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Local News Archives for 2020-12

Convicted Felon Arrested After Allegedly Making Threats


On Wednesday, December 30, 2020 the Columbia Police Deparmtent was dispatched to an apartment complex on Carie Bolin Drive in reference to a caller stating that a male party was beating on their door and making threats. Upon arrival, the subject was already gone and other units began searching in the area. 

Soon after, CPD Officers initiated a traffic stop on Hurt Street near IGA with a vehicle matching the description the male party was said to be driving. The subject, who is a convicted felon, was taken into custody after a search yielded a handgun in the vehicle. 

Diamonds Scruggs, 29, of Columbia, KY has been charged with terroristic threatening, criminal mischief and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. 

Officer Evan Burton made the arrest. He was assisted on scene by Officers Ethan Pike and Trevor Foster.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-31-20

Russell County reported another death on Wednesday, the death is a 55 year old female. This makes 35 deaths in Russell County. We have 13 new cases. We had 8 cases released from isolation. We now have 54 active cases which 53 are on self-isolation and 1 is hospitalized at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County 21 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 3 cases. We have had 1,294 total cases with 1,191 of those released and 45 deaths. We have 58 active cases with 54 of those in home isolation and 4 in area hospitals.

7 New COVID-19 Deaths in the Lake Cumberland District...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.09%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 7 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 256 deaths resulting in a 1.87% mortality rate (about 1 in 53) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.73% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 66 cases* in the hospital. This is 6 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 803 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.85% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.08%. The latest data shows that an unreported % of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and an unreported % of ventilator capacity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 13,722 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6.57% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 189 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 3; Casey: 14; Clinton: 12; Cumberland: 3; Green: 4; McCreary: 65; Pulaski: 37; Russell: 8; Taylor: 16; and, Wayne: 27. In all, we have released 90.5% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 105 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 1,046 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,340.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 17% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 301 today: Adair: 21; Casey: 7; Clinton: 54; Cumberland: 11; Green: 9; McCreary: 33; Pulaski: 78; Russell: 13; Taylor: 23; and, Wayne: 52. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.009. This means our total case count is projected to double every 81.6 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 80-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 27-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Casey: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 80-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 27-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 64-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 93-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 76-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 70-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 82-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, UnkNown;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is released, 12/29/20;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 3m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Taylor: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 93-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 96-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 86-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 86-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 94-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 2 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 9 months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 89-year-old male who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 89-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old male who is released, 12/29/20;
Wayne: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 9m-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The health department offices will be closed on Thursday and Friday in observance of the New Year’s holiday. There will be no Daily Brief posted on those days.

 

A close look at the data may appear some of our county data is off today. This is because we moved 1 case from being assigned to Pulaski to Wayne.

 

Unfortunately, we hit a new record of new cases at 301 today. This is probably due to a combination of more people being tested after the holidays, and more spread of the disease because of holiday gatherings. Almost certainly this will result in an increase in deaths and hospitalizations over the coming days.

 

The deaths we report today are: a 73-year-old female from Pulaski; a 60-year-old female, long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious, but later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness; a 55-year-old female from Russell; a 72-year-old female, long-term care resident from Taylor; an 89-year-old male from Wayne; an 80-year-old male, long-term care resident from Wayne; and a 67-year-old female, long-term care resident from Wayne.

 

COVID-19 is still spreading quickly, and both deaths and hospitalizations are high. So, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 13,722 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 266,046 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 265,262 statewide plus 784 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

3784 New Coronavirus Cases in KY; 29 New Deaths...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 30, 2020) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear updated Kentuckians on COVID-19 case information and encouraged safe and small New Year’s celebrations, ideally with just one household.

 

“Our report for today is higher than it has been for a number of days. The progress we have made is fragile. We have to keep working and making good decisions every day,” said Gov. Beshear. “We need everybody to be safe this New Year’s Eve. Do not gather in large groups.”

 

The Governor said the state’s elevated positivity rate today may be the result of some labs and public testing sites closing for the holidays this week, increasing the percentage of tests conducted in medical settings where patients are already experiencing symptoms and suspect they may have the virus.

 

See all of the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s winter holiday guidance here: English full guidanceone-pager and single slide and Spanish full guidance, one-pager and single slide.

 

Kentuckians can also listen to recorded PSAs about the holiday guidance (created in partnership with RadioLex) here: Bosnian, Chinese, English, French, Japanese, Korean, Persian and Spanish.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 30, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 3,784
New deaths today: 29

Positivity rate: 9.09%
Total deaths: 2,623
Currently hospitalized: 1,673
Currently in ICU: 433
Currently on ventilator: 234

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Hardin, Pulaski and Christian. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 527.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two women, ages 63 and 75, and an 81-year-old man from Bath County; a 67-year-old woman from Bell County; a 96-year-old woman and an 82-year-old man from Boone County; an 86-year-old man from Campbell County; three women, ages 80, 88 and 91, and two men, ages 70 and 84, from Fayette County; two women, ages 69 and 73, and two men, ages 68 and 82, from Floyd County; a 96-year-old man from Hopkins County; five women, ages 54, 71, 85, 100 and 100, from Jefferson County; a 78-year-old woman from Johnson County; an 88-year-old man from Kenton County; a 79-year-old woman from Lawrence County; an 82-year-old woman from Lewis County; a 67-year-old man from Mason County; a 93-year-old woman from Monroe County; and a 90-year-old man from Perry County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

5 MORE CORONAVIRUS DEATHS IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.41%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 5 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 249 deaths resulting in a 1.86% mortality rate (about 1 in 54) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.73% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 60 cases* in the hospital. This is 12 less than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 787 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.86% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.06%. The latest data shows that an unreported % of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and an unreported % of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 13,421 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6.42% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 169 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 9; Casey: 8; Clinton: 15; Cumberland: 4; Green: 6; McCreary: 23; Pulaski: 57; Russell: 4; Taylor: 25; and, Wayne: 18. In all, we have released 91.1% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 77 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 941 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,339.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Schools, and Family. Of our active cases, 17% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 251 today: Adair: 10; Casey: 9; Clinton: 20; Cumberland: 7; Green: 15; McCreary: 22; Pulaski: 79; Russell: 19; Taylor: 30; and, Wayne: 40. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.01. This means our total case count is projected to double every 70.85 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 291 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 64-year-old male who is deceased, expired;
Adair: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Casey: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 4-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Casey: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 99-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 66-year-old female who is released, 12/18/20;
Green: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is deceased, expired;
McCreary: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 84-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 80-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is released, 12/28/20;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11 months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 39-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 14-year-old male who is released, resolved;
Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 94-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 9 months-old female who is released, resolved;
Taylor: A 61-year-old female who is released, resolved;
Wayne: A 4M-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 11m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 88-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The deaths we report today are: a 64-year-old male from Adair who had been hospitalized; a 76-year-old male from Clinton who had been hospitalized; a 51-year-old male inmate from McCreary who had been hospitalized; a 68-year-old female from McCreary who had been hospitalized; and a 86-year-old long-term care resident from Russell who had been hospitalized.

 

We are still experiencing high numbers of new cases, and high numbers of deaths and hospitalizations. So, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 13,421 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 262,219 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 261,492 statewide plus 727 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 12-30-20

 

Russell County Reporting another death on Tuesday, we have 19 new cases. We had 4 cases released from isolation. We now have 50 active cases which 49 cases are on self-isolation and 1 case is hospitalized in Bowling Green.

 

Adair County 10 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 9 cases today. Once again we also have to report a death Tuesday in Adair County. We have had 1,273 total cases with 1,188 of those released and 45 deaths. We have 40 active cases with 37 of those in home isolation and 3 in area hospitals.

Columbia Man Arrested on Outstanding Felony Warrant & Other Charges


On Tuesday evening, December 29th, 2020 just after 7:00pmCT, the Columbia Police Department, acting on an anonymous tip, located a Columbia man in Harper Valley trailer court and placed him into custody on an outstanding felony warrant.


Justin Bledsoe, 27, of Columbia is facing multiple charges including Wanton Endangerment 1st degree (from the felony warrant), Fleeing and Evading Police in a Motor Vehicle as well as other traffic charges. 

Bledsoe’s charges stem from an incident on December 22nd when police attempted to initiate a traffic stop on Jamestown Street. The operator, Justin Bledsoe, did not stop and continued on HWY South 55, passing and weaving through traffic. The pursuit was terminated due to concerns for pedestrian safety. Bledsoe is also charged with Probation Violation. 

Officer Evan Burton made the arrest. He was assisted on apprehension by Officer Ethan Pike as well as officers with the Adair County Sheriff’s Office and Kentucky State Police.

 

MAYOR REPORTS STATE OF COLUMBIA AT YEARS END...

 

It is that time again, when we give a recap of the year to all local residents. This has been an unusual year in many aspects. We have had challenges that have never happened before in our lifetime.

 

COVID 19

The city government, like many elsewhere, was affected by the COVID 19 pandemic. Several departments in the local government were either quarantined; or, had altered work scheduled. We want to commend those employees, who worked through scheduling changes, and extended hours during this time.

 

At the same time, our office at city hall has undergone some changes. We now have Plexiglas at the back entrance; as well as a door into the lobby. We have masks and sanitizer available. We also have alternated at a couple of times the availability to get into the office. The front lobby door remains closed; and, the back is closed (but, the public can call and make an appointment). Our office area for the lobby is small; and, we must limit that. We do have several options available to pay gas bills (online, in the drop box at the back entrance, call in).

 

Gas Department

We are pleased that a project that has been considered for the city on/off for numerous years has some to fruition. The Green Hills Project, which takes the gas from Fairgrounds Street/Highway 206, down Green Hills Road, down East 80, to the Churchill Estates. We completed the project just a few weeks ago; and, the first customers are now signing on.

Our gas department will be working on the lines to the residents in these areas. If you want more information, please contact 270-384-2501.

 

The gas department had the maintenance building painted on Tutt Street; as well as the regulator stations; and, will be continuing painting the meters. Some lines that has been abandoned on Highway 206 were taken out of service.


Grant Applications

We received the funding for the ARC-Flex Funding through the Center for Rural Development. This is the first step in the project of the new park on Burkesville Street.

 

We received funding from the Kentucky League of Cities for a safety grant.

 

The city received a grant from the USDA Community Facilities. The Columbia City Police Department is utilizing for a police vehicle with trailer that will be used for drug education.

 

Other grants in process:

  1. USDA grant for gas line extension to Milltown Church area. Approximate: $700,000.
  2. Funding through the Appalachian Regional Commission: $400,000. Milltown Church gas project.
  3. Funding through Economic Development Administration: $1.5 million to be used for a building for economic development.
  4. $300,000. Through USDA Community Facilities: Maintenance Building for city departments (Street, Parks and Recreation, and Sanitation).
  5. Grant through Land and Water Conservation: water feature at city park on Fairgrounds Street.

CARES Funding

  1. We applied for and received over $333,000. In the first round of CARES funding.
  2. The second round has been applied for, approved, and awaiting final paperwork to process for reimbursement. Just over: $103,000.

Retirements

  1. Donnie Rowe, who worked for the street department for over 30 years, retired in November.
  2. Roger Coffey, who was with the street department for 16 years, retired in September.
  3. Robert Montgomery will be retiring at the end of the month.

Trabue Russell House

  1. Over 30 rosebushes were donated in memory of/in honor of local residents. We appreciate this contribution to our town. Mary Ann Loy took care of the garden and the organization of this project.
  2. The big tree in front was taken down due to safety concerns; and, the health of the tree. Our thanks to Dwan Hadley who assisted our Parks and Recreation Department in distributing this wood to local residents.
  3. A Plant Swap Day was held; and, went well for the first such day of activity.
  4. Roof repair, drywall repair, replacement of lights, filters.

 

Downtown
1. Local residents adopted a plant bed on the square (we had more that wanted a bed than we were able to provide).

  1. Although we didn’t have a “Truck It Up,” we did have several food trucks in the city parking lot this fall.
  2. We striped the city parking lot on the corner of Campbellsville Street.
  3. The benches on the area in the fountain were reviewed and repaired.

Parks and Recreation

  1. This department continues to remain busy. Our new park on Burkesville Street is planning changes this year. Mike Watson, local historian, was reviewing all paperwork/books in the home (when fire occurred). Mike is currently reviewing any books in the former law office at the bottom of the hill.
  2. The Little League Park had several repairs. Fence capping replaced on two fences. Road behind fields completed.
  3. Cookout Restaurant donated their outside tables to the Little League Park.
  4. Work on restrooms completed, water leak repaired.
  5. A Blessing Box was installed at the city park on Fairgrounds Street. (Thanks Stacia and Amanda).
  6. Fence installed at park on Fairgrounds Street. Parking buffers from Cookout Restaurant installed at park.
  7. We gained another park with the addition of the Roadside Park. We have agreed to name it in honor of local veterans in cooperation with the local VFW.
  8. We have done some repairs (minor) at the roadside park.

Drive-Through Christmas

  1. Our first Drive-Through Christmas was a success. We appreciate the approximately 40 businesses, organizations, individuals that participated. We thank Bloomington Chapel Church for their Live Nativity.

Community Activities

Even though we were limited in our interactions this year, we found some ways to bring the spirit of Columbia to others.
 

  1. Paint The Square: Businesses, churches, and individuals did drawings on the sidewalk. Awarded prizes donated by Mayor and Robertson Pools.
  2. Fall decorating contest (business and home). Winners were: Chase and Breanna Coffey and Adair Animal Hospital.
  3. Brought food trucks in limited capacity back to city parking lot.
  4. Thanksgiving people pulled over by Columbia Police Department given country ham and/or gift certificate.
  5. Christmas drive-through. Thanks so much to all participants.
  6. Did a photo contest on Beauty in Columbia.
  7. We made the top ten in the Americas Main Street Contest sponsored by Independent We Stand.
  8. We were ranked as the 2nd safest town in Kentucky.
  9. We delivered throws to several residents. Also, we did a food drive and delivered boxes.

Economic Development

  1. Dairy Queen is now at the intersection of Bomar Heights, Jamestown Street, and Tutt Street. We welcome Fourteen Foods to our community.
  2. Cookout Restaurant have cleared their property; and, indicate construction starting in March.
  3. Virginia Outfitters opened on Tutt Street. Libby’s opened on Campbellsville Road.
  4. The First and Farmers Bank have had a groundbreaking for their new bank location.
  5. Senture had several work from home positions filled by our residents. (Close to 90 people have been hired).
  6. We are working with a manufacturing company that hopefully will be able to come to Columbia soon.
  7. Pepes Grill opened on Campbellsville Road and Sugarbellas on Jamestown Street. Columbia Pharmacy opened on Burkesville Road, L&N Firearms on Campbellsville Road, Southern Nest Realty.
  8. Happy Cow Café opened on Burkesville Road.
  9. Wild and Free and Three Blessings moved to the square. Diamonds on the Square (formerly Grimsley’s).

We are so excited about these businesses and more (in the future) are choosing Columbia for their home.

 

Light Development

  1. We finished the next phase of lighting at the Dohoney Trace/Patricia Trail area. We are talking to the RECC about a plan for lights extension down Burkesville Road.

 

Caly’s Line

  1. We appreciate Stacey Hatcher Wilson and her commitment to drug enforcement in our community. With her support, Caly’s Line was initiated in the community. 270-378-2259 (CALY).

 

Pamela Hoots,

Mayor

 

Gov. Beshear Urges Safe New Year's Celebrations; Reported 31 New Covid-19 Deaths Today...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 29, 2020) – On Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear urged Kentuckians to ring in the new year safely and announced two new vaccine allocations, totaling 53,700 doses, for Kentucky the week of Jan. 4: 27,300 doses from Pfizer and 26,400 doses from Moderna.

 

“I ask every single Kentuckian to keep any New Year’s celebration small, preferably your own household or one more,” said Gov. Beshear. “Remember, going to a big party, hosting a big party or going to any gathering where you’re going to take your masks off will spread this virus at a time where Kentucky is doing better than most, but the virus is rampaging through the United States and we’re seeing record deaths just about everywhere.”

 

The Governor also said today Walgreens reported 1,009 additional vaccinations administered to long-term care residents and staff; CVS reported 501.

 

For more information about vaccine distribution Phase 1a and 1b, click here. To see the state’s full vaccine dashboard, click here.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 29, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,990
New deaths today: 31

Positivity rate: 8.41%
Total deaths: 2,594
Currently hospitalized: 1,635
Currently in ICU: 380
Currently on ventilator: 211

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Warren and Kenton. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 414.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 88-year-old woman from Boone County; an 86-year-old man from Clinton County; a 73-year-old man from Daviess County; a 52-year-old man from Floyd County; an 87-year-old man from Graves County; a 78-year-old woman from Hopkins County; three women, ages 33, 91 and 93, and an 85-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 97-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 75-year-old woman from Knott County; a 93-year-old man from Larue County; a 95-year-old man from Laurel County; a 77-year-old man from Marshall County; a 76-year-old man from McCracken County; a 77-year-old man from Ohio County; a 76-year-old woman from Owen County; two women, ages 80 and 101, from Perry County; two women, ages 79 and 83, and a 78-year-old man from Pulaski County; two women, ages 58 and 86, and a 61-year-old man from Taylor County; a 50-year-old woman and two men, ages 75 and 82, from Wayne County; a 68-year-old man from Webster County; and a 74-year-old man from Wolfe County.

 

Federal Relief Funding Update
Today, Gov. Beshear announced the new federal COVID-19 relief bill includes more than $5 billion for Kentucky, including funds for direct payments, unemployment insurance, rental assistance, vaccine distribution and more. The Governor emphasized that these figures are preliminary estimates, but are subject to change.

 

Assistance to Individuals

  • Direct Payments to Households – $2,265,302,000
  • Unemployment Insurance, $300/week for 11 weeks – $489,614,031
  • Rental/Utility/Energy Assistance – $297,396,819

Education

  • Elementary & Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund – $928,275,000
  • Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund – $261,015,000
  • Governor's Education Emergency Relief Fund-2/3rds for private schools – $60,305,000

Families and Seniors

  • Child Care Development Block Grant – $192,822,381
  • Promoting Safe & Stable Families – $1,004,000
  • Meals for Seniors – 2,259,000
  • Chafee Foster Care Program – $5,879,000
  • Chafee Education & Training Vouchers-Foster Youth – $899,000
  • Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant – $19,221,000
  • Mental Health Block Grant – $21,560,000

Fighting the Virus

  • Testing, Tracing and Mitigation – $289,654,359
  • Vaccine Distribution – $56,965,810

Transportation

  • Federal Highways-Surface Transportation Block Grant – $164,914,864
  • FAA-Airport Improvement Program – $28,249,556

 

Eviction Prevention Update
Gov. Beshear reminded Kentuckians that the CDC has extended its moratorium on evictions through Jan. 31, 2021. The Governor renewed a previous executive order mandating that the CDC moratorium apply in Kentucky. The CDC order and the tenant declaration required by the CDC order and by the Governor’s order are available online.

 

Face Coverings Mandate Extended
Today, the Governor renewed the state’s face coverings mandate for an additional 30 days; the current executive order is set to expire at 4:59 p.m. on Jan. 2 and the new order will be effective on Jan. 2 at 5 p.m.

 

Pharmacy Refills Update
Today, Gov. Beshear signed Executive Order 2020-1057 that extends previous orders allowing pharmacists to dispense 30-day refills. The current executive order is set to expire at the end of Jan. 3; the new order will be effective for 30 days beginning Jan. 4.

 

DDS Glass Doors Completes Todd County Expansion
The Governor announced today that freezer and cooler door manufacturer DDS Glass Doors LLC is relocating to a larger facility in Elkton, a $1.6 million expansion expected to create 50 full-time, Kentucky-resident jobs in the years ahead. To learn more, see the full release.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

See all of the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s winter holiday guidance here: English full guidanceone-pager and single slide and Spanish full guidance, one-pager and single slide.

 

Kentuckians can also listen to recorded PSAs about the holiday guidance (created in partnership with RadioLex) here: Bosnian, Chinese, English, French, Japanese, Korean, Persian and Spanish.

 

10 NEW COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT....

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 10 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 244 deaths resulting in a 1.85% mortality rate (about 1 in 54) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.74% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 72 cases* in the hospital. This is 26 less than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 776 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.89% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.07%. The latest data shows that 87% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 24.1% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 13,170 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6.3% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 173 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 5; Casey: 3; Clinton: 16; Green: 10; McCreary: 39; Pulaski: 43; Russell: 10; Taylor: 11; and, Wayne: 36. In all, we have released 91.6% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 3 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 864 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,338.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Schools, and Family. Of our active cases, 14% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 186 today: Adair: 10; Casey: 6; Clinton: 14; Cumberland: 8; Green: 3; McCreary: 51; Pulaski: 18; Russell: 6; Taylor: 22; and, Wayne: 48. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.009. This means our total case count is projected to double every 75.49 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 291 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 3 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Cumberland: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Green: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 93-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old female who is released, 12/27/20;
McCreary: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 80-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 86-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 93-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 94-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, unkNown;
Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 97-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

Vaccine Update

It is my understanding that all the nursing homes in our area are now scheduled for vaccination, and the first doses should be given in all the facilities by the second week of January. Hospitals are also receiving shipments of vaccine for their staff. The local health department has received vaccine to focus on health care workers. Our health departments have administered over 70% of our supply and expect to have the remainder exhausted by close of business Wednesday. We have also requested additional vaccine for medical staff in two of our counties. According to Dr. Stack, the Kentucky Public Health Commissioner, the Phase 1b vaccination priority groups will be first responders, K-12 faculty and staff, and persons over 70. As soon as additional vaccine is available, we will begin targeting these groups, as well as finishing up with any health care related employees.

 

Other Statistics and Information

A close look at today’s data my appear that some of our numbers are off. This is because we removed one duplicate from Pulaski and moved one case from McCreary to Wayne.

The deaths we report today are: a 76-year-old male from Adair who had been hospitalized, a 61-year-old male from Cumberland who had been hospitalized; an 86-year-old female from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; a 74-year-old male from Pulaski who had been hospitalized, who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious but later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness; a 78-year-old male long-term care resident from Pulaski; a 43-year-old female from Pulaski who passed away at the emergency room; an 83-year-old female assisted living resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; an 83-year-old male from Russell who had been hospitalized; a 68-year-old female from Taylor who had been hospitalized; and a 54-year old female from Wayne who had been hospitalized.

 

As far as the 7-day Incidence Rate, all our counties moved back into the “Red-Critical” range of community-spread today. This was somewhat expected as folks who weren’t able to get tested over the holidays have begun now to do so.

 

Until the vaccine is widely available, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 13,170 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 259,141 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 258,517 statewide plus 624 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

Adair Man Arrested on Multiple Drug Charges including Felony Assault of a Deputy


On Monday, December 28, 2020 at 6:37pmCT, the Adair County Sheriffs Office was responding to a call at a local business who had a customer causing a disturbance inside the store. Chief Deputy Justin Cross made contact with the individual, 41-year-old Patrick Stewart of Columbia, KY at the front counter and observed that he was under the influence of an intoxicating substance. 
 

When Stewart was taken into custody, he became combative and punched Deputy Cross. Stewart was quickly subdued by the deputy and placed in handcuffs. He was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (methamphetamine), Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of Synthetic Drugs, Resisting Arrest, Assault 3rd degree (police officer), and Disorderly Conduct. Stewart was then transported to the Adair County Regional Jail.

 
 

Whitley City Woman Arrested on Drug Charges After Traffic Stop...


On Monday, December 28, 2020 at 4:30pmCT, the Adair County Sheriffs Office received a complaint of erratic driving on the LBN Cumberland Parkway. Sheriff Brockman initiated a traffic stop on the vehicle, a 2010 Nissan, around the 52 mile marker in the west bound lane. During the stop, it was found that the driver, 49-year-old Joella Dawn Dugger of Whitley City, KY had a suspended KY license, a warrant for her arrest out of Laurel County, KY and was in illegal possession of controlled substances. 


Duggar was arrested by Chief Deputy Justin Cross and Sheriff Brockman and lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail on the following charges:

  • Reckless Driving 
  • Operating on a Suspended License 
  • Possession of a Controlled Substance 2nd degree (drug unspecified) and
  • Outstanding Warrant of Arrest served 

 

Columbia Police Ofc. Evan Burton assisted along with K-9 Matt.
 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-29-20

Russell County reported another death Monday from Covid. The death is an 83 year old male. This is Russell County’s 33rd death. We have 6 new cases yesterday. We had 10 cases released from isolation today. We now have 36 active cases which 33 cases are on self-isolation and 3 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Bowling Green, 1 at Danville and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County 10 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 5 cases. Adair County also reported a death Monday. Mondays report puts us back in the "Red-Critical" Category. We have had 1,263 total cases with 1,179 of those released and 44 deaths.

4 NEW COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.06%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 4 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 234 deaths resulting in a 1.8% mortality rate (about 1 in 56) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.74% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 98 cases* in the hospital. This is 7 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 770 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.93% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.08%. The latest data shows that 87% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 24.1% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 12,984 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6.22% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 128 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 3; Casey: 8; Clinton: 14; Cumberland: 5; Green: 3; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 36; Russell: 10; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 34. In all, we have released 91.6% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 26 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 861 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,338.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Schools, and Family. Of our active cases, 13% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 106 today: Adair: 7; Casey: 2; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 2; Green: 2; McCreary: 9; Pulaski: 40; Russell: 6; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 21. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.009. This means our total case count is projected to double every 75.24 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 291 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 59-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 8m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 81-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 81-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 84-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at our data will appear that the Casey and Clinton numbers are off today. This is because we removed one duplicate from each county.

 

The deaths we report today are: an 87-year-old male from Adair who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious but later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness; a 70-year-old female from Clinton who had been hospitalized; a 73-year-old female from Wayne; and a 62-year-old female long-term care resident from Wayne.

