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Local News Archives for 2021-02

RUSSELL CO. SCAM ALERT!

 

Russell County citizens are urged to be aware of SOCIAL SECURITY SCAMS!

 

 

The Russell County Sheriffs Office has received numerous calls reporting they have been contacted by scammers who claim that local law enforcement have warrants for their arrest and want them to get money out of the bank and send to them via Visa Gift Cards or Western Union. PLEASE DO NOT FALL FOR THIS AND GIVE INTO GIVING THEM MONEY OR ANY PERSONAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOURSELF OR YOUR BANK. According to Sheriff Derek Polston, your money cannot be recovered and chances of getting anyone prosecuted is very slim. Please warn your elderly family members, friends, and neighbors about this and if you are contacted by one of these scammers, hang up immediately and call local law enforcement. 

 

COLUMBIA CITY COUNCIL MEETING 03/01/21

 

The Columbia City Council will hold a special called meeting on Monday, March 1, 2021 at 6:00pmCT at City Hall, 116 Campbellsville Street, Columbia, KY. Attendance will be limited, and the meeting will be livestreamed on YouTube: https://youtu.be/hmeI0df3Ab8.

AGENDA:

 

  • Roll Call
  • Opening Prayer
  • Pledge of Allegiance to the American Flag

 

  • 1st Item: Motion to Approve Minutes of the February 1, 2021 Special Called Meeting
     
  • 2nd Item: Representative from Campbell, Myers And Rutledge, Certified Public Accounts to present financial statements for fiscal year ending June 30th 2020
     
  • 3rd Item: Motion to Accept financial statements for FY ending 6/30/20 as presented

 

  • Mayor's Announcements
  • Council Comments
  • Motion to Adjourn

 

LCDHD COVID-19 REPORT - SATURDAY, FEB. 27, 2021

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.56%.

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 358 deaths resulting in a 1.77% mortality rate (about 1 in 56) among known cases. This compares with a 1.14% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.79% mortality rate at the national level.

Hospitalizations: We presently have 34 cases in the hospital. This is 1 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 1,116 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.5% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.73%. The latest data shows that 88.89% of Lake Cumberland's ICU beds are filled, and 27.42% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 20,273 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 9.71% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 53 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 8; Casey: 4; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 1; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 10; Russell: 11; Taylor: 14; and, Wayne: 2. In all, we have released 96.4% of our total cases.

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 17 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 366 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district's 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,342.

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Family, Businesses, Schools, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 5% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 36 today: Adair: 3; Casey: 1; Clinton: 1; Green: 1; McCreary: 13; Pulaski: 4; Russell: 3; Taylor: 5; and, Wayne: 5. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.003. This means our total case count is projected to double every 237.94 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today's new cases include:

  • Adair: A 8-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
  • Adair: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 68-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is released, 2/26/21;
  • McCreary: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is released, Asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We added 409 new cases this week compared to 371 last week. With the blizzard last week, there was not much COVID-19 testing compared to this week, so next week will give us a better picture of if our cases are actually going up, or continuing trend downwardly. We have 366 active cases today compared to 410 last Saturday. We experienced 3 deaths this week. We have 34 cases hospitalized today compared to 28 last Saturday.

Our district-wide 7-day average incidence rate today is 27.9 new cases per day compared to 25.3 last week. However, we do have 5 counties in the "orange-critical" range of community-spread: Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Pulaski, and Wayne; and 5 counties in the "red-critical" range of community-spread: Adair, Green, McCreary, Russell, and Taylor.

Please, let's all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding touching our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 20,273 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 404,479 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 403,947 statewide plus 532 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor's/Department for Public Health's daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread.

 

The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the COVID-19 guidance. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

RUSSELL CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED 02/28/21

 
The boil water advisory in Russell County related to the Hwy 127 and French Valley Road break in front of the high school has been lifted. All is clear. 
 

WEEKEND ARRESTS 02-28-21

 

  • Melvin Wooten, 62, of Columbia was arrested on Saturday by KSP Trooper Begley and charged with Speeding, DUI, Prescription Controlled Substance Not in Proper Container, Possession of Marijuana and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. He was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.
 
  • Ormit Gene Kelsey, 31, of Russell Springs, KY was arrested Friday night and charged with Receiving Stolen Property (Firearm), Menacing, Wanton Endangerment, and Resisting Arrest. Kelsey was lodged in the Pulaski Co. Detention Center.

Louisville Man Arrested in Columbia on Drug and Theft Charges...


Columbia Police were dispatched to a reported reckless driver on HWY 55 South coming into Columbia on Saturday afternoon. The vehicle was said to have nearly struck oncoming motorists as it proceeded into town. Officers made visual with the truck and trailer and initiated a stop at Dollar General Store on Jamestown Street before the truck could fully enter city limits. 

Upon making contact with the operator, it was determined the subject was under the influence and taken into custody. K9 Unit Matt was also utilized for a vehicle search. After running the vehicle and trailer information, both were shown to be reported stolen with the truck stolen from Bullitt County and the trailer stolen in Tennessee. 


Jasmin Vricic, 36, of Louisville is facing multiple traffic, and drug charges including DUI. He is also facing felony charges of wanton endangerment 1st degree, receiving stolen property over $10,000 and receiving stolen property under $10,000 for possessing truck and trailer. 


Officer Evan Burton was the arresting Officer. He was assisted on scene by Officer Drew Conn.
 

ADAIR CO. MAN ARRESTED ON SEX OFFENDER CHARGES ON FRIDAY....

 

Robert Jr. Allen, 46, of Columbia, KY was arrested this morning (Friday) by KSP and charged with Failure to Comply with Sex Offender Registry, Possess/View Matter Portraying Sexual Performance by a Minor, and for being a Persistent Felony Offender. 

 
Allen was lodged in the Adair Co. Regional Jail.
 

1,180 New Coronavirus Cases; 30 New Deaths....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 26, 2021) – On Friday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state’s positivity rate has decreased to 5.52%.

 

“I hope all of our Kentucky families have a great, safe weekend,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’re still not out of the woods with this horrible virus, but every week, we’re taking another step forward in our fight against it.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 26, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,180
New deaths today: 30

Positivity rate: 5.52%
Total deaths: 4,600
Currently hospitalized: 818
Currently in ICU: 218
Currently on ventilator: 105

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton and Boone. Each county reported at least 45 new cases. Jefferson County reported 216.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

The Governor also renewed his executive order requiring face coverings for another 30 days.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FROM LATE SATURDAY NIGHT THROUGH MONDAY MORNING...

 
* Multiple rounds of rainfall Friday and Saturday will help to
  saturate the soil before heavier rainfall moves into the area late
  Saturday night into Sunday. Rainfall totals of 2 to 3 inches with
  locally higher amounts will be possible across the Watch area.
 
* Heavy rainfall may cause excess runoff and localized flooding
  issues in the Watch area.
 
PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...
 
