with a picture ID carrying a Census hand held device (smart phone).

 

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AREA ARREST 8-14-20


Beverly Ballard, 59, of Burkesville was arrested by Officer Williams with the Burkesville Police Department last night. Ballard was charged with Operating a Motor Vehicle under the Influence of Alcohol/Drugs .08 1st Offense, Possession of a Controlled Substance, 3rd Degree – Drug Unspecified, Prescription Controlled Substance not in Proper Container 1st Offense, and Rear License not Illuminated. She was lodged into the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 8-14-2020

Russell County 2 new cases Thursday, a 59 year old female and a 52 year old female which are both on self-isolation. We had 9 cases released from isolation yesterday. We now have 20 active cases which 18 are on self-isolation and 2 are hospitalized, 1 In Somerset and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County NO NEW CASES of COVID19 Thursday. We released 2 cases yesterday. We have 24 active cases with 22 in home isolation and 2 in an area hospital.

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RUSSELL SPRINGS CITY COUNCIL MEETING RECAP...


The Russell Springs City Council met in regular session Thursday night. Mayor Eddie Thomas tells WAVE listeners what took place…

 

 

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24 New Cases in Lake Cumberland District and Another Death

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Casey. We have experienced a total of 47 deaths resulting in a 3.3% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 17 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 138 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.7% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 63% of ICU beds and 23% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 25 cases today from isolation (recovered). Released cases include: Adair: 2; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 3; Green: 1; Pulaski: 9; and, Russell: 9. In all, we have released 79.5% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,417 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 243 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 60 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 24 today: Casey: 4; Green: 2; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 11; Russell: 2; and, Taylor: 2. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.019. This means our total case count is projected to double every 37.7 days.

 

The new cases include:

  • Casey: A 21-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, missing info
  • Green: A 93-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is released, 8/08/20
  • Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is released, 7/23/20
    Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, missing info
  • Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, missing info
  • Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, missing info
  • Taylor: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, missing info
  • Taylor: A 10 months-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

Today has been a real struggle.  The death reported today was a 91-year-old female from Casey. Our current number of hospitalized increased by 4 to 17.


A lot of emotions are running high today as schools struggle with the decision to re-open to in-person instruction or not. There are strong emotions on both sides of issue. Both sides make valid points. Unfortunately, there is no good answer and each community will have to decide which “bitter pill to swallow”. We have little doubt, though, that COVID-19 will spread throughout the schools if face-to-face classes resume. We sincerely hope and pray we are wrong about that.

 

Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding  the touching of your face.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,417 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 37,766 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/13/20 (this includes 37,686 statewide plus 80 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.


 

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785 New Covid-19 Cases in KY & 6 More Deaths

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 13, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Thursday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“Wearing a facial covering is absolutely critical to what we want to be able to do in the commonwealth moving forward,” said Gov. Beshear. “Protect lives, protect people’s health, protect the economy and ultimately get our kids back to in-person classes.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 37,686 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 785 of which were newly reported Thursday. Twenty-five of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger.

 

“We know that we have a lot of work to do to create the type of safe environments that we need to,” said Gov. Beshear. “Wearing a facial covering is working. Other steps are working. But we need you to stick with it. We cannot make decisions that are going to cause a significant spread.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 6 new deaths Thursday, raising the total to 796 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Thursday include a 56-year-old man from Carter County; an 80-year-old woman from Fayette County; two women, ages 82 and 89, and a 92-year-old man from Jefferson County; and a 74-year-old man from Taylor County.

 

“Let’s make sure we continue those green lights and ringing those bells,” said Gov. Beshear. “That’s for these families. Let’s honor those we’ve lost.”

 

As of Thursday, there have been at least 730,362 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.67%. At least 8,965 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

“We had more than 100,000 kids test positive nationwide just in the last couple weeks of July. We are seeing an explosion of positive tests among our young people,” said Gov. Beshear. “We cannot experiment with the health of our children.”

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Dr. Stack Update
Today, Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, demonstrated how the commonwealth’s recent actions against COVID-19, including the statewide face coverings mandate, have flattened our curve of cases in comparison with other Southern states, like Georgia.

 

“When some of these states barreled forward, in Kentucky, we had a very measured and phased approach,” said Dr. Stack. “I think what we see is that the mask mandate is what impacted and hopefully flattened our curve.”

 

Dr. Stack also discussed how starting the K-12 school year virtually will give districts more time to prepare for a safe reopening later in the fall, as public health officials continue to learn more about how to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in classrooms, cafeterias, school buses and other spaces.

 

“Some schools have had to quarantine many students within days of kicking off the school year. I very much support the decision that the Governor made. I respect it’s a very difficult decision, but our disease burden for COVID-19 is at its all-time high,” said Dr. Stack. “We need to get kids back to school but we need to get kids back to school safely.”

 

Finally, Dr. Stack reminded Kentuckians that while the world is still waiting for a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine, each of us can already protect ourselves, our families and our communities from another illness by getting our annual flu vaccine. Dr. Stack has also previously urged parents to keep children on their regular schedule for all other required and recommended vaccines.

 

“Get your flu shot. We need everyone to do this. We have to keep influenza as suppressed as we possibly can,” said Dr. Stack. “In a bad year with influenza, our hospitals are strained just keeping up with flu patients.”

 

State Launches New Website to Support Nonprofit Organizations
Today, Gov. Beshear and Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) Secretary Eric Friedlander announced many nonprofits now have free access to the state's new volunteer recruitment and management website, Volunteer Kentucky.

 

The new website, through Serve Kentucky, a CHFS agency, aims to provide efficient volunteer recruitment and management system, facilitating Kentuckians' search for, and response to service opportunities within their communities. The site will also help better track volunteerism in Kentucky.

 

“Kentuckians are generous people and are always stepping up to give back and help one another in a safe way during these unprecedented times,” Gov. Beshear said. “Through this new platform, more of our nonprofits have the ability to recruit new volunteers to help support many worthy causes.”

 

For more information, read the full release.

 

Virtual Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony for Abandoned Mine Lands Pilot Projects
Gov. Beshear and Rep. Harold “Hal” Rogers (KY-05) hosted the first-ever virtual ribbon-cutting ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda Thursday to celebrate the completion of Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Pilot Program economic development and tourism-related projects in Perry, Floyd and Clay counties.

 

They also applauded the beginning of new construction at the EastPark Industrial Site spanning Boyd, Carter, Elliott, Greenup and Lawrence counties. The projects are a result of multiple investments, including more than $14 million in Abandoned Mine Lands Pilot Program grants.

 

Gov. Beshear praised the projects as a positive step for the region, which has seen coal severance funds diminish.

 

“I am committed to bringing economic opportunity to all regions of Kentucky, to create good jobs and make life better for every Kentucky family,” Gov. Beshear said.

 

“We’ve already made great strides in bringing greater investment to the region. In the coming months and years, more and more of these projects will continue, bringing jobs and economic diversity to Eastern Kentucky.”

 

To learn more, read the full release.

 

Nearly $4 Million Approved in CARES Act Reimbursements for Local Governments
In collaboration with the Department for Local Government (DLG), today, Gov. Beshear announced 15 Eastern Kentucky governments were approved for $3,891,092 in reimbursements from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act for local governments with expenses related to COVID-19.

 

“Our local governments have been lifelines in our communities during the COVID-19 pandemic, which is why this funding is so important,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

“We are grateful for their hard work and dedication to keeping Kentuckians safe.”

 

For more information, read the full release.

 

School Opening Guidance
On Monday, Gov. Beshear, in consultation with Kentucky teachers and school administrators, announced new guidance asking schools to wait until Sept. 28 to begin in-person classes.

 

The Governor said the decision was driven by four factors: Kentucky’s cases being near a peak, an increase in infection rates among children across the U.S., the experience of school districts in other states and families continuing to travel to hotspots for vacations against the advice of health officials.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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ADAIR CO. MAN ARRESTED ON BURGLARY CHARGES....

 
On Tuesday, August 11, 2020  the Adair County Sheriff's Office filed for arrest warrants on Adrian Stotts, 38, of Columbia, KY.  The arrest came as a result of an investigation that originated on August 9th,2020 where a building and a vehicle were broken into in the Glensfork community of Adair County. Firearms and power tools were stolen during the break-in.
 
Adrian Stotts was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail on charges of Burglary 1st degree and Theft by Unlawful Taking (Firearms). The stolen items were recovered and will be returned to the rightful owner.   
 
Chief Deputy Justin Cross is investigating the incident.
 

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AREA ARRESTS 8-13-20

 

  • Adam Mann, 35, of Russell Springs was taken into custody by Deputy Perkins of the Russell County Sheriff’s Office on Wednesday.  Mann was charged with 2 Counts of Probation Violation (for Felony Offense), 2 Counts of Possession of a Controlled Substance (Meth) and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
  • James West, 57, of Russell Springs was arrested by Deputy Perkins just on Wednesday evening. He was charged with Disorderly Conduct, 2nd Degree and Menacing.


Both were lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

  • Anthony Gilbert, 28, of Burkesville, KY was arrested by Deputy Daniels with the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office on Wednesday afternoon. He was charged with Burglary, 3rd Degree, Theft by Unlawful Taking (from building) $500 or more but under $10,000, Theft by Unlawful Taking (all others) $500 or more but under $10,000, Fleeing or Evading Police, 1st Degree (on foot). 


Gilbert was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 8-13-20

 

 

Russell County 1 new case today, which is a 62 year old female who is on self-isolation. We had 3 cases released from isolation today. We now have 27 active cases which 25 are on self-isolation and 2 are hospitalized. 1 in Somerset and 1 at Russell County Hospital. Today, there will be a free drive thru testing clinic off of Dowell Road across from the Russell County Hospital 10:00 to 2:00 pm sponsored by Russell County Hospital, Lake Cumberland District Health Department and Russell County Emergency Management.

 

In Adair County yesterday also 1 new case of COVID19 to report. We have had 237 total cases with 192 recovered and 19 deaths. We have 26 active cases with 24 in home isolation and 2 in area hospitals.

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1 New COVID-19 Death in Casey County; Nursing Home Outbreak in Green County

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Casey. We have experienced a total of 46 deaths resulting in a 3.3% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 13 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 135 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.7% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 62% of ICU beds and 23% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 23 cases today from isolation (recovered). Released cases include: Casey: 1; Cumberland: 4; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 10; Russell: 3; Taylor: 3; and, Wayne: 1. In all, we have released 79.1% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,393 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 245 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 61 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 36 today: Adair: 1; Casey: 2; Clinton: 2; Green: 13; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 6; Russell: 1; Taylor: 6; and, Wayne: 2. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.018. This means our total case count is projected to double every 39.41 days.

 

The new cases include:

  • Adair: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, missing info
  • Casey: A 85-year-old female who is deceased, expired
  • Clinton: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 42-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 95-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

Today has been challenging. The death reported was an 85-year-old female from Casey. Also, we have now experienced another nursing home outbreak, this time in Green County where 16 residents and/or staff are currently positive.

 

We are now hearing that some of the public schools will likely return by way of in-person instruction. I have consulted personally with several area Superintendents today. Our advice must agree with that of the Governor and the Kentucky Department of Public Health. That is, it would be best to wait. I have fielded some complaints today that we (the health department) had recently reviewed the schools’ reopening plans and found them to be consistent with the guidance. It is true, all the schools put a lot of thought into their plans and those plans did align with the guidance that was in place at the moment the plans were reviewed. Today’s guidance from the Governor and the Kentucky Department of Public Health, though, has evolved.

 

We look anxiously forward to the day a vaccine for COVID-19 is developed and we can transition from a containment to a vaccination plan. Until then, please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.


The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,393 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 37,060 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/12/20 (this includes 36,945 statewide plus 115 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.


 

 

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Positive ID of pedestrian involved in collision made....

 

Around noon today (Wednesday), the Adair County Sheriff’s Office learned of a young male from Casey County that had just been reported missing. Casey County Sheriff Chad Weddle confirmed that a missing person’s report had just been filed, and that the boy had left home yesterday (Tuesday).
 

Adair County Sheriff Josh Brockman contacted the boy’s family who advised he would be on a bike and would have a large black backpack on. These, along with other descriptors given to Chief Deputy Justin Cross, matched the description of the pedestrian. The photo taken from a local business security camera was shown to the family who identified the teenager. Sheriff Brockman then directed them to the University of KY Medical Center Intensive Care Unit.
 

The Adair County Sheriff’s Office received a call from the family around 6:00pmCT this evening (Wednesday) that it was indeed a member of their family, 17-year-old Avel Vundorin of Casey County. Vundorin is still listed in very critical condition. 

 
The Adair County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the community for all the calls they received today. Sheriff Brockman tells WAVE News that they followed up on every one of them. Please keep this young man and his family in your prayers. 
 
 

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1,163 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 7 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 12, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Wednesday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

The Governor said he was feeling better a day after he and First Lady Britainy Beshear felt ill and the family was tested for the coronavirus.

 

“I am happy to report that both the First Lady and I and our kids and everybody that’s working around us tested negative for COVID yesterday, but we tried to take every precaution that we would want other people to take,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 36,945 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 1,163 of which were newly reported Wednesday. 39 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger.

 

“I believe today will be our single highest number of positive cases that we’ve had. Today we’ve set a record that we never wanted to set, going over 1,000 cases,” the Governor said. “Now, if there is good news in this, it is with the number of tests with the seven-day average, our positivity rate is actually down a little bit. But we need to get that much, much lower.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 7 new deaths Wednesday, raising the total to 790 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Wednesday include a 71-year-old man from Barren County; a 73-year-old woman from Christian County; a 75-year-old woman from Fayette County; two women, ages 85 and 87, from Jefferson County; a 71-year-old man from Meade County; and an 80-year-old man from Oldham County.

 

In an effort to show the human stories behind the numbers, Gov. Beshear has highlighted some of the Kentuckians taken from us too soon by the deadly coronavirus. On Wednesday, he spoke about William “Curtiss” Ice of Nelson County, who passed away at age 72 after fighting COVID-19.