 

Last week on Sunday we added 89 new cases, today, 108. However, last Sunday we had 1,110 active cases, this Sunday, 861. On another high note, on both the state and local incident rate map, some of our counties have fallen into the “orange-accelerated” rage of community-spread. Our counties don’t match exactly because the state data tends to be a few days behind our data. Also, this good fortune may well be skewed be lower testing levels over the holidays.

 

Unfortunately, our mortality rate is still higher than the state and national mortality rates, and our hospitalizations remain high.

 

We expect to exhaust our supply of our first shipment of COVID-19 vaccines this week and don’t have any information as of today when the next shipments might come.

 

Until the vaccine is widely available let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 12,984 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 257,647 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 257,063 statewide plus 584 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

Gov. Beshear, Dr. Stack: Kentuckians Over 70, First Responders and Educators Will Receive Vaccine in Next Phase

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 28, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear and Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, said the next priority group (Phase 1b) for vaccination will be Kentuckians who are at least 70 years old, as well as first responders and educators.

 

Depending on the vaccine distribution schedule, Phase 1b could begin as early as Feb. 1, 2021, plus or minus a week.

 

The Governor said 40 additional sites will receive vaccine doses for the first time this week.

 

“Remember, this vaccine roll out is, I think, one of the toughest and largest logistics challenges we’ve seen since World War II,” said Gov. Beshear. “It’s not going to be clean the entire time – we’re building the airplane while we’re flying it – but right now, we believe we’ve got the right plan in the right way to distribute this vaccine equitably all across the state.”

 

“In Kentucky, we are going to include people who are 70 and older – that’s five years younger than the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended. We believe here, because we have such a disproportionate burden of death in this population, we want to make the vaccine available as quickly as possible,” said Dr. Stack. “We are also going to include first responders who haven’t been vaccinated in Phase 1a already, as well as K-12 school personnel.”

 

To date, in Phase 1a, approximately 126,600 vaccine doses have been delivered to Kentucky: 39,000 of those doses are designated for long-term care facilities. At least 22,500 vaccine doses have already been administered statewide: 17,752 to health care workers, 2,788 through local health departments and 5,796 to long-term care residents and staff. For more information about Phase 1a and 1b, click here.

 

Dr. Stack clarified that Phase 1a includes all health care personnel in clinical settings, including Kentuckians who work in environmental services, front-line operations, interpretation services, dental care and home-based health care staff. Dr. Stack estimated that there are at least 200,000 Kentuckians included in this category.

 

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services Secretary Eric Friedlander further updated Kentuckians on vaccinations in long-term care facilities.

 

“Walgreens and CVS have been able to provide vaccinations at more than 30 facilities,” said Secretary Friedlander. “This is a great start. We’re making a down payment on our promise to take care of the most vulnerable Kentuckians first. Also, those health care workers who have been in those facilities, who have helped and provided services to those residents all along, this is a way that we are able to prioritize those folks who have done the most for the most vulnerable.

 

“Walgreens and CVS, thank you. We’ve talked with them just about every day as we learn together. They’ve been good partners with us, and we’ll continue to be good partners with them.”

 

Eviction Prevention Update
Gov. Beshear said the CDC has extended its moratorium on evictions through Jan. 31, 2021. The Governor renewed a previous executive order mandating that the CDC moratorium apply in Kentucky. The CDC order and the tenant declaration required by the CDC order and by the Governor’s order are available online.

 

The new federal COVID-19 relief bill has designated $297,000,000 for Kentucky rental assistance, in addition to separate allocations for Louisville and Lexington. These funds can be used for past due rent, future rent payments, as well as to pay utility and energy bills and prevent shutoffs.

 

More State Leaders Vaccinated
The Governor said Secretary of State Michael Adams, Auditor Mike Harmon, Supreme Court Deputy Chief Justice Lisabeth T. Hughes and Justice Samuel T. Wright III received the vaccination against COVID-19 on Monday in the Capitol Rotunda, helping to ensure the continuity of state government and demonstrating bipartisan support for the safe, effective vaccine that is crucial to ending the pandemic and saving lives in Kentucky.

 

Justice Laurance B. VanMeter also received his vaccination last week. With Chief Justice John D. Minton Jr. receiving his along with Gov. Beshear a week ago, a majority of the Kentucky Supreme Court has now received the initial dose of the vaccination.

 

To see the full release and view photos, click here.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Monday, Dec. 28, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,455
New deaths today: 8

Positivity rate: 7.97%
Total deaths: 2,563
Currently hospitalized: 1,552
Currently in ICU: 411
Currently on ventilator: 217

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Kenton, Warren and Pulaski. Each of these counties reported 50 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 225.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 92-year-old man from Bath County; a 74-year-old woman from Grayson County; a 64-year-old woman from Henderson County; a 93-year-old woman and three men, ages 41, 67 and 79, from Jefferson County; and an 80-year-old woman from Madison County.

 

The Governor noted that the state’s smart, limited restrictions and Kentuckians’ sacrifices have made a clear impact in the state’s fight against COVID-19, decreasing Kentucky’s weekly case numbers, positivity rate and hospitalizations.

 

The Governor asked Kentuckians to keep New Year’s celebrations safe and small.

 

“What we do on these holidays in 2020 is going to dictate how many people are or are not with us for holidays in 2021,” said Gov. Beshear. “There is a light at the end of the tunnel. Let’s make sure we’re making the types of decisions that protect people as we get there.”

 

Memorial
“Today’s memorial is a difficult one to share, as it’s the second passing of one of our front-line heroes from Med Center Health in Bowling Green. After losing Dr. Rebecca Shadowen in September to COVID-19, the hospital reported the loss of Dr. Don Miller on Dec. 21. Dr. Miller had been an ER doctor at Med Center Health for 17 years,” said Gov. Beshear. “In early December, he tested positive for the virus, passing weeks later after a hard-fought battle.”

 

Connie Smith, Med Center Health’s president and CEO said, “Dr. Miller worked faithfully alongside his Emergency Department friends and colleagues on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic since the first Med Center Health patient tested positive in March of this year. He provided outstanding emergency care for our patients both before and during the pandemic and will forever be remembered as a true health care hero.” Other colleagues like Seth Wilson stated that Dr. Miller’s “methodical approach to emergency medicine” will leave a lasting footprint on the entire medical community.

 

“But more than anything, Dr. Miller was a good man. His friend and coworker Jackie Evans said Dr. Miller was ‘compassionate and had a wicked dry sense of humor, a great work ethic’ and ‘only wanted the best for his patients and his co-workers.’ If a coworker was ill, Dr. Miller would be the one to check in on them and their family members to make sure they were okay,” said Gov. Beshear. “Today our thoughts and prayers are with Dr. Miller’s wife, Teresa, and their 11 children, as well as the entire team at Med Center Health. Dr. Miller paid the ultimate sacrifice while caring for our people, and he will always be remembered as a hero in the eyes of all Kentuckians.”

 

Dr. Miller’s good friend and colleague Dr. William Moss, Med Center Health’s medical director of emergency services, shared a few words via a video during the press conference.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

See all of the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s winter holiday guidance here: English full guidanceone-pager and single slide and Spanish full guidance, one-pager and single slide.

 

Kentuckians can also listen to recorded PSAs about the holiday guidance (created in partnership with RadioLex) here: Bosnian, Chinese, English, French, Japanese, Korean, Persian and Spanish.

 

Adair Co. Deputy Injured After Physical Altercation with 2 Suspects on Christmas Eve.....

 
 
On Thursday, December 24th, 2020 at 11:00pmCT, Adair County Deputy Sheriff Josh Durbin responded to a residence off Royal Oaks Drive, 6 miles east of Columbia. The original call was reported as a domestic violence call where a female had been assaulted. Upon arrival, Deputy Durbin, who was by himself due to know other additional units being available in the county, began to try a defuse the situation. Once he determined an arrest was going to be made, he attempted to take 41-year-old Lonnie Taylor of Columbia into custody. An altercation broke out between the two and Deputy Durbin deployed his taser. Durbin stated at that time he was assaulted by another member of the family, 35-year-old Robert Maynard of Columbia. Durbin stated he was knocked to the ground and both suspects began assaulting him and trying to disarm him. The deputy was able to get one radio transmission out for help and multiple units on duty and off-duty headed to the scene to assist. Additional personel from the Adair County Sheriffs Office, Columbia PD, KSP, Russell County Sheriffs Office, Adair EMS and the Columbia-Adair County Fire Dept. all responded to the scene.  
 
Lonnie Taylor was arrested on charges of Assault 3rd degree, Assault 4th degree, Disorderly Conduct 2nd degree, Resisting Arrest, Alcohol Intoxication in a Public Place, Criminal Mischief, Strangulation 1st degree, and Attempting to Disarm a Police Officer. 
 
Robert Maynard was charged with Assault 3rd degree, Terroristic Threatening, Disorderly Conduct, Resisting Arrest, Attempting to Disarm a Police Officer, Criminal Mischief, and Alcohol Intoxication. 
 
Deputy Durbin was taken to TJ Health Columbia where he was treated and released several hours later.  
 
Robert Maynard was also taken to TJ Health for medical clearance before he was admitted to the Adair County Regional Jail. Lonnie Taylor was also lodged in the Adair Co. Jail.
 
The investigation into the incident is ongoing.
 

Adair County Man Shoots Stepson Following Altercation...

 

On Wednesday, December 23, 2020 at 5:28pmCT, Adair 911 received a call from the 3000 block of KY 61 north of a reported shooting. The first caller was 29-year-old Adrian Ballou who advised his stepfather had shot him. A second call came in nearly at the same time and was Ballou’s stepfather, 40-year-old Jeremy Austin of Columbia, who advised dispatch that he had shot his stepson.  
     

Upon the arrival of Adair County Deputies, they found that Ballou had been shot in the right knee with a 9mm. He was located about a mile from the scene and was treated by Adair EMS. Ballou was then transported to TJ Health Columbia and later transferred to the University of Louisville Hospital for treatment of non-life threatening injuries.
 
The preliminary investigation indicated there had been a physical altercation between the two within a few days of the incident where Adrian Ballou had assaulted Jeremy Austin multiple times in his home. On this date, Ballou returned to the home uninvited and an altercation took place that led to a single shot being fired.  
    
The investigation is ongoing and the case will be presented to the Commonwealth Attorney to determine if criminal charges will be filed.
    
Deputy Derek Padgett is investigating the incident and was assisted by Deputy Chandler Staten and Sheriff Josh Brockman. The Columbia Police Department and KY State Police also responded to assist.
 

LOCAL Corona Virus Update 12-28-20

Russell County 6 new cases Sunday. We had 10 cases released from isolation. We now have 41 active cases which 37 cases are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 1 in Bowling Green,1 at Danville,1 at Somerset and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County 7 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 3 cases. We also have to report a death Sunday. We have had 1,253 total cases with 1,174 of those released and 43 deaths. We have 36 active cases with 27 of those in home isolation and 9 in area hospitals.

LOCAL Corona Virus Update 12-28-20

Russell County 6 new cases Sunday. We had 10 cases released from isolation. We now have 41 active cases which 37 cases are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 1 in Bowling Green,1 at Danville,1 at Somerset and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County 7 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 3 cases. We also have to report a death Sunday. We have had 1,253 total cases with 1,174 of those released and 43 deaths. We have 36 active cases with 27 of those in home isolation and 9 in area hospitals.

WEEKEND ARRESTS....

 
  • Robert Maynard, 35, of Columbia was arrested early Friday morning by the ACSO and charged with Assault 3rd Degree - Police or Probation Officer, Terroristic Threatening, Disorderly Conduct, Resisting Arrest, Alcohol Intoxication in a Public Place, Criminal Mischief 2nd Degree, and Disarming a Peace Officer.   
  • Lonnie Taylor, 41, of Columbia was arrested early Friday morning by the ACSO for Assault 4th Degree (Domestic Violence); Strangulation 1st Degree, Resisting Arrest, Disarming a Peace Officer, Assault 3rd Dgree - Police or Probation Officer, Disorderly Conduct, and Alcohol Intoxication in a Public Place.
 
Robert Maynard and Lonnie Taylor were lodged in the Adair Co. Regional Jail.
 
 
  • Greg Troutt, 44, of Louisville (formerly of Russell County), was arrested early Sunday morning by RSPD and charged with Public Intoxication of a Controlled Substance (Excluding Alcohol).
  • Sandra Kellam, 34, of Russell Springs, was arrested by KSP and Russell Springs Police on Saturday evening. Kellam was charged with Resisting Arrest, Assault 4th Degree (Domesic Violcence) Minor Injuries, Criminal Abuse 1st Degree (Child 12 or Under), Criminal Abuse 1st Degree, Arson 1st Degree, Wanton Endangerment, and  Alcohol Intoxication in a Public Place.
  • David Allan Wisdom, 32, of Russell Springs was arrested on Friday afternoon by Russell County Deputy Kenny Perkins and charged with Assault 4th Degree (Domestic Violence) with Minor Injuries and Strangulation 1st Degree. 
 
Greg Troutt, Sandra Kellam and David Wisdom were lodged in the Russell Co. Detention Center.
 

T.J. Health Columbia Administers First Doses of Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine

 
Columbia, KY - T.J. Health Columbia has received and begun to administer the first doses of the Moderna vaccine to fight COVID-19. The first recipients included doctors, nurses, and several front line team members from multiple patient care areas, as well as local EMS. Moderna is the second vaccine to be given Emergency Use Authorization by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
 
All team members across T.J. Regional Health have the option to take the vaccine.
 
“This marks a definite turning point and a renewed sense of hope in the fight against the global pandemic,” said Neil Thornbury, CEO of T.J. Regional Health. “We are confident that the vaccine will provide a path toward a return to some sense of normalcy.”
 
The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is administered as a series of two doses, given one month apart, and is for individuals 18 years and older. General side effects, which typically lasted 1-2 days during clinical trials, were pain at the injection site, fatigue, headache, muscle pain, joint pain, chills, nausea and vomiting, and fever. The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine does not contain SARS-CoV-2 and cannot give the recipient COVID-19.
 
The FDA’s scientists and physicians determined that the vaccine’s known and potential benefits clearly outweigh its risks. Through the scientific review process and thorough evaluation, the FDA assures the public and medical community that “two COVID-19 vaccines have been authorized in an expedited timeframe while adhering to the rigorous standards for safety, effectiveness, and manufacturing quality needed to support emergency use authorization.”
 
“It has been a long year of searching for answers on how to treat, prevent, or just slow the spread of COVID-19,” said Dr. Eric Fisher, Chief of the Medical Staff. “I’m exciting to see the arrival of a safe and effective vaccine so that we can close 2020 on a positive note and begin 2021 with a renewed sense of hope that we are going to overcome this.”
 
 
 
 

3 NEW COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.04%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 230 deaths resulting in a 1.79% mortality rate (about 1 in 56) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.75% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 91 cases* in the hospital. This is 3 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 761 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.91% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.1%. The latest data shows that 87% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 24.1% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 12,878 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6.16% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 355 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 17; Casey: 10; Clinton: 36; Cumberland: 9; Green: 20; McCreary: 29; Pulaski: 151; Russell: 19; Taylor: 27; and, Wayne: 37. In all, we have released 91.3% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 240 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 887 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,338.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Family, and Schools. Of our active cases, 11% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 118 today: Adair: 5; Casey: 2; Clinton: 21; Cumberland: 2; Green: 9; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 44; Russell: 5; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 15. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.009. This means our total case count is projected to double every 76.36 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 291 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 11 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 93-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is released, unknown;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

Our 7-day average incidence report will be off for a few days due to not reporting cases on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day. Also, a close look at today’s numbers will appear that the Wayne and Taylor numbers are off. This is because we moved 2 cases from Wayne to Taylor. Our Pulaski numbers are also off by 1 since we removed one duplicate Pulaski case today.

 

The 3 deaths we report today are: a 78-year-old male from Adair who had been hospitalized; an 83-year-old male from Wayne who had been hospitalized; and an 88-year-old female from Wayne who had been hospitalized.

 

Though we know our numbers are very likely skewed due to the holidays since fewer testing sites were open on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, we are thankful our numbers are lower. The weekly total of new cases is down for the third week at the state level and for the 2nd week for Lake Cumberland. This week we added 791 new cases, last week, 1,172. Last week on Saturday we had 1,138 active cases, today, 887. We did experience 14 deaths this week, and our hospitalizations are higher compared to last week (91 vs 80).

 

The biggest news of the week was that vaccinations started becoming available in our District this week. Area nursing homes have began being vaccinated via a federal contract with CVS and Walgreens pharmacies. Area hospitals and local health departments have received limited supplies of vaccine to vaccinate medial and medical support staff. Watch our Daily Brief and social media posts for breaking vaccination information.

 

Unitl the vaccine is widely available, please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 12,878 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 256,155 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 255,563 statewide plus 592 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

53 New COVID-19 Deaths on Thursday; 11 on Friday; 4 on Saturday...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 26, 2020) – As vaccines continue to arrive, on Saturday, Gov. Andy Beshear updated Kentuckians on COVID-19 case numbers and said he hoped all families had a safe and happy Christmas.

 

“The number of deaths we’re announcing today is truly heartbreaking – another wake-up call. But one piece of good news is that our positivity rate continues to decline. It was even under eight percent on Christmas Day,” said Gov. Beshear. “That means our sacrifices are making a difference. Thank you for doing the holidays differently this year to protect each other. Let’s keep working hard so we don’t have more days like today where we have to announce we’ve lost so many of our neighbors, family and friends.”

 

Thursday’s case numbers include the state’s second-highest number of reported deaths ever.

 

“Many Kentuckians found new ways to celebrate Christmas yesterday, including limiting their in-person interactions with others,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health. “Your sacrifices are appreciated and a gift of kindness to your loved ones and your neighbors as we keep this dreadful disease from spreading more rapidly.
 

Please make sure you’re familiar with symptoms of this virus, and if you aren’t feeling well, please stay home until you are better or see a health care provider.”

 

Saturday Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 26, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 764
  • New deaths today: 4
  • Positivity rate: 8.04%
  • Total deaths: 2,534
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,511
  • Currently in ICU: 396
  • Currently on ventilator: 237

 

Top counties with the most positive cases Saturday are: Jefferson and Fayette. Each of these counties reported 90 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 228.

 

Those reported lost to the virus Saturday include a 71-year-old woman from Hart County; a 99-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 94-year-old woman from Monroe County; and a 76-year-old man from Simpson County.

 

Friday Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Dec. 25, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases: 1,803
  • New deaths: 11
  • Positivity rate: 7.95%
  • Total deaths: 2,530
  • Hospitalized: 1,601
  • In ICU: 404
  • On ventilator: 203

 

Top counties with the most positive cases Friday were: Jefferson, Fayette and Kenton. Each of these counties reported 80 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 428.

 

Those reported lost to the virus Friday included an 84-year-old man from Anderson County; a 71-year-old woman from Barren County; a 60-year-old man from Cumberland County; a 71-year-old woman from Franklin County; a 71-year-old woman from Hopkins County; an 87-year-old woman from Logan County; an 81-year-old woman from Madison County; two men, ages 62 and 91, from McCracken County; a 58-year-old man from Monroe County; and an 85-year-old woman from Pulaski County.

 

Thursday Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 24, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases: 2,742
  • New deaths: 53
  • Positivity rate: 8.2%
  • Total deaths: 2,519
  • Hospitalized: 1,689
  • In ICU: 402
  • On ventilator: 206

 

Top counties with the most positive cases Thursday were: Jefferson, Warren and Fayette. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 377.

 

Those reported lost to the virus Thursday included a 67-year-old man from Boyle County; a 72-year-old woman from Breckinridge County; two men, ages 55 and 74, from Bullitt County; a 77-year-old man from Campbell County; two women, ages 90 and 91, and an 89-year-old man from Christian County; a 71-year-old woman from Cumberland County; two men, ages 63 and 65, from Daviess County; an 82-year-old woman from Floyd County; an 83-year-old man from Franklin County; an 84-year-old woman from Graves County; a 94-year-old woman and an 87-year-old man from Grayson County; a 100-year-old woman from Hardin County; four women, ages 67, 74, 92 and 94, and two men, ages 74 and 77, from Hopkins County; an 85-year-old woman and three men, ages 70, 80 and 90, from Jefferson County; two men, ages 74 and 89, from Jessamine County; three women, ages 64, 68 and 73, from Madison County; a 69-year-old woman from Mason County; two men, ages 73 and 77, from Monroe County; two women, ages 77 and 90, from Muhlenberg County; a 77-year-old woman from Ohio County; a 91-year-old man from Owen County; three women, ages 52, 87 and 90, and two men, ages 90 and 91, from Pulaski County; a 66-year-old woman from Rockcastle County; three women, ages 86, 87 and 90, from Russell County; two women, ages 82 and 84, from Taylor County; an 86-year-old man from Trigg County; a 73-year-old man from Warren County; and a 65-year-old woman from Wolfe County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can listen to recorded summaries of the Governor’s Dec. 22 press conference (created in partnership with RadioLex) here: BosnianChineseFrenchJapaneseKoreanand Spanish.

 

See all of the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s winter holiday guidance here: English full guidanceone-pager and single slide and Spanish full guidanceone-pager and single slide.

 

3 NEW COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT; 222 NEW CASES...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.48%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 227 deaths resulting in a 1.78% mortality rate (about 1 in 56) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.77% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 88 cases* in the hospital. This is 11 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 755 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.92% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.13%. The latest data shows that 87% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 24.1% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 12,760 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6.11% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 145 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 5; Casey: 4; Clinton: 13; Cumberland: 1; Green: 8; McCreary: 19; Pulaski: 49; Russell: 10; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 19. In all, we have released 89.4% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 74 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 1,127 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,337.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 7% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 222 today: Adair: 8; Casey: 8; Clinton: 27; Cumberland: 3; Green: 15; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 90; Russell: 11; Taylor: 21; and, Wayne: 31. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 46.24 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 292 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 7m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Casey: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 66-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 95-year-old female who is hospitalized, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 88-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 96-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 95-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 4-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
wayne: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown

 

We will not be posting a COVID-19 News Brief on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day. We hope everyone has a safe and very Merry Christmas!

 

The deaths we report today are: a 79-year-old male from Casey who had been hospitalized; a 56-year-old male from McCreary who had been hospitalized; and a 66-year-old male from Wayne who had been hospitalized.

 

Today the local health departments began the COVID-19 offensive. After almost a year of playing defense, we are now seeing COVID-19 vaccination efforts commence in our district. Nursing homes are starting to be vaccinated, along with hospital, and other medical and medial related staff. The supply of COVID-19 vaccine is currently small, but getting these groups vaccinated will preserve life, and keep the medical infrastructures intact. Vaccination efforts will expand as dose availablity increases. Please watch our Daily Brief and social media for the latest developments.

 

Unfortunately, we are still experiencing high numbers of new cases, large volumes of hospitalizations, and a higher than state-average mortality rate. So, please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 12,760 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 250,930 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 250,280 statewide plus 650 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 12-24-20

 

Russell County 11 new cases today. We had 10 cases released from isolation Wednesday. We now have 59 active cases which 55 are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Danville, 1 at Somerset and 1 at Bowling Green.

 

Adair County 8 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 5 cases yesterday. We have had 1,241 total cases with 1,154 of those released and 41 deaths. We have 46 active cases with 39 of those in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals.

3 More COVID-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.48%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 227 deaths resulting in a 1.78% mortality rate (about 1 in 56) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.77% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 88 cases* in the hospital. This is 11 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 755 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.92% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.13%. The latest data shows that 87% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 24.1% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 12,760 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6.11% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 145 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 5; Casey: 4; Clinton: 13; Cumberland: 1; Green: 8; McCreary: 19; Pulaski: 49; Russell: 10; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 19. In all, we have released 89.4% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 74 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 1,127 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,337.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 7% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 222 today: Adair: 8; Casey: 8; Clinton: 27; Cumberland: 3; Green: 15; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 90; Russell: 11; Taylor: 21; and, Wayne: 31. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 46.24 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 292 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 7m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Casey: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 66-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 95-year-old female who is hospitalized, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 88-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 96-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 95-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 4-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
wayne: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown

 

We will not be posting a COVID-19 News Brief on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day. We hope everyone has a safe and very Merry Christmas!

 

The deaths we report today are: a 79-year-old male from Casey who had been hospitalized; a 56-year-old male from McCreary who had been hospitalized; and a 66-year-old male from Wayne who had been hospitalized.

 

Today the local health departments began the COVID-19 offensive. After almost a year of playing defense, we are now seeing COVID-19 vaccination efforts commence in our district. Nursing homes are starting to be vaccinated, along with hospital, and other medical and medial related staff. The supply of COVID-19 vaccine is currently small, but getting these groups vaccinated will preserve life, and keep the medical infrastructures intact. Vaccination efforts will expand as dose availablity increases. Please watch our Daily Brief and social media for the latest developments.

 

Unfortunately, we are still experiencing high numbers of new cases, large volumes of hospitalizations, and a higher than state-average mortality rate. So, please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 12,760 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 250,930 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 250,280 statewide plus 650 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

New COVID-19 Safety Requirements in Effect for Child Care Providers

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 23, 2020) –  New requirements that help ensure child, family and staff safety during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) emergency are in effect for Kentucky child care providers.

 

The new regulation, which was filed by the Department for Community Based Services (DCBS), an agency of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS), on Dec. 10 and took effect immediately, enhances other requirements for all regulated providers - child care centers, family child care homes and limited duration child care programs.

 

CHFS Secretary Eric Friedlander said many of the changes are a result of several public comments and discussions with stakeholders.

 

“These changes reflect our commitment to listening to the needs of providers and parents as we all continue to balance financial needs with protecting the health and safety of children, families and staff,” he said. “This pandemic has only emphasized the critical role that child care providers play in our economic and community infrastructure. Child care is a bridge for many parents – and the providers themselves – to navigate a successful career or track to complete their education.”