A Flood Watch means there is a potential for flooding based on
current forecasts. Those living in areas prone to flooding should be
prepared to take action should flooding develop.

 

 

1 New Covid-19 Death in Lake Cumb. District; Vaccine Appointments for Phase 1a & 1b begin Monday...

 
On Monday, March 1st, 2021 at 9:00 AM EST/8:00 AM CST we will be scheduling appointments for anyone in Phase 1a and 1b including those 70 and older. Despite the announcement that 1c appointments are now allowed in some areas, we have not completed the 1a and 1b population in THIS area and therefore will continue to ONLY be scheduling appointments for Phase 1a and 1b including those 70 and older at this time. Please do not call early and do not leave your information on our answering machine/voice mail. We are not presently keeping a waiting list. The numbers to call are listed below.
 
  • Adair: 270-384-2286
  • Casey: 606-787-6911
  • Clinton: 606-387-5711
  • Cumberland: 270-864-2206
  • Green: 2709324341
  • McCreary: 606-376-2412
  • Pulaski: 606-679-4416
  • Russell: 270-343-2181
  • Taylor: 270-465-4191
  • Wayne: 606-348-9349

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.67%.

 

Deaths: We regret we must report 1 new death today. We have experienced a total of 358 deaths resulting in a 1.77% mortality rate (about 1 in 56) among known cases. This compares with a 1.14% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.79% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 32 cases in the hospital. This is 3 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 1,113 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.51% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.7%. The latest data shows that 91.11% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 27.42% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 20,191 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 9.67% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 47 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 5; Clinton: 2; Cumberland: 2; Green: 4; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 13; Russell: 5; Taylor: 9; and, Wayne: 3. In all, we have released 96.3% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 7 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 388 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,342.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Schools, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 6% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 55 today: Adair: 5; Casey: 1; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 4; Green: 5; McCreary: 7; Pulaski: 13; Russell: 6; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 4. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.003. This means our total case count is projected to double every 220.63 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 11-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 8-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 45-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 82-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Green: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is released, 2/24/21;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 73-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 90-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 76-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic

 

The death we are reporting today is a 74-year-old male from McCreary who had been hospitalized, who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious, but latter succumbed to lasting complications from the illness.

 

For the district, we added fewer cases today than last Thursday, so our 7-day average incidence rate down slightly. However, for a few of our counties, the incidence rate went up. This resulted in our now only having 3 counties in the “orange-critical” range of community-spread: Casey, Pulaski, and Wayne and 7 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread: Adair, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, McCreary, Russell, and Taylor.

 

The Governor announced some more vaccine sites in our district. Tomorrow, we will confirm some information and then add them to our “Vaccination Sites” section below.

 

Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 20,191 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 402,380 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 401,750 statewide plus 630 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread.

 

The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the COVID-19 guidance. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-26-21

Russell County, 6 new cases Thursday. We had 5 cases released from isolation. We now have 56 active cases of which 53 cases are self-isolated and 3 cases are hospitalized,1 each at Bowling Green, Glasgow and UK.

 

Adair County, 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 5 cases. We have had 1,674 total cases with 1,588 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 37 active cases with 34 of those in home isolation. We have 3 case in the hospital at this time.

RUSSELL CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORIES 02/25/21

 
There is a Boil Water Advisory in Russell County on the following roads (and all side roads in between) starting on Hwy 127 at Baldett Road. From there, going north everything east of Highway 127 including Dowell Road down to Highway 80, going east on Highway 80 to the Casey County line including Hwy 910, Highway 76, Hwy 1383 and Hwy 1611. The advisory is due to the water main break on Hwy 127 and French Valley Road. This was worked on Wednesday, however there is now another break. The city of Russell springs  is working to bring in parts, equipment and personnel for these extensive repairs. If you have any questions, contact City Hall in Russell Springs.
 
----

Due to the the water main repairs on Highway 127 in front of the Russell County Middle School, there will be a boil water advisory for anyone who was without water yesterday (Wednesday). Because of the time frame of putting this back together, it allowed the water tanks to drop to low levels, leaving some without water. This boil water advisory will remain in place until further notice. Boil all water used for drinking & cooking purposes for at least 3 minutes.
 

1,447 New COVID-19 Cases in KY; 43 New Deaths....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 25, 2021) – On Thursday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced 119 new vaccination sites, bringing the state’s total number of vaccine providers to 410.

 

“Vaccinations are going incredibly well in Kentucky,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are giving out doses faster than the federal government provides them. More than 646,000 Kentuckians have received at least the first dose of their shot of hope less than a year after our first confirmed COVID-19 case.”

 

Six of the new locations are regional sites; three are federally qualified health centers; 10 are Walmart stores; 10 are Kroger stores; and 90 are Walgreens stores. New locations will be added to the ‘Where Can I Get Vaccinated?’ map on the vaccine.ky.gov website, also found here.

 

Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman also announced public transit agencies across the commonwealth are offering free or reduced-cost transportation to and from vaccine appointments.

 

These services are already operating in over 90 counties, covering 75% of all counties across Kentucky.

“We want all Kentuckians who wish to get vaccinated to be able to do so, and transportation should not be a barrier,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman.

 

Kentuckians can find transportation services near them by heading to kycovid19.ky.gov for a full list of participating public transit agencies and their phone numbers. Or, call the Kentucky COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline, 855-598-2246.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 25, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,447
New deaths today: 43

Positivity rate: 5.67%
Total deaths: 4,570
Currently hospitalized: 843
Currently in ICU: 220
Currently on ventilator: 122

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Caldwell, Fayette, Boone and Daviess. Each county reported at least 40 new cases. Jefferson County reported 220.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Unemployment Insurance Update
Today, Amy Cubbage, general counsel for Gov. Beshear, updated Kentuckians on progress assisting claimants, yesterday’s cyberattack on the unemployment insurance (UI) system, Bank of America debit cards and a new UI fraud form and webpage.

 

Feb. 25 Cyberattack
After a cyberattack Wednesday morning, Cubbage said the external unemployment system was back online at approximately 3:25 PM.

 

The Commonwealth Office of Technology has deployed reCaptcha Verification (or Completely Automated Public Turing Test to tell Computers and Humans Apart), a common web technique used to help ensure that respondents are real humans and not a program written to try to spam the system. Before the login process begins, claimants will now be asked to select the correct answers to a question via reCaptcha.

 

Bank of America Debit Cards
“If claimants still have Bank of America (BOA) debit cards, the funds must be spent off the cards no later than Feb. 28,” said Cubbage. “If you have funds on the debit card after Feb. 28, BOA will return those funds to the state and then unemployment staff will process them back out to you with a paper check.”

 

Fraud Form and Webpage Updated
People who believe their identity has been stolen can access a new fraud form online.

 

“If you have sent an email to our fraud box before today, we do not need you to fill out the form again. We are processing the messages as soon as we can in the order they are received,” said Cubbage. “If the impostors have filed a claim in Kentucky, they will most likely attempt to file claims in other states as well.”