 

Ice served in the Kentucky National Guard Battalion 138th Field Artillery, before a career as a manufacturing engineer with General Electric. After retiring, he returned to his passion of farming where he remained active in agriculture and beef cattle.

 

“Above all else, Curtiss was proud of his family and loved helping serve people in need,” the Governor said. “Those who knew him described Curtiss as intelligent, amiable and ‘downright jolly.’ You’d often see him supporting his grandchildren in their sports or academics, or using his leadership qualities in organizations throughout the area.”

 

Ice is survived by his loving wife of 49 years, Wanda, his three children, seven grandchildren and 10 siblings.

 

As of Wednesday, there have been at least 717,370 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.62%. At least 8,893 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

$6 Million to Aid Kentucky Area Development Districts
Gov. Beshear announced today that Kentucky’s 15 Area Development Districts will have access to $6 million through the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act to reimburse costs associated with the fight against COVID-19.

 

“Our Area Development Districts are critical parts of our local communities,” said Gov. Beshear. “These funds come at a crucial time when we are looking for ways to strengthen our communities and thoughtfully provide new opportunities, while continuing to keep Kentuckians safe. I am confident their guidance and this funding will help our cities and counties develop recovery plans that will help us come out of COVID-19 stronger than before.”

 

The funding will be split equally among the ADDs, totaling approximately $392,000 each. The remaining 1% each year will cover administrative costs for Department for Local Government. A list of Kentucky ADDs and their areas of service is available here.

 

Travel Advisory Update
Gov. Beshear offered an update on his administration’s travel advisory, which recommends a 14-day self-quarantine for Kentuckians who travel to states and U.S. territories that are reporting a positive coronavirus testing rate equal to or greater than 15%.

 

The current areas meeting this threshold include Washington State, Florida, Nevada, Mississippi, Idaho, South Carolina, Texas, Alabama and Arizona.

 

For an updated list of areas meeting that threshold, click here.

 

School Opening Guidance
On Monday, Gov. Beshear, in consultation with Kentucky teachers and school administrators, announced new guidance asking schools to wait until Sept. 28 to begin in-person classes.

 

The Governor said the decision was driven by four factors: Kentucky’s cases being near a peak, an increase in infection rates among children across the U.S., the experience of school districts in other states and families continuing to travel to hotspots for vacations against the advice of health officials.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Unknown Bicyclist Remains in Critical Condition; Public's Help Needed in Finding his Family...


Unknown man remains in critical condition after a vehicle vs pedestrian collision yesterday.

On 8-11-20 at 4:06pmCT, the Adair County Sheriffs Office responded to a call received by Adair 911 of a vehicle vs pedestrian collision 4 miles east of Columbia in KY80. Upon arrival and investigation it was found that an unknown white male, who appears to be in his early to mid 20’s, was pushing his bike in the middle of the roadway going west toward Columbia. A 2007 Chevy pickup, operated by William Bryant, 79 of Columbia who was also traveling west, came over a small rise and struck the male who was in the roadway.

At this time we have no positive ID on the pedestrian. A picture has been distributed to local and state media that was taken from a security camera a few hours prior to the collision. The bicyclist had no form of ID on him or any information leading to who he was or where he came from. The Sheriffs Ooffice has information he was seen in Casey County and Russell County earlier In the day. Sheriff Brockman says they are tracking down all leads but have had no success in making ID .   


At this time he is in critical condition, and any information the public has that may help in finding his family would be greatly appreciated.
 

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233 ACTIVE COVID-19 CASES IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT


Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 45 deaths resulting in a 3.3% mortality rate among known cases.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 12 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 132 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.7% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 62% of ICU beds and 23% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 27 cases today from isolation (recovered). Released cases include: Adair: 2; Casey: 8; Clinton: 1; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 7; Russell: 5; and, Taylor: 1. In all, we have released 79.5% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,357 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 233 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 48 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 13 today: Casey: 2; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 2; Pulaski: 3; Russell: 3; Taylor: 1; and, Wayne: 1. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.02. This means our total case count is projected to double every 33.91 days.

 

The new cases include:

  • Casey: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

We are glad to be able to report no new deaths. Our hospitalized cases increased by 2 to a total of 12. We released 14 more cases today as recovered than we added new cases. Our growth rate now projects our total cases to double about every 34 days.

 

Most of the area public schools have decided to start the school off via a virtual modality. Most of the private schools still plan on going in-person. At least this will allow us to evaluate how quickly COVID-19 will spread in a school setting on a “smaller scale” than if all schools had elected to returned to in-person instruction. We will learn a lot between now and October.

 

Please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,357 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 35,928 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/11/20 (this includes 35,793 statewide plus 135 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread.
 

The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.

 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 8-12-20

 

Russell County with 3 new cases yesterday. We had 5 cases released Tuesday. We now have 29 active cases which 27 are on self-isolation and 2 are hospitalized, 1 in Somerset and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County with no new cases on Tuesday...

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Local ARREST 8-12-20


A Russell Springs man was arrested on several charges early this morning. Perry Bryant Bishop, 25, was taken into custody by Officer Justice with the Russell Springs Police Department just after 3:30 this morning. He was charged with: Fleeing or Evading Police, 1st Degree (Motor Vehicle), Fleeing or Evading Police, 2nd Degree (on Foot), Criminal Mischief, 1st Degree, Reckless Driving, Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth), Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/ Possession, Wanton Endangerment – 1st Degree, Driving too Fast for Traffic Conditions, Operating on a Suspended or Revoked License, The by Deception-Include Cold Checks under $10,000, Theft of Identity of Another Without Consent, and Forgery, 2nd Degree. Bishop was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

Ellen Nicole Hodge, 24, of Columbia was taken into custody by Officer Foster with the Columbia Police Department, just before midnight last night. Hodge was charged with Menacing, Resisting Arrest and Disorderly Conduct, 1st Degree. She was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.  

 

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Police Need Help in Identifying Bicyclist Critically Injured in Accident....


The Adair County Sheriff’s Office is needing assistance identifying the young man seen here on the bicycle. This photo is from a security camera taken on KY East 80 approximately 2 hrs before he was struck by a vehicle 4 miles east of Columbia on 80. The young man was airlifted out and is in critical condition. He had no identification with him and authorities are unable to find anyone who knows him.
     
If you have any information you think could help identify him, please call Adair County 911 and ask to speak to the deputy on duty or to Sheriff Brockman.   

 

 

 

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ADAIR COUNTY FISCAL COURT MET TUESDAY NIGHT

Adair County Fiscal Court met Tuesday night. Jim Liebe covered the meeting for 92.7 the Wave...

 

 

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562 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 8 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 11, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Tuesday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

Earlier Tuesday, the Governor and First Lady Britainy Beshear were not feeling well and, out of an abundance of caution, were tested for COVID-19 to protect themselves and those around them. The test results for Gov. Beshear and his family came back negative for the coronavirus.

 

“I wanted to start by letting you know that both my family and I are OK. We’ve tested negative for COVID-19 after a real scare. And I want to thank everybody out there who sent their thoughts and their prayers,” the Governor said. “This morning, late in the morning, I started feeling bad with a lot of the symptoms that can suggest COVID-19. Because of that I immediately isolated and canceled events we had in the afternoon. A couple hours later, I was tested. And even the short wait that I had to endure gives me newfound empathy for those that are having to wait even a couple days to get their test results back, knowing that they may be separated from their family and wondering what their immediate future is going to be. So I’m going to continue to try to lead with this empathy and hopefully it makes me a better Governor in addressing this virus.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT (4:00pmET) on Tuesday,  Aug. 11, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 35,793 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 562 of which were newly reported Tuesday. 18 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger, including an 18-day-old from Hardin County, a 1-month-old from Rowan County and a 3-month-old from Lincoln County.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 8 new deaths Tuesday, raising the total to 783 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

“This thing is real, it’s out there. We’ve got to make sure we’re doing everything we can to fight it,” the Governor said.

 

“While my family ended up negative today, I know there are a lot of families out there that are positive. We send you our love, we want you to get better. We want to make sure we’re not spreading this to any other family that has to endure any of that hardship.”

 

The deaths reported Tuesday include an 86-year-old man from Grant County; a 79-year-old woman from Hopkins County; three women, ages 54, 65 and 84, and two men, ages 75 and 93, from Jefferson County; and a 60-year-old man from Ohio County.

 

As of Tuesday, there have been at least 711,017 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.87%.

 

“That is a number that is just too high to do a number of things we want to do,” Gov. Beshear said. “It means it’s just not safe at this moment to do a number of things that we’re working toward. But I’m committed, I’m committed to getting our kids back in school in a safe manner.”

 

At least 8,819 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

School Opening Guidance
On Monday, Gov. Beshear and administration officials, in consultation with Kentucky teachers and school administrators, announced new guidance asking schools to wait until Sept. 28 to begin in-person classes.

 

The Governor said the decision was driven by four factors: Kentucky’s cases being near a peak, an increase in infection rates among children across the U.S., the experience of school districts in other states and families continuing to travel to hotspots for vacations against the advice of health officials.

 

Restaurants and Bars Update
Also Monday, La Tasha Buckner, the Governor’s chief of staff and general counsel, offered an update on bars and restaurants operating in the commonwealth.

 

Buckner said a new order, effective today, allows bars to reopen and restaurants to increase their capacity. Both bars and restaurants can operate at 50% of capacity, as long as other guidance requiring social distancing, facial coverings and sanitation is followed.

 

Customers in both bars and restaurants will be required to remain in their seats, except when entering, leaving or using the restroom. In addition, bars and restaurants will be required to halt food and beverage service by 10 p.m. and close at 11 p.m. local time.

 

The full list of requirements is posted on the Healthy at Work website.

 

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KSP INVESTIGATES OFFICER INVOLVED SHOOTING IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY

 

Burkesville, KY. (August 11, 2020) – The Kentucky State Police, Columbia Post is investigating an officer involved shooting that occurred just before 4:30pmCT yesterday afternoon in Cumberland County.

 

The initial investigation indicates that the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Department responded to a residence on Rose of Sharon Road in reference to a domestic violence dispute between a man and a woman. During their investigation, 40 year old Kevin M. Starks of Burkesville, refused to cooperate, and attempted to leave the scene in a 2009 Ford Flex. While leaving, he struck a deputy and a cruiser with his vehicle, at which time shots were fired. Following the shooting, the suspect led deputies on a short pursuit that ended on Glidwell Spur Rd, where Starks was taken into custody without further incident.

 

Kevin Starks was transported to the Cumberland County Hospital with non-life threatening injuries and later airlifted to the University of Kentucky Hospital. The Cumberland County Deputy who was struck by the vehicle was not injured, and criminal charges are pending by the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Department.

 

The ongoing shooting investigation is being conducted by KSP Post 15 Sergeant Adam Likins.

 

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LCDHD REPORT: 1 COVID-19 DEATH IN TAYLOR CO.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Taylor. We have experienced a total of 45 deaths resulting in a 3.3% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 10 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 130 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.7% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 63% of ICU beds and 25% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 41 cases today from isolation (recovered). Released cases include: Adair: 5; Casey: 8; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 5; Green: 1; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 11; Russell: 1; Taylor: 3; and, Wayne: 4. In all, we have released 78.3% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,344 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 247 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 47 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 28 today: Adair: 4; Casey: 2; Clinton: 1; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 9; Russell: 5; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 2. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.02. This means our total case count is projected to double every 30.54 days.

 

The new cases include:

  • Adair: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 67-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 74-year-old male who is deceased, expired
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated

 

We must announce one new COVID-19 related death today, a 74-year-old male from Taylor. We also have one additional hospitalized case over yesterday (from 9 to 10). On the upside, we released 14 more cases today than we added new ones.

 

I just heard in the Governor’s Brief where he is recommending schools be postponed to in-person classes until the end of September. How many of our local school districts will follow this guidance, we will find out over the next few days. Hopefully, a vaccine will be developed by early next calendar year and we can transition from a containment to a vaccination strategy. Like everyone else, we are anxious for things to return to normal.

 

Until then, please help us slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing your face covering, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing your hand hygiene, increasing your general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of your face?

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,344 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 35,409 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/10/20 (this includes 36,254 statewide plus 155 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.

 

https://www.lcdhd.org/2020/08/10/public-information-brief-8-10-20/

 

 

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AREA ARREST 8-11-20

 

A Russellville woman was arrested early Tuesday morning on speeding and drug charges by the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office.

 

Barbara Johnson, 29, was taken into custody by Deputy Daniels and charged with Speeding 16 mph over the limit, Failure to Wear Seat Belt, Operating on a Suspended or Revoked Operators License, and Possession of a Controlled Substance, 1st Degree, 2nd Offense (Meth). Johnson was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

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RC FISCAL COURT MET MONDAY NIGHT...

 

The Russell County Fiscal Court met last evening for its regular monthly meeting. Russell County Judge Exec. Gary Robertson spoke to WAVE NEWS following the meeting... 
 

 

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ADAIR CO. MAN ARRESTED ON ARSON CHARGES...


An Adair County man was arrested for Arson following an early morning fire in the Coburg community.

 
Around 2:30amCT this morning (Monday), August 8, 2020 the Adair County Sheriff's Office was dispatched to the Coburg community in response to a vehicle on fire close to a residence.   
    
As a result of the effort by the Columbia Adair County Fire Department, there was evidence of possible arson that was not consumed by the fire. The 2004 Buick SUV was a total loss, but valuable items to the investigation were recovered. It was determined the fire was intentionally set and 41-year-old Bryan Crozier of Adair County was arrested a couple of hours later. 

He was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail by Deputy Joey Keith on charges of Arson, Wanton Endangerment 2nd degree, and Alcohol Intoxication in Public place 

The Adair County Sheriffs office is continuing the investigation. 