 

DCBS Commissioner Marta Miranda-Straub said her agency and the cabinet’s Office of the Inspector General and Department for Public Health (DPH) have worked hard to serve providers, including managing the distribution of $67 million in federal CARES Act funding designated for Kentucky child care.  

 

“Throughout this challenging time, child care providers have evolved to make their centers safer and more accommodating for families, and we have strived to be responsive and supportive to them, with financial assistance, expert guidance and helpful resources,” she said. “Many of our child care staff are parents and grandparents themselves, and they genuinely serve in the best interests of both providers and families.”

 

“We understand the challenges providers have faced, the losses they have experienced and their difficulties in staying open,” Miranda-Straub said. “Because every facet of our commonwealth benefits from quality child care, we’ve taken several steps to help.”

 

The new regulation updates criteria for children’s mask wearing, including exemptions in accordance with DPH’s face covering regulations.

 

DCBS Division of Child Care Director Sarah Vanover said two guidelines stay the same: Children under age 2 do not wear masks, and children in first grade and older do wear masks, unless exempted.

 

Now, under the new regulation, when parents of children between age 3 and first grade do want their children to wear masks while in center, both parents and their providers must sign a child care face mask permission form to note agreement. Providers cannot mandate that all children age 3 through first grade wear masks.

 

Vanover said by signing the form, providers assure that they have the supervision available to make sure that children are safe while wearing a masks. And parents and guardians signing the form acknowledge that they will supply the masks and that it is the children’s responsibility, not the providers’, to ensure masks are worn.

 

“This is something parents need to talk about with their children at home to make sure children understand their role,” Vanover said. “Providers are not responsible for making sure that every child in the class wears the same mask, all day long, while also completing their other responsibilities. This is a team effort.”

 

Children who are deaf or hard of hearing or who have a disability or a health exemption do not have to wear masks. Children cannot wear lanyards with their masks because of risk of suffocation or strangulation.  

 

Children shall not wear masks when they are napping because of a risk of suffocation.

 

“Sleep time is a mask-free time, and both parents and providers can emphasize this to children for safety,” Vanover said.

Children also shall not wear masks when they are engaged in vigorous play, when they’re outdoors and 6 feet apart from each other, when they are actively eating or drinking.

 

Vanover appears in a video explaining the new masking requirements to providers and families. Watch it here.

 

Other new provisions in the emergency regulations include an exception to keeping groups of children separate throughout the day for sibling groups if they are the only children in the center, references to the Kentucky Department of Education’s student transportation guidance for providing child transportation.

 

Read the regulation here. Public comments on the regulations will be accepted through Feb. 28, 2021, and may be submitted to CHFSregs@ky.gov.

 

ALMOST 3,000 COVID19 CASES AND 26 NEW DEATHS....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 23, 2020) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear updated Kentuckians on the state’s vaccine rollout and COVID-19 case numbers.

 

“Team Kentucky, from the bottom of my heart – thank you. This war is far from over, but we’ve won another battle, beating back exponential growth of this virus in our state before Christmas,” said Gov. Beshear. “I hope you all enjoy a wonderful holiday, even if it looks a little different this year. Please be careful so we can hold on to the progress we’ve made.

 

“What I love about this holiday most is that it’s not about the gifts; it’s about people taking care of each other and appreciating their loved ones and community more than ever. Let’s all live up to the true spirit of Christmas this year, and every year in the future after we get through this together.”

 

The Governor also announced that more state leaders received the vaccination against COVID-19 on Wednesday, including Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman, Chief Judge Denise G. Clayton of the Kentucky Court of Appeals, acting Kentucky State Police Commissioner Phillip Burnett Jr. and Emergency Management Director Michael Dossett.

 

Other state leaders who received the vaccine today included Gov. Andy Beshear’s chief of staff, La Tasha Buckner, his senior advisor, Rocky Adkins, and Virginia Moore, executive director of the Kentucky Commission on the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, who has been instrumental in helping Gov. Beshear reach more Kentuckians during the pandemic. To learn more and view photos, see the full release.

 

Finally, the Governor again wished Kentucky families a merry Christmas and reminded them of guidance to keep their families safe this holiday season.

 

See all of the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s winter holiday guidance here: English full guidanceone-pager and single slide and Spanish full guidance, one-pager and single slide.

 

Kentuckians can also listen to recorded PSAs about the holiday guidance (created in partnership with RadioLex) here: Bosnian, Chinese, English, French, Japanese, Korean, Persian and Spanish.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 23, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,953
  • New deaths today: 26
  • Positivity rate: 8.35%
  • Total deaths: 2,466
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,644
  • Currently in ICU: 413
  • Currently on ventilator: 222

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton and Daviess. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 415.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 95-year-old woman and a 77-year-old man from Adair County; an 82-year-old man from Allen County; a 90-year-old woman and a 69-year-old man from Bath County; an 85-year-old man from Carter County; an 85-year-old man from Casey County; an 87-year-old woman from Clinton County; an 89-year-old woman from Daviess County; two women, ages 85 and 89, from Fayette County; a 69-year-old man from Greenup County; two men, ages 73 and 89, from Harlan County; an 85-year-old woman from Hopkins County; an 82-year-old woman and two men, ages 66 and 90, from Jefferson County; a 69-year-old man from Letcher County; two women, ages 69 and 79, from Lincoln County; an 83-year-old man from Madison County; a 90-year-old woman from Mason County; and two women ages, 62 and 63, and a 76-year-old man from Pulaski County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED 12/23/20

 

As of 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, December 23, 2020 the boil water advisory for customers starting at 84-570 Lakeview Dr., Butler Cove Rd., Bridgewater Rd., and David Pike Rd. has been lifted by the Division of Water Columbia Office. This means your water is safe for human consumption. You no longer have to boil your water.

 

 

8 New Covid-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District.....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.48%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 8 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 224 deaths resulting in a 1.79% mortality rate (about 1 in 56) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.77% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 77 cases* in the hospital. This is 16 less than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 742 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.92% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.12%. The latest data shows that 87% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 24.1% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 12,538 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 6% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 136 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 4; Casey: 3; Clinton: 10; Cumberland: 4; Green: 10; McCreary: 16; Pulaski: 48; Russell: 10; Taylor: 11; and, Wayne: 20. In all, we have released 89.8% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 39 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 1,053 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,337.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 7% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 183 today: Adair: 5; Casey: 11; Clinton: 14; Cumberland: 4; Green: 9; McCreary: 41; Pulaski: 50; Russell: 11; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 21. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 45.05 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 292 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 19-year-old female who is released, unknown;
Casey: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Casey: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 79-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old female who is hospitalized, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 71-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 3m-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 66-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is released, 12/01/20;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 55-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 4-year-old male who is released, 12/16/20;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 83-year-old female who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, 12/18/20;
Wayne: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old male who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The deaths we announce today are: an 85-year-old male from Clinton; a 69-year-old male from Cumberland who had been hospitalized; a 76-year-old male from Green; a 64-year-old male long-term care resident from McCreary; a 90-year-old long-term care resident from Pulaski; a 92-year-old female long-term care resident from Taylor; a 65-year-old male from Wayne who had been hospitalized, and an 83-year-old female from Wayne who had been hospitalized.

 

Unfortunately, for the second day in a row, our new cases are up compared to this time last week. Whatever decline we seemed to be enjoying, now seems to be over.

 

On an exciting note, the COVID-19 vaccine is starting to flow into our district. The process of vaccinating nursing home residents and staff has begun and will hopefully be continuing over the next few weeks. The Local Health Departments have started receiving vaccine and will begin vaccinating medical staff and support staff of medical practices. The hospitals are also expected to receive vaccine and will vaccinate their staff and other identified priority groups.

 

Getting the nursing home staff and residents vaccinated will help tremendously. Despite being only about 8% of our total cases, this group makes up about 65% of our total deaths and 27% of our total hospitalizations.

 

Getting area medical and medical support staff vaccinated will ensure our medical infrastructures can continue to function.

 

Keep in mind, all of this is in Phase 1a of the vaccination plan. Vaccination opportunities will be expanded as more vaccine becomes available. Please be patient and watch our Daily Brief and social media posts for breaking information.

 

Until the vaccine is widely available, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 12,538 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 247,969 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 247,344 statewide plus 625 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

COLUMBIA MAN FACING NUMEROUS CHARGES INCLUDING SEXUAL ASSAULT OF A MINOR...


Columbia Police have arrested a Columbia man for sexual assault after beginning an investigation on Tuesday, December 22, 2020.


David McGraw, 34, is facing multiple felonies including unlawful transaction with a minor 1st degree; illegal sexual act, rape 3rd degree, sodomy 3rd degree, possession of matter portraying juvenile in a sexual act, and use of a minor under 16 in a sexual performance.
McGraw, was taken into custody late Tuesday night and electronics have been seized for the investigation which is ongoing.


CPD Officers Trevor Foster and Jordan Dean made the arrest. CPD Officer Adam Cravens is heading the investigation.

 

Kentuckians Are Warned About Covid-19 Vaccine Scams....


Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron has issued a consumer protection alert to warn Kentuckians about potential scams related to the distribution of the COVID-19 vaccines.

 

"Throughout the pandemic, we’ve seen scammers attempt to take advantage of consumers by capitalizing on the circumstances surrounding COVID-19, whether it be with fraudulent pop-up testing sites, fake COVID-19 cures, or online work-from-home scams, and we expect that scammers will try to use the rollout of the new vaccine to their advantage,” said Attorney General Cameron. “We are committed to closely monitoring vaccine-related scams to ensure Kentuckians do not become victims and that any scams are quickly investigated and stopped. I urge anyone who is contacted by a scammer about a COVID-19 vaccine to report it immediately to our office."

 

Cameron's office offers these tips to avoid potential COVID-19 scams: 

 

  • Do not pay for the promise of a vaccine. If someone promises immediate or early access to the vaccine in return for payment, it is a scam.
  • You should not receive an unsolicited call asking for your Social Security number or your credit card or bank account information to sign up to get the vaccine. If you do receive such a call, you should hang up and verify the source of the caller before proceeding further.
  • Beware of individuals who contact you offering products, such as medicine or treatments, which they claim are as effective as the vaccine. Check with your healthcare provider before paying for or receiving any COVID-19-related treatment.


As of now, the AG's office has not received complaints of vaccine scams but says Kentuckians must remain vigilant. 

 

Vaccine scams should be reported immediately to Cameron's office by visiting this website or by calling 1-888-432-9257.
 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 12-23-20


Russell County 11 new cases Tuesday. We had 10 cases released from isolation. We now have 58 active cases which 55 are on self-isolation and 3 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Bowling Green and 1 at Somerset.

 

Adair County 5 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 4 cases. We have had 1,233 total cases with 1,149 of those released and 41 deaths. We have 43 active cases with 38 of those in home isolation and 5 in area hospitals.

28 NEW COVID-19 DEATHS IN KENTUCKY....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 22, 2020) – On Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear said he hoped all Kentuckians will have a wonderful Christmas, encouraging them to keep gatherings small and safe so they may enjoy many future holidays with their loved ones.

 

“I want to make sure I start by asking everybody to make that additional sacrifice and do their part to keep their Christmas celebrations small,” said Gov. Beshear. “With the rest of the country on fire, with hospitalizations escalating in almost every other state, in Kentucky we are seeing a stabilization that is protecting the lives of our people, and we want to make sure that we continue to plateau or even see a decrease in cases as we move forward with this vaccine.

 

“How we do Christmas and New Year’s celebrations is going to be so critical to protecting as many Kentuckians as possible until we can get this vaccine disseminated. In my family, this Christmas will just be Britainy and myself, the kids and the dog.”

 

See all of the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s winter holiday guidance here: English full guidanceone-pager and single slide and Spanish full guidance, one-pager and single slide.

 

Kentuckians can also listen to recorded PSAs about the holiday guidance (created in partnership with RadioLex) here: Bosnian, Chinese, English, French, Japanese, Korean, Persian and Spanish.

 

Earlier today, the heads of the three branches of Kentucky government – Gov. Beshear, Kentucky Supreme Court Chief Justice John D. Minton Jr., House Speaker David Osborne and Senate President Robert Stivers – along with First Lady Britainy Beshear, Secretary of the Executive Cabinet J. Michael Brown and commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health Dr. Steven Stack each received their initial dose of the Moderna vaccine, ensuring the continuity of state government during this pandemic and demonstrating broad, bipartisan support for the safe, effective COVID-19 vaccination.

 

To learn more and view photos, see the full release.

 

This morning, vaccinations also began at Thomson-Hood Veterans Center, which has been hit extremely hard by the virus. Army Private First Class Norris Hardison, the first resident to receive the vaccine, said: “I am not afraid. I want everyone to see me take it and know that it is safe.”

 

She added, “Every single person should get this vaccine. I have been talking to my family, and even my daughter, who is afraid of needles, is going to take it. It’s the best way to protect us all from this COVID virus, and I am just so happy that it’s finally here.” To view a photo of her vaccination, click here.

 

At least 8,839 Kentuckians outside of long-term care facilities have been vaccinated. The Governor said he would update Kentuckians on vaccinations in long-term care facilities in the coming days as those numbers are updated by facilities that received doses this week.

 

He added that approximately 100,000 Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine initial doses and 100,000 Moderna vaccine initial doses are expected in Kentucky by the end of the year, including those already delivered and deployed. This includes a newly announced Dec. 27-31 allocation from Pfizer of more than 34,000 doses.

 

Finally, Gov. Beshear announced all lanes of travel on the Brent Spence Bridge are expected open later today, ahead of schedule and under budget.

 

“Travel lanes and various access ramps leading to the bridge will gradually reopen to full capacity throughout the afternoon and evening, once lane striping on the upper and lower decks is complete,” said Gov. Beshear. “Thank you to everyone involved. We are all grateful for your quick response and hard work.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 22, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,057
  • New deaths today: 28
  • Positivity rate: 8.48%
  • Total deaths: 2,440
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,631
  • Currently in ICU: 419
  • Currently on ventilator: 223

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Warren, Madison, Fayette, Kenton and Christian. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 468.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 91-year-old woman from Boyd County; two women, ages 91 and 94, from Calloway County; a 66-year-old man from Casey County; two women, ages 64 and 87, and a 71-year-old man from Daviess County; a 67-year-old man from Fleming County; a 67-year-old woman from Graves County; two women, ages 57 and 63, and two men, ages 58 and 83, from Henderson County; a 67-year-old man from Henry County; a 67-year-old man from Hopkins County; a 74-year-old woman from Jackson County; a 53-year-old woman and a 62-year-old man from Jefferson County; an 81-year-old man from Knott County; three women, ages 86, 94 and 96, from Marion County; two men, ages 79 and 85, from McCracken County; an 87-year-old woman and a 59-year-old man from Monroe County; a 60-year-old woman from Perry County; and a 54-year-old woman from Todd County.

 

6 NEW COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.64%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 6 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 216 deaths resulting in a 1.75% mortality rate (about 1 in 57) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.77% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 93 cases* in the hospital. This is 3 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 726 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.88% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.12%. The latest data shows that 89.1% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 31.3% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 12,355 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 5.91% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 281 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 13; Casey: 9; Clinton: 33; Cumberland: 5; Green: 8; McCreary: 27; Pulaski: 100; Russell: 16; Taylor: 33; and, Wayne: 37. In all, we have released 90% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 110 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 1014 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1337.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 7% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 177 today: Adair: 4; Casey: 5; Clinton: 12; Cumberland: 6; Green: 4; McCreary: 33; Pulaski: 57; Russell: 9; Taylor: 12; and, Wayne: 35. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 46.7 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 292 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 76-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 61-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 6-year-old female who is released, 12/03/20;
McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is released, 12/03/20;
McCreary: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 103-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22m-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 100-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 5m-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look would appear that some of the counties’ numbers are off. This is because we deleted a duplicate case in Clinton. We moved 1 case from Wayne to Pulaski, and we moved 1 case from McCreary to Clinton.

 

The deaths we report today are: a 66-year-old male from Casey who had been hospitalized; a 76-year-old female from Casey who had been hospitalized; an 82-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; a 98-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; a 79-year-old female long-term care resident from Russell who had been released from Public Health observation as no longer contagious, but later succumbed to lasting complications from the disease; and a 53-year-old female from Wayne who had been hospitalized who had been released from Public Health observation as no longer contagious, but later succumbed to lasting complications from the disease.

 

Unfortunately, after several days of declining numbers, we added more cases today than we did for Monday of last week. However, we did release more cases than we added new cases. Let’s just hope the declining numbers of new cases will return over the next few days. For now, and until the vaccine is widely available, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 12,355 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 244,949 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 244,297 statewide plus 652 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 12-22-20


Russell County 9 new cases Monday. We had 16 cases released from isolation. As reported earlier we had 1 death today. We now have 57 active cases which 54 cases are on self-isolation and 3 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Somerset, 1 at University of Louisville and 1 at Danville.

 

Adair County 4 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 13 cases yesterday. We have had 1,228 total cases with 1,145 of those released and 41 deaths. We have 42 active cases with 35 of those in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals.

RC SCHOOL BOARD MEETING RECAP....

 

It was a busy meeting last evening at the Russell County School Board meeting. Superintendent Michael Ford tells WAVE NEWS what took place..... 

 

 

Gov. Beshear Provides Kentuckians COVID-19 Vaccine Update

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 21, 2020) – On Monday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced that during the day, several long-term care facilities in the commonwealth began administering the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine.

 

“Again, our goal is to get everyone in long-term care facilities vaccinated by March 1,” said Gov. Beshear. “If we do that, we cut off 66% of the deaths that we have been experiencing. We also reduce hospitalizations and we free up more health care capacity. That means patients who do come in to the hospital get more attention and access and we improve their health outcomes.”

 

For more information, read the full release. Kentuckians can also view images of the first long-term care residents in Kentucky who were able to receive the vaccine.

 

The Governor highlighted a Washington Post report that, currently, an American dies from COVID-19 every 33 seconds.

 

The report emphasized the virus’ severity across the United States, but recognized Kentucky’s unique success in one aspect of the fight against it: Kentucky is the only state in the nation where fewer intensive care unit beds are in use today than were in use three months ago.

 

The Governor was joined virtually by Dr. Ashley Montgomery-Yates, Interim Chief Medical Officer for Inpatient Services at UK HealthCare. Dr. Montgomery-Yates is also a physician in the COVID unit and the director of the ICU recovery clinic where she works directly with COVID-19 patients at the University of Kentucky Hospital.

 

“This pandemic has affected all of our lives in a myriad of different ways,” said Dr. Montgomery-Yates. “But I’m excited that one of the positive things that has come out of this global crisis is that the scientific community has come together to roll out in a record amount of time – in a way that has been safe and effective – a new and novel vaccine that is going to change the way we see, develop and distribute vaccinations forever.

 

“I know that there have been some fears about the vaccine, but from the medical community, we see this as an incredibly safe and an incredibly well thought out vaccine. I had a little arm soreness after the COVID-19 vaccine, but honestly, the flu shot caused more soreness for me. We’ve now vaccinated about 2,000 people here at UK. I feel very confident in the safety.

 

“The workers on the COVID unit are exhausted. This has been a war. But as news of the vaccine has come, there’s a renewed energy, there’s a renewed sense of hope that this is going to end.”

 

Dr. Montgomery-Yates also talked about how she approaches conversations about the vaccine with her children.

 

“Both my children would say they don’t particularly enjoy shots and needles, but they feel privileged to live in a place where they are offered that opportunity to get vaccines like this one. They understand that just like going to the doctor for other things, vaccines help keep them healthy. It’s the same reason that we don’t eat 15 bowls of ice cream for dinner,” said Dr. Montgomery-Yates. “I’ve told them, ‘it’s not horrible, it’s very quick, and it will save your life, the life of your grandmother, your aunt, your classmates – it’s not just about us.’”

 

Today, Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, introduced a new vaccine dashboard on kycovid19.ky.gov where Kentuckians can learn more about the vaccine, its planned distribution stages and progress of its rollout across the state. Eighty hospitals in Kentucky will receive the Moderna vaccine this week.

 

“This will show the total number of doses that have been shipped to the state; it will show the total number of Kentuckians who have been vaccinated; and it will show the total number of doses remaining to be deployed,” said Dr. Stack. “These numbers do not include the numbers that go to the long-term care facility immunization, at least not currently. Those get assigned over to CVS and Walgreens and show up in a different tracking methodology.”

 

Finally, the Governor commented on the new COVID-19 relief bill the federal government is expected to pass tonight. State governments are expected to receive financial assistance for vaccines, contact tracing, testing, schools, transportation, rental assistance, nutrition and child care.

 

“This bill also includes another round of the paycheck protection program for small businesses. I will say, I don’t think it’s going to be enough for small businesses. I’m certainly looking at additional relief that we can provide here in Kentucky,” said Gov. Beshear. “There also appears to be an extension of unemployment benefits for those who are about to fall off.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Monday, Dec. 21, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,988
  • New deaths today: 15
  • Positivity rate: 8.64%
  • Total deaths: 2,412
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,580
  • Currently in ICU: 411
  • Currently on ventilator: 231

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton and Boone. Each of these counties reported 80 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 376.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 87-year-old man from Bullitt County; a 75-year-old woman and a 74-year-old man from Caldwell County; a 72-year-old woman from Clark County; a 68-year-old man from Fayette County; an 83-year-old woman from Hopkins County; an 82-year-old woman from Jefferson County; a 61-year-old woman from Johnson County; two women, ages 76 and 92, from Livingston County; an 88-year-old woman from Muhlenberg County; a 92-year-old woman from Ohio County; an 87-year-old woman and an 88-year-old man from Owsley County; and a 61-year-old woman from Webster County.

 

Memorial
Today, the Governor announced that Kentucky lost another front-line hero to COVID-19. On Nov. 10, Bloomfield City Police Chief Scott Dennis was taken to Flaget Memorial Hospital in Bardstown. Only nine days later he was put on a ventilator.

 

“He wanted everyone to know he was going to ‘fight this virus’ – which he did, with the bravery he displayed throughout his life and career,” said Gov. Beshear. “Unfortunately, after his courageous battle with the virus, Chief Dennis passed away on Dec. 4 due to complications from COVID-19.

 

“Chief Dennis was a hero. Throughout his life he put himself on the line to protect the people of Kentucky and their families. For the past eight years he served the city of Bloomfield, and was named Chief of Police in 2016.

 

“‘What makes a loyal friend? Just ask those fortunate enough to be friends with Scott,’ his family said. He was many things, but most of all he was a good man. Chief Dennis leaves behind his wife of 22 years, Mary Ann Dennis, his daughter Brystal and two sons, West and Colt. His family shared it was a blessing to have had such an incredible husband, father, friend and colleague. He will leave behind a legacy that will be remembered, and truly missed, by all those who loved him.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

See all of the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s winter holiday guidance here: English full guidanceone-pager and single slide and Spanish full guidanceone-pager and single slide.

 

89 New Covid-19 Cases in Lake Cumberland District; 3 New Deaths...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.58%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 210 deaths resulting in a 1.72% mortality rate (about 1 in 58) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.78% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 90 cases* in the hospital. This is 3 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 717 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.89% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.15%. The latest data shows that 89.1% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 31.3% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 12,178 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 5.83% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 109 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 3; Casey: 6; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 1; Green: 5; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 27; Russell: 14; Taylor: 12; and, Wayne: 26. In all, we have released 89% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 23 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 1124 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1336.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 8% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 89 today: Adair: 3; Casey: 1; Clinton: 6; Cumberland: 2; Green: 1; McCreary: -13; Pulaski: 49; Russell: 2; Taylor: 6; and, Wayne: 32. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 48.11 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 292 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 69-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old female who is released, 12/11/20;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is released, 12/19/20;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4 Months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 84-year-old female who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the numbers today will reveal that McCreary and Wayne are off by several each. This is because of correcting a clerical error where several Wayne cases were inadvertently assigned to McCreary.

 

The 3 deaths we report are: a 63-year-old male from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; an 84-year-old female from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; and an 89-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized.

 

On a positive note, we had fewer new cases last week than the week before, and we are starting this week reporting fewer cases today than last Sunday. Let’s hope and pray we are not only plateaued but seeing a lowering of new cases.

 

Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 12,178 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 242,986 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 242,321 statewide plus 665 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

Stabbing Results in the Arrest of Columbia Woman; Another Woman Treated at Hospital


Columbia Police responded to a residence just off of Bomar Heights on Sunday night after a 911 call of an active physical altercation. Upon arrival and gaining control of the scene, one female at the residence was taken into custody and is facing multiple charges. 


Shaniqua Woolridge, 29, of Columbia has been charged with three counts of wanton endangerment 1st degree, assault 4th degree with minor injuries, assault 2nd degree, and possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). 

The female victim, who sustained a puncture wound, was transported by EMS to TJ Health Columbia for treatment. A male victim on scene did not seek medical attention. Additionally, there was a child at the residence who was not harmed. 

Officer Adam Cravens was the arresting Officer. He was assisted on scene by Officer Jordan Dean and Deputy Justin Cross.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-21

Russell County 2 new cases Sunday. We had 14 cases released from isolation. We now have 65 active cases which 61 are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Somerset, 1 at VA in Lexington and 1 at University of Louisville.

 

Adair County 3 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 3 cases. We have had 1,224 total cases with 1,132 of those released and 41 deaths. We have 51 active cases with 45 of those in home isolation and 6 in area hospitals.

LCDHD COVID-19 REPORT - SUNDAY, DEC. 20TH

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.58%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 210 deaths resulting in a 1.72% mortality rate (about 1 in 58) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.78% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 90 cases* in the hospital. This is 3 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 717 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.89% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.15%. The latest data shows that 89.1% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 31.3% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 12,178 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 5.83% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 109 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 3; Casey: 6; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 1; Green: 5; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 27; Russell: 14; Taylor: 12; and, Wayne: 26. In all, we have released 89% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 23 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 1124 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1336.