 

There are several recommendations on the Kentucky Career Center website for Kentuckians who believe their identity has been stolen. The Beshear administration is working with law enforcement partners to prosecute criminals committing fraud. Cubbage said she expects to see prosecution on a local, state and national level.

 

Kentucky Broadband Initiative
Lt. Gov. Coleman updated Kentuckians on the 30-second, anonymous broadband speed test.

 

“We need every single Kentuckian to go to speedtest.ky.gov to take the speed test which will give us data we need to build a map across Kentucky of the high and low points of internet connectivity,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “Our goal is to connect every Kentucky household that we possibly can to affordable, reliable internet.”

 

Lt. Gov. Coleman said the state needed help increasing responses in Lexington and Louisville. The deadline has been extended to March 1. More than 72,000 Kentuckians have participated in the test so far.

 

Kentucky to Receive Nearly $200 Million in Federal Child Care Aid
Over 2,000 licensed child care centers and family child care homes in Kentucky will potentially benefit from federal funding received earlier this month totaling $195.5 million for child care aid, an appropriation of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act and the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021.

 

Components of the funding include sustainment payments for regulated child care programs; the cost of fingerprint background checks for child care providers; training and technical assistance on safe and healthy work environments, and the cost of parent copayments for families benefitting from subsidies.

 

“We are in the process of building a child care system that works for every Kentucky family, and this is a huge step toward reaching our future goals,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman.

 

Gov. Beshear Announces $5.9 Million in Tobacco Settlement Funds to Kentucky Farms
Lt. Gov. Coleman said Gov. Beshear and Energy and Environment Cabinet Secretary Rebecca Goodman today announced that the Kentucky Soil and Water Conservation Commission has selected 592 Kentucky farm projects in 86 counties to receive a total of $5,920,643 in tobacco settlement funds.

 

The money will be used to promote practices that protect water quality and prevent soil erosion. Projects include watering facilities to offer alternative water sources for livestock, grassed waterways, fencing to facilitate rotational grazing and cover crops.

 

“It is Future Farmers of America, or FFA, Week, so I am particularly excited to share this really good agricultural news today,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “The Beshear-Coleman administration is proud to continue this work bringing resources and support to rural Kentucky. We understand how vital local farms are to Kentucky’s economy and we’re helping keep them productive for generations to come.”

 

KSP Post 15 Investigates Fatal Collision In Metcalfe County


Edmonton, KY (February 25, 2021) On Wednesday, February 24th, 2021 at approximately 11:45 AM Kentucky State Police Post 15 was notified of a 2-vehicle injury collision that occurred 2 miles south of Summer Shade at the intersection of KY 163 and Apple Grove Rd. 

 
Preliminary investigations indicate that 86-year-old Jack Gibbins of Summer Shade was operating a 2008 GMC south bound when he turned left into the path of a 1992 north bound Chevy S10, operated by 67-year-old Jackie Emberton of Tompkinsville, KY. Emberton was unable to avoid the collision and struck Gibbons in the passenger side.
 
Emberton was not wearing a seat belt and was pronounced deceased at the scene by the Metcalfe County Coroner. Gibbons and a passenger in his vehicle, 80-year-old Martha Gibbons of Summer Shade, KY were both wearing a seatbelt. Jack Gibbons was airlifted to Vanderbilt University Hospital where he is listed in critical condition. Martha Gibbons was admitted to T.J. Sampson hospital in Glasgow, KY. 
 
The collision remains under investigation by Trooper Jason Warinner. 
 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 2-25-21


Russell County: 5 new cases Wednesday. We had 8 cases released from isolation. We now have 55 active cases of which 52 cases are self-isolated and 3 cases are hospitalized, 1 each at Bowling Green, Glasgow and UK.

 

Adair County: 6 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 11 cases. We have had 1,669 total cases with 1,583 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 37 active cases with 34 of those in home isolation. We have 3 case in the hospital at this time.

RUSSELL CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY 02/24/21

 
There is a Boil Water Advisory in Russell Springs, KY on Baldett Road due to the water main repairs on Highway 127. Boil all water used for drinking & cooking purposes for at least 3 minutes until further notice!
 

1,306 New COVID-19 Cases & 51 New Deaths...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 24, 2021) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state’s positivity rate has declined to 5.9%, the lowest since Oct. 27.

 

“We are getting these vaccines out faster than the federal government can provide them, so there’s a lot of hope moving into the future,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are going to defeat this virus this year, but until then, we’ve got to protect each other.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 24, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,306
New deaths today: 51

Positivity rate: 5.9%
Total deaths: 4,527
Currently hospitalized: 883
Currently in ICU: 228
Currently on ventilator: 112

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette and Kenton. Each county reported at least 50 new cases. Jefferson County reported 173.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

91 New Coronavirus Cases in Lake Cumberland District; No New Deaths


By Amy Tomlinson
Lake Cumberland District Health Department


We added more cases today than last Tuesday, so our 7-day average incidence rate went up. We still have 5 counties in the "orange-critical" range of community-spread: Casey, Clinton, McCreary, Pulaski, and Wayne. We have 5 counties are in the "red-critical" range of community-spread: Adair, Cumberland, Green, Russell, and Taylor.

Schools have moved back into second place for the most common place visited before a positive case is isolated. While the kids are the least likely to get sick from the virus, and while the staff are in the vaccination process, there is concern that community-spread will happen between the kids at school and then from the kids to their parents and grandparents, then to work and church. The bottom-line, we shouldn't become cavilier with following the guidance.

While more and more vaccine sites are opening in our area and more and more vaccine is flowing in, until the vaccine is widely available, let's all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding touching our faces.

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 6.3%.

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 352 deaths resulting in a 1.75% mortality rate (about 1 in 57) among known cases. This compares with a 1.12% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.78% mortality rate at the national level.

Hospitalizations: We presently have 42 cases in the hospital. This is 3 less than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 1,108 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.52% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.7%. The latest data shows that 88.89% of Lake Cumberland's ICU beds are filled, and 30.65% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 20,067 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 9.61% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 88 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 7; Casey: 3; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 2; McCreary: 13; Pulaski: 15; Russell: 18; Taylor: 21; and, Wayne: 4. In all, we have released 96.3% of our total cases.

Active (Current) Cases: We added 3 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 393 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district's 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,342.

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 8% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 91 today: Adair: 10; Casey: 4; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 2; Green: 5; McCreary: 5; Pulaski: 36; Russell: 9; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 7. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.003. This means our total case count is projected to double every 223.37 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today's new cases include:

  • Adair: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Adair: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Casey: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Clinton: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • Cumberland: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • Green: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Green: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 20-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • McCreary: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is released, Resolved;
  • Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 96-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 61-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 68-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 3M-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Pulaski: A 80-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
  • Russell: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Russell: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 24-year-old male who is released, Resolved;
  • Taylor: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
  • Wayne: A 11-year-old male who is released, 2/22/21


The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 20,067 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 399,683 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 399,013 statewide plus 670 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor's/Department for Public Health's daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released.
 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the COVID-19 guidance. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 2-24-21

 

Russell County: 9 new cases Tuesday. We had 18 cases released from isolation. We now have 58 active cases of which 55 cases are self-isolated and 3 cases are hospitalized, 1 each at Bowling Green, Glasgow and UK.