 

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ADAIR CO. FISCAL COURT AUG. 11TH MEETING AGENDA

 
The Adair County Fiscal Court will have a Regular Called meeting Tuesday, August 11, 2020 at 6:00pmCT in the basement of the Adair Annex. This meeting will be open to the public. Masks will be required due to the Governor’s Emergency Executive Order. 
 
AGENDA
 
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
PRAYER
CALL TO ORDER
ROLL CALL
                            
 1.  APPROVAL OF AGENDA
 2.  APPROVAL OF MINUTES 
          A.) July 28, 2020 - MINUTES - REGULAR CALLED
           B.) July 30, 2020 - MINUTES - SPECIAL CALLED  
  
 3.  DISBURSEMENTS
 4.  REPORTS
         A.)  SHERIFF’S REPORT 
          B.)  ROAD DEPARTMENT REPORT 
          C.)  G.R.A.S. REPORT 
          D.)  COMMITTEE REPORTS 
          E.)  JAIL REPORT 
 
 5.  TREASURER
         A.) TREASURER’S REPORT 
 
 6.  BUDGET AMENDMENTS
                                              
 7.  BUDGET TRANFERS 
         A.)  LINE TO LINE TRANSFERS
          B.)  FUND TO FUND TRANSFERS
                                    
 8.   COURT ORDERS 
 9.   READING OF ROADS
 
10.   ACTION ITEMS:                                    
  • REQUEST FOR PAYMENT FOR TRANSFER STATION 
  • PERMISSION TO APPLY FOR AND ALLOW JUDGE TO SIGN LITTER ABATEMENT GRANT 
  • PERMISSON FOR RIGHT OF WAY EASEMENT ON LOY CEM. RD. 
  • PERMISSON TO SIGN CINTAS AGREEMENT FOR ROAD DEPT UNIFORMS, MATS & GRAS SANITIZATON STATION


11.  OTHER BUSINESS

12.  PUBLIC COMMENTS
13.  ADJOURN 
 

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275 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES; 2 NEW DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 10, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Monday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“Let me start by reiterating that we are still in a very difficult, dangerous place with a virus that is spreading so significantly right now,” the Governor said. “One of the foremost experts this morning talked about it raging in the United States. I believe we have stopped the exponential growth, but we can’t just stay where we are. We have got to start decreasing our cases.”

 

School Opening Guidance
Gov. Beshear and administration officials, in consultation with Kentucky teachers and school administrators, on Monday announced new guidance for schools that are planning for the fall semester.

 

“Our recommendation today is that schools wait to begin in-person classes until Sept. 28,” the Governor said. “Yes, that’s six weeks from now, but it’s also six weeks from what I hope is the peak of this virus, six weeks from the last three weeks where we have been at an all-time high week in and week out, six weeks from a time when we just had a 6% positivity rate. Let’s face it, we’re trying really hard and we’ve taken good steps. Masks are working. But we do not have control over this virus. And to send tens of thousands of our kids back into in-person classes when we don’t have control of this virus, it’s not the right thing to do for these kids, it’s not the right thing to do for their faculty and it’s not the right thing to do as Governor.”

 

He said the decision was driven by four factors: Kentucky’s cases being near a peak, an increase in infection rates among children across the U.S., the experience of school districts in other states and families continuing to travel to hotspots for vacations against the advice of health officials.

 

“I think what all of the health care specialists said when we talked about reopening, is we need to be looking at a decline. In other words, we need to get our positive rate down,” the Governor said. “On top of that, what we’re seeing are more outbreaks and more infections in kids. The two hardest things I do every day is read the deaths and the number of kids infected under 5. And it’s not just kids under 5. We’re having record numbers of children that are infected, and it shows this infection spreads to them when we still don’t know the long-term impact. What we do know is children have a harder time social distancing. And we can’t put a whole bunch of them in a classroom with a teacher right now. Other states that have tried to open this new school year are now having to close. We don’t want to start and stop. That may be more difficult on our children.”

 

Restaurants and Bars Update
La Tasha Buckner, the Governor’s chief of staff and general counsel, offered an update on bars and restaurants operating in the commonwealth.

 

“Today we are issuing a new order, effective tomorrow, which will allow bars to reopen and restaurants to increase their capacity,” Buckner said. “Both bars and restaurants can operate at 50% of capacity, as long as people can remain six feet from anyone who is not in their household or group.”

 

She said the reopening and increase in capacity comes with new requirements to avoid another spike in COVID-19 cases. First, customers in both bars and restaurants will be required to remain in their seats, except when entering, leaving or using the restroom.

 

Second, bars and restaurants will be required to halt food and beverage service by 10 p.m. and close at 11 p.m. local time.

 

“Third, as the Governor mentioned previously, the face-covering requirement has been extended as of Sunday for another 30 days,” Buckner said. “Therefore, just like in other businesses, all customers and staff must wear a face covering while in the bar or restaurant except when actively eating or drinking.”

 

The full list of requirements is posted on the Healthy at Work website.

 

Case Information – Monday, Aug. 10
As of 4 p.m. Aug. 10, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 35,254 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 275 of which were newly reported Monday. Thirteen of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger, including five who are less than a year old.

 

The Governor noted that a technical issue with the state’s data processor is causing a delay in some reporting, leading to lower numbers that will be updated later this week.

 

“Today’s number needs to have a giant asterisk on it, because we know that number is higher and will change,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 2 new deaths Monday, raising the total to 775 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Monday include a 60-year-old woman from Graves County and a 98-year-old woman from Lincoln County.

 

“We hope we are getting even better at treating this virus,” said Gov. Beshear. “But these are two families that still need our support, our green lights, those bells and most important, for us all to do the things we know will help prevent more tragic loss.”

 

As of Monday, there have been at least 700,417 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.71%. At least 8,738 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Case Information – Sunday, Aug. 9
Due to limited reporting on the weekends, some updated information is now available from Sunday, Aug. 9.

 

As of Sunday, there were 698,854 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was at 5.74% and at least 8,721 Kentuckians had recovered from the virus.

 

For a detailed look at coronavirus case information from Sunday, Aug. 9, click here.

 

Behavioral Health Care
Eric Friedlander, Secretary of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, also spoke Monday about a new project that Kentucky has been selected to take part in to expand behavior health care treatment.

 

The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently informed Kentucky it had been selected to participate in the Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic demonstration.

 

“In addition to a more efficient payment system, more treatment options for serious mental illness are needed, and that includes attention to opioid addiction,” Secretary Friedlander said.

 

Initial results from an evaluation of the eight original states to participate in the program found positive outcomes across a range of factors, officials said.

 

Secretary Friedlander also provided an update about payment assistance to providers impacted by COVID-19. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has made $15 billion available to help cover lost revenue attributed to the coronavirus, or to help defray the cost of expenses to prevent, prepare or respond to COVID-19. Providers may be eligible for approximately 2% of reported revenue from patient care. The application deadline is Aug. 28, and providers may call 866-569-3522 for more information.

 

State Budget Update
The Office of the State Budget Director announced today that the state’s General Fund receipts for July, the first month of Fiscal Year 2021 (FY21), totaled $905.1 million, a 7% increase compared with July 2019 receipts. Collections for the month were surprisingly strong given the general slowdown in consumer spending arising from the uncertainty of the novel coronavirus.

 

“That’s really good news. It suggests that our economy is still afloat. But we know what it’s taken to keep it afloat,” said Gov. Beshear. “The people of Kentucky are doing what we need them to do with those stimulus and unemployment insurance dollars – they are spending them. They are helping our economy in so many different ways. And so the federal government is going to have to come to some compromise to continue to support state and local governments.”

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

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2 ADAIR COUNTY TEENS ARRESTED ON DRUG CHARGES


On Sunday evening, August 9, 2020 a traffic stop was initiated by the Columbia Police Department near Helen Flatt Drive. The operator could not produce a valid operators license and denied Officers consent to search the vehicle. 


K-9 Unit Nitro was utilized from the Adair Sheriff’s Office and alerted on the vehicle. A search of the vehicle yielded drug paraphernalia and suspected methamphetamine. 

Noah Dial, 18, of Columbia, KY has been charged with No Operators License, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Possession of Methamphetamine 1st offense (a class D felony).


Additionally, Riley Baker, 18, also of Columbia who was a passenger in the vehicle, was charged with possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of Methamphetamine 1st offense and Tampering with Physical Evidence. 

Officer Trevor Foster was the arresting Officer. He was assisted on scene by Deputy Justin Cross and Deputy Josh Durbin.

 

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RUSSELL COUNTY WOMAN ARRESTED ON METH CHARGES


Latisha Bunch, 31, of Russell Springs, KY was taken into custody by Deputy Hughes of the Russell County Sheriff’s Office just after noon on Sunday. Bunch was charged with Assault, 4th Degree (Domestic Violence) with Minor Injury and Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth). She was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.


 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 8-10-20

Russell County 2 new cases Sunday, a 50 year old female and a 51 year old female which are both on self-isolation.We had 1 case released today from isolation. We now have 27 active cases which 26 are on self-isolation and 1 is hospitalized in Lexington at Central Baptist. One of the new cases is symptomatic and the other new case is asymptomatic.

 

Adair County had 1 new case of COVID19 to report Sunday. We released 3 cases today. Adair has 28 active cases with 27 in home isolation and 1 in an area hospital.

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425 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 1 NEW DEATH

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 9, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Sunday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“Some good news and some bad news in today’s COVID-19 report,” the Governor said. “In good news, we’re ending the week with about 330 fewer cases than we had last week. That’s directly attributable to people wearing their facial coverings or masks. Please keep it up, wear them even more, especially when you’re inside. On the bad side, our positivity rate, which won’t be official until tomorrow for this week, will be higher meaning that the virus continues to spread aggressively.”

 

Case Information
As of 3 p.m. Aug. 9, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 34,982 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 425 of which were newly reported Sunday. Nine of the newly reported cases were from children age 5 and younger.

 

“We’ve got a number of counties that have 10 or more new cases – Jefferson, Fayette, Pulaski, Taylor, Hardin, Madison, Casey, Warren and Wayne – and a number that are really close there. So remember no matter where you are in the commonwealth, COVID-19 is spreading,” the Governor said. “Nine new kids under 5 have tested positive, so again let’s make sure we’re protecting each other.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported one new death Sunday, raising the total to 773 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

“That’s yet another family that is suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The death reported Sunday was a 71-year-old man from Pulaski County.

 

Due to limited reporting on Sundays, some statistics are unavailable until Monday.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health, said: “Last week, we saw rising case counts of COVID-19 in all but five Kentucky counties.
 

COVID-19 is still out there and it’s still a threat. We are encouraged, though, by the many Kentuckians taking this seriously and taking steps to keep themselves and others safer, including wearing a mask.”

 

Dr. Stack added: “More Kentuckians will get COVID-19 resulting in more hospitalizations and deaths, but we know what to do right now to mitigate the risk. Every time we take steps, such as wearing masks and social distancing, it impacts how many Kentuckians will test positive, how many businesses, schools and other places where we gather can remain open, and how many Kentuckians will get hurt.”

 

He noted that this can be done by remembering a few things. “When you and your household members leave your home, be aware that it increases your risk of exposure. Ultimately, you decide when to leave your home, how often, and for what reasons. If you do, please do it in a safe way,” Dr. Stack said.

 

“Continue to wear a mask. When possible, walk or bike to your destination or take your own vehicle,” he said.

 

“Avoid interacting closely with people and unnecessarily touching things. Keep disinfecting wipes or hand sanitizer with you. Wash your hands frequently. If you sneeze, sneeze into your elbow. If you sneeze into a cloth mask, wash your mask when you get home.”

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

Week in Review
For more information on this week’s updates, including those on expanded COVID-19 testingnew flexibility for schoolsthe David McAtee shooting investigationthe First Lady’s Coverings for Kids programlong-term caretransportation CARES Act fundingDollar General’s expansion in Kentuckythe Nettie Depp monumentKentucky Infrastructure Authority loans, the 2020 Kentucky State Faircorrectionsdriver’s licensingpharmacy refills and price-gouging prohibition, visit governor.ky.gov.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.
 

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Work From Home Positions to be Available in Columbia....

 
The City of Columbia will be working with Senture on work-at-home positions that will be available in our community. They are anticipating at least 100 positions to be needed. Representatives will be on-site Monday, August 10th from Noon until 5 p.m., Tuesday, August 11th and Wednesday, August 12th from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. The title of the position is Signify Scheduling Coordinator and the rate of pay is $12.50 an hour plus incentives are possible.
 
You will need to bring the following information with you to appointment:
 
  • Drivers License or state-issued identification
  • Social security card
  • High school diploma or GED
  • Home internet test (test can be run by going to www.speedtest.com)

 

Jason Blackaby with Human Resources will be onsite to talk with you. He will be set up at the pavilion and meeting area on Fairgrounds Street.
 
For information, go to http://www.senture.com/index.php/en/.
 
CDC guidelines will be utilized. Please use appropriate social distancing.
 
 

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2 NEW COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT

 
 
 
Deaths: We are sad to report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 44 deaths resulting in a 3.4% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 7 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 123 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.4% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 63% of ICU beds and 24% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 15 cases today from isolation (recovered). Released cases include: Adair: 1; Cumberland: 1; Green: 3; Pulaski: 9; and, Wayne: 1. In all, we have released 75.4% of our total cases.
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,303 cases since the onset of the outbreak.
 
Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 276 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 47 are asymptomatic.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 18 today: Adair: 1; Clinton: 1; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 4; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 7. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.03. This means our total case count is projected to double every 27.17 days.
 
NEW CASES:
  • Adair: 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, missing info
  • Pulaski: 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: 67-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

We experienced two COVID-19 related deaths today: an 82-year-old female from Clinton; and, a 70-year-old male from Pulaski. This pushes our mortality rate back above that of the state and national averages. Obviously, this is not how we want to see our hospitalization numbers reduced. We added three more new cases today than we released cases as recovered.
 