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 8% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 89 today: Adair: 3; Casey: 1; Clinton: 6; Cumberland: 2; Green: 1; McCreary: -13; Pulaski: 49; Russell: 2; Taylor: 6; and, Wayne: 32. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 48.11 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 292 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 69-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old female who is released, 12/11/20;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is released, 12/19/20;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4 Months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 84-year-old female who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the numbers today will reveal that McCreary and Wayne are off by several each. This is because of correcting a clerical error where several Wayne cases were inadvertently assigned to McCreary.

 

The 3 deaths we report are: a 63-year-old male from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; an 84-year-old female from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; and an 89-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized.

 

On a positive note, we had fewer new cases last week than the week before, and we are starting this week reporting fewer cases today than last Sunday. Let’s hope and pray we are not only plateaued but seeing a lowering of new cases.

 

Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 12,178 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 242,986 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 242,321 statewide plus 665 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

RUSSELL CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY DEC. 19TH

 
There is a boil water advisory in Russell County on a section of Lakeway Drive starting at the 4-way stop at Lakeway and Maple Street up to Oak Street. The advisory was issued on Saturday afternoon, Dec. 19th, 2020 due to a water main break. Until further notice, boil all water used for drinking and cooking puposes.
 
 

LCDHD Report - Saturday, December 19, 2020

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.59%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report one new death today. We have experienced a total of 207 deaths resulting in a 1.71% mortality rate (about 1 in 58) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.79% mortality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 87 cases* in the hospital. This is 4 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 711 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.88% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.17%. The latest data shows that 97.8% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 28.8% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 12,089 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 5.79% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 200 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 17; Casey: 11; Clinton: 12; Cumberland: 8; Green: 6; McCreary: 27; Pulaski: 56; Russell: 22; Taylor: 15; and, Wayne: 26. In all, we have released 88.8% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 53 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 1147 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1335.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 8% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 147 today: Adair: 2; Casey: 9; Clinton: 14; Cumberland: 4; Green: 9; McCreary: 14; Pulaski: 56; Russell: 4; Taylor: 14; and, Wayne: 21. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.015. This means our total case count is projected to double every 46.19 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 292 cases.
 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 7months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Clinton: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 78-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 8-year-old female who is released, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 83-year-old male who is hospitalized, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 8months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 7 Month-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We neglected to report one death yesterday, a 69-year-old female from Casey who had been hospitalized.

 

On some positive notes, after a long period of steady growth, this week’s new case numbers (1,174) were down for Lake Cumberland compared to last week (1,433). This marks the second week of decline at the state level. Also, our active cases are down by 164 compared to last Saturday (1,147 vs 1,311). However, we have 1 more hospitalized case today (87) compared to last Saturday (86). We also experienced 24 deaths this week. Hopefully, Kentucky and Lake Cumberland have now plateaued, and we will see additional declining numbers over the days to come. With vaccinations on the horizon, perhaps we are at the beginning of the end of our fight with COVID-19.

 

That being said, it is not yet time to let down our guard. After months of keeping COVID-19 largely out of several area nursing homes, most are now seeing cases. They just could not withstand the latest community spike. This is a real shame with vaccinations so close at hand. Please do your part so we do not repeat these types of scenarios. How can we all pitch in? By wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 12,089 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 241,223 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 240,564 statewide plus 659 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

Gov. Beshear: Mitigation Efforts Have Stopped Growth of COVID-19 Cases

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 19, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear Saturday said mitigation efforts have stopped the growth of COVID-19 cases in the commonwealth, noting that case numbers are continuing to decline and Kentucky’s positivity rate is stable.

 

“What we are seeing is that the measures we have taken are working,” said Gov. Beshear. “We have stopped the increase in cases, which we knew we had to do before we can start to decrease those numbers.
 

Let’s all commit to doing what we know is right – wearing masks, social distancing, washing our hands and limiting our holiday gatherings – so we can beat this virus once and for good.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 19, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,388
  • New deaths today: 27
  • Positivity rate: 8.58%
  • Total deaths: 2,371
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,655
  • Currently in ICU: 438
  • Currently on ventilator: 253

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are Jefferson, Kenton, Fayette, Pulaski, Daviess, Boone, Campbell and Warren. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 459.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 62-year-old man from Bell County; a 75-year-old man from Christian County; a 92-year-old woman and five men, ages 62, 73, 83, 83 and 97, from Daviess County; a 61-year-old man from Fayette County; a 50-year-old man from Grayson County; a 63-year-old woman from Hancock County; an 85-year-old woman from Hardin County; a 79-year-old man and two women, ages 58 and 97, from Jefferson County; a 96-year-old woman from Jessamine County; a 77-year-old woman from Knott County; a 91-year-old-man from Marion County; a 70-year-old man from Ohio County; an 87-year-old woman from  Oldham County; two men, ages 69 and 88, from Owsley County; two women, ages 50 and 84, from Pike County; a 78-year-old man from Shelby County; a 63-year-old man from Spencer County; and an 89-year-old woman from Webster County.

 

“Perseverance in the weeks ahead is critical as vaccine supplies increase and we work towards COVID-19 immunizations available to Kentuckians as 2021 unfolds,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “It would be an added tragedy to reverse our hard won progress through leisure travel and large gatherings. Some hospitals are already near full capacity and that could make it difficult to receive care if there is an added holiday surge. Watch your space, wear a mask, and wash your hands to ensure that 2021 is a year of hope and healing.”


More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

See all of the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s winter holiday guidance here: English full guidanceone-pager and single slide and Spanish full guidanceone-pager and single slide.

 

Kentuckians can also listen to recorded PSAs about the holiday guidance (created in partnership with RadioLex) here: BosnianChineseEnglishFrenchJapaneseKoreanPersian and Spanish.

 

RUSSELL CO. MAN ARRESTED ON BURGLARY & OTHER CHARGES....

 

Anthony Popplewell, 32, of Russell Springs was arrested Friday by the Russell Springs Police Dept. Popplewell was charged with: Burglary 2nd degree, Menacing, Criminal Trespassing 1st degree, Criminal Mischief 2nd degree, Resisting Arrest, and Failure to Appear.

ADAIR COUNTY MAN ARRESTED ON METH CHARGES....

 

Roy Kyle Johnson, 25, of Columbia, KY was arrested Friday afternoon by Columbia Police and charged with Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of a Controlled Substance 2nd Degree (Drug Unspecified), Falsely Reporting an Incident, and Public Intoxication of a Controlled Substance (excluding alcohol). Johnson was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.


 

Russell County Man Arrested Following Vehicle Pursuit...

 
A vehicle pursuit this afternoon in the Caney Fork area of Russell County resulted in the arrest of a Russell County man.
 
Following the pursuit, 31-year-old Justin Gabehart of Russell Springs was arrested by Deputy Ron Golden and charged with Wanton Endangerment 1st degree (Police Officer), No Operators License, Possession of a Controlled Substance 3rd degree (Drug unspecified), Reckless Driving, Fleeing or Evading Police 1st degree (Motor Vehicle), Fleeing or Evading Police (on foot), and DUI (aggravating circumstances). 
 
Deputy Golden was assisted by other sheriffs deputies and the Russell Springs Police Department. This case will be presented to a Russell County Grand Jury. 
 

INDIANA WOMAN ARRESTED ON METH CHARGES IN ADAIR CO....

 

Robbie Strunk, 30, Indianapolis, IN arrested by KSP and lodged in the Adair Co. Regional Jail on Thursday afternoon for Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, DUI, Improper Registration Plate, Operating on a Suspended or Revoked License, and Failure to Produce Insurance Card.
 

RUSSELL CO. DRUG ROUND-UP....

 

On Friday morning, December 18th, 2020 The Russell County Sheriffs Office kicked off the 2nd Russell County Drug Trafficking Round-up named "Christmas Jeer #2". According to Sheriff Derek Polston, the drug roundup began at 9:00amCT. Several subjects were not located at this time and more arrests are forthcoming.

 
ARRESTS:
  • Rebecca Bennett, 57, Russell Springs, KY - Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Possession of a Controlled Substance, and Prescription Controlled Substance Not in Proper Container
  • Andrew Bolin, 33, Russell Springs, KY - Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Operating on a Suspended or Revoked License, Driving Without a License, and Violating Part 392 Federal Safety Regulations - Driving of Motor Vehicle
  • Damion Anderson, 46, Russell Springs, KY - Trafficking in Methamphetamine
  • Shannon Wooten, 46, Russell Springs, KY - Trafficking in Methamphetamine
  • Amber Lawless, 33, Russell Springs, KY - Trafficking in a Controlled Substance 3rd degree (Drug Unspecified)
  • Angela Passmore, 38, of Eli in Russell County -  Trafficking in Methamphetamine
  • Anthony Popplewell, 32, of Russell Springs was arrested Friday by the Russell Springs Police Dept. Popplewell was charged with: Burglary 2nd degree, Menacing, Criminal Trespassing 1st degree, Criminal Mischief 2nd degree, Resisting Arrest, and Failure to Appear

 

The cases will be presented to a Russell County Grand Jury. 
 

If you suspect illegal drugs in your neighborhood, please call the Drug/Wanted Persons Ttip-line at 270-343-8116.

 

Other agencies are assisting the RCSO with Christmas Jeer #2: Kentucky State Police, the Russell Springs Police Dept., the Jamestown Police Dept. and the Columbia Police Dept. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

RUSSELL CO. HOSPITAL BOARD MEETING DEC. 21ST...

 
There will be a special called Russell County Hospital Board Meeting on Monday, December 21st, 2020 at 12:00pmCT in the Hospital Conference Room. The topic of discussion is a new portable x-ray machine.
 

SPECIAL CALLED A.C. FISCAL COURT MEETING DEC. 21ST

 
The Adair County Fiscal Court will have a special called meeting on Monday, December 21, 2020 at 3:30pmCT. The meeting will NOT be open to the public but will be live-streamed on the Adair County Fiscal Court Facebook page. The only item on the agenda is approval of a budget amendment.
 
AGENDA
CALL TO ORDER
ROLL CALL
                                 
  1. APPROVAL OF AGENDA
  2. FIRST READING OF BUDGET AMENDMENT
  3. ADJOURN

 

                                    

Gov. Beshear Directs More Federal Funds to COVID-19 Related Unemployment Insurance Costs

 
FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 18, 2020) - Gov. Andy Beshear today announced that he is directing $51.5 million in federal CARES Act funding to provide more than 1,500 employers, including public schools, universities, government entities and nearly 1,000 nonprofits, relief from unemployment costs. 
 
“We wanted to provide relief to our schools, government entities and our non-profits who have been hit hard by this pandemic, but continued to do so much to help Kentuckians through this crisis,” said Gov. Beshear. “We need everyone ready to help us emerge from this pandemic prepared to build a better, brighter commonwealth for all Kentuckians.”
 
During the pandemic, the federal government allowed states to provide relief to employers that reimburse the state 100% on unemployment insurance claims paid on their behalf. This group only had 50% of these costs covered by the federal government during the pandemic. To eliminate the other 50% owed to the state Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund by these employers, the Governor is applying CARES funds to cover the remaining costs.
 
Combining both the state and federal portions, the state unemployment trust fund will receive a $103 million boost to help continue to pay the federal unemployment insurance loan.
 
“This relief will help nearly 1,000 nonprofits keep their doors open to maintain services and meet the urgent needs of Kentuckians,” said Danielle Clore, chief executive officer for the Kentucky Nonprofit Network. “We appreciate Gov. Beshear’s recognition that Kentucky’s charitable nonprofits are on the frontlines in the battle to beat this disease and, as the fourth largest employer in the commonwealth, are essential to ensuring our communities will recover.”
 
The Governor has directed full payment of all billing statements for 1,568 Kentucky reimbursing employer accounts to the state’s Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund, which includes the second quarter charge statements recently issued, as well as the third- and-fourth quarter charge statements.
 
Any reimbursing employer who has already paid their second quarter 2020 statement can request a refund online by visiting the Unemployment Insurance Employer Self-Service site https://kewes.ky.gov and clicking on “Request Refund.”
 
All unemployment benefit charges will resume to both contributory and reimbursing employer accounts beginning Jan. 1, 2021. Reimbursing employers do not contribute to the fund. They are only responsible for reimbursing the fund for any benefits paid out to workers.
 
This year the Governor has distributed $1.6 billion in federal CARES funding.
 
Among other areas, this funding provided additional unemployment relief and support for Kentuckians impacted:
  • $298 million to pay benefits and make unemployment insurance system improvements;
  • $200-300 million to help repay the federal unemployment insurance loan to assist contributing employers;
  • $15 million for an Eviction Relief Fund;
  • $15 million for a Utility Relief Fund, which already has supported families struggling at the hands of the pandemic;
  • $40 million to create a Food and Beverage Relief Fund. 

 

Gov. Beshear also launched the Team Kentucky Fund, which has helped Kentuckians pay their rent or mortgage, electric bills, natural gas, sewage, propane and waste, and buy groceries. At the height of a global recession, Kentuckians, Kentucky businesses and even our children, some of whom sent a dollar and a note, donated more than $3.7 million to help their neighbors.
 
The record level of unemployment spurred by the pandemic and years of painful staffing cuts, location reductions and failure to upgrade IT systems slowed the state’s ability to help many Kentuckians who lost jobs through no fault of their own. Gov. Beshear has committed to doing more to fix these historical issues.
 
Since the pandemic began, there have been more than 1.3 million unemployment insurance claims. Kentucky has paid out more than $5 billion in wage replacement assistance when Kentucky workers needed it the most. Kentucky also was one of the few states to provide the additional $100 to claimants in conjunction with the $300 from the Lost Wages Assistance Program.

3,179 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES IN KY; 28 NEW DEATHS....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 18, 2020) – On Friday, Gov. Andy Beshear reminded Kentuckians to follow new holiday guidance issued Thursday and reminded restaurant and bar owners to apply for assistance through the Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund by midnight tonight, if they have not already done so.

 

“Christmas is probably my favorite day of the year, and I know we all want to celebrate the way we usually do, but this year we need to do things differently,” said Gov. Beshear. “With vaccines arriving this week, we can see the bright light at the end of the tunnel. Now we just need everyone to keep doing their part to protect one another.”

 

Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund
The Governor reminded Kentuckians that today is the last day to apply for the $40 million Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund. Check eligibility and apply here.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Dec. 18, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,179
  • New deaths today: 28
  • Positivity rate: 8.59%
  • Total deaths: 2,344
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,712
  • Currently in ICU: 410
  • Currently on ventilator: 227

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Pulaski, Kenton and Warren. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 434.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 64-year-old woman from Boyd County; two men, ages 67 and 71, from Christian County; a 75-year-old man from Clark County; a 92-year-old woman and an 84-year-old man from Fayette County; a 93-year-old woman from Graves County; a 71-year-old woman from Greenup County; a 70-year-old man from Hardin County; two men, ages 54 and 86, from Hopkins County; a 95-year-old woman and five men, ages 58, 74, 77, 77 and 79, from Jefferson County; a 57-year-old woman from Johnson County; an 84-year-old woman from Kenton County; a 93-year-old woman from Larue County; a 75-year-old woman from Lee County; a 90-year-old man from Marshall County; a 66-year-old man from Mason County; an 83-year-old woman and a 59-year-old man from McCracken County; a 74-year-old man from Pike County; a 95-year-old woman from Taylor County; and a 62-year-old woman from Union County.

 

School Recommendations and Requirements
The Governor said Kentuckians can now view his new executive order related to public health precautions in schools. Gov. Beshear first announced these updated requirements and recommendations on Dec. 14.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

See all of the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s winter holiday guidance here: English full guidanceone-pager and single slide and Spanish full guidanceone-pager and single slide.

 

7 COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT....

 

Covid-19 vaccine is arriving in Kentucky! You may have seen images this week of Kentuckians beginning to receive the new COVID vaccine. This is an incredibly exciting and hopeful development. The first vaccine that has been approved for distribution is the Pfizer vaccine. While we did not receive any of this vaccine in Lake Cumberland in this first shipment, we are anticipating receiving the next approved vaccine (Moderna) possibly within the next week or two. The first doses are expected to be available in very small numbers and will be reserved for health care workers, first responders and long term care residents and staff, initially. LCDHD is continuing to actively plan for receipt and distribution of vaccine with our community partners. We will certainly be sharing more information VERY soon, but for now, please continue to be patient and stay healthy!

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.45%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 7 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 199 deaths resulting in a 1.69% mortality rate (about 1 in 59) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.81% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 106 cases* in the hospital. This is 8 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 700 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.94% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.18%. The latest data shows that 97.8% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 28.8% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 11,783 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 5.64% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 192 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 14; Casey: 11; Clinton: 9; Cumberland: 6; Green: 7; McCreary: 21; Pulaski: 50; Russell: 19; Taylor: 27; and, Wayne: 28. In all, we have released 87.2% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 93 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 1310 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1334.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Family, and Schools. Of our active cases, 7% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 292 today: Adair: 8; Casey: 11; Clinton: 15; Cumberland: 3; Green: 14; McCreary: 34; Pulaski: 138; Russell: 8; Taylor: 27; and, Wayne: 34. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.017. This means our total case count is projected to double every 42.32 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/17/2020 when we added 292 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 2m -year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 3 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 81-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 85-year-old male who is deceased, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 1-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is hospitalized, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 96-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 94-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, 11/29/20;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 96-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 95-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 94-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 95-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 98-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 98-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is released, 12/15/20;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 86-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 98-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is released, 12/15/20;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 100-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 4m-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 44-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The deaths we report today are: an 85-year-old male long-term care resident from McCreary; a 99-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski; a 90-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski; a 94-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski; a 91-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski; a 96-year-old female long-term care resident from Russell; and an 85-year-old male long-term care resident from Taylor. It is a pity how hard our long-term care facilities have been hit of late, being only a few days away from receiving the vaccine. It seems almost none of our nursing homes have been able to withstand this latest surge. Oh, how I wish we could have all done a little more to slow the spread of COVID-19.

 

We had a record number of new cases today at 292. We are still having high numbers of deaths and high numbers of hospitalizations. Also, we are seeing a surge in nursing home outbreaks. When the vaccine is available, please take it. Until then, please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 11,783 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 235,255 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 234,021 statewide plus 1,234 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-18-20

Russell County reported another death Thursday. It is a 96 year old female who is a resident of a long term care facility. We now have a total of 29 deaths. We had 8 new cases. We had 19 cases released from isolation. We now have 102 active cases which 95 cases are on self-isolation and 7 cases are hospitalized, 3 cases at Russell County Hospital , 1 case at Bowling Green ,1 case at Glasgow ,1 case at Danville and 1 case at VA in Lexington.

 

Adair County 8 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 14 cases yesterday.  We have had 1,210 total cases with 1,097 of those released and 40 deaths. We have 73 active cases with 66 of those in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals.

RUSSELL SPRINGS CITY LEADERS MET IN SPECIAL SESSION

The Russell Springs City Coucil met in special session with a few items on the agenda.. 

 

Mayor Eddie Thomas sit down with WAVE NEWS to share what took place. 

 

JAMESTOWN CITY COUNCIL MET LAST NIGHT

Jamestown City Council met last night in their regular monthly meeting. 

 

Mayor Nick Shearer shares with WAVE listeners what took place... 

 

ADAIR COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MET THURSDAY NIGHT...

The Adair County School Board met last night for the regular monthly meeting for them. 

 

Jim Liebe attended the meeting for 92.7 the WAVE and files this report... 

 

Gov. Beshear: Previous Spike in COVID-19 Cases Leads to Record 54 Reported Deaths

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 17, 2020) – On Thursday, Gov. Andy Beshear updated Kentuckians on COVID-19 and said while new cases continue to plateau and the state’s positivity rate declines, the commonwealth set a record of newly reported deaths – a result of the state’s previous spike in cases.

 

“Our death report today is by far the most people that we’ve lost, and remember, that’s a reflection of where this virus was about three weeks ago, where it was trending,” said Gov. Beshear. “I hope we don’t have another day like this, ever. These are 54 families that need our help and compassion and green lights. They also need us to do better.”

 

The state’s previous record of 38 deaths was reported Dec. 2. Gov. Beshear took action on Nov. 18 to stop the rampant spread of COVID-19 and save Kentuckians’ lives while keeping the economy open.

 

The Governor announced that more shipments of Pfizer and Moderna vaccines would be arriving in the commonwealth over the next two weeks for front-line health care workers and long-term care employees and residents.

 

Gov. Beshear also previewed a multimedia campaign to help all Kentuckians learn about the vaccine and its benefits to individuals, families and the commonwealth as a whole.

 

In the White House report this week, the Governor said Kentucky has seen stability in new cases and a decrease in our positivity rate. They also make recommendations to help protect those over age 65.

 

The Kentucky COVID-19 hotline, 800-722-5725, is now open 24 hours per day, seven days a week, for questions about the COVID-19 vaccine. The Governor noted this hotline cannot be used to schedule appointments for getting a vaccine; instead, it can be used to learn more about the safety of the vaccine. Gov. Beshear said he will continually update Kentuckians as the vaccine becomes more widely available.

 

While briefing Kentuckians today, the Governor received news that the U.S. Supreme Court refused to disturb the Sixth Circuit’s order allowing the Governor to require all schools to briefly turn to virtual learning to help slow the virus when cases were skyrocketing in late November.

 

“The Supreme Court of the United States denied the Kentucky Attorney General’s attempt to overturn the ruling in the Sixth Circuit that said we were treating all schools during this dangerous period the same and taking steps to protect the lives of those around us,” said Gov. Beshear. “First, we didn’t close any school, we just moved them to online, virtual instruction, and I think that’s important, because suggesting a school is closed suggests that educators aren’t working with students to provide the best experience possible, and they are doing a heck of a job.

 

“The second thing is, in no way were religious schools treated any differently. We asked everybody to make the same sacrifices. Everybody. Every school. Not picking on anybody, just asking every school to do the exact same thing. And guess what? We see with that and other steps it stopped an exponential growth that was threatening our hospital capacity.

 

“The things we’ve put into place have worked. We still have a lot longer to go in battling this virus, but I hope when we know things will work, that in the future everybody will say ‘We’ll do our part. We don’t want to be an exception; we want to be part of the solution.’”

 

Today, Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health, highlighted the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s (KDPH) winter holiday guidance, which includes:

 

 

To see all of KDPH’s winter holiday guidance, click here: full guidance, one-pager, single slide.

 

“Let’s not do Christmas in a way that would dishonor loving our neighbors as ourselves,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The Governor also shared good news from across the commonwealth.

 

Today, Gov. Beshear announced $450,000 from the Appalachian Regional Commission’s Distressed County Infrastructure Program to upgrade the wastewater system in Middlesboro.

 

In addition, he said that Taica Cubic Printing Kentucky LLC, which provides cubic printing, paint application and assembly services on molded substrates for Tier 1 automotive suppliers, plans to expand its Clark County facility with a $4.4 million investment expected to create 20 well-paying jobs.

 

Finally, Gov. Beshear said Thursday the commonwealth is in an even stronger position to help Kentuckians as we emerge from this pandemic after the Kentucky Supreme Court reinstated an almost $1.3 billion award for Kentucky in a judgment against PokerStars. The Supreme Court reinstated the Franklin Circuit Court judgment, concluding the commonwealth’s decade-long fight against illegal offshore internet gambling. 

 

In 2008, J. Michael Brown, then-Secretary of the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet under Gov. Steve Beshear who now serves as Gov. Andy Beshear’s executive cabinet secretary, brought actions on behalf of the commonwealth in Franklin Circuit Court seeking to stop the unregulated, untaxed and illegal offshore gambling operations that were operating in Kentucky. 

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 17, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,349
  • New deaths today: 54
  • Positivity rate: 8.45%
  • Total deaths: 2,316
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,817
  • Currently in ICU: 431
  • Currently on ventilator: 254

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Kenton, Boone, Fayette, Campbell, Pulaski and Hardin. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 475.

 

The red zone counties can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two men, ages 67 and 72, from Bullitt County; a 94-year-old woman from Calloway County; an 83-year-old woman from Carroll County; a 47-year-old man from Casey County; an 81-year-old woman and a 69-year-old man from Christian County; a 97-year-old woman and an 82-year-old man from Clinton County; a 76-year-old man from Daviess County; a 92-year-old woman from Fayette County; an 88-year-old woman from Graves County; two women, ages 63 and 68, from Grayson County; an 85-year-old woman from Hardin County; a 94-year-old man from Henderson County; a 65-year-old woman and two men, ages 64 and 98, from Hopkins County; two women, ages 82 and 97, and two men, ages 47 and 87, from Jefferson County; an 85-year-old woman and a 55-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 77-year-old man from Johnson County; a 66-year-old man from Kenton County; a 75-year-old woman and a 79-year-old man from Knott County; a 75-year-old man from Larue County; an 88-year-old woman from Logan County; four women, ages 76, 85, 90 and 99, and two men, ages 77 and 89, from Madison County; two men, ages 83 and 87, from Mason County; an 88-year-old woman from McLean County; a 76-year-old man from Monroe County; an 81-year-old woman and a 77-year-old man from Muhlenberg County; a 61-year-old woman and a 52-year-old man from Nelson County; three men, ages 75, 86 and 95, from Oldham County; two men, ages 70 and 87, from Robertson County; a 63-year-old man from Russell County; a 92-year-old woman from Spencer County; a 73-year-old woman from Union County; and a 58-year-old woman from Washington County.

 

Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund
Today, the Governor updated Kentuckians that the application for the $15 million Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund closed at noon today, after 396 new completed applications were received. Gov. Beshear said those applications are expected to exhaust all remaining funds. As of today, the fund has approved $12,959,082 in assistance to 3,477 households.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidance, red zone counties, red zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

CAMPBELLSVILLE MAN ARRESTED ON SEX ABUSE CHARGES...

 
On Wednesday, December 16, 2020 Campbellsville Police received a sexual abuse complaint involving two small children.  After an investigation, Det./Sgt. Nelson Bishop arrested 21-year-old Devin L. Pike of Campbellsville and charged him with sexually abusing two different juveniles under the age of 12.  His official charge is Sexual Abuse 1st degree (victim U/12 year old age) – 2 counts. Pike was lodged in the Taylor Count Detention Center.