 

Adair County: 10 new COVID19 cases to report Tuesday. We released 7 cases yesterday.  We have had 1,663 total cases with 1,572 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 42 active cases with 38 of those in home isolation. We have 4 case in the hospital at this time.

4 RUSSELL COUNTY DRUG ARRESTS


Russell County Sheriff Derek Polston released a statement on a Drug Trafficking Search Warrant executed by members of the Russell County Sheriff’s Office and Kentucky State Police on Tuesday night at 1102 Jericho Road. 

 

Arrested on Trafficking in Methamphetamine 1st Degree (2nd or more offense), Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree 3rd offense (Drug unspecified), and Possession of Marijuana and Drug Paraphernalia charges were Marvin Owens, 36, Randy Copley, 49, and April Weston, 37. Copley and Weston were additionally charged with outstanding indictment warrants on Drug and Parole Violations. Arvin Stargell was also arrested on an outstanding warrant at the scene.

 

Deputy Kenny Perkins is the investigating Officer and was assisted at the scene by other members of the Russell County Sheriff’s Office and Kentucky State Trooper Billy Begley. The investigation is continuing and will be presented to a Russell County Grand Jury.

 

If you suspect illegal drugs being sold in your Neighborhood, contact the Russell County Sheriff’s Office Drug/Wanted Persons Tip-Line at 270-343-8116. All callers will remain anonymous.

 

ADAIR COUNTY FISCAL COURT MEETING RECAP


It was a short meeting last night for county leaders as the Adair County Fiscal Court held their regular monthly meeting. 

 

County Judge Gayle Cowan tells Jim Lieb with WAVE NEWS what took place... 

 

 

RCHS & RCMS ALL VIRTUAL ON WEDNESDAY...

 
Russell County School Superintendent Michael Ford says Russell County High School and Middle School will remain virtual on Wednesday, February 24, 2021 due to water line repairs. Elementary schools will be in-person.
 

RUSSELL CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY FEB. 23, 2021

 
There is a Boil Water Advisory on Milton Heights Road in Russell Springs until further notice. The advisory was issued Tuesday afternoon due to a water main break. Boil all water used for drinking & cooking purposes for at least 5 minutes.

 

 

T.J. Health Columbia Scheduling Phase 1A & 1B Appointments for Friday, Feb. 26th...

 

T.J. Regional Health is still accepting appointments for the COVID-19 vaccine to be given this Friday, February 26th at the V.F.W. Building at 500 Greenhills Road for Phase 1A – Healthcare Workers and for Phase 1B – people 70 years of age or older. If you are a healthcare worker or age 70 or older and would like to receive your first vaccine dose, please call the T.J. Regional Health vaccine hotline at 270-659-1010 to schedule your appointment for Friday, February 26th.

 

Gov. Beshear Recommends Schools Return to Some Form of In-Person Learning March 1

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 23, 2021) – On Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced he is issuing a new executive order that recommends all school districts, including private schools, offer or expand some form of in-person instructional opportunities beginning March 1.

 

If district personnel have not yet finished their vaccine series as of March 1, the executive order recommends some form of in-person instruction begin seven days after they have received their second vaccination.

 

“What we foresaw is that the safest way to expand in-person opportunities is to vaccinate all of our school personnel,” said Gov. Beshear. “Since then, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and others have moved that way and other states have followed our lead.”

 

Lt. Gov. Coleman said the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) issued a comprehensive, 136-page manual, KDE COVID-19 Guidance 2.0, which will assist with the shift back into school buildings.

 

“Kentucky continues to be a national leader in vaccinating our school staff, and getting our kids back in the classroom safely remains a top priority for every Kentuckian – from the Governor to our littlest learners,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman.

 

“With this guidance, we hope to make the transition back to in-person learning as smooth and safe as possible.”

 

Lt. Gov. Coleman said the manual advises schools on planning school-related student travel; administering spring state testing; operating schools after teachers and staff are vaccinated; assessing knowledge gaps caused by the pandemic’s impact on learning; and using second round Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Funding.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 23, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,497
New deaths today: 16

Positivity rate: 6.3%
Total deaths: 4,476
Currently hospitalized: 894
Currently in ICU: 242
Currently on ventilator: 121

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Boone, Laurel and Kenton. Each county reported at least 60 new cases. Jefferson County reported 208.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

The Governor said today’s positivity rate is the state’s lowest since Nov. 4.

 

He also reminded Kentuckians that regional vaccination sites will begin accepting Phase 1C appointments March 1.

 

“Remember, there’s a lot of people in 1C, so it’s going to feel like it’s really hard to get an appointment in the beginning,” said Gov. Beshear. “But our supply is increasing and we will get to you. Hang in there.”

 

Kentucky Kingdom and Herschend Family Entertainment Announce New Partnership
The Governor’s chief of staff, La Tasha Buckner, said Gov. Beshear joined Herschend Enterprises Chief Executive Officer Andrew Wexler, state officials and community leaders this morning to announce that Herschend Enterprises has become a majority partner and operator of Kentucky Kingdom and Hurricane Bay amusement and water park located in Louisville.

 

Georgia-based Herschend is the nation’s largest family-owned theme attractions and entertainment company. Herschend operates popular tourism attractions such as the Dollywood Parks & Resorts in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. and the Newport Aquarium in Northern Kentucky. To learn more, see the full release.

 

State Hiring 12 New Conservation Officers
Buckner said applications are now being accepted for 12 conservation officer positions with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. Kentucky’s conservation officers are sworn law enforcement officers with statewide jurisdiction and have a primary mission to focus on hunting, fishing and boating laws.

 

The department seeks prospective conservation officers who reflect the diversity of all citizens of the commonwealth, including those who enjoy hunting, fishing and recreational boating in Kentucky. Interested applicants must be 21 years old, possess a valid driver’s license and submit a complete online application for each county of interest.

 

The deadline to apply is 7 p.m. (EST) on March 5. Visit personnel.ky.gov for more information.

 

New Coldstream Campus Research Lab to Support Early Stage, High-Tech Companies
Today, Buckner also said Gov. Beshear congratulated the University of Kentucky and its partners on breaking ground for a high-tech building at UK’s Coldstream Research Campus, a $15 million development to provide office and laboratory space for early stage, high-tech companies.

 

Known as “The Core – Collaboration. Research. Entrepreneurship.” the new facility will be an entry-level resource for companies looking to locate on the research campus. The project is supported by a $500,000 matching grant through the Product Development Initiative, a statewide investment program created to help communities supplement site or building improvement projects. To learn more, see the full release.