For the second week in a row, our new case growth rate exceeded that of the state’s average growth rate. Kentucky ends the week with the second highest week of growth since the onset of the outbreak. For the Lake Cumberland area, it was our largest week of growth. We also ended the week with our largest number of active cases since the onset of the outbreak (276 total – 26 higher than last Saturday). We saw four COVID-19 related deaths this week.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,303 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 34,802 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/08/20 (this includes 34,578 statewide plus 224 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread.
 
The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.
 
 
 

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WEEKEND ARRESTS 08/08/20

 
  • Thomas McVay, 37, Campbellsville - arrested on Saturday morning by the Cumberland County Sheriffs Office for Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Giving Office False Identifying Information, and was served 3 Warrants for other Police Agencies.
  • Bryan Cozier, 42, Columbia - arrested by the ACSO early Saturday morning for Alcohol Intoxication in a Public Place (1st & 2nd Offense).
  • Brian White, 56, Columbia - arrested Saturday night by CPD for Terroristic Threatening 3rd Degree and Alcohol Intoxication in a Public Place. 
  • Michael White, 57, Columbia- arrested last night by the CPD for Speeding, Reckless Driving, DUI, Menacing, Possession of Open Alcoholic Beverage in Motor Vehicle, Disorderly Conduct 2nd degree, and 2 counts of Terroristic Threatening.

 

Lodged in the Adair Co. Regional Jail.
 
 
  • Kenny Robertson, 65, Russell Springs - arrested by KSP on Saturday morning for DUI, Driving on a DUI Suspended License, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Trafficking in a Controlled Substance 3rd degree (Drug Unspecified).
  • Pamela Murray, 66, Jamestown - arrested by RSPD for Illegal Possession of a Legend Drug and Failure to Appear.
  • Robert Gagel, 57, of Battletown, KY arrested by Fish and Wildlife Resources for Failure to Operate his Boat at Idle Speed; Operating Boat/Watercraft While Intoxicated or Under the Influence; and Non-Approved, Insufficient, or No Personal Floatation Device.
 
Lodged in the Russell Co. Detention Center.
 

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801 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 8 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 8, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“Today is a tough day in our fight against COVID-19,” said Gov. Beshear. “I know we are slowing the growth of this virus in Kentucky, but it’s still aggressive. We simply need to do better.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Aug. 8, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 34,578 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 801 of which were newly reported Saturday. Twenty-nine of the newly reported cases were from children age 5 and younger.

 

“Our positivity rate is the highest we’ve had since we tested the entire Green River Correctional Facility back in May,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 8 new deaths Saturday, raising the total to 772 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

“Folks, we need your help. This is the time where we need to buckle down and do what it takes to get this virus under control. Please stay safe and take this seriously,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The deaths reported Saturday include a 64-year-old woman from Fulton County; a 56-year-old woman from Kenton County; a 68-year-old man from Bell County; a 93-year-old man from Christian County; a 97-year-old woman, also from Christian County; a 66-year-old woman from Pulaski County; an 82-year-old woman from Clinton County, and a 73-year-old woman from Muhlenberg County.

 

COVID-19 has hit us hard, “but we are not powerless,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “We have shown repeatedly that our individual actions will determine our future. Will you continue to wear a face covering? Are you keeping at least six feet distance between yourself and others?

 

Are you washing your hands frequently? And, if you receive a call from a contact tracer, will you answer? If each of us answers ‘Yes!’ through our actions, we can keep Kentuckians safe and keep Kentucky open.


Together, Team Kentucky can contain the coronavirus.”


As of Saturday, there have been at least 690,942 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 6.02%. At least 8,647 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

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ADAIR COUNTY MAN ARRESTED ON HEROIN CHARGES


On Saturday, August 8, 2020 CPD Officers observed a subject at FiveStar on Hudson Street behind the wheel, whom they were aware had a suspended operators license. The individual, identified as 33-year-old Patrick Rowe of Columbia, KY also had warrants from Adair and Russell counties. Officers observed scales in the auto and suspected there was heroin in the vehicle. 


Rowe was arrested on multiple charges including Possession of Heroin (a class D felony), Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Operating on a Suspended License.

 

As Rowe was being taken into custody, he was asked if he had anything on him that would poke or stab Officers and he replied “no”. However, following a search of Mr. Rowe an uncapped syringe was located. He was additionally charged with Wanton Endangerment of a Police Officer, 2nd degree.

 

CPD Officer Ethan Pike made the arrest. He was assisted on scene by Officer Evan Burton and KSP Trooper Billy Begley.

 

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COLUMBIA MAN ARRESTED ON HEROIN CHARGES


The Columbia Police Department initiated a traffic stop on Bomar Heights near Cedar Street on Friday afternoon, August 7, 2020 which resulted in drug charges.


The operator of the vehicle, Lonnie Mann, 25, of Columbia was taken into custody on three active warrants related to previous drug charges. Mann was also charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance (Heroine) after he was found to be in possession of suspected narcotics at the time of his arrest. 

Officer Evan Burton was the arresting Officer. He was assisted on scene by Officer Drew Conn.

 

 

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CASEY CO. MAN FLOWN TO LOUISVILLE HOSPITAL FOLLOWING CAR VS MOPED ACCIDENT; JAMESTOWN MAN NOT INJURED

 
On Friday, August 7, 2020 at 12:18pmET, Campbellsville Police responded to East Broadway at Auto Smart in reference to an injury collision involving a moped. A 2012 Kia, operated by 68-year-old Jimmy Glover of Jamestown, KY was attempting to make a left turn from East Broadway into Auto Smart. Glover turned into the path of 41-year-old Brandon J. Halecki of Liberty, KY who was operating a moped. 
 
Halecki was flown from the scene to the University of Louisville Hospital by Air Evac. Glover was not injured. 
 
Agencies Involved: Campbellsville Police, Campbellsville Fire / Rescue, Campbellsville Taylor County EMS, and Air Evac.
 

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573 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 4 NEW DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 7, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Friday updated Kentuckians on the continued fight against the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

Yesterday, the Governor extended the state’s mandate requiring face coverings in some situations for another 30 days, citing its success and continued importance in flattening the curve of Kentucky’s COVID-19 cases.

 

“I hope you are staying safe and have planned a weekend that will help you enjoy but also do what it takes to defeat COVID-19,” said Gov. Beshear. “Our positivity rate is up to 5.57%, and what it suggests is that we are still in a very dangerous place where this virus could easily get out of control.”

 

On Monday, the Governor is expected to have additional guidance for Kentucky’s bars and restaurants.

 

“Expectations ought to be that capacity will increase again to 50%, but there will be some changes. Especially in restaurants, we need people to still prioritize outdoor seating,” said Gov. Beshear yesterday. “Bars and restaurants are both going to be expected to have their last item served at 10 p.m. Then there is going to be an hour to let people eat and drink and ultimately go home.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Aug. 7, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 33,796 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 573 of which were newly reported Friday. Twenty-one of the newly reported cases were children age 5 and younger.

 

“We all ought to do our part for these kids and all of our kids,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported four new deaths Friday, raising the total to 764 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Friday include a 62-year-old woman from Graves County; a 73-year-old woman from Jefferson County; a 91-year-old man from Laurel County; and a 53-year-old man from Pulaski County.

 

“We are in a place right now where this virus is spreading too much,” said Gov. Beshear. “Let’s beat COVID-19 so we don’t lose even more beloved Kentuckians.”

 

As of Friday, there have been at least 684,356 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.57%. At least 8,589 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Expanded COVID-19 Testing
Gov. Beshear continues to encourage all Kentuckians to take advantage of coronavirus testing being offered at more than 200 locations across the commonwealth.

For additional information about each location, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

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WEEKEND ARRESTS 08-17-20

 

  • Joshua Eugene York, 33, of Russell Springs - arrested Saturday by Office Justice with the RSPD and charged with Assault 4th degree (Domestic Violence), Resisting Arrest, Disorderly Conduct, Menacing, Violation of a Kentucky EPO/DVO, and Terroristic Threatening 3rd degree.

 

Lodged in the Russell Co. Detention Center.

 

  • Tracy Huff, 46, Monticello – arrested Sunday afternoon by KSP for Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (Opiates), Prescription Controlled Substance Not in Proper Container, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Failure to Produce Insurance Card.
  • Austin Weller, 25, Columbia - arrested Saturday night by the ACSO for DUI, Possession of Marijuana, Reckless Driving, and 3 counts of Wanton Endangerment 2nd degree.
  • Kelsey Allen, 41, Westmoreland, TN - arrested by KSP on Saturday night for Possession of Open Alcoholic Beverage Container in Motor Vehicle, DUI, and Failure to Wear Seatbelt.
  • Preslie Anne Lawless, 24, Columbia – arrested by Columbia Police on Saturday for DUI and No Seatbelt
  • Reginald O’Connor of Columbia - arrested by KSP on Saturday for Registered Sex Offender Public Playground Restrictions.

 

Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

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ADAIR CO SCHOOL BOARD APPROVES BACK TO SCHOOL PLAN

The start of school for Adair County Students is just a couple weeks away and according to Superintendent Dr Pamela Stephens classes will resume in the classroom... We discussed that and other action taken at last nights board meeting with Dr. Stephens... 

 

 

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8 New COVID-19 Cases in Adair; 1 in Russell; 1 New Death in Lake Cumberland District

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Pulaski. We have experienced a total of 41 deaths resulting in a 3.3% mortality rate among known cases. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 9 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 121 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.7% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 62% of ICU beds and 24% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 18 cases today from isolation recovered). Released cases include: Adair: 1; Casey: 2; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 2; and, Taylor: 4. In all, we have released 75.1% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,251 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 271 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 37 are asymptomatic. 

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 25 today: Adair: 8; Casey: 1; Green: 1; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 7; Russell: 1; Taylor: 3; and, Wayne: 2. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.03. This means our total case count is projected to double every 23.44 days.

 

New cases include:

  • Adair: A 1-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, under investigation
  • McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 4 months-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

It’s always heartbreaking to report a death, this time a 53-year-old male from Pulaski. He had been released as free of the virus but succumbed to lingering complications from the disease.

 

We are glad our hospitalizations lowered by one. Today we added 6 more new cases than we released recovered cases. Our growth rate still suggests that our total cumulative case count will double about every 23 days. The top three categories of what our active cases are tied to, in descending order, are business, recreation, and travel.
 

Until there is a vaccine, we will continue the common-sense suggestions of encouraging everyone to continue to wear their face coverings, the avoidance of crowds as much as possible, social distancing, washing their hands frequently, increasing sanitation, and the avoidance of touching their faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,251 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 33,469 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/06/20 (this includes 33,254 statewide plus 215 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread.
 

The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.


 

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JAMESTOWN CITY COUNCIL MET IN SPECIAL SESSION THURSDAY NIGHT

Jamestown city council met last night in special session and approved a purchase that will improve water quality in Russell and surrounding areas that get their water from Jamestown. 

 

Mayor Nick Shearer shared with WAVE NEWS details about the meeting... 

 

 

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KSP Raises Over $16K for Special Olympics

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (August 6, 2020) –The first Kentucky State Police (KSP) “Cover the Cruiser” event is in the books and raised $16,206.16 to support Special Olympics of Kentucky (SOKY). 

 

KSP posts across the state parked their cruises at designated locations and encouraged the public to cover their cruisers with custom SOKY stickers. A minimum donation of $1 was requested to place a sticker on the cruiser, but Kentuckians donated more than the minimum. 

 

The 'Cover the Cruiser’ campaign was developed when the Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run was canceled due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. Each year, The Torch Run escorts the Special Olympics Flame of hope to kick off the Kentucky State Summer Games in Richmond. State Troopers, in conjunction with national law enforcement agencies throughout the U.S., participate to raise awareness and funding for Special Olympics programs. 

 

KSP Spokesman Sergeant Josh Lawson gave credit to the troopers who hosted the local 'Cover the Cruiser' events. "Even in the midst of a global pandemic our troopers stepped up and took ownership of this new program, adding it to their long list of community outreach activities," said Lawson. "Whether it was during torrential downpours or sweltering heat they did what was needed, as they always do, to demonstrate their service to the citizens of Kentucky." 

 

SOKY President Trish Mazzoni said the new campaign was a tremendous success. “We are deeply grateful to the Kentucky State Police, all of the Troopers who took part, our host locations and to everyone who donated," said Mazzoni.

 

"Thank you to KSP and to all of the law enforcement community that continues to be so deeply committed to the support of Special Olympics Kentucky Athletes.” 

 

The fundraiser developed into a friendly competition among Kentucky State Police posts*. For this inaugural event, the London Post took top honors with a total of $2,577.94 raised. Trooper Scottie Pennington organized the post fundraiser and battled heavy rain on the date of his event. ”To say that I am humbled by the support and generosity of our Laurel County Citizens is an understatement. Special Olympics of Kentucky holds a special place in my heart and it was an honor to assist them in this way." 

 

Special Olympics is the world’s largest program of sports training and competition for children and adults with intellectual disabilities. The organization has been serving the needs of our athletes and their families since 1970 and welcomes 11,300 athletes in Kentucky. 

 

Photo Description: Trooper Scottie Pennington, KSP London Post accepting a donation from a young girl at the London Walmart. 

 

*Link to individual post level donation totals: http://kentuckystatepolice.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Cover-The-Cruiser-Donation-Results.pdf

 

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516 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES; 8 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 6, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Thursday extended the state’s mandate requiring face coverings in some situations for another 30 days, citing its success and continued importance in flattening the curve of novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) cases in the commonwealth.

 

“By now, we all know someone that we care about, that we’re close to who is fighting this virus or has fought this virus. And as things progress, we will all probably know somebody who we have lost to this virus. This is going to be a month where I hope we turn things around, but based on July, we’re still going to see a lot of pain,” said Gov. Beshear. “So let’s make sure that we protect our mental and emotional health, stay as committed as we’ve always been to defeating this virus and step it up.”

 

The Governor also noted that on Monday, he will have additional guidance for Kentucky’s bars and restaurants.