Office of Highway Safety Reminds Kentucky Drivers to Plan Safe Rides this Holiday Season

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 10, 2020) – The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s (KYTC) Office of Highway Safety is joining the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and law enforcement nationwide in the “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” campaign Dec. 16, 2020 through Jan. 1, 2021.

 

“It’s been a tough year for all Kentuckians, and I want us to have a great Christmas and New Year’s holiday,” said Gov. Beshear. “But to keep each other safe, I’ve got to ask you two things. First, please celebrate safely – avoid travel, significantly limit gatherings, and use precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 while with anyone from outside of your household. Second, please get home safely. Drive sober or plan a safe ride home with someone else to protect yourself and everyone on the road.”

 

According to NHTSA, impaired driving-related crashes tend to increase during the holidays.

 

“While our holiday celebrations may look a little different this year, our message stays the same:  Always plan for a sober ride home,” said KYTC Secretary Jim Gray. “If you are under the influence of any substance and choose to get behind the wheel, you put everyone on the road in danger, including yourself.”

 

In Kentucky, 547 impaired driving-related crashes resulting in 276 injuries and 10 deaths occurred during the Christmas and New Year holidays over the last five years.

 

“Drugs and/or alcohol not only hinder your ability to drive, but also affect your judgment about whether you can or should drive,” said KYTC State Highway Engineer James Ballinger. “This is why we ask that you make a plan before drinking begins.  No matter what you choose – a sober friend, taxi service or ride booking company – we want you to arrive to your destination safely.”

 

To prevent impaired driving-related tragedies this holiday season, the KYTC recommends the following:    

       

  1. Before festivities begin, plan a way to safely get home at the end of the night.
  2. If impaired, use a ride-booking company or taxi, call a sober friend or family member, or use public transportation to get home safely.
  3. If you see an impaired driver, safely pull over and contact law enforcement. You may dial the KSP toll-free line directly at 1-800-222-5555 or call 911.
  4. If you know people who are about to drive or ride while impaired, take their keys and help them make other arrangements to get them safely to where they are going.
  5. Wear a seat belt! It is not only the law, it is the best defense against an impaired driver. Buckling up helps prevent injury and death if involved in a crash.

 

“Impaired driving-related crashes are 100 percent preventable,” said Ballinger.  “All we ask is that you make safe choices this holiday season and celebrate responsibly.”

 

For more information on drunken driving visit https://www.nhtsa.gov/risky-driving/drunk-driving.  For more information on drug-impaired driving visit https://www.nhtsa.gov/risky-driving/drug-impaired-driving.

 

231 NEW COVID CASES IN LAKE CUMB. DISTRICT; 3 NEW DEATHS...

 

Covid-19 vaccine is arriving in Kentucky! You may have seen images this week of Kentuckians beginning to receive the new COVID vaccine. This is an incredibly exciting and hopeful development. The first vaccine that has been approved for distribution is the Pfizer vaccine. While we did not receive any of this vaccine in Lake Cumberland in this first shipment, we are anticipating receiving the next approved vaccine (Moderna) possibly within the next week or two. The first doses are expected to be available in very small numbers and will be reserved for health care workers, first responders and long term care residents and staff, initially. LCDHD is continuing to actively plan for receipt and distribution of vaccine with our community partners. We will certainly be sharing more information VERY soon, but for now, please continue to be patient and stay healthy!

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.57%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 192 deaths resulting in a 1.67% mortality rate (about 1 in 60) among known cases. This compares with a 0.98% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.82% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 98 cases* in the hospital. This is 9 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 690 hospitalizations resulting in a 6% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.08%. The latest data shows that 97.8% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 27.6% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 11,491 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 5.5% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 180 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 32; Casey: 7; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 10; Green: 9; McCreary: 12; Pulaski: 38; Russell: 30; Taylor: 19; and, Wayne: 16. In all, we have released 87.7% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 48 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 1217 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1336.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 8% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 231 today: Adair: 16; Casey: 7; Clinton: 21; Cumberland: 6; Green: 10; McCreary: 29; Pulaski: 67; Russell: 20; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 38. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 43.26 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/02/2020 when we added 288 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 59-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 46-year-old female who is released, 12/15/20;
Casey: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Casey: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 51-year-old male who is released, 12/15/20;
McCreary: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 80-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, Unknown;
Russell: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The deaths we report today are: a 99-year-old female long-term care resident from Adair; a 92-year-old female long-term care resident from Russell who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious, but later succumbed to lasting complications from the disease; and a 90-year-old male long-term care resident from Russell.

 

Unfortunately, we added more cases today than we released historic cases. Also, today’s new case count is equivalent to last Wednesday’s numbers. Let’s hope tomorrow is better so we can continue to see the down-turn in cases we have been experiencing so far this week. So please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 11,491 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 232,008 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 230,693 statewide plus 1,315 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

AREA ARREST 12-17-20

AREA ARREST 12-17-20

Tyler Baker age 30, of Russell Springs was taken into custody by Deputy Bradshaw with the Russell County Sheriff’s Officer last evening just after 7. Baker was charged with Resisting Arrest, Criminal Mischief, 1st Degree, 3 Counts of Contempt of Court Libel/Slander Resistance to Order and Serving a Warrant for another Police Agency.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-17-20

Russell County reported 2 deaths Wednesday. We have 20 new cases. We had 30 cases released from isolation. We now have 114 active cases which 107 cases are on self-isolation and 7 cases are hospitalized, 3 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Bowling Green, 1 at Glasgow, 1 at Danville and 1 at VA in Lexington. Total cases cumulative 1036. 894 cases have recovered and 28 deaths since the beginning.

 

Adair County 16 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 32 cases yesterday. We also had another death reported. We have had 1,202 total cases with 1,083 of those released and 40 deaths. We have 79 active cases with 72 of those in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals.

Burglary/Home Invasion Results in the Arrest of 2 Campbellsville Residents

 
On Tuesday, December 15, 2020 at 1:30amET, Campbellsville Police responded to 106 Wethington Court in reference to a burglary/home invasion. Officer Elliott Taylor responded and after an investigation determined that 23 year old Fabian Echols and 19 year old Christina Barrera both of Campbellsville, had kicked in the door to a residence at 106 Wethington Court and held the occupant at gunpoint while ransacking the residence. During the crime Echols accidentally shot himself in the leg.
 
Both Echols and Barrera were arrested and charged with Burglary 1st degree and Theft by Unlawful Taking U/$500. Echols was also charged with Wanton Endangerment 1st degree.  
 
Echols was treated and released at Taylor Regional Hospital and both were lodged in the Taylor County Detention Center.
 

APPROX. 2900 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES & 23 NEW DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 16, 2020) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced all 11 health facilities identified to receive initial shipments of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines have confirmed receipt.

 

“This is a very exciting time. With these life-saving vaccines being administered right now to our front-line workers, the beginning of the end of the coronavirus crisis is in sight,” the Governor said. “We are also continuing to see fewer cases week over week, with today’s number down from last Wednesday. This is all great news, but it will take time before these modern medical miracles are available to everyone. Until then, we need everyone on Team Kentucky to be patient and vigilant. Continue to mask up, maintain social distance, avoid unnecessary travel and crowds, and practice proper hand washing.”

 

Today, Mercy Health-Lourdes Hospital in Paducah accepted its delivery.

 

“A corner has been turned as we begin vaccinating our heroes who’ve been battling on the front lines of this virus,” Michael Yungmann, president of Mercy Health – Lourdes Hospital, said. “While it has been a long year, today is a day for celebration. We’re honored to be delivering the first COVID-19 vaccinations in Western Kentucky and to play a role in this historic moment of going on offense against coronavirus. Thank you to the Governor and his administration for the leadership and coordination that has made this moment possible.”

 

Initial recipients, announced Dec. 14, include: UofL Health in Louisville; The Medical Center at Bowling Green; and Baptist Health Lexington.

 

Baptist Health hospitals in Corbin, Louisville and Madisonville; Norton Hospital in Louisville; Pikeville Medical Center, St. Elizabeth Healthcare Edgewood, and University of Kentucky Medical Center received shipments yesterday, according to the Governor’s Dec. 15 announcement.

 

Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund (HHERF)
Today, the Governor also provided an update on the Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund. As of 5 p.m. yesterday, 151 applications had been received. The application portal is expected to shut down today. This update comes within 48 hours of reopening the portal for additional applications until all funds are exhausted, which at the time was estimated to be $1.4 million.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 16, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,898
  • New deaths today: 23
  • Positivity rate: 8.57%
  • Total deaths: 2,262
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,793
  • Currently in ICU: 460
  • Currently on ventilator: 239

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Madison, Daviess and Pulaski. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 352.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 80-year-old woman and a 67-year-old man from Adair County; a 61-year-old woman from Bell County; an 81-year-old woman from Daviess County; an 81-year-old man from Jefferson County; two women, ages 77 and 85, from Marion County; two men, ages 71 and 86, and a 96-year-old woman from Mason County; a 77-year-old woman and a 67-year-old man from McCracken County; two men, ages 73 and 75, and a 76-year-old woman from Nelson County; two men, ages 65 and 72, and an 84-year-old woman from Oldham County; a 95-year-old woman and an 87-year-old man from Pulaski County; an 89-year-old man from Russell County; an 81-year-old man from Taylor County; and a 72-year-old man from Todd County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

9 NEW COVID DEATHS IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.53%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 9 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 189 deaths resulting in a 1.68% mortality rate (about 1 in 60) among known cases. This compares with a 0.98% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.82% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 89 cases* in the hospital. This is 1 less than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 677 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.01% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.09%. The latest data shows that 93.5% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 31% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 11,260 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 5.39% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 180 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 9; Casey: 12; Clinton: 14; Cumberland: 3; Green: 5; McCreary: 21; Pulaski: 50; Russell: 18; Taylor: 15; and, Wayne: 33. In all, we have released 87.9% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 67 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 1169 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1335.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 7% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 122 today: Adair: 6; Casey: 1; Clinton: 8; Cumberland: 5; Green: 6; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 43; Russell: 11; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 30. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.017. This means our total case count is projected to double every 42.3 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/02/2020 when we added 288 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 64-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4m-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 93-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is released, 12/14/20;
Taylor: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 77-year-old male who is released, 12/13/20;
Wayne: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, 12/14/20;
Wayne: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 3 weeks-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 82-year-old male who is deceased, expired ;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is deceased, expired ;
Wayne: A 75-year-old male who is deceased, expired 

 

We are sad to have to report 9 new deaths. The deaths include a 78-year-old male from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; an 83-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; a 79-year-old female from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; a 58-year-old female from Taylor who had been hospitalized who had been released from public health observation as being no longer contagious, but later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness; a 61-year-old male from Taylor who had been hospitalized; an 86-year-old female from Taylor who lived in assisted living; a 75-year-old male from Wayne who had been hospitalized; an 82-year-old male from Wayne who had been hospitalized; and a 50-year-old female from Wayne who had been hospitalized.

 

While our deaths and hospitalizations remain high, these trends follow on about a 2 to 3-week delay behind new case surges. On the positive, this is our third day of fewer cases than the equivalent day of the previous week. For the first time in a very long time, the 7-day incidence rate is going down in most of our counties. This is not a time to let up, though. If we are at the beginning of a decline, lets all make sure we do our part in not letting this thing get away from us again. So, please,  let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 11,260 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 229,249 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 227,818 statewide plus 1,431 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-16-20

 

Russell County 1 new cases Tuesday. We had 18 cases released from isolation. We now have 126 active cases of which 119 cases are on self-isolation and 7 cases are hospitalized, 2 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Bowling Green, 1 at Glasgow, 1 at Danville 1 at VA in Lexington and 1 at University of Louisville.

 

Adair County 6 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 9 cases yesterday. We have had 1,186 total cases with 1,051 of those released and 39 deaths. We have 96 active cases with 89 of those in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals.

Gov. Beshear: 7 More Kentucky Hospitals Receive COVID-19 Vaccine Shipments

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 15, 2020) – On Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced that seven more Kentucky hospitals received shipments of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines and that the administration of thousands of vaccines are beginning to occur.

 

“The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are absolute game changers with 94-95% effectiveness and, it appears, minimal side effects,” Gov. Beshear said. “It gives us a view and a vision and a certainty of victory against this virus. We’ve just got to stay vigilant between now and when everybody can get it.”

 

Sharing photos of vaccine shipments received from hospitals across the state, the Governor said, “These front-line heroes know that we’ve got their back. They fought for us every single day. We value their safety and we need their help getting through these next couple of months.”

 

Facilities receiving vaccine deliveries late yesterday and today include Baptist Health in Corbin, Louisville and Madisonville; Norton Hospital in Louisville; UK HealthCare in Lexington; Pikeville Medical Center; and St. Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood.

 

The seven facilities received shipments after UofL Health in Louisville, Baptist Health Lexington and the Medical Center at Bowling Green received the first shipments provided in Kentucky. Gov. Beshear announced receipt of the vaccines yesterday and looked on as the first vaccines were given to Kentuckians. To learn more about yesterday’s announcement, see the full release

 

St. Elizabeth CEO Garren Colvin noted, “St. Elizabeth Healthcare is honored to be among the first health care organizations in the commonwealth to receive the COVID-19 vaccine allocations. Being able to provide an additional layer of defense to our front-line associates and physicians who, in their line of work, have the most risk of exposure to COVID-19 patients is critical. This is a landmark moment in health care history, and we are grateful to help lead these vital efforts for the greater health of our community.”

 

“Though the process is a significant logistical challenge, the Governor, Dr. Stack, and staff have made it as seamless as possible,” said Pikeville Medical Center CEO Donovan Blackburn. “As the largest regional hospital in Eastern Kentucky, we fully understand the need to protect our health care infrastructure by vaccinating our dedicated staff. They have stood on the front line during these difficult, unprecedented times. The distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine is a huge step in dismantling the pandemic.”

 

“After 10 months of being on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are excited for the good news that a vaccine is now available and that we can offer it to some of our health care workers at UK HealthCare,” said Dr. Mark Newman, UK executive vice president for health affairs. “We will be providing the first vaccinations to our front-line workers, employees who have direct patient care primarily for COVID-19 patients or under investigation for COVID-19. While we know that we have a long way to go in ending this pandemic, we are grateful to be part of this momentous first step.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 15, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,946
  • New deaths today: 15
  • Positivity rate: 8.53%
  • Total deaths: 2,239
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,788
  • Currently in ICU: 438
  • Currently on ventilator: 246

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Daviess and Madison. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 418.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 68-year-old man from Boyd County; a 62-year-old woman from Caldwell County; a 77-year-old and 80-year old man from Daviess County; an 88-year-old woman from Graves County; a 77-year-old man from Hardin County; five men from Jefferson County, ages, 61, 64, 78, 83 and 92; a 90-year-old man from McCracken County; and three women from Ohio County, ages 87, and two, both of whom were 91.

 

Federal coronavirus coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx was in Kentucky today, meeting with Gov. Beshear, Department for Public Health Commissioner Dr. Steven Stack and Kentucky General Assembly leaders.

 

The Governor thanked Dr. Birx for the visit and for applauding the state’s proactive measures that helped to slow the spread of the virus. The Governor noted that Kentucky has fared better than many other states.

 

Dr. Stack said the pandemic’s third surge is rising more rapidly than seen in the previous surges. The current surge is also broader, involving more counties simultaneously. This surge is also lasting longer, nearly twice as long so far from initiation of rapid spread to plateau.

 

Further, the pattern of the rapid increase in case numbers and accompanying hospitalizations and fatalities are also being observed across the nation, beginning with the Northern Plains.

 

“As the weather cools and Americans gather indoors, we expect to see a rise in cases following indoor gatherings where masks were not worn,” Dr. Stack said.

 

The need for testing has not slipped in importance, Dr. Stack added. Asymptomatic, or silent transmission, is “a critical component of viral spread and must be identified through testing.” He equated the importance of testing as on par with masking, physical distancing, and hand hygiene.

 

Memorial
Kentucky lost a hero Dec. 11 in the passing of Chief Robert Lee Orkies of Shepherdsville after a battle with cancer and COVID-19. Chief Orkies was only 55. His family shared that he was destined to be a hero and those who knew Rob, knew his heart was big enough to love more than just one family. He was passionate about firefighting, which started in 1984 and never left him. He loved the brotherhood of the firefighters and felt driven to be a leader. He had the opportunity to work for several fire departments in various roles, but cherished his time as the Chief of the Zoneton Fire District.

 

“To Rob’s family, to those little granddaughters, we are so sorry for your loss,” Gov. Beshear said. “In his honor, we’re going to protect other people just like he did during his life. We’re going to wear masks, we’re going to do right by our neighbor and we’re going to live up to the example he set for all of us.”

 

Other News
Today, the Governor highlighted two new jobs announcements. iwis-Daido LLC, a new joint venture between iwis engine systems LLC and Daido Corp. of America, is expected to add 37 well-paying jobs in Murray with a $2.7 million investment for the production of high-quality automotive engine chains. Span Tech LLC, which designs and produces plastic chain conveyor systems for manufacturers, plans to expand in Barren County with a $13.2 million investment expected to create 40 full-time jobs over the next 10 years.

 

The Governor reminded Kentuckians that applications for the Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund are staying open until all funds are exhausted, which is believed to be 24 to 48 hours from the time of this release. This reopening will be for past due rent for March through December 2020 only; future rent does not apply. It is estimated that about $1.4 million will be available. When CARES Act funding is exhausted, applications will close again. Kentuckians may apply here.

 

The Governor also congratulated the Kentucky Air National Guard’s 123rd Airlift Wing in Louisville, which just earned its 19th Air Force Outstanding Unit Award. The award is bestowed for excellence in mission performance, deployments, readiness, inspection results and community involvement. Only top 10% of units earn this award and this is Kentucky’s seventh consecutive award.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

COLUMBIA GIVING PROGRAMS....

 
The City of Columbia is planning their annual holiday giving programs this season. Boxes for drop off for the following project will be located at City Hall.
 
  1. The annual Coat Drive for Children. These donations will be distributed through the family resource centers.
  2. The Paws Christmas. Supplies for the local animal shelter and Sugarfoot Farms Rescue. Donations can include: blankets, dog food, dog/cat treats, cat food.
  3. Canned food drive. Non-perishable food items that will be used for distribution in our community.

 

Boxes/totes will be located at the front entrance of City Hall.
 

TAYLOR CO. MAN ARRESTED ON BURGLARY CHARGES...

 
On Monday, December 14, 2020 at 5:14pmET, Campbellsville Police Dept. Officer Josh Patrick was on patrol when he was flagged down by an individual who advised that he was following a vehicle whose occupants had broken into his son’s residence. Officer Patrick caught up to the vehicle in question and conducted a traffic stop in the area of Carnation Street. During the investigation, items from the burglary were located in the vehicle that Officer Patrick had stopped.  
 
As a result of the investigation, 27 year old Javonne Q. Taylor of Campbellsville was arrested and charged with Burglary 2nd degree and Theft of Identity of Another without Consent. Taylor was lodged in the Taylor County Detention Center. 
 
Agencies Involved: Campbellsville Police Department 
 
Investigating Officer: Officer Josh Patrick 
 

LCDHD REPORT MONDAY, DEC. 14th - 3 New Deaths

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.58%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 180 deaths resulting in a 1.62% mortality rate (about 1 in 62) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.83% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 90 cases* in the hospital. This is 10 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 670 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.02% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.1%. The latest data shows that 100% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 29.8% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 11,138 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 5.33% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 159 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 18; Casey: 7; Clinton: 15; Cumberland: 3; Green: 6; McCreary: 10; Pulaski: 29; Russell: 20; Taylor: 24; and, Wayne: 27. In all, we have released 87.3% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 39 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 1236 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1334.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 8% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 123 today: Adair: 6; Casey: 9; Clinton: 18; Cumberland: 2; Green: 4; McCreary: 12; Pulaski: 34; Russell: 13; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 18. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.019. This means our total case count is projected to double every 36.52 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/02/2020 when we added 288 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Casey: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Casey: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 79-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 64-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 6M-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 67-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Green: A 80-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Green: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 8m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, 12/14/20;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is released, 12/14/20;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 11 Months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 14-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 74-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 86-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 16-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, not listed

 

A close look at the data may appear that McCreary, Pulaski, and Russell’s cases are off today. This is because we removed a duplicate entry for McCreary and Russell. Also, 1 case assigned to Pulaski has been reassigned to an appropriate address in Russell.

 

The 3 deaths we report today are a 60-year-old male from Cumberland who had been hospitalized who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious, but later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness; a 77-year-old female from Green who had been hospitalized; and an 85-year-old female from Pulaski who had been hospitalized.

 

On an upside, we added 30 fewer cases today than last Monday. We also added less cases on Sunday than the previous Sunday. Let’s hope this improvement in numbers holds into the future.

 

Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 11,138 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 226,634 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 224,890 statewide plus 1,744 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-15-20

Russell County had 13 new cases announced yesterday and 20 cases released from isolation. We now have 133 active cases which 126 cases are on self-isolation and 7 cases are hospitalized, 2 at Russell County Hospital,1 at Bowling Green,1 at Glasgow, 1 at VA in Lexington,1 at University of Louisville and 1 at Danville.12-14-20 Monday.

 

Adair County with 6 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 18 cases Monday. We have had 1,180 total cases with 1,042 of those released and 39 deaths. We have 99 active cases with 93 of those in home isolation and 6 in area hospitals.

RC FISCAL COURT MET LAST NIGHT...

The Russell County Fiscal Court met last night for their December monthly session.

 

Judge Gary Robertson sit down with WAVE News following the meeting and discussed what took place…

 

 

Gov. Beshear: Beginning of the End of the Pandemic is Here


FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2020) – On Monday, Gov. Andy Beshear celebrated that COVID-19 vaccinations have begun in the commonwealth.

 

The Governor watched as five doctors and nurses from UofL Health first received the vaccine this morning. Soon after, other health care workers from UofL Health, Baptist Health Lexington and the Medical Center at Bowling Green began receiving inoculations. To learn more, see the full release and these photos(credit: Scotty Perry/Bloomberg) and video(credit: UofL Health).

 

“Today is the most exciting day that I’ve had, I think that we as a commonwealth have had, since March 6, when we had our first diagnosed COVID case,” said Gov. Beshear. “Today marks the beginning of the end of COVID-19. We are going to defeat this virus in 2021. This is a moment that we have hoped for and prayed for. The effectiveness of this Pfizer vaccine and the Moderna vaccine that’s going to follow is nothing short of a modern medical miracle.

 

“We are so proud of our corporate citizen UPS that is going to supply much of the eastern United States with this vaccine.

 

“This evil virus has taken over 2,000 Kentuckians, but now we know that victory is in sight. If we are smart and we work hard between now and when we can get everyone vaccinated and we don’t do rash things like eliminate protections that we have in place, we can save so many lives.”

 

Seven Kentucky hospitals are expected to receive vaccine shipments tomorrow: Baptist Health Corbin, Baptist Health Louisville, Baptist Health Madisonville, Norton Hospital, Pikeville Medical Center, St. Elizabeth Healthcare Edgewood and University of Kentucky Medical Center.

 

“We know the vaccine is vitally important to getting back to normal, and we are thankful to be a part of this effort to eradicate COVID-19,” said Baptist Health Corbin President Anthony Powers. “We stand ready to play a key role in this crucial initiative as we begin vaccinating our front-line health workers and our community as more supplies of vaccine become available over the next several months.”

 

“At Baptist Health Louisville, we are grateful for the opportunity to offer this vaccine to our front-line employees, who are caring for our most vulnerable patients. They have been there for our community, and now we want to be there for them,” said Baptist Health Louisville President Larry Gray. “We eagerly look forward to the day that the vaccine is more readily available to provide needed protection for all of our families and neighbors.” 

 

“Baptist Health Madisonville has been working tirelessly to care for our community throughout COVID-19,” said Baptist Health Madisonville President Robert Ramey.

 

“We are excited and grateful to be chosen as one of the first locations in the commonwealth to have the opportunity to vaccinate our health care heroes to help stop the spread and devastation caused by this virus.”

 

“We appreciate Gov. Beshear for prioritizing health care workers. After months of being on the front line of this pandemic, we are ready for the promise of a vaccine,” said Russell F. Cox, president and CEO, Norton Healthcare. “We are eager to receive our first shipment of the vaccine and are committed to being responsible stewards of this process.”

 

The Governor also announced that the state’s $15 million Eviction Relief Fund has spent $12.3 million since the application opened Sept. 8 to help 3,254 households stay healthy in their homes.

 

“We’ve also spent over $1 million of Team Kentucky Fund dollars to pay for rent in 2021 – that helps 1,752 households,” said Gov. Beshear. “Today at 5:30 p.m. EST we will reopen applications for the Healthy at HomeEviction Relief Fund, and it will stay open until all funds are exhausted, which we think could be between 24 and 48 hours. This reopening will be for past due rent for March through December 2020 only, not future rent. We estimate about $1.4 million will be available.”


When CARES Act funding is exhausted, the applications will again close. Kentuckians can apply here.

 

Finally, the Governor announced new public health guidance for Kentucky schools. He said there would be no change in the way the incidence rate will be calculated for each county; instead, the recommendations and requirements for each color-coded zone from the Kentucky Department for Public Health are changing in the following ways:

 

  1. Adjustments of red/orange county recommendations.
  2. Every school must provide a meaningful virtual option that cannot negatively impact virtual students’ GPA, class rank or any other educational opportunity or recognition.
  3. Schools must accommodate all educators and employees who fall into a high-risk category with a virtual option.
  4. Healthy at School guidelines will be mandatory starting on Jan. 4, 2021.
  5. KDPH recommends returning to in-person learning no sooner than Jan. 11, 2021.
  6. Continue daily reporting.