 

Flags Lowered in Honor of 500,000 Americans Lost to COVID-19
Yesterday, in accordance with a proclamation from the White House, Gov. Beshear directed that flags at all state office buildings be lowered to half-staff until sunset on Friday, Feb. 26, to commemorate the milestone of more than 500,000 American lives lost to COVID-19. 

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-23-21

 

Russell County, 12 new cases Monday. We had 10 cases released from isolation. We now have 67 active cases of which 61 cases are self-isolated and 6 cases are hospitalized, 1 each at Glasgow, Bowling Green, Danville, UK and 2 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County, 7 new COVID19 cases to report Monday. We released 13 cases yesterday.  We have had 1,653 total cases with 1,565 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 39 active cases with 35 of those in home isolation. We have 4 case in the hospital at this time.

ADAIR COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING RECAP...

 

Here's Adair County School Superintendent Dr. Pamela Stephens with details on Monday evenings school board meeting...

 

 

Gov. Beshear Announces Sixth Straight Week of Declining COVID-19 Cases

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 22, 2021) – On Monday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced COVID-19 cases have declined for six straight weeks in the commonwealth.

He also reported the lowest number of new COVID-19 cases since Oct. 5.

 

“The trends are going in a positive direction, perhaps the most positive since the pandemic began,” said Gov. Beshear. “What that means is that we’re doing a good job. Do I think that vaccines are starting to have an impact? Certainly in the long-term care community.

 

Hopefully we’ll see more of it in the overall state. But we’re seeing more people wearing masks, engaging in social distancing, thinking about the number of contacts they have in their day, and it is working.”

 

The Governor announced that regional vaccination sites will open to Kentuckians in Phase 1C beginning March 1, and he expects other vaccination sites to move into Phase 1C around the same time.

 

Gov. Beshear encouraged all vaccine sites to continue prioritizing Phase 1A and 1B individuals, even as 1C appointments are made as well. He asked all providers to continue outreach to vulnerable Kentuckians who may have a harder time navigating the vaccine sign-up system.

 

More than 583,000 Kentuckians have received at least their first dose of the vaccine.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, updated Kentuckians on the federal pharmacy program for COVID-19 vaccines.

 

“The good news is, we have wildly expanded our vaccine provider network in a very short time frame,” said Dr. Stack. “As of today, we have 47 independent pharmacies and 77 Walgreens pharmacies across the state participating in this program to help get vaccines to Kentuckians right in their local communities. We are going to continue to move progressively faster, getting closer and closer to where you live.”

 

Finally, the Governor highlighted a tragic milestone in the nation’s war against COVID-19.

 

“This country has now lost more than 500,000 Americans to the coronavirus. It is an almost unimaginable loss. While we have good news about the direction things are going, we’re going to emerge from this with a lot of scars inside and out,” said Gov. Beshear. “Let’s all remember that we’ve got to love one another and be patient with one another through that.

 

While I hope that we are months away from the end of this virus, it’s going to take a little longer to process our collective grief.”

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 22, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 530
New deaths today: 13
Positivity rate: 6.6%
Total deaths: 4,460
Currently hospitalized: 870
Currently in ICU: 243
Currently on ventilator: 119

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Oldham, Campbell and Kenton. Each county reported at least 20 new cases. Jefferson County reported 95.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Governor and First Lady Launch Team Kentucky Gallery
On Monday, First Lady Britainy Beshear invited Kentuckians to lend their artistic talents to a new Team Kentucky Gallery, which will be located in a main hall of the state Capitol in Frankfort. The gallery will feature art in six-month installments.

 

The deadline to submit artwork for the first installment is May 15. For more information, see the full release.

 

“The Capitol is the peoples’ house, and there is no better place to highlight Kentuckians’ voices represented through art,” said First Lady Beshear. “We want to make sure Kentuckians across the commonwealth see their stories and communities represented. This exhibit is by Team Kentucky, for Team Kentucky, just as it should be.”

 

$40 Million in Federal Emergency Relief Funding to Non-Public Schools
Today, First Lady Beshear announced that Gov. Beshear has authorized the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) to administer $40,817,799 in emergency assistance to non-public schools for reimbursement of COVID-19 related costs or to provide COVID-19 related services.

 

The U.S. Department of Education has allocated this funding to Kentucky for emergency assistance that must be directed to non-public schools. All non-public schools may apply to the state for reimbursement or for services through the recently authorized Emergency Assistance to Non-Public Schools under the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief Fund. More information will be available soon on the KDE website.

 

$4.6 Million in Grants Expand Treatment and Recovery Services for Opioid Use Disorders
Today, First Lady Beshear and Gov. Beshear along with the Office of Drug Control Policy (ODCP) and the Kentucky Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities announced that a total of $4,645,070 has been awarded to 12 nonprofit organizations throughout the commonwealth.

 

The total grant funding has been distributed among Community Mental Health Centers and Neonatal Abstinence Treatment Programs from the Senate Bill 192 Treatment Grant which is administered by ODCP.


The grant awards are primarily focused on addressing Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome by offering comprehensive residential treatment services to pregnant and parenting women. To learn more, see the full release.

 

Virginia Moore Access Award
Today, First Lady Beshear also announced a special recognition for Team Kentucky’s primary American Sign Language interpreter, Virginia Moore, who is executive director of the Kentucky Commission on the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

 

“Our very own Virginia Moore has been honored for demonstrating her dedication to advocating for the deaf and hard of hearing community in Kentucky,” said First Lady Beshear. “The award, properly named the Virginia Moore Access Award, is presented by the Kentucky Educators for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing here in Kentucky.”

 

Indoor Visitation Resumes for Some Long-Term Care Facilities
Today, Gov. Beshear reminded Kentuckians that indoor visitation has resumed for non-Medicare-certified facilities that have been through the vaccination process.

 

Those facilities include assisted living facilities, personal care homes, intermediate care facilities for individuals with intellectual disabilities and independent living facilities. They do not include Medicare-certified skilled nursing facilities at this time because, for those facilities, the federal government would also need to waive restrictions.

 

Memorial
“Today, we share the loss of Gladys Bass, who passed away from COVID-19 on Feb. 10 at the age of 94. Her death came just eight weeks after her soulmate and husband of 74 years, Lewis ‘Sonny’ Bass, passed away from the virus,” said Gov. Beshear. “His loss left her heartbroken.

 

“Gladys was born in Lexington and was the youngest of eight children. She attended the University of Kentucky before meeting Sonny in Cincinnati. It was love at first sight, and they decided to build a beautiful life together. 

“She effortlessly managed a busy household while encouraging Sonny throughout his many endeavors in life. When Sonny and his partners started Heritage House Nursing Home in 1961, the predecessor of Humana, you could find Gladys mopping floors, vacuuming or working the front desk to help get their first nursing home open. 