 

“Expectations ought to be that capacity will increase again to 50% but there will be some changes. Especially in restaurants, we need people to still prioritize outdoor seating,” said Gov. Beshear. “Bars and restaurants are both going to be expected to have their last item served at 10 p.m. Then there is going to be an hour to let people eat and drink and ultimately go home.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020 Gov. Beshear said there were at least 33,254 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 516 of which were newly reported Thursday. 12 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger.

 

“We appear to not just be slowing, but we hope stopping any escalation that we’ve seen. It’s further evidence that wearing that facial covering is truly helping Kentucky in so many different ways – our people, our economy, our kids,” said Gov. Beshear. “So let’s keep it up. I believe that if we continue to do this, we can see even better numbers than what we have now.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 8 new deaths Thursday, raising the total to 760 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Thursday include a 68-year-old woman from Bell County; an 86-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 94-year-old woman and a 94-year-old man from Franklin County; an 87-year-old man from Graves County; a 78-year-old woman from Jefferson County; a 68-year-old woman from Kenton County; and an 84-year-old woman from Ohio County.

 

“We’ve had major wars that we’ve gone through, at least in the last 40 years, where we’ve lost fewer Kentuckians than those who we’re going to lose to Covid-19,” said Gov. Beshear. “So let’s remember that just because we don’t see numbers like New York had or Florida is going to experience, that doesn’t mean this isn’t hitting Kentucky really hard.”

 

As of Thursday, there have been at least 674,490 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.51%, unchanged from yesterday. At least 8,523 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

“We know the deaths follow large numbers of cases and that we’re going to have days when it’s really hard to read that list. But I do feel hopeful. I do feel optimistic that if we do wear that facial covering that we have found a way to stop what was going to be devastating,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Kentucky Infrastructure Authority Loans Update
Gov. Beshear announced today the approval of five project loans from the Kentucky Infrastructure Authority (KIA) totaling $7,230,900 for wastewater and sewer system improvements in the cities of Bardstown, Calvert City, Dawson Springs, Lewisburg and Whitesburg. For more information, read the full release.

 

“Every city and county in Kentucky should have reliable wastewater and sewer systems” said Gov. Beshear. “I’m glad these five cities can make necessary updates and provide more reliable service to their communities.”

 

State Fair Update
Today, the Governor announced that through consultation with public health officials, the Kentucky State Fair Board determined that limiting the fair to participants only was a necessary step to prevent a surge in COVID-19 cases.

 

The fair will feature wider aisle ways, reduced occupancy, increased hygiene accessibility and facial covering requirements. In an effort to manage crowds and social distancing, Lot A exhibits, Midway, concerts, entertainment and food vendors will not be featured in this year’s fair.

 

“By hosting a participant-only event, fair officials can more effectively enforce social distancing and facial covering requirements as well as gather the necessary information to perform contact tracing,” said Gov. Beshear. “I appreciate the board’s willingness to be agile, and their efforts to ensure that the health and safety of Kentuckians remains a top priority.”

The Kentucky State Fair will be held Aug. 20-30 at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville.

 

The World’s Championship Horse Show will be held without spectators and adhere to the U.S. Equestrian Federation COVID-19 guidelines.

 

“We believe the decision will allow Kentucky to continue our tradition of highlighting the state’s premiere agriculture and equestrian industry while prioritizing the health and safety of Kentuckians,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

“We are proud that we are having the fair, but obviously the health and safety of our community is uppermost in our minds and we’re delighted that we will at least be able to have the horse show and livestock contestants, the 4H-ers and the FFA kids,” said Steve Wilson, chair of the State Fair Board.

 

Agriculture is one of the state’s leading and most vital industries. There are nearly 76,000 farms in Kentucky, contributing about $45.6 billion to Kentucky’s economy each year.

 

For more information, visit the Kentucky State Fair’s website.

 

Corrections Update
Today, Secretary of the Executive Cabinet J. Michael Brown provided a Department of Corrections update.

 

“To date, system-wide, we’ve had 844 positive cases with inmates and 136 with our employees. But we’ve also had 560 inmates recover and 87 employees recover, leaving today 49 active employee cases and 284 active inmate cases,” said Secretary Brown.

 

Unfortunately, 10 DOC inmates have died from complications due to the coronavirus.

 

For more information on Department of Corrections cases and facilities, click here.

 

Driver’s Licensing Update
Today, the Governor’s chief of staff and general counsel, La Tasha Buckner, reminded Kentuckians that Secretary of Transportation Jim Gray issued an order for two emergency actions that help limit in-person traffic at driver’s licensing offices:

 

  1. There is a 90-day rolling extension of expiration dates for driver’s licenses whose printed expiration date was March 16 to July 6.
  2. Kentuckians must use mail or a clerk’s drop box for renewal or replacement of standard operator’s licenses, permits and ID cards that expire(d) between March 1 to Sept. 30 and do not require testing for renewal.

 

For more information, go to drive.ky.gov.

 

Pharmacy Refills Update
Buckner also announced that Gov. Beshear signed an executive order extending previous orders allowing pharmacists to dispense 30-day refills. This order will be in effect until Sept. 5 and is subject to renewal.

 

“Pharmacists in any Kentucky county can dispense emergency refills for up to 30 days on medicines that are not controlled substances to residents of any Kentucky county,” said Buckner. “You can get multiple 30-day refills. The order allows people to be healthy at home and still get the medicine they need.”

 

Price-Gouging Update
In addition, Buckner announced that Gov. Beshear signed an executive order prohibiting price gouging, extending a previous order. This order will remain in effect for the duration of the state of emergency.

 

“The order protects Kentuckians from those who would take advantage of the pandemic by charging inflated prices for goods – goods like hand sanitizer, soap, cleaners and disinfectants,” Buckner said.

 

First Lady Launches Coverings for Kids Program
First Lady Britainy Beshear on Tuesday launched a new program, Coverings for Kids, which will help Kentuckians donate facial coverings directly to school districts.

 

More information, including links to tutorials and patterns to make both child- and adult-size facial coverings, can be found on the Coverings for Kids web page. To view the complete Coverings for Kids news release, click here.

 

Expanded COVID-19 Testing
Gov. Beshear continues to encourage all Kentuckians to take advantage of coronavirus testing being offered at more than 200 locations across the commonwealth.

 

For additional information about each location, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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RC SCHOOL BOARD APPROVES VIRTUAL START TO THE SCHOOL YEAR

In a special called meeting Thursday the Russell County School Board approved the recommendation of Superintendent Michael Ford to start the school year virtually for students. Ford spoke to WAVE NEWS following the meeting... 

The school board heard numerous options for students whose parents do not have access to the internet at their home. As of right now the school system doesn't have the Google Chromebooks that were ordered a couple of months back. Ford said this could cause a delay in the start of the school year until they are received. 

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Letter From Adair Co. School Supt. Dr. Pamela Stephens Regarding 2020-2021 School Year....

 

Letter from Adair Co. School Supt. Dr. Pamela Stephens to parents, guardians and community regarding the reopening of schools for the 2020/2021 school year.....
 

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COLUMBIA MAN ARRESTED ON DRUG CHARGES FOLLOWING POLICE PURSUIT

 

The Columbia Police Department made an arrest Wednesday night following a brief vehicle pursuit on Liberty Road.


The pursuit began when a vehicle refused to stop during an attempted traffic stop on Fairground Street. The operator continued on into the county and finally brought his vehicle to a stop on Walker Lane. Tyler Scott Grooms, 29, of Columbia, KY has been charged with Fleeing and Evading Police, DUI, Possession of Marijuana and numerous traffic violations. Grooms was transported to TJ Health Columbia where he refused the blood draw.

CPD Officer Trevor Foster made the arrest. He was assisted on scene by Officer Jamie Cole and members of the Adair Sheriffs Office, including the K-9 unit.
 
Mugshot courtesy of bustednewspaper

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ADAIR COUNTY GRAND JURY INDICTMENTS

Mike Scales with WAVE NEWS has the list of indictments from the Adair County Grand Jury... 

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AREA ARRESTS 8-6-2020

 

A Cannon man was taken into custody by Officer Justice with the Russell Springs Police Depart just before midnight on Drug Charges…

 

David Mason, 55, was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth), Drug Paraphernalia – Buy/Possession, Theft by Failure to make Required Disposition of Property $500/$10,000, Persistent Felony Offender.

 

Jacob Hall, 20, of Jamestown, KY was taken into custody by the Kentucky State Police,Trooper Begley on Wednesday night. Hall is charged with Assault, 4th Degree (Domestic Violence) No Visible Injury and Assault, 4th Degree (Domestic Violence) Minor Injury.

 

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Local Coronavirus Update 8-6-2020

 

Russell County reported 3 new cases Wednesday. We had 1 case released. There aer currently 29 active cases in Russell County. 28 are on self-isolation and 1 is hospitalized at Central Baptist in Lexington. The new cases are a 58 year old male, a 31 year old male, and a 10 month old female.

 

Adair County reported 1 new case of COVID19 on Wednesday. 2 cases were released Wednesday. There are 21 active cases in Adair Co. with 20 in home isolation and 1 in an area hospital.

 

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ADAIR CO. SPECIAL CALLED SCHOOL BOARD MEETING AUG. 6TH

 
The Adair County Board of Education will be holding a Special Called School Board Meeting on August 6, 2020, at 6 PM at the Adair County High School Library.  
 

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546 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 1 ADDITIONAL DEATH

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 5, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Wednesday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“This is not going to last forever,” the Governor said. “We are going to make it through, but we are going to have to do what it takes to make sure as many of our fellow Kentuckians make it through with us and that we protect each other’s lives, lift up our economy and do everything we can to get our kids back in school.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Aug. 5th, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 32,741 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 546 of which were newly reported Wednesday. 21 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger, including seven kids under a year in age with one of those being only 18 days old.

 

“Today’s number strongly suggests and I believe it’s evidence that face coverings are working,” the Governor said.

 

“Proving that even when other parts of the country may be escalating out of control, that we can still control our own destiny here in Kentucky with a small act that shows we care about each other.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported one new death Wednesday, raising the total to 752 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

The death reported Wednesday was a 71-year-old woman from Logan County.

 

“That is still one family that will need our help,” Gov. Beshear said. “We pray and think about this family and what they must be going through, as we have with all of the families.”

 

As of Wednesday, there have been at least 663,100 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.51%. At least 8,467 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

“I believe you are doing the right thing, the vast majority of people are wearing a face covering and it is making a difference,” the Governor said. “It looks like we are stopping a very dangerous situation from occurring and we need to keep it up.”

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Benefits and Long-Term Care Updates
Eric Friedlander, Secretary of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, provided updates Wednesday on benefit programs to help Kentuckians and work to keep long-term care facilities safe.

 

“We want folks to sign up for benefits,” Secretary Friedlander said. “It makes sense to have health care coverage during a pandemic. It also makes sense to have food during a pandemic.”

 

Secretary Friedlander continues to encourage Kentuckians to apply for health care assistance and access to food through the Medicaid, SNAP and WIC programs.

 

He said approval of a waiver under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act has been granted, giving thousands of Kentucky families an additional six months of SNAP benefits that would have expired June 30. This is in addition to an extension granted to those SNAP households with benefits expiring in March, April and May.

 

“Take advantage of signing up. When you get SNAP you support your local grocers. When you get Medicaid, you support your local health care industry,” he said. “Without Medicaid, the health care industry would collapse. Without SNAP there would be significant damage to our grocers and local communities.”

 

Secretary Friedlander also said Kentucky CARES funds are being used to support testing of staffers in all of the commonwealth’s 286 long-term care facilities every 14 days for COVID-19. The testing will continue through 2020 and will help keep residents of these facilities safer.

 

“We have done a good job in Kentucky and we are going to continue to do a good job,” Secretary Friedlander said. “We are going to continue to provide the services necessary to make a difference. I believe we have and I believe it shows in our rates.”

 

CARES Act Funds Boost Transportation
Gov. Beshear announced that the federal government has awarded $6.4 million to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The money will go to 16 regional agencies serving 79 Kentucky counties.

 

“Those transit agencies have been hard-hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, through lost ridership and lost revenues,” the Governor said. “It’s important to keep them on the road because public transit is a lifeline for thousands of our fellow Kentuckians. Public transportation is how they get to jobs, medical appointments, the grocery and other places of business.”

 

Gov. Beshear noted this is the second round of CARES funding for KYTC, following $22.9 million awarded in May. The agency also is awaiting approval of a third round of funding, totaling $12.3 million, for capital projects, including new transit hubs in Richmond and Frankfort.

 

CARES Act funding can be used for a range of operating expenses, but much of it is spent specifically for the safety and protection of employees and passengers.

 

Dollar General Opening New Distribution Centers
Gov. Beshear was pleased to announce Wednesday some positive economic news that will bring hundreds of needed jobs and spur wider business activity.

 

“This morning, Dollar General Corporation announced plans to open two new distribution center facilities in the Bluegrass State, including a traditional warehouse in Walton in Boone County and a DG Fresh cold storage facility in Bowling Green in Warren County,” the Governor said.

 

The addition of both facilities is expected to create more than 365 jobs for Kentuckians and support operations at more than 2,300 store locations. Construction on both facilities is expected to begin by September 2020 with plans for Walton to be operational by January 2021 and Bowling Green by summer 2021.

 

“I wanted to take time to thank Dollar General for this latest investment in Kentucky and our people,” Gov. Beshear said. “Protecting our workers is a top priority for my administration and me as we work to recover from the widespread economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic.”

 

Dollar General was founded in the commonwealth, currently operates more than 580 stores in the Bluegrass State and employs more than 5,600 Kentuckians.

 

Nettie Depp Monument
Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman on Wednesday announced plans to unveil the first monument honoring a woman in the state Capitol. The new monument will be placed in the West Wing of the Capitol, as planned.