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Monday, Dec. 14, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,802
  • New deaths today: 17
  • Positivity rate: 8.58%
  • Total deaths: 2,224
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,712
  • Currently in ICU: 441
  • Currently on ventilator: 243

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Boone and Warren. Each of these counties reported 50 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 346.

 

The new red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 74-year-old man from Bath County; a 92-year-old woman from Calloway County; a 92-year-old woman and an 81-year-old man from Fayette County; a 61-year-old woman and two men, ages 69 and 83, from Hopkins County; two women, ages 37 and 74, and a 77-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 77-year-old woman from Jessamine County; a 67-year-old man from Lawrence County; two men, ages 55 and 59, from Oldham County; and three women, ages 66, 83 and 84, from Washington County.

 

The Governor said different Kentucky regionshave between 53% and 73% of hospital beds already in use; in addition, Kentucky regions have between 51% and 94% of ICU beds already filled.

 

Memorial
On Nov. 25, Kentucky lost William Orban Manns of Mt. Sterling. He was only 65 years old. He tested positive for COVID-19 on Nov. 16, along with his entire family. His daughter, Pamela, said they were all tested ahead of her upcoming procedure, and they were shocked to learn they had contracted the virus because they did everything right. They live on the same property, quarantined together, always wore masks and only left home for the occasional errand or grocery run.

 

“Pamela said her father quickly declined due to complications and was taken to UK Medical Center for treatment. The team at UK took great care of William, keeping the family regularly updated. But it was hard for Pamela, William’s only daughter, to understand the seriousness of the situation – because this was her dad. The hero to her and her three children – which William himself cared for as if they were his own,” said Gov. Beshear. “One night the doctor FaceTimed the family where they said the loved each other. Little did they know it would be the last time they saw him, as hours later William passed away. Our thoughts and prayers are with William’s entire family as they mourn his loss and still recover from the virus themselves. Team Kentucky is with you.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Gov. Beshear: UofL Hospital Administers State's First COVID-19 Vaccines

 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear and UofL Health officials marked a historic moment in the fight against the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) as the first vaccines shipped to Kentucky were administered this morning at UofL Hospital.

 

Three Kentucky hospitals, UofL Hospital, Baptist Health Lexington and the Medical Center at Bowling Green, each received 975 doses today and began their vaccination plans.

 

“Today is a historic day in the commonwealth – we are at the beginning of the end of our war with COVID-19,” said Gov. Beshear, who was at UofL Hospital as UPS delivered the vaccines. “The Pfizer vaccine, which we believe to be 95% effective, is the defense we have needed to end this pandemic, and with the highly effective Moderna vaccine likely on its way to approval soon, we are all filled with hope for the first time in a very long time. Thank you to everyone who helped make this possible. To our front-line workers: we are forever grateful for your bravery, talents and compassion.”

 

The Governor watched as five UofL Health doctors and nurses, who have been working on the front lines to help Kentuckians during the once-in-100-years pandemic, received their vaccinations in public and before the media. Sarah Bishop, MSN, APRN, CCNS, CIC, director of infection prevention at UofL Hospital, administered the vaccinations to all five.

 

Those receiving the first vaccinations at UofL Health this morning were: Jason Smith, MD, PhD, chief medical officer at UofL Health and trauma surgeon at UofL Hospital; Valerie Briones-Pryor, MD; Mohamed Saad, MD; LaShawn Scott, MSN/Ed, RN, CCRN-K; and Beth Sum, BSN.

 

Dr. Smith is board certified in both surgery and critical care and continues to regularly practice clinically. As one of UofL Health’s trauma surgeons, he is on the front lines caring for emergency patients and trauma patients at UofL Hospital. As chief medical officer of the health care system, he has been instrumental in developing the system’s response to COVID-19 and for planning for the mass vaccination campaign of its health care workers, staff and patients. 

 

“The arrival of this vaccine demonstrates the best of medicine and our commonwealth’s collaborative spirit,” said Dr. Smith. “For the first time, we now have a tool to minimize the spread of COVID-19 in a significant way. I appreciate the leadership of Gov. Beshear and UPS working to expedite getting this vaccine to our front-line health care workers. And I am humbled by the ongoing individual sacrifices of so many Kentuckians who continue to help through social distancing and masking until the vaccine is more widely available to the general population.”

 

Dr. Briones-Pryor has been with UofL Health for 16.5 years. She grew up in Louisville and always wanted to work in her hometown. Dr. Briones-Pryor has been working with COVID-19 patients at UofL Health – Jewish Hospital since March 17, and said she lost her 27thCOVID-19 patient Monday morning.

 

“I did this for them, for all of my patients,” said. Dr. Briones-Pryor. “I was honored to be one of the first five to receive this vaccine.”

 

She says she gets emotional knowing the vaccine is here, because she’s seen patients and their families go through so much.

 

Dr. Saad is the director of critical care at UofL Health – Jewish Hospital. Throughout the pandemic, he has taken care of all COVID-19 ICU patients throughout the UofL Health system.  
 

LaShawn Scott has worked for UofL Health for more than 20 years. She is an infection prevention nurse. Scott has worked tirelessly to help support our front-line staff in ensuring they have the PPE they need and know how to use it correctly and making sure the health care system has protocols in place to help the front-line staff stay safe as they battle the pandemic.

 

Adair Man Arrested on Strangulation Charges Following Altercation

  
On Saturday, December 12, 2020 the Adair County Sheriffs Office responded to an altercation in the Oak Grove community, 7 miles east of Columbia. Upon arrival, Deputy Joey Keith learned that a domestic violence incident had taken place between 27-year-old Troy Berry of Columbia and a female in the residence. During the altercation, the female was allegedly struck and strangled. 

 

Deputy Keith found probable cause to believe the assaults did take place and as a result Mr. Berry was arrested for Assault 4th degree (domestic violence) and Strangulation 1st degree (a class D felony). He was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

AREA ARREST 12-14-20

 

A Russell Springs man was arrested on Burglary Charges Saturday. Buford Sheppard, age 48, was taken into custody by Deputy Perkins of the Russell County Sheriff’s Officer on the charges of 2 counts of Burglary 2nd Degree, Theft by Unlawful Taking/Disposition Others $5000 or more but Under $10,000, Giving Officer False Identifying Information. He was lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-14-20

Russell County 6 new cases Sunday. We had 6 cases released from isolation. We now have 140 active cases which 131 cases are on self-isolation and 9 cases are hospitalized,4 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Glasgow,1 at Danville,1 at Bowling Green, 1 at University of Louisville and 1 at VA in Lexington.

 

Adair County 4 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 14 cases. We have had 1,174 total cases with 1,024 of those released and 39 deaths. We have 111 active cases with 106 of those in home isolation and 5 in area hospitals.

15 Coronavirus Deaths and Over 2,400 New Cases

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 13, 2020) – On Sunday, Gov. Andy Beshear asked Kentuckians to remain vigilant in the fight against the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) even as the commonwealth welcomed the first shipment of vaccine against the deadly virus.

 

“We are seeing good trends and getting great news in our battle against COVID-19. We saw 1,235 fewer positive cases and our positivity rate declined 1.23% Sunday to Sunday this week, and now we are less than 24 hours from the true beginning of the end of this virus,” the Governor said, heralding news that the first shipment of the two-dose Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines had arrived at Louisville’s UPS Worldport.

 

“Our community doctors and nurses, as well as long-term care residents and staff, are preparing to do their part first. We will all get a turn. When it is your turn, I strongly encourage you to get vaccinated so you can do your part to protect yourself, your family and our entire state.”

 

To view the full news release on the first vaccine shipment, click here.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 13, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,454
  • New deaths today: 15
  • Positivity rate: 8.52%
  • Total deaths: 2,207
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,712
  • Currently in ICU: 434
  • Currently on ventilator: 224

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Boone, Pulaski and Kenton, as each reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 446.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 75-year-old woman from Bell County; two women, ages 65 and 58, from Boone County; an 84-year-old man from Caldwell County; two women, ages 65 and 74, from Daviess County; an 82-year-old woman and a 79-year-old man from Hopkins County; an 83-year-old man from Jefferson County; an 85-year-old man from Kenton County; a 58-year-old woman from Lawrence County; a 56-year-old man from Oldham County; two women, ages 89 and 50, from Pulaski County, and a 76-year-old man from Taylor County.

 

“The first doses of Pfizer vaccine have arrived in Kentucky, and the rollout will begin immediately. This is fantastic news and offers hope we are beginning the end of this pandemic,” shared Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health.

 

“Early doses will be limited in supply and immunization will begin with nursing home residents and frontline health care workers. From there, as vaccine shipments continue, Kentucky will immunize all health care (including oral health) workers and first responders followed by the K-12 education community to get our children and educators safely back to school. More federal guidance on subsequent populations to be immunized will be available in the upcoming weeks. Having vaccines this quickly is a modern medical miracle. Having patience in the months ahead is essential, though, as vaccine supplies increase and hopefully all interested persons have access to vaccination by the end of summer 2021.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

208 New Coronavirus Cases in Lake Cumb. District; 1 New Death.....

 

SATURDAY, DEC. 12TH REPORT

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.79%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today. We have experienced a total of 176 deaths resulting in a 1.61% mortality rate (about 1 in 62) among known cases. This compares with a 0.99% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.86% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 73 cases* in the hospital. This is 7 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 651 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.96% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.12%. The latest data shows that 97.8% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 36.8% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 10,919 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 5.23% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 223 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 16; Casey: 15; Clinton: 9; Cumberland: 4; Green: 12; McCreary: 36; Pulaski: 63; Russell: 12; Taylor: 21; and, Wayne: 35. In all, we have released 86.3% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 16 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 1316 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1336.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 9% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 208 today: Adair: 6; Casey: 16; Clinton: 14; Cumberland: 7; Green: 7; McCreary: 17; Pulaski: 77; Russell: 8; Taylor: 18; and, Wayne: 38. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.02. This means our total case count is projected to double every 34.38 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/02/2020 when we added 288 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 60-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 1 month-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 21-year-old female who is released, 12/11/20;
Cumberland: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 69-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Green: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 76-year-old female who is released, 12/10/20;
McCreary: A 2 months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 91-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 99-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is hospitalized, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 94-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 89-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 93-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, not listed;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, not listed;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 86-year-old male who is hospitalized, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 89-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is hospitalized, not listed;
Wayne: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old male who is released, unknown;
Wayne: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 88-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we announce today is an 87-year-old female from Clinton who had been hospitalized. This was a very difficult week as far as COVID-19 related deaths are concerned as we experienced 20 COVID-19 related deaths.

 

At 1,336, we reached our peak number of active cases since the onset of the outbreak on 12/10/20. As of today, at a total of 73, we are only 2 away from having a record number of hospitalized cases. Last Saturday we were at 63 hospitalized cases. Further, compared to last Saturday, we have 158 additional active cases (1158 vs 1316). We added 1,436 new cases this week compared to 1,330 last week. At our present growth-rate, our total cases are expected to double in just over 34 days. If that growth-rate holds, over those same 34 days we will go from 5% to 10% of our total population having tested positive for COVID-19.

 

While our growth-rate slowed a bit this week, this was the sharpest growth-rate week statewide since the onset of the outbreak. Nevertheless, several of the Governor’s restrictions are set to expire tomorrow night. We hope with all of heart that this does not create a false sense of security. We are still in a period of accelerated growth and everyone should continue to be vigilant with personal precautions. So, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 10,919 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 222,565 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 220,660 statewide plus 1,905 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

Gov. Beshear Hails Arrival of First COVID-19 Vaccine in Kentucky

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 13, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear marked a major milestone in the battle against the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) as the first vaccines against the deadly virus arrived in the commonwealth.

 

The initial shipment of the two-dose Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines has arrived in Kentucky, delivered to Louisville’s UPS Worldport. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was the first to win approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To see photos, click herehere and here.

 

“The Pfizer vaccine, which we believe to be 95% effective, has now been authorized in this emergency for us to start vaccinating individuals,” said Gov. Beshear. “The vaccine started to be shipped from the factory and a significant portion landed in Kentucky today. Kentucky is going to play a major role in getting this vaccine to people all over the eastern United States through UPS’ Worldport. We in the commonwealth are excited to be a big part of defeating this virus all over this country. We now believe that the first individuals will be vaccinated here in the commonwealth tomorrow morning. We are less than 24 hours away from the beginning of the end of this virus.”

 

The Governor said those most at risk will get the vaccine first.

 

As shipments continue, Kentucky is expected to received exactly 12,675 vaccine vials that will soon make their way to 11 regional and ready hospitals in Louisville, Paducah, Bowling Green, Madisonville, Pikeville, Corbin, Lexington and Edgewood and an additional 25,350 are being delivered to CVS and Walgreens, destined for long-term care facilities in our commonwealth.

 

Approval is also expected any day for the highly effective Moderna vaccine. This month alone, Kentucky could receive 150,000 doses of vaccine, which the Governor celebrated as great news after a long and tough year.

 

In the initial rounds, local hospitals, as well as long-term care facilities, which have not yet been announced, will be following guidance issued by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), which advises the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ACIP is prioritizing vaccinations among health care staff members who have been our only line of defense treating patients and long-term care residents and staff who have been at high risk and greatly affected by the spread of the virus.

 

The immediate goal is reducing COVID-19 deaths. With 66% of the deaths coming from long-term care facilities, vaccines could help significantly decrease Kentucky’s COVID-19 death toll beginning in January. Also, because long-term care residents tend to require the most care, vaccinations in these facilities will help reduce COVID-19’s burden on Kentucky’s health care system.

 

Local health departments have also been working closely with the Governor and Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, to prepare for these distributions.

 

Gov. Beshear said to get back to the Kentucky that we have missed, we need Kentuckians to be vaccinated.

 

“Our community doctors and nurses, as well as long-term care residents and staff, are preparing to do their part first,” the Governor said. “We will all get a turn. When it is your turn, I strongly encourage you to get vaccinated so you can do your part to protect yourself, your family and our entire state.”

 

The phases in which more Kentuckians will get vaccines, and the timing, is still unfolding. But, Kentuckians can get the facts about the vaccines and latest distribution information at kycovid19.ky.gov, which includes:

 

 

With this information and by talking with a health care provider, Kentuckians can make a plan to get the vaccine when the time is right.

 

The Governor said there are still months to go in this battle with the pandemic, but in this historic week to which we are all witness, we can celebrate having turned a corner to a brighter, better Kentucky. 

 

11 Coronavirus Deaths Reported Friday Night by LCDHD and 203 New Cases

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 8.86%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 11 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 175 deaths resulting in a 1.63% mortality rate (about 1 in 61) among known cases. This compares with a 1% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.87% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 66 cases* in the hospital. This is 34 less than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 641 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.98% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.15%. The latest data shows that 97.8% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 36.8% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 10,711 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 5.13% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 203 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 33; Casey: 16; Clinton: 11; Green: 7; McCreary: 21; Pulaski: 74; Russell: 10; Taylor: 21; and, Wayne: 10. In all, we have released 85.9% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 11 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 1332 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1335.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Family, Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 8% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 203 today: Adair: 8; Casey: 15; Clinton: 13; Cumberland: 9; Green: 11; McCreary: 26; Pulaski: 53; Russell: 22; Taylor: 19; and, Wayne: 27. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.021. This means our total case count is projected to double every 33.86 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/02/2020 when we added 288 cases.
 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 19-year-old female who is released, 12/07/20;
Adair: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 26-year-old female who is released, not listed;
Clinton: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, not listed;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is released, 12/09/20;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is hospitalized, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old female who is deceased, expired ;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 88-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 8months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 85-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 87-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 10 M-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the data will appear that McCreary’s numbers are off by one. That is because we re-added a case from a previous day we accidentally deleted.

It is tragic that we have to report 11 Lake Cumberland deaths today: a 77-year-old male from Adair who had been hospitalized; an 85-year-old male from Casey who had been hospitalized; a 76-year-old female from McCreary who had been hospitalized; a 62-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; an 85-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; a 77-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; a 76-year-old male long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; a 94-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski; an 86-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski; an 80-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; and, an 89-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized.

 

The most recent set of restrictions by the Governor is set to expire Sunday night, though many limitations still exist. Just because some restrictions are being lifted, please do not take that as a signal everything can go back to normal. While we are not in favor of lockdowns, we are neither in favor of behaving as if we aren’t in the middle of a pandemic. Everyone should follow the precautions to avoid crowds, to social distance, and to mask.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 10,711 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 219,216 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 217,120 statewide plus 2,096 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

Over 3,500 New Coronavirus Cases in KY and 24 New Deaths....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 12, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced that, with the FDA’s approval of the Pfizer vaccine on Friday, Kentucky’s first shipment is expected to arrive early in the coming week. He urged Kentuckians to continue wearing masks, washing their hands, social distancing and keeping gatherings small to keep each other safe while the vaccine begins to be distributed.

 

“Late yesterday, the FDA approved Pfizer’s vaccine for COVID-19. That’s great news, but it will still be some time before everyone can get vaccinated and we have to stay vigilant until that time,” said Gov. Beshear. “It is morally imperative that we get the vaccine to the most vulnerable Kentuckians first, and that is why we are starting with our long-term care facilities and front-line health care workers. In the meantime, please keep doing what you know is right: wear your mask, keep your distance from others and don’t have large gatherings. Together we can defeat this virus.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 12, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,558
  • New deaths today: 24
  • Positivity rate: 8.79%
  • Total deaths: 2,192
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,711
  • Currently in ICU: 423
  • Currently on ventilator: 199


Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Pulaski, Kenton, Boone and Daviess. Jefferson, Fayette, Pulaski and Kenton counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 588.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 73-year-old woman and a 75-year-old man from Adair County; an 86-year-old man from Campbell County; an 81-year-old man from Casey County; a 50-year-old woman from Clinton County; a 49-year-old man and 89-year-old woman from Fayette County; an 88-year-old woman and a 90-year-old man from Hardin County; a 75-year-old man from Mason County; a 62-year-old woman from Metcalfe County; two women, ages 88 and 98, from Muhlenberg County; a 94-year-old man from Nelson County; a 71-year-old man and two women, ages 78 and 80, from Pike County; two men, ages 71 and 90, and a 77-year-old woman from Pulaski County; a 70-year-old woman from Russell County; an 81-year-old man and a 92-year-old woman from Warren County; and an 89-year-old woman from Whitley County. 

 

“Decreasing statewide positivity rates are encouraging, but they are the result of difficult choices made to decrease spread of disease,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health.

 

“Multiple Kentucky hospitals are still under strain and the market for available health care workers has become extremely tight as states around the nation experience massive COVID-19 surges, overwhelming their hospitals. Every Kentuckian has choices to make – choices that matter tremendously – in the weeks ahead. Wear your mask, socially distance and if you are sick, seek medical care or stay at home until you are fully recovered. And if you are over 65 or have medical problems, stay healthy at home as much as you possibly can, since leaving your home now places you at high risk of exposure to COVID-19.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

22 New Coronavirus Deaths & Almost 3,700 New Cases....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 11, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state’s positivity rate has decreased for the eighth straight day, now dropping under 9%.

 

“These numbers are still high and we are still watching for any increases related to the Thanksgiving holiday, but we are making progress in our fight against this invisible enemy,” said Gov. Beshear. “I hope this gives everyone the courage and grit to keep going, to keep doing what we know is right, things like wearing a mask and staying socially distant, because we know they are working.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Dec. 11, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,691
  • New deaths today: 22
  • Positivity rate: 8.86%
  • Total deaths: 2,168
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,717
  • Currently in ICU: 432
  • Currently on ventilator: 253

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Boone, Pulaski, Warren and Hardin. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 513.

 

The new red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include three women, ages 57, 62 and 80, and four men, ages 57, 66, 77 and 88, from Adair County; two men, ages 69 and 99, from Casey County; two women, ages 86 and 92, and two men, ages 80 and 81, from Clinton County; a 60-year-old woman from Cumberland County; a 63-year-old woman from Fayette County; an 85-year-old woman from Jefferson County; two men, ages 75 and 88, from Pulaski County; two men, ages 51 and 82, from Russell County; and an 81-year-old woman and an 80-year-old man from Wayne County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-11-20

 

Russell County 15 new cases Thursday. We had 14 cases released from isolation. We now have 132 active cases which 127 cases are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 2 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Bowling Green, 1 at Glasgow and 1 at University of Louisville.

 

Adair County 18 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 12 cases yesterday. Adair County officials reported another death Thursday. We have had 1,156 total cases with 961 of those released and 38 deaths. We have 157 active cases with 147 of those in home isolation and 10 in area hospitals.

RUSSELL SPRINGS CITY COUNCIL MET THURSDAY NIGHT...

The Russell Springs City Council met for the regular session of the city leaders last night.

 

Mayor Eddie Thomas shares with WAVE listeners what took place during the meeting…

 

 

236 New COVID-19 Cases in Lake Cumberland District; 2 New Deaths

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.13%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 164 deaths resulting in a 1.56% mortality rate (about 1 in 64) among known cases. This compares with a 1.01% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.88% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 100 cases* in the hospital. This is 2 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 627 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.97% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.15%. The latest data shows that 97.8% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 36.8% of ventilator capicity is being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 10,508 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 5.03% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 219 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 12; Casey: 8; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 7; Green: 8; McCreary: 18; Pulaski: 70; Russell: 14; Taylor: 40; and, Wayne: 37. In all, we have released 85.7% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 15 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1343 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1343.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 236 today: Adair: 18; Casey: 13; Clinton: 18; Cumberland: 14; Green: 9; McCreary: 31; Pulaski: 52; Russell: 15; Taylor: 25; and, Wayne: 41. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.021. This means our total case count is projected to double every 33.09 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/02/2020 when we added 288 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 76-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Green: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9m -year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 91-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 28-year-old female who is released, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 10 M-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 68-year-old female who is released, 12/10/20;
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 83-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the data will appear that the Casey and Pulaski numbers are off by 1 each. This is because we corrected an address from Casey to Pulaski.

 

The 2 deaths we report today are a 95-year-old female long-term care resident from Adair who had been hospitalized; and a 63-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized. Also, we are at a record number of active cases.

 

The other day someone on social media was making fun of the health department for having active cases within our facilities. This is not unique to the health department as 221 medical related offices have had active cases in our district. Unfortunately, medical personnel can not avoid coming into contact with positive cases.

 

Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 10,508 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 215,717 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 213,450 statewide plus 2,267 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report).
 

Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

28 COVID-19 Deaths Today; Governor Makes New recommendations

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 10, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced that public health restrictions will change Monday, Dec. 14, but said the state’s virus fight depends on all Kentuckians continuing to do the right things, in particular, wearing masks, social distancing and keeping gatherings small.

 

He reported the state’s highest-ever number of new COVID-19 cases; however, the state’s positivity rate declined for the seventh straight day.

 

“When we talk about COVID being a fast moving train, it doesn’t just immediately turn; you have to slow it down, stop it and turn it around. We still believe that’s what we’re seeing,” said Gov. Beshear. “We may also be seeing some of the impact from Thanksgiving in these numbers, that we could be moving in the right way, but still, Thanksgiving has a major impact. I can tell you that if we are seeing Thanksgiving’s impact, it’s a lot less than what we are seeing in some other states.”

 

On Dec. 14, Kentucky’s public health restrictions and recommendations will include:

 

  • All public and private middle and high schools will continue remote instruction until Jan. 4, 2021. Elementary schools can return to in-person learning once their county is out of the red zone.
  • Restaurants and bars can reopen at 50% capacity. Masks are required except when actively drinking or eating. Service must stop at 11 p.m.; establishments must close no later than 12 a.m.
  • Indoor social gatherings are recommended to have no more than eight people from a maximum of two households. There is no recommended limit on the number of people from the same household. There is no limit on outdoor social gatherings.
  • Gyms, fitness centers, pools and other indoor recreation facilities can operate at 50% capacity. Masks must be worn while exercising.
  • Venues, event spaces and theaters can reopen at 50% capacity.
  • Professional services can operate with up to 50% of employees working in-person; however, all employees who are able to work from home must do so.

 

Finally, the Governor shared positive economic development news, more evidence that the commonwealth will be prepared to sprint out of the pandemic in 2021.

 

Today, Gov. Beshear and executives from Protective Life Corp. announced the company will relocate its core site in the greater Cincinnati region to Covington. The new location positions Protective Life for long-term employee and business growth. The initial move to RiverCenter Towers in downtown Covington will bring approximately 100 well-paying jobs to Kentucky in 2021. As the company grows over the next decade, leaders expect to more than double that employee count.

 

In addition, in a win for Kentucky’s growing agritech sector, Gov. Beshear and leaders from EnviroFlight LLC announced the company’s plans to add 40 jobs in Maysville with a nearly $20 million expansion.

 

EnviroFlight, which produces black soldier fly larvae for animal and plant nutrition, established its Kentucky production facility just two years ago.

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 10, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 4,324
  • New deaths today: 28
  • Positivity rate: 9.13%
  • Total deaths: 2,146
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,756
  • Currently in ICU: 442
  • Currently on ventilator: 231

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Pulaski, Kenton, Boyd, Boone, Warren and McCracken. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 659.

 

The new red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two men, ages 61 and 72, from Adair County; a 63-year-old woman from Barren County; a 61-year-old woman from Boyd County; a 71-year-old man from Casey County; a 94-year-old woman from Christian County; an 83-year-old woman from Clinton County; a 92-year-old woman from Cumberland County; a 95-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 78-year-old man from Fleming County; a 93-year-old man from Henderson County; two women, ages 70 and 96, from Hopkins County; a 91-year-old woman and four men, ages 69, 70, 72 and 88, from Jefferson County; a 75-year-old man from Martin County; a 96-year-old man from McCracken County; a 92-year-old woman from Montgomery County; a 97-year-old woman and a 99-year-old man from Oldham County; a 59-year-old man from Owsley County; two men, ages 81 and 88, from Russell County; an 85-year-old woman from Taylor County; and a 74-year-old man from Wayne County.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health, noted that different Kentucky regions have between 54% and 87% of hospital beds already in use; in addition, Kentucky regions have between 61% and 96% of ICU beds already filled.