 

“Gladys was the sweetest, most caring and loving woman, the matriarch that kept the foundation of the Bass family strong. Her friends and family always knew how much they were loved. 
 

“Gladys’ loving spirit, beautiful smile and unending patience blessed this world for 94 years, and we are all better for it. She taught her family to love unconditionally, live life to the fullest and eat a piece of chocolate at every meal. We will mask up for Gladys, for Sonny and for every beloved Kentuckian lost to this horrible virus.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, information on testing locationsvaccinescontact tracingschool reports and guidanceguidance for health care providersand the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

WAVE POLAR REPORT (CANCELLATIONS) - MON, FEB. 22nd.

Sponsored by: Jack and Jack Insurance in Jamestown, Barger Insurance in Columbia, and Napa Auto Parts in Russell Springs, Columbia and Campbellsville... 

 

  • Russell and Adair County School all  Virtual 
  • Russell Springs and Jamestown Headstart - Closed

CHURCH SERVICE CANCELLATIONS - SUNDAY, FEB. 21, 2021

 
No Services today (SUNDAY, FEB. 21st) at the following churches due to weather conditions.....
 
  • New Hope Separate Baptist Church
  • Temple Hill Community Church (Pastor Phillip Miller)
  • Columbia Church of God

Gov. Beshear Provides Update on COVID-19

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 19, 2021) – On Friday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced nearly 2,000 cases of COVID-19, but said the state’s positivity rate has decreased to 6.89%.

 

“Overall, our COVID-19 numbers are coming down, which is great news – but we can’t let our guard down when we’re this close to finishing the fight,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 19, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,993
New deaths today: 28

Positivity rate: 6.89%
Total deaths: 4,401
Currently hospitalized: 923
Currently in ICU: 265
Currently on ventilator: 131

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton and Boone. Each county reported at least 80 new cases. Jefferson County reported 466.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

A Nancy woman was taken into custody last evening by the Kentucky State Police on several Charges.

Just after 8:30 last night Danna Konkle  was taken into custody by Trooper Thompson with the state police and charged with Speeding 20 mph over the limit, Wanton Endangerment-1st Degree-Police Officer, Fleeing or Evading Police, 1st Degree (motor vehicle), Operating Motor Vehicle Under the Influence Alcohol/Substance 1st Aggravated Circumstance, Resisting Arrest, Terroristic Threatening, 1st Degree, Failure to Wear Seat Belts, Failure of Owner to Maintain required Insurance, Failure to Produce Insurance Card, Assault 3rd Degree-Police Officer. She was lodged into the Pulaski County Detention Center.

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-19-21

Russell County, 10 new cases Thursday. We had 29 cases released from isolation. We now have 82 active cases of which 77 cases are self-isolated and 5 cases are  hospitalized, 1 each at Bowling Green, Danville, UK and 2 at Russell County Hospital.

 

           Adair County, 10 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 11 cases. We have had 1,630 total cases with 1,545 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 36 active cases with 34 of those in home isolation. We have 2 case in the hospital at this time.

Gov. Beshear Announces 28 New COVID-19 Vaccination Sites, 291 Total Sites

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 18, 2021) – On Thursday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state is opening an additional 28 vaccination sites, for a total of 291 sites across the commonwealth.

 

“There is now a provider that has vaccine close to where everybody lives in the commonwealth,” said Gov. Beshear. “There are some areas where you might have to drive just a little bit further, but we continue to add new sites for greater convenience. In many ways, we wish you could just call one number to sign up, but we are building for the future so there will be many sites available when vaccine supply increases to what we need.”

 

Kentuckians can see a list of all new vaccination sites here. To see a map of all regional vaccination sites, click here. For more information, go to vaccine.ky.gov or kycovid19.ky.gov/ky-covid-vaccine.

 

The Governor also updated Kentuckians on visitation protocols in some of the state’s long-term care facilities that will take effect Saturday, Feb. 20.

 

“Indoor visitation will resume for non-Medicare-certified facilities that have been through the vaccination process: that includes assisted living facilities, personal care homes, intermediate care facilities for individuals with intellectual disabilities and independent living facilities,” the Governor said. “Group activities, communal dining and visitation amongst vaccinated residents will resume.”

 

Cabinet for Health and Family Services inspector general Adam Mather added, “I want to thank residents and their families for their patience during this pandemic. It’s been a long journey and it’s exciting to be able to relax some restrictions. I want to reiterate that this relaxation only applies to facilities that are not Medicare-certified at this time. Thanks to Walgreens and CVS for their quick vaccination efforts to make this happen.”

 

Visitors must schedule with the facility ahead of time. Up to two visitors (if from the same household) can visit a resident at one time. Visitors need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours of the visit or of a COVID-19 vaccination. Detailed guidance will be posted here tomorrow.

 

Case Information 
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 18, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 963
New deaths today: 37
Positivity rate: 7.07%
Total deaths: 4,373
Currently hospitalized: 935
Currently in ICU: 260
Currently on ventilator: 130

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Laurel, Christian and Kenton. Each county reported at least 30 new cases.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Winter Storm Update
Today, Gov. Beshear, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) Secretary Jim Gray and Kentucky Division of Emergency Management Director Michael Dossett updated Kentuckians on winter storm safety.

 

“Kentuckians have pulled together during these three winter storms. We have now restored power to more than half of the Kentucky customers who lost it – that’s substantial progress, but a lot more work needs to be done,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are a tough people, we’ve been through this before and we’re going to make it because we take care of one another.”

 

“The State Emergency Operations Center remains at a Level 3. There are 39 community warming centers now open, as well as seven shelters,” said Director Dossett. “We caught a glancing blow overnight with some additional snow and sleet, but better times are coming our way. Temperatures will be bitterly cold tonight and tomorrow but are warming for the weekend.”

 

“Precipitation has let up in most places, allowing our crews and contractors to make real progress on clearing roadways. In Eastern Kentucky, work continues to clear fallen trees and power lines,” said Secretary Gray. “We’re on the lookout for freezing drizzle today and overnight. That’s one of the most treacherous forms of winter weather. We urge the public to continue to limit travel and to be patient when they are on the roads.”

 

To help Kentucky families impacted by the storm, Secretary Gray has extended his official order temporarily lifting some restrictions on commercial vehicles delivering aid to affected areas.

 

For snow and ice updates and resources, visit snowky.ky.gov. For updates on roadway conditions, visit goky.ky.gov.

 

If Kentuckians lose power, they should call their utility company.

 

Never use a generator inside your home or garage, even if doors and windows are open. Only use generators outside, more than 20 feet away from your home, doors and windows. Never use an outdoor grill, a gas stovetop or oven to heat your home.

 

Unemployment Insurance Update
Today, Amy Cubbage, general counsel to Gov. Beshear, updated Kentuckians on unemployment insurance (UI).