 

“In honor of the United States Women’s Suffrage Centennial August 18 and Women’s Equality Day on August 26th, today I’m announcing the first monument honoring a woman, Nettie Depp, in the state Capitol,” the Lieutenant Governor said. “The unveiling of the Nettie Depp monument will occur next year, August 21, 2021.”

 

Nettie Depp was a pioneer in education in Kentucky, as a teacher, principal and elected school superintendent in 1913, seven years before women earned full voting rights in Kentucky. She advocated for improved education for every Kentuckian, regardless of gender or race.

 

“She was a true visionary in education reform and suffragist,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said. “The impact Nettie Depp had on her community is profound and can be felt a century later. May her life serve as a lesson to us all.”

 

She noted that the project began in 2014 and aims to redress a historical lack of honor and understanding of American history regarding women’s work, sacrifices and untold contributions.

 

“I hope that by having the statue of Nettie Depp prominently displayed in the Capitol, we can inspire the next generation of Kentuckians, promote gender equality, and highlight the importance of education and careers in education for the thousands of student visitors we welcome to Frankfort every year,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said.

 

First Lady Launches Coverings for Kids Program
First Lady Britainy Beshear on Tuesday launched a new program, Coverings for Kids, that will help Kentuckians to donate facial coverings directly to school districts.

 

More information, including links to tutorials and patterns to make both child- and adult-size facial coverings, can be found on the Coverings for Kids web page. To view the complete Coverings for Kids news release, click here.

 

Expanded COVID-19 Testing
Gov. Beshear continues to encourage all Kentuckians to take advantage of coronavirus testing being offered at more than 200 locations across the commonwealth.

 

For additional information about each location, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 8-5-2020

 

The latest local numbers of Covid-19 took a big jump on Tuesday.

 

Russell County Judge Executive Gary Robertson announced that the county had 10 new cases Tuesday. We also had 2 cases released yesterday. We now have 26 people who are on home self-isolation and 1 person is hospitalized at Central Baptist in Lexington.

 

In Adair County 6 New Cases of COVID19 were announced yesterday. We released 8. We have 22 active cases with 21 in home isolation and 1 in an area hospital.

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RC SUPT. FORD RECOMMENDS STARTING SCHOOL YEAR VIRTUALLY

 

Russell County Schools Superintendent Michael Ford announced Tuesday that the School Board will meet in special session on Thursday, Aug. 6th, 2020. Supt. Ford tells WAVE News that he will be recommending the school system start the school year virtually. This would last until at least Fall break, then review where things stand and decide at that time to continue virtual learning or return to the classroom. Ford went on to say that the decision to make the recommendation has not been an easy one, but he feels it is best.

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LAKER BASEBALL PLAYER SIGNS WITH JUNIOR COLLEGE

 

Russell county Laker baseball player Hunter Thomas has signed to play baseball at rend Lake Junior College in Illinois.

 

Hunter was a 3 year starter for the Lakers and lead the team to 3 district championships a regional championship game and two semifinal appearances. He was selected as an east west all-star and 3rd team all-state. He hit over .400 for the Lakers in his career and was a finalist this year for the Johnny bench award for outstanding catcher in the state of Kentucky. He is the son of Wallace and Carla Thomas of Russell Springs. Coach Rexroat had this comment: “Hunter is a very hard worker and has put himself in a good position to be successful in college and in life. Just a special player.”

 

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DRUG ARREST TUESDAY IN RC

 

Russell County Sheriff Derek Polston reports that a drug trafficking investigation by his office in the ongoing battle of illegal drugs resulted in the arrest of Scott Hooper, age 56, from the Salem community of Russell County. Hooper was charged with Trafficking in a controlled Substance 1st degree 1st offense (Meth) and Trafficking in Marijuana less than 8oz, 1st offense. The investigation continues and more arrests may be forthcoming. Deputy Kenny Perkins is the investigating Officer and this case will be presented to the Russell County Grand Jury.

 

Sheriff Polston reminds all Russell County citizens that if you suspect illegal drugs being sold in your area to contact the Russell County Sheriff’s Office Drug/Wanted Persons Tip-Line at 270-343-8116. All callers will remain anonymous.

 

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10 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN RUSSELL CO.; 6 IN ADAIR CO....

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 40 deaths resulting in a 3.3% mortality rate among known cases.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 12 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 117 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.7% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 62% of ICU beds and 24% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 40 cases today from isolation (recovered). Released cases include: Adair: 8; Casey: 11; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 3; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 5; Russell: 2; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 1. In all, we have released 73.8% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 40 deaths resulting in a 3.3% mortality rate among known cases.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 12 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 117 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.7% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 62% of ICU beds and 24% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 40 cases today from isolation (recovered). Released cases include: Adair: 8; Casey: 11; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 3; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 5; Russell: 2; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 1. In all, we have released 73.8% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,201 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 275 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 38 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 36 today: Adair: 6; Casey: 8; Cumberland: 1; Green: 1; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 10; and, Taylor: 1. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.03. This means our total case count is projected to double every 23.44 days.

 

The new cases include:

  • Adair: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic isolated, still symptomatic 
  • Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic 
  • Adair: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic 
  • Casey: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Casey: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Green: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

Overall, this was a pretty good day. We had no new deaths and we released more cases as recovered than we added new cases. Our total hospitalizations, however, returned to twelve. We encourage everyone to continue to wear their face coverings, avoid crowds as much as possible, social distance, wash their hands frequently, increase sanitation, and avoid the touching of their faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,201 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 32,386 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/04/20 (this includes 32,197 statewide plus 189 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. 
 

The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.

 

 

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COLUMBIA CITY COUNCIL CALLED MEETING AUG. 5TH

 

Columbia City Council Called Meeting August 5th...

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Comer Congratulates Local Agency for Receiving Federal Substance Use Disorder Response Grant

 
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Following advocacy by Congressman James Comer and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the Lake Cumberland Community Action Agency (LCCAA) has been awarded a competitive grant to increase opioid use disorder treatment and reduce the harmful effects of substance abuse. 
 
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awarded the agency $1,000,000 to support their efforts to tackle substance use disorder. Congressman James Comer, who wrote a letter in support of the grant application, applauded the support for the counties served by LCCAA and reiterated his commitment to fighting the drug epidemic.
 
“Unfortunately, the opioid epidemic has hit rural areas like ours extremely hard. But thanks to the diligent efforts of organizations like Lake Cumberland Community Action Agency, we are pushing back against the drug scourge and helping struggling citizens get their lives back on track. This funding will be influential in assisting Executive Director Alicia Polston and her staff in their work to help Kentuckians recover from drug misuse,” Congressman James Comer said.
 
Lake Cumberland Community Action Agency Executive Director Alicia K. Polston thanked Congressman Comer for his support for the funding: “We are thankful to Congressman Comer for his support for our grant application and commitment to fighting drug misuse in our region,” said Polston. “These resources will help our organization deliver positive change through substance use disorder treatment, prevention and recovery, and we are grateful for Congressman Comer’s partnership in fighting the drug epidemic.”
 
The grant is part of HHS’s Rural Communities Opioid Response Program, which was established to reduce the toll of substance use disorder by enhancing rural residents’ ability to access treatment. 
 

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Adair Co. Gets $647,000 Grant for Infrastructure Improvement Project...

 
LEXINGTON, KY - Aug. 4, 2020 – Department of Agriculture Rural Development Kentucky State Director Hilda Legg today announced the department is investing over $13.6 million in 9 water infrastructure improvement projects across rural Kentucky.  
 
USDA is funding the projects through the Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant program and Adair County is one of the nine grant recipients.
 
“Maintaining and upgrading water and wastewater infrastructure is crucial to our rural communities,” said Legg. “Water districts that practice sound management and keep their systems in good health will be there to serve their respective communities for decades to come. Together, we can help those communities thrive, because when rural Kentucky thrives, America thrives.”
 
Adair County Water District - This Rural Development investment ($1.945 million loan/$647,930 grant) will be used to construct approximately four miles of new waterline, replace approximately 2,800 lateral feet of substandard waterline, install telemetry at 19 sites, and replace three intake pumps at the wastewater treatment plant.
 
The Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant program provides funding for clean and reliable drinking water systems, sanitary sewage disposal, sanitary solid waste disposal, and storm water drainage to households and businesses in eligible rural areas. 
 

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700 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 7 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 4, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Tuesday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“This is a devastating virus, and it’s one that we have got to battle against, but we know how,” the Governor said.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Aug. 4, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 32,197 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 700 of which were newly reported Tuesday. 18 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger, including a 2-month-old and a 6-month-old in Jefferson County. In addition, a 1-year-old in Metcalfe County was positively diagnosed after being exposed to the coronavirus at church and recently traveled to Tennessee.

 

“We hope to see the trend we think we had over the past couple weeks continue, which is a slow of the growth,” the Governor said. “While today we have a higher number than we did at this time last week, we believe there is a general leveling off though today there are more cases than last week.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 7 new deaths Tuesday, raising the total to 751 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Monday include a 53-year-old man from Calloway County; a 70-year-old man from Daviess County; two women, ages 45 and 69, and an 81-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 50-year-old man from Kenton County; and a 95-year-old woman from Ohio County.

 

“That is 7 more than we ever want to lose,” Gov. Beshear said. “Let me warn you that this is probably going to be a really tough month as far as our losses in Kentucky.”

 

As of Tuesday, there have been at least 650,093 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.24%. At least 8,406 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

First Lady Launches Coverings for Kids Program
First Lady Britainy Beshear on Tuesday launched a new program, Coverings for Kids, that will help Kentuckians to donate facial coverings directly to school districts.

 

“As a mom, nothing is more important to me than protecting each one of Kentucky’s children, as well as the teachers and staff who work hard every day to help them learn and grow,” said First Lady Beshear. 

 

“Kentuckians’ generosity is unmatched, and during this pandemic, this program will help ensure each school has enough masks to protect their students and staff.”

 

Starting on Tuesday, Aug. 11, people can drop off purchased or homemade facial coverings at district-level donation centers. The individual school districts will designate drop-off locations, which will be announced soon.

 

The Office of the First Lady and Office of the Lieutenant Governor, through the Kentucky Department of Education, will provide each district with the donated facial coverings along with information to promote their use.

 

“I’m an educator who trusts educators,” said Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman. “We want to provide each district with resources and guidance while still giving them the flexibility to make sure these coverings are going where they’re most needed at any given time.”

 

More information, including links to tutorials and patterns to make both child- and adult-size facial coverings, can be found on the Coverings for Kids web page.

 

To view the complete Coverings for Kids news release, click here.

 

Expanded COVID-19 Testing
Gov. Beshear continues to encourage all Kentuckians to take advantage of coronavirus testing being offered at more than 200 locations across the commonwealth.

 

“With us being in a time where we have had more cases than really ever before, though we certainly hope they are leveling out, we want to make sure that everyone out there can get a test,” the Governor said.

 

The Governor said there are many private testing sites across the commonwealth, including:

  • 34 in Western Kentucky
  • 65 in Eastern Kentucky
  • 29 in Louisville and surrounding counties
  • 30 in Northern Kentucky
  • 34 in South Central Kentucky
  • 38 in Lexington and Central Kentucky

 

He also highlighted new free COVID-19 testing that is being provided by University of Louisville Health and a new drive-through option in Northern Kentucky.

 

The testing sites available under the UofL program:

  • Downtown Louisville – 499 S. Brook Street
  • South Louisville – Mary & Elizabeth Hospital, 1850 Bluegrass Avenue
  • Bullitt County – Medical Center South, 1903 W. Hebron Lane

 

The testing is free and available seven days a week. Appointments are required. Starting Aug. 5, Kentuckians can call 502-588-0414 to sign up.

 

In Northern Kentucky, new drive-through testing will be offered starting Thursday, Aug. 6, at the Atlantic Corporate Center, 25 Atlantic Avenue, in Erlanger. The testing is free, but by appointment only, and will be conducted from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

 

In addition, beginning Tuesday, Aug. 11, drive-up testing will be available at St. Elizabeth Imaging, 7200 Alexandria Pike, in Alexandria. The testing will be performed from 5 to 9 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. The testing is free, and no appointment or doctor’s order is required.

 

For additional information about each location, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

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Road Work to Begin Tomorrow (AUG. 5th) at KY 76 & KY 910 Intersection in Russell Co.

 
 
SOMERSET, Ky. (Aug. 4, 2020) – The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) advises motorists that starting tomorrow, Aug. 5, crews will begin road work at the intersection of KY 76 and KY 910 in Russell County. The project will realign KY 76 near Salem Elementary as it intersects with KY 910.
 
During the project, traffic will be controlled by flaggers. Motorists should expect delays and are asked to heed all warning signs, slow down in work zones and remain aware of workers and construction equipment when traveling.
 
Work is expected to last approximately 3 weeks. The starting date and duration of work may be adjusted for inclement weather or other unforeseeable delays.
 
Motorists can access travel and traffic conditions at http://goky.ky.gov or contribute their own reports at www.waze.com or via the Waze mobile application.
 
Traffic information for the District 8 counties is also available at www.facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8 or by following us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8.  
 

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6 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN ADAIR; 4 IN RUSSELL

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 40 deaths resulting in a 3.4% mortality rate among known cases.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 12 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 114 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.8% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 64% of ICU beds and 24% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 31 cases today from isolation (recovered). Released cases include: Adair: 3; Casey: 8; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 2; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 10; Russell: 2; and, Wayne: 3. In all, we have released 72.6% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,165 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 279 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 41 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 42 today: Adair: 6; Casey: 6; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 2; Green: 1; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 13; Russell: 4; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 3. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.03. This means our total case count is projected to double every 23.44 days.

 

New cases include:

Adair: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Adair: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Casey: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Clinton: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Green: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
McCreary: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, missing info
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 4 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 76-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Wayne: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Wayne: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

This was our third highest days of new cases since the onset of the outbreak. Our hospitalizations have returned to twelve. After several days of significant facial covering compliance, it seems several businesses and citizens are once again becoming complacent. Our citizens can be our biggest asset in slowing the spread of this disease. Please don’t forget the guidance. Everyone should continue to wear their face coverings, avoid crowds as much as possible, social distance, wash their hands frequently, increase sanitation, and avoid the touching of their faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,165 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 30,668 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/03/20 (this includes 30,508 statewide plus 160 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread.