 

“With these hospitalization and ICU numbers, you start having to make more difficult choices, including having to postpone or defer surgeries or procedures for patients who would have to stay in the hospital afterwards,” said Dr. Stack. “For example, people who have large aneurysms in their aorta come into the hospital, have a major surgery oftentimes, and may have to stay in the hospital for multiple days. If it’s not an immediate emergency, hospitals may have to postpone that kind of surgery because they have so few beds available.”

 

Memorial
“Today, we share the heartbreaking loss of The Rev. Gregory Smith, a beloved pastor in Louisville who led the Hill Street Baptist Church for nearly 40 years,” said Gov. Beshear. “He passed away one day after his 69th birthday.

 

“Rev. Smith lived by the message of ‘love thy neighbor.’ His life was dedicated to the service of others. From leading his congregation, to mobilizing people to help those impacted by natural disasters across the country, Rev. Smith was there for those in need. His daughter, Caitlin, described him as the most joyful, kind and giving person that walked this earth. And his work wasn’t for recognition. He did it to make a difference.

 

One example of this is how he personally paid the tuition for some students at Simmons College of Kentucky where he was on the Board of Trustees – something his family didn’t even know of until his passing. His daughter said, ‘This was just who he was. He was always looking to share. … He’d give whatever he had to help others.

 

“He was a man of faith, and lived through his faith each and every day. Caitlin said whether it was 3 a.m. or 1 p.m., if her father received a call from a member of the congregation or a friend, he’d drop everything to be by their side wherever that was. From a hospital bedside, to traveling out of state to support someone mourning the loss of someone he’d never even met, Rev. Smith was there.

 

“The impact of this man stretches far and wide, and can easily be seen through the words of his grandson who ‘wants to be just like him when he grows up.’ Smith left behind his wife of 34 years, his three children and his beloved grandchildren. Our thoughts and prayers are with the entire Smith family and the members of the Hill Street Baptist Church. Today we mask up in honor of Rev. Smith.”

 

The Governor also noted that today marks his first-year anniversary serving as the Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. To read more about his first year, click here.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-10-20

 

 

Russell County there was another death reported Wednesday. We now have 26 deaths in Russell County. We have 36 new cases yesterday. We had 22 cases released from isolation. We now have 131 active cases which 127 cases are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at University of Louisville, 1 at T J Sampson in Glasgow and 1 at Bowling Green. The death today is a 49 year old female.

 

Adair County 28 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 10 cases yesterday. We have had 1,138 total cases with 949 of those released and 37 deaths. We have 152 active cases with 141 of those in home isolation and 11 in area hospitals.

LWC Will Hold A Virtual Ceremony on Saturday, Dec. 12 for Winter Commencement

 

COLUMBIA, KY. - Lindsey Wilson College will not hold its traditional winter commencement ceremony due to concerns about large gatherings and travel related to COVID-19.

 

Instead, the College is making plans for a virtual ceremony to be made available Saturday, Dec. 12, at 10 a.m. CT, on the college’s Youtube channel. The ceremony is scheduled to last about 40 minutes and will include all degree levels. The pre-recorded video can be accessed at this link: www.lindsey.edu/commencement.

 

Students registered for commencement ceremonies between May 2020 to Dec. 2020 have been invited to participate in the virtual event. 

 

“Our 2020 graduates deserve to be recognized for their hard work and commitment to staying the course in the face of unimaginable obstacles," said LWC President William T. Luckey Jr., “While this situation is not ideal, we certainly hope we can make the experience as memorable as possible.”

 

Students can expect many of the traditional components of an in-person ceremony including a downloadable program in pdf format, a faculty processional, a performance by the Lindsey Wilson Singers and greetings from President Luckey. 

 

The decision to move the ceremony to a virtual format is in compliance with local health department guidelines with the safety and well-being of the LWC community of utmost concern. 

 

Watch for updates via Lindsey Wilson’s social media accounts on Twitter and Facebook. 

 

For more information or questions, call 1-800-264-0138, email info@lindsey.edu or go to www.lindsey.edu

 

By: Venus Popplewell

 

16 New COVID-19 Deaths & 3,481 New Cases in KY

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 9, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced that while COVID-19 numbers in the commonwealth are still alarmingly high, Team Kentucky is making progress in its fight against the virus.

 

Today was the state’s sixth straight day with a declining positivity rate, showing that Kentuckians’ ongoing sacrifices and the Governor’s recent actions to slow the spread have made an impact.

 

“We continue to see some promising trends in our COVID-19 numbers. They are still far too high, but given that we were experiencing exponential growth before we took those difficult steps, this is evidence that we may not just be slowing down that growth, we may even be plateauing our cases,” said Gov. Beshear. “You have to slow down the train before you stop it, and you have to stop it before you turn it around.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 9, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,481
  • New deaths today: 16
  • Positivity rate: 9.23%
  • Total deaths: 2,118
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,792
  • Currently in ICU: 412
  • Currently on ventilator: 211

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Warren, Boone and Madison. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 731.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two women, ages 81 and 94, and an 80-year-old man from Caldwell County; a 32-year-old man from Clark County; a 94-year-old man from Daviess County; a 65-year-old man from Floyd County; a 98-year-old woman from Harlan County; a 78-year-old woman and a 74-year-old man from Jefferson County; a 90-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 69-year-old woman from Livingston County; an 82-year-old man from Marshall County; an 82-year-old man from McLean County; a 69-year-old woman from Ohio County; an 89-year-old man from Owsley County; and a 68-year-old man from Webster County.

 

Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund
Today, the Governor reported that 4,069 applications have been filed for the Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund, requesting $36.4 million in assistance. Already, $17.5 million has been approved for distribution; in total, the fund includes $40 million that can be disbursed to eligible bar and restaurant owners. For more information, visit teamkyfbrf.ky.gov.

 

Price-Gouging Prohibited
Today, Gov. Beshear signed an executive order prohibiting price-gouging, extending a previous order. This order will remain in effect for the duration of the state of emergency.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: BosnianChineseEnglishJapaneseKoreanSpanish and Russian.

 

National Influenza Vaccination Week


It’s National Influenza Vaccination Week, a reminder that there’s still time to get vaccinated. When more people are protected against flu, it is less likely to spread.

 

While it's ideal to get your flu shot early, before the flu starts spreading, it's not too late to get it now. Flu activity typically peaks between December and February, but it can last through May. So you may still get some protection if you get a shot now.

 

Flu vaccines are available in all T.J. Regional Health clinics during regular business hours.

 

KSP Search of Outbuilding Leads to Drug Arrest


Liberty, Ky. (December 9, 2020) – On Tuesday, December 8th, 2020 at approximately 4:23pmCT, Trooper Billy Begley responded to a residence on Thomas Ridge Rd in Casey County to assist Probation and Parole on a home visit. Upon arrival, Trooper Begley observed 46-year-old William Luttrell of Dunnville, KY exiting an outbuilding with 2 other males. Luttrell consented to a search of the outbuilding which resulted in the location of several bags of suspected marijuana, suspected methamphetamine, and a smoke pipe.

 

Luttrell was arrested and charged with Trafficking in a Controlled Substance, 1st degree 2nd offense (> or 2 grams Methamphetamine) (enhancement), Trafficking in Marijuana ( 8 ounces to < 5 lbs) 1st offense, and Possession of Ddrug Paraphernalia. Luttrell was lodged in the Casey County Jail.
 

Tpr. Begley was assisted by Tpr. Zach Scott, Probation and Parole Officer Adam Wilson, and the Casey County Sheriffs Department.

 

3 New Deaths Yesterday & Highest Number of Covid-19 Cases Reported in Lake Cumberland District

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.56%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 161 deaths resulting in a 1.6% mortality rate (about 1 in 63) among known cases. This compares with a 1.02% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.89% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 80 cases* in the hospital. This is 5 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 599 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.96% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.27%. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 10,043 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 4.81% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 202 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 11; Casey: 9; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 2; Green: 5; McCreary: 26; Pulaski: 77; Russell: 11; Taylor: 43; and, Wayne: 11. In all, we have released 85.7% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 82 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1272 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/08/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1272.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Family, and Schools. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 287 today: Adair: 26; Casey: 18; Clinton: 16; Cumberland: 7; Green: 8; McCreary: 30; Pulaski: 70; Russell: 15; Taylor: 45; and, Wayne: 52. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.023. This means our total case count is projected to double every 30.74 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/08/2020 when we added 289 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 87-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 18-year-old female who is released, 12/07/20;
Adair: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old male who is released, 12/07/20;
Adair: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 27-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 68-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 5 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 92-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, Not Listed;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, Not Listed;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, Not Listed;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, Not Listed;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, Not Listed;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is released, 12/07/20;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is released, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, Not Listed;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is released, 12/07/20;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, Not Listed;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is released, 12/07/20;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 88-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, Not Listed;
Russell: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 98-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 9months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 102-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, Not Listed;
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, 11/29/20;
Taylor: A 32-year-old female who is released, 12/07/20;
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 80-year-old male who is hospitalized, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, Not Listed;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 85-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 82-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is released, 12/07/20;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at our numbers will appear that McCreary and Wayne are both off by 13. That is because we inadvertently counted 13 cases yesterday to McCreary that should have been counted to Wayne County. Also, the Adair and McCreary numbers will be off by 1 each as we removed 1 case in each county that did not meet case criteria.

 

We are reporting 3 deaths today: a 78-year-old male long-term care resident from Adair; a 76-year-old male from Casey who had been hospitalized; and, a 90-year-old female long-term care resident from Russell.

 

Today was for Lake Cumberland: the highest day so far of new cases, the highest day so far of active cases, and, the highest day so far of hospitalized cases. So, please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 10,043 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 208,152 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 205,668 statewide plus 2,484 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

AREA ARREST 12-9-20

 

 

A Georgetown man was arrested on several charges by the Russell County Sheriff’s Office. Jody Bandy, age 45, was taken into custody by Deputy Meyer at 4:30 Wednesday afternoon. He was charged with Operating a Motor Vehicle Under the Influence of Alcohol – 1st, Resisting Arrest, Terroristic Threatening, 3rd Degree, Wanton Endangerment – 1st Degree, Failure to Produce Insurance Card and Possession of an Open Alcoholic Beverage Container in Motor Vehicle Prohibited.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-9-20

Adair County with 27 new cases yesterday. There are currently 134 active cases and 10 people hospitalized in the county.

 

Russell County another new death yesterday. The death is a 90 year old female who is a long term care facility patient. We have 15 new cases. We had 11 cases released from isolation. We now have 118 active cases which 114 cases are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 2 cases at Russell County Hospital, 1 case at Bowling Green and 1 case at University of Louisville. We have now had 25 total deaths in…

 

Tuesday, was for Lake Cumberland: the highest day so far of new cases, the highest day so far of active cases, and, the highest day so far of hospitalized cases. We are reporting 3 deaths today: a 78-year-old male long-term care resident from Adair; a 76-year-old male from Casey who had been hospitalized; and, a 90-year-old female long-term care resident from Russell.

Gov. Beshear: Daily Case Total Falls by 1,000, State Surpasses 3 Million Tests

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 8, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear heralded some positive signs in Kentucky’s fight against the coronavirus: Daily, week-over-week positive cases fell by 1,000 Tuesday and the commonwealth surpassed more than 3 million COVID-19 tests administered.

 

“We have built in the last nine months a system that provides over 350 testing locations, that has now done more than 3 million tests in a state that 4.4 million people,” the Governor said.

 

Gov. Beshear also highlighted a new amicus brief filed with the U.S. Supreme Court by the American Medical Association and the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health & Wellness.

 

The brief emphasizes that Gov. Beshear’s recent orders had detailed scientific rationale:

“The public health order at issue in this case, which temporarily ordered the closure of all Kentucky schools from kindergarten through high school for in-person learning, was based on sound scientific considerations.

 

“The Declaration of Dr. Steven J. Stack, M.D., Commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, gives a detailed scientific explanation for the temporary in-person closure of Kentucky schools, grades K-12. It also explains why other Kentucky institutions may face fewer restrictions. Dr. Stack’s declaration is based on solid medical reasoning, which is largely apparent from the declaration itself. The district court, however, asserted that Dr. Stack and the Governor had inadequately explained why K-12 schools should close, while other institutions can remain open.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 8, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,114
  • New deaths today: 20
  • Positivity rate: 9.56%
  • Total deaths: 2,102
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,760
  • Currently in ICU: 416
  • Currently on ventilator: 207

 

The Governor noted that different Kentucky regions have between 54% and 87% of hospital beds already in use; in addition, Kentucky regions have between 61% and 96% of ICU beds already filled.

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Kenton and Boone.


The red zone counties for this week can be found here.

 

Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 92-year-old woman and a 92-year-old man from Bullitt County; two men, ages 52 and 72, from Boyd County; a 74-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 58-year-old man and a 74-year-old woman from Hopkins County; a 35-year-old woman and a 90-year-old man from Jefferson County; two men, ages 56 and 71, from Johnson County; two men, ages 37 and 83, from Lee County; a 78-year-old man from Marshall County; a 62-year-old man from Nelson County; an 87-year-old woman from Owsley County; two women, ages 78 and 90, and a 79-year-old man from Pike County; and a 66-year-old man from Scott County.

 

Get Covered 2021
Today, Gov. Beshear proclaimed Dec. 10, 2020 as “Get Covered Day” and joined a broad coalition of other states, health care groups and health care providers in launching Get Covered 2021.

 

“Get Covered 2021 is a national effort to encourage mask-wearing and to substantially increase the number of people with health coverage,” the Governor said.

 

Get Covered 2021 emphasizes:

  • Practicing the three Ws to reduce risk of COVID-19: Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Watch your distance. Together, these can help keep you and your community healthy and safe;
  • Cover Yourself and Your Family. Renew your health coverage. If you haven’t already, visit kynect.ky.gov. It will point you to health care options and financial resources to help you get covered; and
  • Cover Everyone. Support efforts to increase access to affordable, meaningful health coverage for all Kentuckians.

 

In Kentucky, 239,000 residents are currently uninsured. More than half – 175,000 – qualify for financial help to pay for health coverage or coverage through Medicaid.

 

“Health care is a basic human right,” Gov. Beshear said, “and we are committed to working quickly and diligently to getting health coverage for as many Kentuckians as possible.”

 

Gov. Beshear also recognized CHFS Deputy Secretary Carrie Banahan for her role as national co-leader of the Get Covered Day initiative.

 

“Carrie was instrumental in the implementation of the state health benefit exchange in 2014 and helped with the relaunch of the new kynect.ky.gov health coverage, benefits and community resources portal,” the Governor said. “She is also leading the relaunch of our state-based exchange, which will be in place for 2022 benefits enrollment.”

 

Memorial
Today, Gov. Beshear spoke about the life of Henderson resident Louise Connell, who died at 93 on Thanksgiving Day just 10 days after testing positive for COVID-19.

 

“The heartbreaking fact about this memorial is Louise was living in a long-term care facility and likely would have been one of the first to receive one of the life-saving vaccines this month,” the Governor said.

 

Louise was a mother of three, a grandmother to four and a great-grandmother to nine children. She was married for 70 years to her childhood sweetheart, Oliver, who passed away in 2016. She is remembered as a loving, good person who always took care of others. She worked for years as a nursing assistant at Methodist Hospital, and was a member of Audubon Baptist Church.

 

Louise loved Christmas. It was her favorite holiday because she loved that her little house on Pope Street was always full of people and full of love.

 

“Today we lift her family and loved ones in prayer as they continue to mourn this loss,” Gov. Beshear said.
 

“And we recognize these are people being taken from us, not just numbers, who might still be here today if we all decided to do the right thing – especially now that we see the light at the end of the tunnel.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: BosnianChineseEnglishJapaneseKoreanSpanishand Russian.

 

7 NEW COVID-19 DEATHS IN LAKE CUMBERLAND DISTRICT.....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.6%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 7 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 158 deaths resulting in a 1.62% mortality rate (about 1 in 62) among known cases. This compares with a 1.03% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.9% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 75 cases* in the hospital. This is 4 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 589 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.04% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.3%. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 9,756 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 4.67% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 149 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 8; Casey: 13; Clinton: 10; Cumberland: 2; Green: 10; McCreary: 14; Pulaski: 54; Russell: 18; Taylor: 1; and, Wayne: 19. In all, we have released 86.2% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, we decreased the same number of cases today as we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1190 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/07/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1190.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Businesses, Family, and Schools. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 156 today: Adair: 13; Casey: 8; Clinton: 9; Cumberland: 1; Green: 6; McCreary: 25; Pulaski: 57; Russell: 15; and, Taylor: 22. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.022. This means our total case count is projected to double every 32.16 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/02/2020 when we added 288 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 79-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 70-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old female who is released, 12/06/20;
Clinton: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, 11/27/20;
McCreary: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 79-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 91-year-old male who is deceased, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 93-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 96-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 91-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is released, 11/30/20;
Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic

 

The deaths we are reporting tonight are: a 67-year-old male from Adair who had been hospitalized; a 91-year-old male long-term care resident from Pulaski; and 89-year-old male long-term care resident from Russell; an 85-year-old female long-term care resident from Russell; an 82-year-old female long-term care resident from Taylor who had been hospitalized; an 84-year-old female long-term care resident from Taylor who had been hospitalized; and, a 95-year-old female long-term care resident from Taylor who had been hospitalized.

 

Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 9,756 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 204,973 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 202,592 statewide plus 2,381 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-8-20

Russell County 2 more deaths reported in Russell County Monday. We now have 24 deaths. The deaths are an 89 year old male and an 85 year old female who are both long term care facility patients. We have 15 new cases yesterday. We had 18 cases released from isolation. We now have 115 active cases which 110 cases are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 3 cases at Russell County Hospital, 1 case at Bowling

 

Adair County 13new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 8 cases. Adair County also reported another new death. We have had 1,084 total cases with 928 of those released and 36 deaths. We have 120 active cases with 112 of those in home isolation and 8 in area hospitals.

Gov. Beshear: Additional December Vaccine Shipments Expected

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 7, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state is expecting two additional COVID-19 vaccine shipments before the end of the year. In total, the state expects at least 38,000 Pfizer doses and 109,000 Moderna doses in December.

 

The Governor expects more Pfizer allocations to be announced at a later date, possibly before the end of the month.

 

“The end of this virus is out there. We can see it, and we can feel it. But it’s still months away, and until then, we’ve got to do the right things to protect one another, knowing that when we work hard, we save the lives of those around us and ensure we have the health care capacity we need,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The Governor expects Kentucky will receive approximately: 38,000 Pfizer doses the week of Dec. 13-19 (previously announced on Nov. 30); 76,000 Moderna doses the week of Dec. 20-26; and more than 33,000 Moderna doses from Dec. 27-31. Gov. Beshear reminded Kentuckians that while these numbers are the state’s best estimate at this time based on available information from the federal government, they are subject to change.

 

Each of these doses will go to a different Kentuckian; they are the initial shots that will be followed up with a booster vaccine about three weeks later. Both Pfizer’s and Moderna’s vaccines require an initial dose and a booster dose.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Monday, Dec. 7, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,972
  • New deaths today: 10
  • Positivity rate: 9.60%
  • Total deaths: 2,082
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,700
  • Currently in ICU: 410
  • Currently on ventilator: 210

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, McCracken, Boone and Kenton. Each of these counties reported 50 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 343.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 89-year-old man from Allen County; a 71-year-old man from Bullitt County; an 89-year-old woman from Graves County; a 77-year-old woman from Greenup County; a 92-year-old woman from Jessamine County; two men, ages 86 and 87, from Johnson County; a 76-year-old man from Marshall County; and a 67-year-old woman and an 81-year-old man from Pike County.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, shared two examples of how COVID-19 has spread in schools and youth sports.

 

“This is about trying to share with people why we’re making these difficult decisions to keep people safe,” said Dr. Stack. “We had a school where one teacher was positive with COVID-19. This case caused nine total cases and one death. Four hundred people were exposed and needed to quarantine.

 

“The second situation I will share is related to a student-athlete. We had one volleyball player who was positive for COVID-19. This resulted in 14 more cases and a total of 40 contacts exposed – this was when school was not even in session.

 

“One of the lessons from these two cases: Stay home if you are sick, regardless of a test result. Stay home if you are sick.”

 

Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund
Today, the Governor reported that 3,753 applications have been filed for the Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund, requesting $35 million in assistance. Already, $12 million has been approved and distributed; in total, the fund includes $40 million that can be disbursed to eligible bar and restaurant owners. For more information, visit teamkyfbrf.ky.gov.

 

Remembrance Ceremony and Memorial
Today, the Governor held a remembrance ceremony for more than 2,000 Kentuckians who we have lost to COVID-19, and hung a wreath on the front of the state Capitol in their honor. During today’s press briefing, he shared the story of one of those people, all of whom he called “special souls.”

 

“Today, we share the heartbreaking story of Rufus Mason, a 72-year-old custodian at Westport Middle School in Louisville, who passed away from COVID-19 on Nov. 30. Rufus received confirmation of being infected with COVID-19 after exposure at the school where he worked. He entered Baptist Hospital on Nov. 19 where he fought, but ultimately succumbed to the virus,” the Governor said.

 

“We spoke to his wife, Evelyn, whom he was married to for 52 years. Evelyn had also contracted the virus, but thankfully is doing much better and was able to share her husband’s story with us. She said Rufus was the most kind, gentle, caring soul and everyone who knew him loved him. He enjoyed staying busy and active, working for Ford Motor Company for 40 years before retiring in 2009 and joining the Westport Middle School team. Evelyn shared the family he had built at the school with faculty, staff and students are heartbroken by his loss. 

 

“Our thoughts and prayers are with Evelyn and her family as they mourn the loss of Rufus. Today we mask up in his honor, and remember the importance of spreading kindness and compassion like he did during his 72 years.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: BosnianChineseEnglishJapaneseKoreanSpanish and Russian.

 

2 New COVID-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District; One in Russell & One in Adair.....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.75%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 2 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 151 deaths resulting in a 1.57% mortality rate (about 1 in 64) among known cases. This compares with a 1.03% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.92% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 71 cases* in the hospital. This is 1 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 581 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.05% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 17) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.32%. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 9,600 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 4.6% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 101 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 9; Casey: 7; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 1; Green: 5; McCreary: 23; Pulaski: 24; Russell: 5; Taylor: 12; and, Wayne: 8. In all, we have released 86% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 13 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1190 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/06/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1190.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Businesses, Family, and Schools. Of our active cases, 9% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 116 today: Adair: 10; Casey: 7; Clinton: 3; Green: 3; McCreary: 15; Pulaski: 39; Russell: 4; Taylor: 19; and, Wayne: 16. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.022. This means our total case count is projected to double every 32.24 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/02/2020 when we added 288 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 52-year-old female who is released, 12/04/20;
Casey: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 3 Months-old female who is released, 12/04/20;
Clinton: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 74-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10 Month-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is released, 12/04/20;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is released, 12/04/20;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 6 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 38-year-old male who is released, 12/04/20;
Taylor: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 1 month-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

As you may be aware the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) updated their quarantine guidance for contacts last week, additionally the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH) released guidance to mirror the new CDC guidance.  For more information: Tested Positive for COVID-19? Close Contact?

 

In summary, if you’ve been exposed to COVID19:

  1. Quarantine for 14 days; especially if you are going to be around people that are high-risk for the virus (i.e. elderly, people with comorbidities, immunocompromised),
  2. Quarantine for 10 days if you have NO symptoms,
  3. Quarantine for 7 days if you have a negative COVID-19 test on or after Day 5 and have NO symptoms.

 

The deaths we report today are an 80-year-old female from Adair who had been hospitalized; and an 87-year-old female long-term resident from Russell who had been hospitalized.

 

We added 9 more new cases today over last Sunday, and have 26 more active cases. Our active cases at 1,190, are an all-time high. Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 9,600 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 202,955 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 200,632 statewide plus 2,323 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

Gov. Beshear Honors More than 2,000 Kentuckians Lost to COVID

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 7, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear honored the more than 2,000 Kentuckians lost to COVID-19 during a moving ceremony in front of the State Capitol Building on Monday.

 

The Governor, First Lady Britainy Beshear, Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman and the Kentucky State Police Honor Guard recognized the loss of those 2,000 Kentuckians. They watched the lighting of a wreath in remembrance of the more than 2,000 Kentuckians lost and to demonstrate support for their families and communities.

 

Soloist Keith Dean, the Rev. Jack Brewer of the Franklin County Ministerial Association and the Handbell Ensemble from First United Methodist Church in Frankfort also participated in the remembrance. Chris Perry talked about the loss of his brother Rob Perry to COVID. Chris Perry was joined by Rob’s daughter, Destiny.

 

You can view the photos here.

 

You can watch the ceremony here.

 

AREA ARREST 12-7-20

 

 

Eleztra Aki age 36, of Jamestown was arrested by Deputy Goldman with the Russell County Sheriff’s Office Sunday morning just after 10 a.m. she was charged with (2 counts) of Theft by Unlawful Taking or Disposition – Firearm and Fleeing or Evading Police, 2nd Degree (on Foot). She was lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE FOR 12-7-20

 

 

Russell County reported another death Sunday. The death is an 87 year old female who was a long term care facility patient. We now have 22 deaths. We had 4 new cases yesterday. We had 5 cases released from isolation. We now have 120 active cases which 115 are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized,3 at Russell County Hospital,1 at Bowling Green and 1 at Somerset.

 

Adair County with 10 new COVID19 cases to report Sunday. We released 9 case. Adair County reported 1 new death Sunday. We have had 1,071 total cases with 920 of those released and 35 deaths. We have 116 active cases with 105 of those in home isolation and 11 in area hospitals.