 

“From the beginning of the pandemic through Dec. 31, we can tell you that we now have 82% of those claims that we received paid. About 10% of those claims are still pending, but the vast majority of those are from the last quarter of the year,” said Cubbage. “While we won’t rest until every claim is resolved, this is great progress in light of us receiving 1.6 million claims from about 650,000 people through the end of 2020.”

 

Bank of America Debit Cards
“Claimants who did not change their method of payment from debit card to direct deposit in their UI account were moved on Feb. 1 to receive their benefits by paper checks that will arrive in the mail,” Cubbage said.

 

  • If you received a paper check and believe you should not have received a check, please send that check back to: Office of Unemployment Insurance, Attention: BPC, 500 Mero Street, 4thFloor Frankfort, KY 40601
  • Include your name, contact information such as phone number and email address and a message that you never filed for UI.
  • Claimants who still have UI debit cards are reminded that the funds must be spent off the cards no later than Feb. 28.
  • Funds on the debit card after Feb. 28 will be returned to the state and then UI staff will process them back out to claimants in the form of a paper check.

 

Increased Fraud on Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) Claims 
“New measures have been put in place to help slow down the increased fraud claims we are receiving,” said Cubbage.

 

  • All PUA out-of-state claims have a stop on them until they can be verified.
  • UI staff are updating the office’s fraud form and fraud information page on the Kentucky Career Center website in the next week so that people who believe to have their identity stolen can access the form online.

 

“For these situations, staff put a stop on the claim due to fraud which stops the claim from processing any further,” Cubbage said. “After staff have reviewed the information, they will communicate to the person who had the claim filed against them. You will see prosecution on a local, state and national level in the coming months against the people committing fraud.”

 

New User-Friendly Interface Tested Yesterday
“UI information technology staff have been working tirelessly on a new claimant experience for the UI system,” Cubbage said. “A group of selected claimants tested the new interface yesterday and will be giving us feedback. Once the feedback is received and possible changes made we will launch this new application.”

 

This is not a new UI system, but an enhancement to the welcome screens the user sees when they first log on to their account to make it more user friendly. Proposals are currently being reviewed for a new UI system.

 

Virtual Appointments
“We make every effort during the time you are scheduled to contact you,” said Cubbage. “Our rule is, we call the claimant based on the phone number on their UI claim. If they do not answer the call, we will try the number they made the appointment with, and we also email the claimant.

 

“We then ask the claimant to email the staff person back before end of business day so that we can reach you and address your concern. If UI staff are unable to reach claimants, they will need to make another appointment. We make three attempts: two phone calls and one email.”

 

Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund
Today, Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman updated Kentuckians on the new $264 million Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund.

 

“We are nearly a year into the COVID-19 pandemic and, sadly, many Kentuckians are still grappling with its economic effects,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “This fund is a program in partnership with Kentucky Housing Corporation and is utilizing a portion of the $297 million in federal Coronavirus Relief Funds the commonwealth recently received.”

 

For 118 Kentucky counties, go to teamkyhherf.ky.gov.

 

If you live in Fayette County, go to covid19renterhelp.org to apply.

 

If you are a Jefferson County resident, visit stopmyeviction.org.

 

Tenants applying through the Team Kentucky portal can request assistance with rent dating back to April 2020 and for three months of future payments. They can also get help paying utility bills, up to 12 months of past-due bills and three months of future payments.

 

“These programs will provide significant relief for Kentuckians and help with bills into the future. We need both the landlord and the tenant to apply online,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “There are some federal guidelines that both renters and landlords must meet. Those details are on the website, teamkyhherf.ky.gov. Last year, Team Kentucky helped 4,135 households avoid eviction with nearly $15 million in assistance. This year, we want to do more.

 

“I received a story about a family from Clark County that was helped last year. Like many Kentuckians, they had their work hours cut back dramatically. They have a son with special needs and a parent battling cancer which made things much more difficult. They said they had no clue how they were going to pay bills. She said,

 

‘I remember on the day I found out I got funds, I cried. It was amazing. It was like a weight had been lifted off me. It was life-changing for us. We were really struggling. It is hard when you have to decide between food and paying rent.’”

 

To date, more than 8,500 people have started their applications, and more than 4,700 have completed the application process – that includes more than 3,000 tenants and more than 1,700 landlords.

 

Those with completed applications have requested more than $4.1 million in rental assistance and more than $1.1 million in utility assistance.

 

Special Open Health Care Enrollment
“We believe that access to health insurance is a right for every Kentuckian. Expanded health care has helped us to have fewer COVID-19 deaths per capita than most states,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “President Biden signed an executive order that activated a special three-month health care enrollment period, which started Feb. 15 and will last until May 15. The Special Enrollment Period is for Americans to get quality, affordable health care coverage through their state’s health insurance marketplace.”

 

Kentucky residents currently uninsured may qualify for financial help to pay for health coverage or free coverage through Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

 

Kentuckians may get help with enrolling in several ways:

 

  • Visit HealthCare.gov and submit an application, or update an application that has already been started.
  • Visit kynect.ky.gov, a one-stop portal for finding health coverage and other benefits.
  • Kentuckians may also call 855-459-6328 for assistance.
  • And lastly, another option is contacting a health insurance agent currently licensed in Kentucky.


Kentucky Broadband Initiative
“Closing the digital divide is critical for economic development, education and creating the jobs of the future right here in Kentucky,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman. “I am happy to report that we have registered over 61,000 broadband speed tests so far. In order to get as many people from across Kentucky to take this test, we are extending the deadline to March 1.”

 

The speed test takes 30 seconds and is completely anonymous. This data will highlight areas in the commonwealth most in need of broadband.

Visit speedtest.ky.gov to take the test.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, information on testing locationsvaccinescontact tracingschool reports and guidanceguidance for health care providersand the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Gov. Beshear Provides Update on Winter Storm Impacts

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 18, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear said Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) crews worked overnight and into this morning to maintain mobility along critical routes across the state following the third winter storm to strike the commonwealth in a week.

 

More than half of customers impacted by power outages in Eastern Kentucky have had power restored.

 

“State road crews and contractors have been focusing on high-priority routes, and in some areas they are tackling secondary routes as well,” Gov. Beshear said. “In Eastern and Northeastern Kentucky especially, the challenge of clearing roads continues to be made more difficult by downed trees and power lines. Electricity has been restored to approximately 85,000 customers after outages peaked at 154,000. That’s substantial progress, but much work remains to be done until power is restored to every Kentuckian who has been impacted.”

 

Today, KYTC Secretary Jim Gray extended an official order that temporarily suspends certain restrictions on commercial vehicles engaged in relief efforts, including utility trucks and carriers delivering fuel and other supplies to the stricken area. The extension runs to Feb. 28.

 

The Governor said the State Emergency Operations Center is currently activated at Level 3, supporting the power outage response and the winter storm recovery. As of Thursday morning, 51 counties and 31 cities have declared states of emergency.