 

The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.

 

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ADAIR CO. SCHOOL BOARD SPECIAL CALLED MEETING AUG. 6TH....

 

The Adair County School Board meets for a Special Called Meeting on Thursday, August 6, 2020.....

 

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T.J. Samson Hospital receives "Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Bronze Quality Achievement Award"

 

GLASGOW, KY - T.J. Samson Community Hospital has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Bronze QualityAchievement Award. The award recognizes the hospital’scommitment to ensuring stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence.

 

?T.J. Samson Community Hospital earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period. These measures include evaluation of the proper use of medications and other stroke treatments aligned with the most up-to-date, evidence-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing death and disability for stroke patients. Before discharge, patients should also receive education on managing their health, get a follow-up visit scheduled, as well as other care transition interventions.

 

?“T.J. Samson is dedicated to improving the quality of care for our stroke patients by implementing the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Stroke initiative,” said Neil Thornbury, CEO of T.J. Regional Health. “The tools and resources provided help us track and measure our success in meeting evidenced-based clinical guidelines developed to improve patient outcomes.” 

 

?T.J. Samson Community Hospital received the designation of Acute Stroke Ready Hospital in September 2019, featuring a comprehensive system for rapid diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients admitted to the emergency department. After receiving this designation, many hospitals take more than a year to achieve the Bronze award. The Hospital will be eligible for the next tier, the Silver Achievement Award, if performance is sustained for the next 12 months, and for the Gold award for 24 months of sustained performance.

 

?“We are pleased to recognize T.J. Samson Community Hospital for their commitment to stroke care,” said Lee H. Schwamm, M.D., national chairperson of the Quality Oversight Committee and Executive Vice Chair of Neurology, Director of Acute Stroke Services, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. “Research has shown that hospitals adhering to clinical measures through the Get With The Guidelines® quality improvement initiative can often see fewer readmissions and lower mortality rates.”

 

?According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the No. 5 cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States. On average, someone in the U.S. suffers a stroke every 40 seconds and nearly 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.


 

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TUES. AUG. 04. 2020.

WAVE SWAP SHOP - 08/04/20

The Live Call-in Show starts after the 9am news. Call 270-866-7979 OR 270-384-7979. No more than 5 items per call, NO dogs for sale, and NO businesses are allowed to put items on the Swap Shop.

 

  1. Refrigerator to give away 270-585-9819
  2. Looking for Odd Jobs 270-805-1682
  3. 4 Good Used Tires $80 for all 4 270-384-2432
  4. Sofa and Chair, Recliner, Pressure Washers and Mini Bike for sale 270-566-3023
  5. Looking to do Interior and Exterior Work 270-585-9113
  6. Treadmill and Chandler and a Stove Top Canner 270-585-7291
  7. Kitchen Table and 4 Chairs, TV Stand and 3 Bar Stools for sale 3130296-8750
  8. Canning Jars, Electric Hand Tools, Wall Pictures and Jet Ski parts for sale 270-465-1240
  9. Looking for Cedar Chest and a Small Freezer 270-403-4192
  10. Looking to buy Green Beans. Also, they have Antique Items and Dolls for sale 270-384-3502
  11. ATV Helmet, 2021 Kawasaki Dirt Bike, Ty Beanie Babies and Cards and Stuffed Animals for sale 270-465-1210
  12. Toaster Oven for sale and Looking for Garden Stuff 270-385-1205
  13. New Holland Square Bailer, Water Trough, Hay Wagon and a Craftsman Table Saw 270-932-1777
  14. Yard Sale at 90 G Brown Road through Saturday. 
  15. 42" Cub Cadet Riding Mower 270-250-3100
  16. Looking for someone that can lay floor tile 270-250-4687
  17. Looking for a 2bd Apartment or House to rent 270-585-9784
  18. Bird Houses and House Trim for sale 270-405-1260
  19. 2004 Kawasaki Vulcan for sale $2800 looking for a vehicle for a family and Pitt Bull to giveaway 270-250-9060
  20. 2001 Ford Focus $1600 270-634-1730
  21. Yard Sale 305 Merchant Street Columbia 270-384-4083
  22. 2 Tractor Wheels for a Massey Fergusson and a Upright Diesel Fuel Oil Tank 270-250-5061
  23. Looking for a sliding glass for an Extended Cab Chevy Truck 270-465-1223
  24. Deep Freeze for sale 270-634-5112
  25. Wood Table with 4 Chairs 270-308-0702
  26. 2 Mini Bikes and a Complete Wii System with 5-6 Games 270-250-9938
  27. Several Sections of Counter Top for sale 270-670-4723
  28. 15" Aluminum Wheels for 1/2 Ton Chevy Truck 270-250-5992
  29. Looking to stay with the Elderly 270-585-5289
  30. Looking to buy a 90 from 2000 Dump Truck and Semi Truck 270-585-1601
  31. Looking for a Pull Behind Camper 270-459-3034
  32. 2007 Yamaha V Star for sale $2800 606-305-4411
  33. Dark Oak Bed and Head Board, Night Stand and Mower for sale 270-250-2526 

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A NANCY COUPLE WAS TAKEN INTO CUSTODY AROUND MIDNIGHT ON RAPE AND OTHER CHARGES WITH A 12 YEAR OLD VICTIM

A Nancy Couple was arrested overnight on Rape and other charges of a 12 year old victim according to jail records.

Johnny Hensley age 37, was charged with Rape, 1st Degree and Sodomy, 1st Degree (Victim 12 Years of Age) and Assault, 2nd Degree. Rebecca Hensley age 32, was jailed on charges of Sodomy, 1st Degree (Victim 12 years of Age) and Assault, 2nd Degree. Both were taken into custody around midnight by Deputy Nathan Ginn of the Russell County Sheriff’s Office and lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 8-4-2020

Adair County announced 6 new COVID19 cases yesterday. We released 3. We have 24 active cases with 23 in home isolation and 1 in an area hospital.

 

Russell County had 4 new cases Monday. With 2 cases released yesterday. We now have 19 active cases which are all on self-isolation. The new cases are a 65 and 70 year old females and a 41 year old male and a 5 year old male.

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COLUMBIA CITY COUNCIL SPECIAL CALLED MEETING MONDAY NIGHT...

The Columbia City Council met in a special session Monday night. 

Jim Liebe with WAVE NEWS was there and spoke to Mayor Hoots following the meeting... 

 

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6 MORE COVID-19 CASES IN ADAIR; 2 MORE IN RUSSELL


Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 40 deaths resulting in a 3.4% mortality rate among known cases.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 12 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 114 hospitalizations resulting in a 9.8% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 64% of ICU beds and 24% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.


Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 31 cases today from isolation (recovered). Released cases include: Adair: 3; Casey: 8; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 2; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 10; Russell: 2; and, Wayne: 3. In all, we have released 72.6% of our total cases.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,165 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 279 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 41 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 42 today: Adair: 6; Casey: 6; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 2; Green: 1; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 13; Russell: 4; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 3. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.03. This means our total case count is projected to double every 23.44 days.
 

The new cases include:

  • Adair: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 4 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 76-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

This was our third highest days of new cases since the onset of the outbreak. Our hospitalizations have returned to 12.

 

After several days of significant facial covering compliance, it seems several businesses and citizens are once again becoming complacent. Our citizens can be our biggest asset in slowing the spread of this disease. Please don’t forget the guidance. Everyone should continue to wear their face coverings, avoid crowds as much as possible, social distance, wash their hands frequently, increase sanitation, and avoid the touching of their faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,165 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 30,668 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/03/20 (this includes 30,508 statewide plus 160 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.


Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders.


 

 

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KY Circuit Court Clerks' Trust for Life Continue Need for Organ Donation Registration & Contributions...

 
August 3, 2020 - Kentucky Circuit Court Clerks’ Trust For Life (TFL) continues its mission to register as many people as possible to its various organ donation platforms, as well as other ways to support their efforts. While the COVID-19 pandemic has altered how each of us lives our daily lives, they stress that everyone can still register as a donor both safely and efficiently. Here’s how:
 
  • Online 24/7 at http://donatelifeky.org/
  • At the Kentucky Online Gateway website at http://bit.ly/kyonlinegateway, a repository for state services.
  • Driver’s License Renewals: All Circuit Clerks’ offices and some KYTC offices re-opened in June, adhering to Governor Beshear’s COVID-19 guidelines and continue to do so.

Residents can also help others by logging on to donatelifeky.org/financial-contributions/ and supporting the Satterwhite Patience Assistance Fund established in 2000. The fund is designed to aid Kentucky organ transplant recipients in meeting financial needs that are not covered by insurance or other programs. Fundraising events like golf tournaments, silent auctions and cookbook sales typically support the fund, but they are limited this year due to the virus.
 
“The support from fellow Kentuckians will give hope to thousands waiting on lifesaving transplants,” says Dennis Loy, Adair County Circuit Court Clerk. “Since 1992 more than two million Kentuckians have joined the Kentucky Organ Donor Registry. Those registrations are critical for our ongoing efforts to save the lives of as many patients as possible.”
 

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323 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY; 3 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 3, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Monday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in the commonwealth.

 

“July was the toughest month, with the largest number yet of overall positive cases. Unfortunately, that will have negative ramifications for August,” the Governor said. “We find we often lose Kentuckians several weeks after they test positive. That means we are likely to have a larger number of deaths in August.”

 

Despite this, Gov. Beshear said, there is reason for optimism.

 

“The numbers are telling us that facial coverings and masks are working,” he said. “We were facing what looked like exponential growth. In order to see our cases go down, we had to slow the increase. That’s why the mask mandate was necessary. If we had done nothing, by now, we would have been seeing 1,000 new cases every day, but instead we are seeing the increase drop off.”

 

To reinforce the effectiveness of wearing a face covering, the Governor unveiled MaskUpKY, a new statewide public service campaign aimed at encouraging the use of masks by everyone in the commonwealth, along with a new hashtag – #MaskUpKY – to promote facial coverings on social media.

 

“We know that if we can get the majority of Kentuckians to wear a mask when you go in public, we can make a major difference,” Gov. Beshear said. “If we want to get our kids back in school, reopen our economy, keep each other safe and get to a new normal, we need every Kentuckian to wear a mask or facial covering. It’s that simple.”

 

The Governor said that over the next couple of months, Kentuckians are going to be hearing from a number of their fellow citizens about the importance of wearing a mask.

 

He showed one of several new public service announcement featuring his simple message: Don’t put it off. Put it on.

 

“When we are united in this fight, we are protecting ourselves, each other and our state's economy,” he said. “Do it for Team Kentucky.”

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, said Kentuckians’ willingness to comply with the mandates is working.

 

“I think we have a lot to be proud of in Kentucky. It’s been hard and taken a real toll on us, but the evidence shows that we have done a good job from a medical standpoint,” Dr. Stack said. “We now appear to have flattened the curve again.

 

We can see that taking the right steps and doing it consistently works. We hope to see the curve stay flat, and go back down again.”

 

Case Information – Monday, Aug. 3
As of 4 p.m. Aug. 3, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 31,508 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 323 of which were newly reported Monday. 12 of the newly reported cases were from children ages 5 and younger, including two 3-month-olds from Jefferson County.

 

“Again, there are lots of different reasons to wear a mask,” the Governor said. “So how about wearing a mask for those two 3-month-olds or any of those children under 5.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 2 new deaths Monday, raising the total to 744 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Monday include a 99-year-old man from Calloway County and a 75-year-old man from Floyd County.

 

“While we’re moving in the right direction on cases, trend-wise we’re going to have a tough month ahead in terms of Kentuckians we have lost,” the Governor said.

 

As of Monday, there have been at least 642,577 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.18%. At least 8,335 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Case Information – Sunday, Aug. 2
Due to limited reporting on the weekends, some updated information is now available from Sunday, Aug. 2.

 

As of Sunday, there were 640,918 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate was at 5.17% and at least 8,316 Kentuckians had recovered from the virus.

 

For a detailed look at coronavirus case information from Sunday, Aug. 2, click here.

 

Expanded COVID-19 Testing
Gov. Beshear spoke Monday about coronavirus testing options in the state, including new free COVID-19 testing that is being provided by University of Louisville Health.

 

“We have more than 225 locations right now where you can get a COVID-19 test,” the Governor said. “Every region of the state has at least 29 options on where to get tested. If you haven’t had a test in the past two weeks, please go get one.”

 

The testing sites available under the program:
 

  • Downtown Louisville – 499 S. Brook Street
  • South Louisville – Mary & Elizabeth Hospital, 1850 Bluegrass Avenue
  • Bullitt County – Medical Center South, 1903 W. Hebron Lane

 

The testing is free and available seven days a week. Appointments are required. Starting Aug. 5, Kentuckians can call 502-588-0414 to sign up.

 

In Northern Kentucky, new drive-through testing will be offered starting Thursday, Aug. 6, at the Atlantic Corporate Center, 25 Atlantic Avenue, in Erlanger. The testing is free, but by appointment only, and will be conducted from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

 

The Governor said there are many private testing sites across the commonwealth, including:
 

  • 34 in Western Kentucky
  • 65 in Eastern Kentucky
  • 29 in Louisville and surrounding counties
  • 30 in Northern Kentucky
  • 34 in South Central Kentucky
  • 38 in Lexington and Central Kentucky


For additional information about each location, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New Flexibility for Schools
Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman, who also serves as Secretary of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, announced Monday new flexibility that the state is providing for the commonwealth’s schools.

 

Previously, the Lieutenant Governor announced several moves designed to help schools navigate the uncertainty caused by the coronavirus. Those measures included unlimited non-traditional instruction (NTI) days, removing the “average daily attendance” requirement for funding, expanding the care program and allowing districts to grant additional paid leave for COVID-19 emergencies.