Gov. Beshear Urges Vigilance as Kentucky Passes 200,000 COVID-19 Cases


FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 6, 2020) – On Sunday, Gov. Andy Beshear asked all Kentuckians to redouble efforts to fight COVID-19 as Kentucky surpassed 200,000 reported cases of coronavirus in the commonwealth – exactly nine months since the state’s first reported case.

 

“These are difficult numbers, having passed 200,000 cases and earlier this week passing 2,000 deaths. And now this is our highest week to date. However, in the data there is some potentially good news: While this is our highest week ever, the rate of growth does appear to be slowing. In other words, our increase from the last couple of weeks is less than what we have been seeing. Certainly, our hope is that we are slowing down this train and are moving at least to a new plateau,” the Governor said. “We’ll have to watch in the coming week if we do have that Thanksgiving surge or if the majority of our families kept it small this year. So even on a tough day, possibly some good news. That should make all of us want to work that much harder knowing that we can impact this thing, that it is within our control and that a vaccine – two vaccines – are just around the corner.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 6, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 2,567
  • New deaths today: 10
  • Positivity rate: 9.75%
  • Total deaths: 2,072
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,673
  • Currently in ICU: 401
  • Currently on ventilator: 214

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Boone and Boyd. Jefferson, Fayette and Kenton counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 446.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 68-year-old woman from Barren County; two men, ages 64 and 74, from Fayette County; two women, ages 69 and 71, from Jefferson County; a 65-year-old woman from Jessamine County; an 84-year-old man from Laurel County; an 81-year-old man from Lewis County; a 68-year-old man from Mason County; and a 72-year-old man from Washington County.

 

“The imminent distribution of COVID-19 vaccine in the upcoming weeks should help put this pandemic in the past, but the coming weeks remain critical and come with sacrifices,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “We must make good decisions every day and protect fellow Kentuckians by wearing masks, practicing social distancing, and staying home if we are sick. Doing so will save lives. It won’t be easy, but Team Kentucky is strong and supportive. We look out for each other, take care of those in need, and will get through this together.”

 

Reporting is limited on Sundays. Additional information, including the number of Kentuckians who have recovered from COVID-19, will be reported Monday.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.


Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: BosnianChineseEnglishJapaneseKoreanSpanishand Russian.

 

Kentucky Commemorates Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day - Gov. Beshear directs state offices to fly flags at half-staff Monday

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 6, 2020) – On July 16, Kentucky lost its last Pearl Harbor survivor, 101-year-old Albert Patrick. Last year, the community of Salyersville celebrated Patrick’s 100th birthday, when he was one of four remaining Pearl Harbor survivors in the nation. Today there are only two, both of them 98 years old.

 

Seventy-nine years later, the name “Pearl Harbor” still sends chills up the spine of even people born decades after the event.

 

“On Sunday morning, December 7, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service attacked Naval Station Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii Territory, without warning and without a declaration of war, killing 2,403 American servicemen and civilians, and injuring 1,178 others. The attack sank four U.S. Navy battleships and damaged four others. It also damaged three cruisers, three destroyers, and one minelayer. Aircraft losses were 188 destroyed and 159 damaged.”

 

It was a surprise attack on a nation then at peace.  It was intended by the Japanese to be a devastating first strike, from which the U.S. could not recover.

 

“Canada declared war on Japan within hours of the attack on Pearl Harbor, the first Western nation to do so. On December 8, the United States declared war on Japan and entered World War II on the side of the Allies. In a speech to Congress, President Franklin D. Roosevelt called the bombing of Pearl Harbor "a date which will live in infamy." “

 

Instead of collapsing, the U.S. rallied and rose to battle. Instead of delivering defeat, Pearl Harbor became the event that led to Allied victory in World War II and global U.S. leadership after the war.

 

It is a tribute to both American power and American peace-making that both Japan and Germany, the defeated Axis nations, are two of our strongest allies today.

 

But America did not emerge victorious just on the battlefield.  For four years, Americans suffered restrictions and rationing here at home.  To have to endure that, after a decade of severe privation during the Great Depression, must have seemed more than anyone could stand.

 

We did stand it.  We gave up driving because the troops needed the tire rubber and the steel and the gasoline for cars.  We grew Victory Gardens and canned everything.  We saved every scrap, went without, endured Thanksgivings and Christmases without loved ones.

 

We did it year after hard year because every sacrifice meant saving the lives of the troops fighting overseas.


On December 7, remember Albert Patrick and his fellow survivors, remember the 2,403 fallen, remember that at our lowest point in the 20th Century, we had what it took to not just survive but emerge victorious.

 

In accordance with a proclamation from the White House, Gov. Andy Beshear has directed that flags at all state office buildings be lowered to half-staff on Monday, Dec.7, in observance of Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. The Governor encourages individuals, businesses and organizations throughout the commonwealth to join in this tribute. Flag status information is available at https://governor.ky.gov/flag-status.

 

COLUMBIA BURGER KING FIRE


The Columbia Fire Department responded to 101 Dohoney Trace, Columbia, KY to the Burger King restaurant on Saturday, Dec. 5, 2020 at 11:35amCT. Upon arrival fire was coming through the roof.   

 
There were 20 firemen on the scene for 1.5 hours. 
 
 
 

6 New COVID-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.8%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 6 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 149 deaths resulting in a 1.57% mortality rate (about 1 in 64) among known cases. This compares with a 1.04% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.93% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 70 cases* in the hospital. This is 1 less than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 578 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.09% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.39%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 9,484 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 4.54% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 209 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 7; Casey: 17; Clinton: 13; Cumberland: 1; Green: 15; McCreary: 22; Pulaski: 57; Russell: 24; Taylor: 37; and, Wayne: 16. In all, we have released 86% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 14 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1177 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/04/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1182.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Businesses, Family, and Schools. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 201 today: Adair: 21; Casey: 9; Clinton: 12; Cumberland: 2; Green: 11; McCreary: 22; Pulaski: 77; Russell: 10; Taylor: 14; and, Wayne: 23. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.022. This means our total case count is projected to double every 32.06 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/02/2020 when we added 288 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Casey: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 74-year-old male who is released, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 73-year-old female who is released, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 36-year-old female who is released, 12/04/20;
Clinton: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Green: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Green: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Green: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 66-year-old male who is released, 12/04/20;
McCreary: A 67-year-old female who is released, 12/04/20;
McCreary: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 63-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old male who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is released, 12/03/20;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is released, 12/03/20;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is released, 12/03/20;
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is released, 12/03/20;
Taylor: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Wayne: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The deaths that we report today are a 71-year-old female from Cumberland who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious but later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness; an 87-year-old female long-term-care resident from Pulaski; a 70-year-old male long-term care resident from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; an 81-year-old male from Taylor who had been hospitalized; a 52-year-old female from Pulaski; and, an 87-year-old male from Pulaski who had been hospitalized.

 

This has been the worse week of the outbreak so far for both Lake Cumberland and the state. We experienced 21 deaths in Lake Cumberland this week. We have near-record numbers of hospitalizations while hospitals locally and state-wide report a significant surge in COVID-19 hospitalizations. Hospitals, health departments, EMSs, and long-term care facilities area-wide and state-wide are experiencing staff shortages due to the surge in cases and the loss of staff who have either become infected with COVID-19, or are quarantined as a close-contact. Our active cases are 155 more today than last Saturday (1,177 vs 1,022). And, we added 1,331 new cases this week compared to 945 last week. And, to top it all off, at our present growth-rate, our total cases will double in 32 days. Imagine going through everything we have gone through over the last 262 days in only 32 days!

 

Friends, if these numbers do not convince of the danger and the need to follow precautions, I am not sure what it will take do so. Let’s hope that we have not crossed a tipping point from which there is no return!

 

There are a significant number of cases being reported locally that is not showing up in the state’s numbers. On Monday, members of the Lake Cumberland Epi Team are meeting with members of the state Epi Team to work out the glitch. Even though 3 of our counties are coded in the “orange” on the state map, this is not accurate. All of Lake Cumberland’s counties are very much in the “red”.

 

Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 9,484 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 200,397 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 198,065 statewide plus 2,332 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

5 New COVID-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District; 205 New Cases....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.93%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 5 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 143 deaths resulting in a 1.54% mortality rate (about 1 in 65) among known cases. This compares with a 1.05% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.95% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 71 cases* in the hospital. This is 29 less than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 576 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.2% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.44%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 9,283 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 4.44% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 158 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 16; Casey: 10; Clinton: 14; Cumberland: 6; Green: 8; McCreary: 20; Pulaski: 48; Russell: 9; Taylor: 13; and, Wayne: 14. In all, we have released 85.6% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 42 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1191 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/04/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1191.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Businesses, Family, and Schools. Of our active cases, 9% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 205 today: Adair: 12; Casey: 7; Clinton: 11; Cumberland: 3; Green: 8; McCreary: 21; Pulaski: 51; Russell: 33; Taylor: 32; and, Wayne: 27. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.021. This means our total case count is projected to double every 33.45 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/02/2020 when we added 288 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Adair: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 80-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 43-year-old female who is released, 12/03/20;
Casey: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is released, asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 61-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Green: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is released, 12/03/20;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is released, 12/03/20;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is released, 12/03/20;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is released, unknown;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, 12/03/20;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old female who is released, 12/03/20;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 89-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 86-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 90-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Russell: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 86-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at the data would appear that our Pulaski and Russell numbers are both off by 1 today. This is because we removed 2 duplicate entries. This resulted in our daily total case count increase being 2 less than our daily new case count increase.

 

The deaths we report today are a 97-year-old male from Pulaski who had been hospitalized and had been an assisted living facility resident; a 90-year-old female long-term care resident from Pulaski; an 89-year-old male long-term care resident from Russell; and an 89-year-old female long-term care resident from Russell who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious, but later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness; and, a 90-year-old female long-term care resident from Russell.

 

On top of the deaths, today we set a new record for active cases, 1,191. Also, area hospitals are now joining us in asking the public to mask and social distance, “Please Trust Us, Doctors Ask“. So please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 9,283 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 196,438 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 194,193 statewide plus 2,245 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.


For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

Gov. Beshear: New Highest Week of COVID-19 Cases

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 5, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear announced on Saturday that Kentucky has had its new highest week of COVID-19 cases, even with one day left to report and encouraged Kentuckians to keep fighting.

 

“With a day still to go, we have set a new one-week record for highest cases in the commonwealth,” Gov. Beshear said. “We are all sacrificing so much right now; we are all tired – but let’s do what it takes to crush this third surge of cases and defeat this virus once and for all.”

 

“The imminent arrival of COVID-19 vaccines is a monumental scientific accomplishment offering great hope that this devastating pandemic can at last be ended,” commented Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “Initially, though, very limited quantities of vaccine coupled with complicated and changing distribution logistics mean not everyone can have access at the very start. It’s essential that everyone work together and know that all Kentuckians will be given access as rapidly as vaccine supplies, shipping, storage, and handling limitations allow. There is a bright light of hope ahead; let’s all support each other as we look forward to better days soon.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,892
  • New deaths today: 23
  • Positivity rate: 9.80%
  • Total deaths: 2,062
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,731
  • Currently in ICU: 401
  • Currently on ventilator: 226

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Boone, Kenton and Daviess. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 594.

 

The 113 red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include two men, ages 77 and 86, from Barren County; a 55-year-old man from Fayette County; two women, ages 38 and 41 from Hardin County; a 65-year-old man from Hart County; an 85-year-old woman and a 67-year-old man from Hopkins County; two women, ages 94 and 98, and two men, ages 72 and 74 from Jefferson County; a 77-year-old man from Jessamine County; an 87-year-old man from Logan County; a 97-year-old woman from Metcalfe County; two women, ages 58 and 69, and two men, ages 70 and 95 from Nelson County; a 57-year-old man from Simpson County; and two women, ages 75 and 103, and a 68-year-old man from Warren County.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: BosnianChineseEnglishJapaneseKoreanSpanishand Russian.

 

JAMESTOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT WAS CALLED OUT EARLY THIS MORNING TO A STRUCTURE FIRE

 

 

Jamestown Fire was Dispatced this morning about 3:30 to the report of a structure fire on Blankenship Street just off 127 S.

On  scene firefighters found a structure completely involved, no one was home,no injuries reported, firefighters on scene for just over two hours

TWO RC HOSPITAL POSITIONS AVAILABLE...

 

RUSSELL COUNTY HOSPITAL has 2 Respiratory Therapist (CRT/RRT) positions available immediately!

 

  • One position is Full-Time, benefits eligible.
  • Other position is FLEX/PRN position.

 

If interested, go to the Russell County Hospital website at www.russellcohospital.org, press the careers tab and complete the application. 
 

Gov. Beshear: With Vaccines in Sight, Fight Harder Than Ever

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 4, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear encouraged Kentuckians to stay strong in the fight against COVID-19, as the commonwealth is just days away from beginning to administer life-saving vaccines.

 

“These vaccines are right around the corner. Within the next 10 days or so we might be giving out the first vaccines,” said Gov. Beshear. “That means every loss of life and every extra infection that happens between now and then is entirely avoidable. So let’s fight harder than we ever have and do our part as Team Kentucky.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Dec. 4, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,614
  • New deaths today: 25
  • Positivity rate: 9.93%
  • Total deaths: 2,039
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,792
  • Currently in ICU: 409
  • Currently on ventilator: 230

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Boone, Kenton, Warren and Daviess. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 576.

 

The red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 76-year-old man from Boone County; a 69-year-old woman from Caldwell County; an 84-year-old woman from Christian County; a 70-year-old woman from Crittenden County; a 70-year-old man from Elliott County; a 74-year-old man from Franklin County; a 72-year-old woman and two men, ages 74 and 87, from Greenup County; an 87-year-old man from Hopkins County; two men, ages 67 and 71, from Jefferson County; two women, ages 40 and 64, and a 99-year-old man from Johnson County; a 55-year-old man from Lawrence County; an 82-year-old man from Lewis County; a 73-year-old woman and an 81-year-old man from Madison County; a 94-year-old man from Marion County; a 97-year-old woman from Marshall County; a 91-year-old woman from Martin County; an 83-year-old woman from McCracken County; a 77-year-old woman from Monroe County; and an 85-year-old woman from Muhlenberg County.

 

Travel Advisory
The Kentucky Department for Public Health advises against travel to states with a positivity rate of 15% or higher. Those states currently include: Idaho (50.64%), Kansas (44.58%), South Dakota (44.09%), Iowa (42.24%), Oregon (40.18%), Alabama (34.72%), Pennsylvania (32.03%), Arizona (25.39%), Mississippi (24.91%), Utah (22.20%), Missouri (19.21%), Oklahoma (19.01%), Nevada (16.42%), Arkansas (16.17%), Ohio (15.49%) and Tennessee (15.34%).

 

Pharmacy Refills Update
Today, Gov. Beshear signed an executive order that extends previous orders allowing pharmacists to dispense 30-day refills. The current executive order is set to expire Saturday at midnight; the new order will be effective for 30 days beginning Dec. 4.

 

Week in Review
For more information on the state's first vaccine shipmentsKentucky’s first day with more than 4,000 new casestwo days of record COVID-19 deaths and the state surpassing 2,000 deaths and a 10% positivity rate, visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.

 

Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: BosnianChineseEnglishJapaneseKoreanSpanishand Russian.

 

AREA ARREST 12-4-20

Kristen Stephens age 30, of Columbia was arrested by Trooper Brumley of the Kentucky State Police just before 4 a.m. this morning. Stephens was charged with Possession of Marijuana, Drug Paraphernalia Buy/Possession, Illegal Possession of Legend Drugs, Prescription Controlled Substance Not in Proper Container 1st Offense, Operating a Motor Vehicle under/Influence Controlled Substance – 2nd (Aggravated Circumstances, Inadequate Silence Muffler and No Tail Lamps.

 

Adam Feese age 33, of Russell Springs, was taken into custody by Deputy Bradshaw with the Russell County Sheriff’s Office. Feese was charged with (2 counts) of Assault, 1st Degree, Operating a Motor Vehicle under Influence Alcohol – 1st (Aggravated Circumstances), Operating on Suspended or Revoked License,  and Possession of Controlled Substance, 3rd Degree – Drug Unspecified.

 

Justen Woodall age 36, of Jamestown, was arrested by Jamestown Police Chief Jeff Kerns just before 9 a.m. Thursday and charged with Theft by Unlawful Taking or Disposition all others (under $500)

 

All 3 men were lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-4-20

Russell County 11 new cases Thursday. We had 13 cases released from isolation. We now have 115 active cases which 111 cases are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 3 at Russell County Hospital and 1 at Somerset.

 

Adair County 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 17 cases. We’re sad to report 2 deaths for Adair Co. Thursday. We have had 1,028 total cases with 888 of those released and 34 deaths. We have 106 active cases with 93 of those in home isolation and 13 in area hospitals.

4 New COVID-19 Deaths in the Lake Cumberland District

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 10.07%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 4 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 138 deaths resulting in a 1.52% mortality rate (about 1 in 66) among known cases. This compares with a 1.06% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.96% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 100 cases* in the hospital. This is 4 more than yesterday. We have had a total of 563 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.2% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.41%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 9,078 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 4.35% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 214 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 17; Casey: 14; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 5; Green: 6; McCreary: 25; Pulaski: 80; Russell: 13; Taylor: 42; and, Wayne: 5. In all, we have released 85.8% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 10 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1149 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 11/25/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1154.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Long-term Care/Residential Facilities, Family, and Schools. Of our active cases, 10% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 208 today: Adair: 15; Casey: 9; Clinton: 10; Cumberland: 3; Green: 9; McCreary: 26; Pulaski: 63; Russell: 11; Taylor: 39; and, Wayne: 23. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.021. This means our total case count is projected to double every 33.23 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/02/2020 when we added 288 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 4m-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Casey: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 6-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 1-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old female who is released, 12/02/20;
McCreary: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 94-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 92-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 96-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 91-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 81-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is released, 12/01/20;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is released, 12/01/20;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is deceased, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is released, 12/01/20;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 87-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 97-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, unkonwn;
Taylor: A 14-year-old female who is released, unknown;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 93-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 15-year-old male who is released, 11/21/20;
Taylor: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown;
Taylor: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 98-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 6weeks-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 69-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at our numbers will appear that our McCreary numbers are off today by 2. This is because we removed 2 cases that did not meet case definition. This causes our total cases count increase to be two less than our new cases count increase for the day.


The deaths we are announcing today were a 75-year-old male long-term care resident from Adair; a 73-year-old female long-term care resident from Adair, a 71-year-old male from Pulaski who had been hospitalized; and, 48-year-old male from Pulaski who had been hospitalized, who had been released from public health monitoring as non-contagious, but later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness.

 

I failed to mention it yesterday, but yesterday we experienced a record number of new cases, 288. Therefore, COVID-19 is still spreading freely through our communities at an alarming rate. So, please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 9,078 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 192,801 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 190,601 statewide plus 2,200 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

Gov. Beshear: Kentucky Surpasses 2,000 Deaths; 10% Positivity Rate

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Dec. 3, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced that Kentucky has surpassed 2,000 COVID-19 deaths and the positivity rate is now higher than 10%.

 

He also updated Kentuckians on the distribution plan for the commonwealth’s initial COVID-19 vaccine shipments. Long-term care residents and staff, as well as health care professionals, will be inoculated first.

 

“Today, we passed some tough milestones both in the country and here in Kentucky. Today is the toughest day our country has ever seen during the COVID-19 pandemic, as we lost more people than any other day this year. We’re also at record hospitalizations across America,” said Gov. Beshear. “This ought to show us and tell us that now, more than ever, we need to do the right things to protect those around us.”

 

In total, Kentucky is expected to receive 38,025 COVID-19 vaccine doses in the first round of shipments from the federal government. These doses are all for the initial vaccine; booster shots will be delivered approximately three weeks later. Both Pfizer and Moderna’s vaccines require an initial dose and a booster dose.

 

The Governor emphasized that the state’s total doses and the plan for where those will be distributed are subject to change.

 

“The initial allocation sites were chosen because they were large enough to handle 975 Pfizer doses; the CDC required they had to have ultra-low cold storage; they had to be completely enrolled as a COVID provider; and we wanted a good coverage area across Kentucky,” said Gov. Beshear. “We also looked at high-incident rate sites.”

 

The current planned allocation for 12,675 doses going to hospitals is: Lourdes Hospital (975), Pikeville Medical Center (975), University of Kentucky Hospital (1,950), Baptist Health Madisonville (975), Baptist Hospital Louisville (975), St. Elizabeth Healthcare Edgewood (975), Baptist Health Corbin (975), Baptist Health Lexington (975), Norton Hospital (1,950), Medical Center at Bowling Green (975) and University of Louisville Hospital (975).

 

In addition, 25,350 doses will go to CVS and Walgreens; the federal government has contracted with these companies to vaccinate long-term care residents and staff. All of the initial doses given to CVS and Walgreens will be used for this purpose.

 

“We are allowing each facility to make their own allocation decisions according to who they believe are tier one staff,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Vaccine providers still needing to enroll should fill out the form at kycovid19.ky.gov. The website includes the draft Kentucky vaccination plan, which includes a draft outline of our planning phases and critical populations.
 

The site also has a number of COVID-19 vaccine resources to help you and your family understand the COVID-19 vaccine as well as a CDC Vaccine Toolkit for Health care providers, labs and facilities.

 

Finally, the Governor today extended the state’s face coverings mandate for an additional 30 days.

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 3, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 3,895
  • New deaths today: 34
  • Positivity rate: 10.07%
  • Total deaths: 2,014
  • Currently hospitalized: 1,810
  • Currently in ICU: 415
  • Currently on ventilator: 240

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Hardin, Kenton, Boone and McCracken. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 683.


The 113 red zone counties for this week can be found here. Community leaders, businesses, schools and families in these counties should all follow red zone reduction recommendations, as well as other orders and guidance.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 65-year-old woman and two men, ages 63 and 69, from Barren County; an 86-year-old woman from Bell County; two women, ages 87 and 93, from Caldwell County; two women, ages 71 and 76, from Christian County; a 50-year-old man from Crittenden County; a 96-year-old woman from Daviess County; seven women, ages 65, 78, 87, 90, 94, 95 and 96, and two men, ages 81 and 93, from Fayette County; a 101-year-old woman from Graves County; a 64-year-old woman from Greenup County; a 69-year-old woman from Hickman County; two women, ages 82 and 94, from Jefferson County; a 62-year-old man from Marion County; a 94-year-old woman from McCracken County; a 76-year-old woman from Metcalfe County; a 91-year-old woman and an 88-year-old man from Oldham County; two women, ages 74 and 92, and two men, ages 84 and 88, from Warren County; and a 68-year-old man from Woodford County.

 

Memorial
This past weekend, Kentucky lost Arethia Tilford to COVID-19 after 25 days in the hospital. She was only 57 years old. Her husband of 22 years, Mark Tilford said, “Arethia was a queen.” He described her as the love of his life, and the most unselfish, charismatic person he’d ever met.

 

“She was the life of the party, and lifted up everyone who knew her. This was apparent as we heard from those who knew Arethia,” said Gov. Beshear. “As an attendance clerk at Lincoln Elementary Performing Arts School in Louisville, ‘Mrs. Arethia’ touched the lives of every child who walked through the school’s door. She always said ‘when you can’t find the sunshine, be the sunshine’ and she lived that through each day.

 

“Arethia is now looking over her husband and their two sons. Our thoughts and prayers are with them. We’re so thankful you shared your wife with so many people who were honored to know her.”

 

Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund
As of Thursday at 3 p.m. EST, 3,420 Kentuckians have applied for the $40 million Team Kentucky Food and Beverage Relief Fund, requesting $32.5 million. $4.2 million has already been disbursed.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate mapnew statewide requirements, testing locations, long-term care and other congregate facilities update, school reports and guidancered zone countiesred zone recommendations, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

New requirements impact restaurants, bars, social gatherings, indoor fitness and recreation centers, venues and theaters, professional services and schools. See the full executive orders here and here.


Audio public service announcements about the new requirements (created in partnership with RadioLex) are published here in: BosnianChineseEnglishJapaneseKoreanSpanishand Russian. Recorded summaries of the Governor’s Dec. 1 briefing are published here in: BosnianChineseEnglishFrenchJapaneseKoreanRussian and Spanish
 

AN ADAIR COUNTY MAN ARRESTED ON ARSON AND OTHER CHARGES IN RUSSELL COUNTY

An Adair County man was arrested on Arson and other charges early this morning by the Russell County Sheriff’s Office.

 

Dakota Sullivan age 27, of Columbia, was taken into custody by Deputy Pace and charged with Arson 1st Degree and 3 Counts of Wanton Endangerment – 1st Degree. He was lodged into the Russell County Detention Center.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 12-3-2020

 

Russell County 22 new cases Wednesday. We had 12 cases released from isolation. We now have 117 active cases which 113 cases are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized, 3 at Russell County Hospital and 1 at Somerset.

 

Adair County 23 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 15 cases. We have had 1,013 total cases with 871 of those released and 32 deaths. We have 110 active cases with 99 of those in home isolation and 11 in area hospitals.

3 New COVID-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District; 286 New Cases...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 9.62%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 3 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 134 deaths resulting in a 1.51% mortality rate (about 1 in 66) among known cases. This compares with a 1.06% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.97% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 96 cases* in the hospital. This is 11 more than yesterday. We have had a total of 557 hospitalizations resulting in a 6.28% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 16) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 5.46%. The latest state data shows that 86% of ICU beds and an unreported % of ventilator capacity are being utilized. (*This number is an estimation. Due to the high numbers, we only check with the hospitals on Fridays now. Therefore, the best time to see the most accurate hospital data will be in the Saturday News Brief.)

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 8,870 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 4.25% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 133 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 15; Casey: 5; Clinton: 7; Cumberland: 3; Green: 3; McCreary: 12; Pulaski: 42; Russell: 12; Taylor: 12; and, Wayne: 22. In all, we have released 85.4% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 150 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 1159 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 1