 

Today, Lt. Gov. Coleman said the state will provide expanded flexibility in the way districts provide online instruction.

 

“A lot of districts are moving to digital platforms. We have received requests to allow more flexibility for a variety of school staff to facilitate and support classes in online platforms,” Lt. Gov. Coleman said. “We have listened, and the Governor has issued an executive order to enact these changes. The goal of all of this is to empower our schools to meet the needs of the students and the parents where they are.”

 

David McAtee Shooting Investigation Update
J. Michael Brown, secretary of Gov. Beshear’s executive cabinet, provided an update Monday on the ongoing investigation into the June 1 shooting death of David McAtee in Louisville.

 

“The Governor vowed from the beginning there would be a quick, thorough investigation committed to the truth,” Secretary Brown said. “The community, all who were involved and the families of all of those involved deserve the truth.”

 

Secretary Brown noted that the Governor immediately authorized the Kentucky State Police’s Critical Incident Response Team to quickly investigate Mr. McAtee’s death. Previously, Secretary Brown reported that, based on preliminary autopsy results, Mr. McAtee was believed to have died from a single gunshot wound to the chest. KSP was able identify the caliber and type of ammunition involved. Only one agency, the Kentucky National Guard, fired those rounds that night, in responding to gunfire toward their personnel.

 

Secretary Brown also previously reported that a 9mm pistol seen with Mr. McAtee in videos from inside YaYa’s clearly shows that Mr. McAtee was armed with a handgun, which could later be seen falling to the ground after he had been shot. Mr. McAtee had gunshot residue on his hands, and two shell casings found immediately outside the doorway were found to have been fired from McAtee’s gun.

 

“Today, I am reporting that the Kentucky State Police investigation is substantially complete and is now being turned over to the Jefferson County Commonwealth Attorney’s Office for review,” Secretary Brown said. “That file is also being shared with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, although they are conducting an independent investigation.”

 

He said the Governor’s Office was being asked not to comment further on the case as the investigations continue.

 

“The U.S. Attorney has formally requested that we do not release any other additional information about this investigation until the federal investigation is complete,” Secretary Brown said. “The federal government has assured us this case is of high priority.”

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.gov, kycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at tinyurl.com/kygovespanol (Spanish) and tinyurl.com/kygovtranslations (more than 20 additional languages).

 

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Adair Co. Woman Injured in Single Vehicle Collision...


On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 3:13pmCT, the Adair County Sheriffs Office was dispatched to the Coburg community on KY 55N to a single vehicle collision.

 
The preliminary investigation found that Virginia Tweedy, 54, of Columbia, KY was traveling south on KY55 in a 2005 Suzuki SUV as a heavy rain storm was moving through the area. Weather conditions caused her to hydroplane and lose control of the vehicle. She crossed the northbound lane into the emergency lane, striking a guardrail. The auto then came back across the highway finally coming to rest in the southbound lane. 
 
Ms. Tweedy was treated on scene by Adair EMS then transported to Taylor Regional Hospital for additional treatment.
 
The accident is being investigated by Adair County Deputy Chandler Staten who was assisted at the scene by Sheriff Josh Brockman. Adair County EMS and the Columbia-Adair County Fire Department also responded. 
 

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R.S. Man Arrested after Breaking into Residence with Firearm...

 

On Saturday night at 10 p.m., the Adair County Sheriffs Office was dispatched to a residence 5 miles north of Columbia to a reported home invasion. The caller stated that an ex-boyfriend of a female had entered her home armed with a pistol, pointing it at her and other guests in the home threatening to kill them.   
    
One of the guests was armed and was able to keep the intruder at bay until police arrived. Once Adair County Sheriffs Deputies were on the scene, they secured the firearm and placed 27-year-old Jason Harmon of Russell Springs into custody. He was charged with: 1st degree Burglary, Wanton Endangerment, Terroristic Threatening and Menacing.  Harmon was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail. 
 
The arrest was made by Deputy Chandler Staten who was assisted by Chief Deputy Justin Cross.
 

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AREA ARREST 8-3-2020

 

 

A Manchester woman was taken into custody on drug and other charges Sunday.  Kelly Sams age 27, was arrested by Deputy Nathan Ginn just after 6:30 Sunday morning. Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense, Prescription Drug not in Proper Container 1st Offense and Drug Paraphernalia – Buy-Possession. She was also served Warrants for other Police Agency. She was lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.

 

Malissa Conley age 38, of Burkesville was arrest by Deputy Daniels with the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office Sunday morning just after 2 a.m.. Conley was charged with Reckless Driving and Operating a Motor Vehicle under the Influence of Alcohol Drugs (aggravated circumstance) 1st Offense. She was lodged into the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

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Local Coronavirus Update 8-3-2020

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 40 deaths resulting in a 3.6% mortality rate among known cases.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 10 cases in the hospital. We have had a total of 112 hospitalizations resulting in a 10% hospitalization rate among known cases. The latest state data shows that 64% of ICU beds and 24% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Released (Recovered) Cases: We released 1 case today from isolation (recovered). Released cases include: Pulaski: 1. In all, we have released 72.6% of our total cases.


Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 1,123 cases since the onset of the outbreak.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 268 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. Of those active cases, 43 are asymptomatic.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 21 today: Adair: 1; Casey: 1; Cumberland: 3; Green: 1; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 1; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 2. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.03. This means our total case count is projected to double every 23.44 days.

 

NEW CASES INCLUDE:

Adair: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Casey: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Cumberland: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Green: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Russell: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
Wayne: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

Our cases are still on the rise. Please don’t forget the guidance. Everyone should continue to wear their face coverings, avoid crowds as much as possible, social distance, wash their hands frequently, increase sanitation, and avoid the touching of their faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 1,102 Cumulative Confirmed Cases and there have been 30,866 Confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of 08/01/20 (this includes 30,723 statewide plus 143 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor's/Department for Public Health's daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. 

 

The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor's Executive Orders.

 

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463 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 2 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 2, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Sunday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“We’ve made it to August, and while I know we all hoped months ago when this pandemic first arrived in Kentucky that we’d be closer to a decisive victory, we remain at war with the coronavirus,” the Governor said.

 

“We need everyone in this fight, to save lives, to save our economy and to help get our kids back in school. I know we have what it takes and that we’ll do what it takes, because we care about one another.”

 

Case Information
As of 1 p.m. Aug. 2, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 31,185 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 463 of which were newly reported Sunday. 11 of the newly reported cases were from children age 5 and younger.

 

“We appear to be seeing what we all hope is a plateau in the alarming growth of coronavirus cases in the commonwealth,” the Governor said. “It shows that wearing a mask, social distancing and not traveling to virus hot spots is working. We need to see this trend continue to avoid having to make more hard choices and sacrifices.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 2 new deaths Sunday, raising the total to 742 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Sunday include a 56-year-old man from Oldham County and a 70-year-old woman from Muhlenberg County.

 

“This is a pivotal time for Kentuckians. Tomorrow, we begin a new week in a new month, a month in which we will implement Healthy At School guidelines as students and teachers return to classrooms,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner for the Department for Public Health.

 

“I’m cautiously optimistic we have blunted our steep COVID-19 escalation with the mask requirement, restriction of gatherings to 10 or fewer people, bar closings and restaurant capacity restrictions. This is a prolonged challenge, though,” Dr. Stack said.

 

“As we continue to fight COVID-19 with personal choices that include responsible decisions about travel, crowd sizes, thorough and frequent hand-washing and wearing face masks, there’s still a need to keep other public health considerations in mind, conditions that don’t care that there’s a global pandemic going on.”


For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

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463 NEW COVID-19 CASES; 2 MORE DEATHS

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 2, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Sunday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

“We’ve made it to August, and while I know we all hoped months ago when this pandemic first arrived in Kentucky that we’d be closer to a decisive victory, we remain at war with the coronavirus,” the Governor said.

 

“We need everyone in this fight, to save lives, to save our economy and to help get our kids back in school. I know we have what it takes and that we’ll do what it takes, because we care about one another.”

 

Case Information
As of 1 p.m. Aug. 2, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 31,185 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 463 of which were newly reported Sunday. 11 of the newly reported cases were from children age 5 and younger.

 

“We appear to be seeing what we all hope is a plateau in the alarming growth of coronavirus cases in the commonwealth,” the Governor said. “It shows that wearing a mask, social distancing and not traveling to virus hot spots is working. We need to see this trend continue to avoid having to make more hard choices and sacrifices.”

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 2 new deaths Sunday, raising the total to 742 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

The deaths reported Sunday include a 56-year-old man from Oldham County and a 70-year-old woman from Muhlenberg County.

 

“This is a pivotal time for Kentuckians. Tomorrow, we begin a new week in a new month, a month in which we will implement Healthy At School guidelines as students and teachers return to classrooms,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner for the Department for Public Health.

 

“I’m cautiously optimistic we have blunted our steep COVID-19 escalation with the mask requirement, restriction of gatherings to 10 or fewer people, bar closings and restaurant capacity restrictions. This is a prolonged challenge, though,” Dr. Stack said.

 

“As we continue to fight COVID-19 with personal choices that include responsible decisions about travel, crowd sizes, thorough and frequent hand-washing and wearing face masks, there’s still a need to keep other public health considerations in mind, conditions that don’t care that there’s a global pandemic going on.”


For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

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WEEKEND ARRESTS 08/01/20

 
  • Kelly Sams, 27, Manchester, KY - arrested this morning (Sunday) by the RCSO Deputy Nathan Ginn for Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Prescription Controlled Substance Not In Proper Container, Possession of a Controlled Substance (Drug Unspecified), and was served 3 Warrants for other Police Agencies.
  • Stevie Sapp, 38, Russell Springs - arrested by RC Deputy Nathan Ginn on Saturday afternoon for Assault, 4th degree (Domestic Violence) with no visible injuries.
  • Resisting Arrest.Ronnie Adams, 33, Stanford, KY - arrested Saturday night by RSPD Officer Justice for Disorderly Conduct, Menacing, and
 
Lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
 
  • Jason Kelly Harmon, 27, Russell Springs - arrested by ACSO for Burglary, 1st Degree; Wanton Endangerment, Menacing, and Terroristic Threatening, 3rd Degree.
 
Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.
 

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KSP Charges McCreary County Man with Attempted Murder of a Police Officer

 
Whitley City, KY (August 1, 2020) – Kentucky State Police, London Post is investigating an Officer Involved Shooting that occurred in McCreary County on Friday morning.
 
The initial investigation indicates that just after 10:30amET, a KSP Trooper attempted to arrest 35-year-old Christopher A. Phillips of Pine Knot, KY who was wanted on felony charges. During the encounter, Phillips shot at the Trooper, at which time shots were exchanged by police. Phillips ran from the area and was located a short time later, at which time he was taken into custody without incident. Both Phillips and the Trooper were uninjured in the shooting.
 
Phillips was lodged in the McCreary County Detention Center charged with Attempted Murder of a Police Officer, Possession of a Stolen Firearm, Fleeing and Evading 1st Degree, and Resisting Arrest.
 
The investigation continues and is being led by Lieutenant Tony Dingess and Detective Billy Correll. Both were assisted at the scene by Post 11 Personnel, The Kentucky State Police Critical Incident Response Team, the McCreary County Sherriff’s Office, the Whitley City Fire Department, and McCreary EMS.
 

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ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED

 
As of 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, August 1, 2020 the Boil Water Advisory for Columbia Adair Utilities District customers on Blue Ridge Circle, Harrods Fork Road, Toria Road, Rowetown Road, Marion Fudge Road, Allen Sparks Road and from 11159 to 13175 Burkesville Road has been lifted by the Division of Water Columbia Office. This means your water is safe for human consumption. You no longer have to boil your water.
 

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572 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES; 5 MORE DEATHS


FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 1, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday updated Kentuckians on the state’s continuing efforts to fight the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

 

Case Information
As of  4 p.m. Aug. 1, Gov. Beshear said there were at least 30,723 coronavirus cases in Kentucky, 572 of which were newly reported Saturday. Eleven of the newly reported cases were from children age 3 and younger.

 

“Our positivity rate is again lower today than it was yesterday. Facial coverings work. They are our best chance of saving lives and protecting the health of our people, ensuring our economy can stay open, and getting our kids back in school,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported 5 new deaths Saturday, raising the total to 740 Kentuckians lost to the virus.

 

“That’s five families that are going to be suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The deaths reported Saturday include 55-, 61- and 67-year-old men from Oldham County, an 81-year-old man from Jefferson County, and an 84-year-old woman from Simpson County.

 

“We’re nearly five months into this global pandemic reaching Kentucky, but the last few weeks we saw a big growth in the number of positive COVID-19 cases,” said

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “This past week, Gov. Beshear reminded us that if we have plans to travel to a state where the rate of positive cases is 15% or higher, we need to change these plans. If someone travels to one those states anyway, then when they return to Kentucky they should self-quarantine for 14 days.”

 

Kentuckians who remain in-state can’t let down their guard either, Dr. Stack said.

 

“Gatherings should be limited to 10 or fewer guests, especially informal ones going on in backyards, parks, lakes and similar settings,” he said.

 

“The commonly more personal, informal social behavior in these situations is a big risk. If you and your guests are not keeping at least a six-foot social distance and if you’re not wearing masks, this spreads the disease. It places the people you care about most at risk and it endangers others if they spread the disease throughout the community.”

 

He cautioned saying, “I don’t want to sound like an alarmist, but a big part of this is about the decisions made and behaviors practiced by every one of us as individuals. Public gatherings and social activities can be tinderboxes for COVID-19 transmission. Until we get a vaccine or cure to neutralize this threat, we all must continue practicing social distancing and wearing masks.”

 

As of Saturday, there have been at least 638,772 coronavirus tests performed in Kentucky. The positivity rate currently stands at 5.22%. At least 8,135 Kentuckians have recovered from the virus.

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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