 

Weather Update

  • Multiple rounds of wintry weather crossed Kentucky overnight and will continue in some areas of the state today, tapering off later tonight.
  • Kentucky has received snow, sleet, freezing rain and cold rain through this system.
  • Frostbite and hypothermia can occur if people are outdoors for extended periods of time, especially in single-digit temperatures.
  • Winter storm warnings and advisories are still current for Kentucky. To learn more, click here. Click here to view the National Weather Service forecast provided at 5 a.m. EST.

 

Power Outages

  • There are widespread outages across Eastern and Sortheastern Kentucky. As of noon EST, there were 70,249 Kentucky customers without power, with numerous counties reporting downed trees.
  • Power has been restored to approximately 85,000 customers after outages peaked at more than 154,000.
  • Power outages have also impacted traffic signals. Treat dark signals as four-way stops.
  • Clearing downed trees is an ongoing task in impacted areas. Division of Forestry crews are out in high-impact areas. Kentucky National Guard teams are on standby to assist the Forestry crews to remove cut debris. 
  • Tomorrow afternoon Kentucky State Police (KSP) will fly Kentucky Power employees to Eastern Kentucky to assist in power restoration efforts.
  • Kentuckians experiencing a downed power line or power outage should contact their local utility company. Never use a generator inside your home or garage, even if doors and windows are open. Only use generators outside, more than 20 feet away from your home, doors, and windows. Never use an outdoor grill, gas stovetop or gas oven to heat your home. Visit http://www.cdc.gov/co/guidelines.htm for more information.

 

“Utility companies are moving as quickly as possible to restore power to our hardest hit eastern and southeastern counties,” said Michael Dossett, director of the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management. “Team Kentucky is assisting with Division of Forestry saw teams, National Guard soldiers providing wellness checks and transportation of citizens to warming centers, our Public Service Commission and Division of Water monitoring power outages and plant operations, along with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s important role of clearing major roadways and statewide storm response. A heartfelt thank-you to all of our community volunteers, agencies and emergency services personnel engaged in this important recovery mission.”

 

Road Conditions

  • KYTC crews are treating and plowing statewide and report most highly traveled priority A routes are passable. Plows are making headway on secondary, lower-volume routes. In eastern and Northeastern Kentucky, the challenge of clearing roadways continues to be made even more difficult by countless downed trees and power lines.
  • All 16 KSP posts report for the third straight day that roads, particularly neighborhood and side roads, are snow-covered, slick and hazardous. At this time, KSP reports no interstate closures; however, portions of Interstate 75 around Richmond have one lane open.
  • While Ashland has no major road closures, several side roads are closed due to downed trees, and a significant number of Kentuckians remain without power.
  • Even if roads appear clear, drivers should still use caution. Freezing drizzle and black ice pose an invisible danger to drivers on the road. Drivers are reminded to slow down, buckle up and leave a large space cushion between other vehicles on the road. Kentuckians are urged to tune in to local media for information on weather, and visit snowky.ky.gov for snow and ice resources and goky.ky.gov to check road conditions.
  • A majority of KSP Driver Testing Branch locations are closed for the remainder of the week but are expected to reopen next week. Appointments will be automatically rescheduled for citizens who had written permit and skills tests scheduled for this week. Applicants do not need to reschedule online. 

 

“Crews still have their work cut out for them even after this last round of precipitation ends this evening,” said Secretary Gray. “Single-digit temperatures this weekend will keep ice and snow around for some time, but the break in precipitation will give crews a chance to maintain passable lanes plows have already cleared. We appreciate the patience from the public and ask all drivers to use caution if they have to travel.”

 

Wellness Support

  • More than 80 Kentucky National Guardsmen are currently assisting in Boyd, Carter, Crittenden, Elliott, Floyd, Jackson, Johnson, Laurel, Lawrence, Leslie, Magoffin, Menifee, Owsley, Rockcastle  and Rowan Counties.
  • Guardsmen are assisting with wellness checks, transporting those in need to warming stations and shelters, providing crews to transport medical staff and providing debris removal teams to assist the Kentucky Division of Forestry.
  • There are currently 23 warming centers open, with another 23 on standby. There are nine emergency shelters open, with one on standby.
  • KSP troopers are also responding to wellness checks and helping Kentuckians as needed. If you need help, please contact a KSP post directly. KSP is requesting Kentuckians only utilize 911 for emergencies. Phone numbers for local KSP posts can be found at kentuckystatepolice.org/post-locations.

 

For additional information on this week’s news updates from Gov. Beshear click here.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-18-21

Russell County, 2 new cases Wednesday. We had 15 cases released from isolation. We now have 101 active cases of which 96 cases are self-isolated and 5 cases are hospitalized, 1 each at Bowling Green, Danville, UK and 2 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County, 2 cases yesterday.  We have had 1,620 total cases with 1,534 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 37 active cases with 35 of those in home isolation. We have 2 case in the hospital at this time.

Gov. Beshear Provides Update on COVID-19

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 17, 2021) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear said Kentucky continues to hold its progress against COVID-19, but it is too early to relax precautions.

 

“We have made incredible strides against this evil virus, but we can’t let up yet,” said Gov. Beshear. “Even Kentuckians who have been vaccinated should continue to mask up, social distance and keep any gatherings small. Team Kentucky, we are so close to getting through this together, but we must remain vigilant and run through the finish line to slow the spread and save as many lives as possible.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 17, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,017
New deaths today: 18
Positivity rate: 6.99%
Total deaths: 4,336
Currently hospitalized: 934
Currently in ICU: 259
Currently on ventilator: 128

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton and Boone. Each county reported at least 40 new cases.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Winter Storm Update
On Wednesday morning, Gov. Beshear, Transportation Secretary Jim Gray and Kentucky Division of Emergency Management Director Michael Dossett updated Kentuckians on road conditions, power outages and alternate heat source safety as the state faces its third winter storm in eight days, expected to start this evening.

 

On Wednesday afternoon, the Governor visited the warming center at the Boyd County Community Center in Catlettsburg to meet with local officials on emergency response efforts and to support residents impacted by severe winter weather. Kentuckians can view a video update from the Governor’s visit on his social media channels later today.

 

The Governor said the State Emergency Operations Center is currently activated at Level 3, supporting the power outage response and the winter storm recovery. As of Wednesday morning, 44 counties and 24 cities have declared states of emergency.

 

The Governor said tomorrow, regional vaccination centers will stay open. If it’s too difficult or dangerous for Kentuckians to reach their appointments, Gov. Beshear encouraged them to reschedule using the link in their appointment confirmation email.      

 

To learn more, see the full release.   

 

For snow and ice updates and resources, visit snowky.ky.gov. For updates on roadway conditions, visit goky.ky.gov.

If Kentuckians lose power, they should call their utility company.

 

Never use a generator inside your home or garage, even if doors and windows are open. Only use generators outside, more than 20 feet away from your home, doors, and windows. Never use an outdoor grill, a gas stovetop or oven to heat your home.

 

Kentucky General Assembly will not convene this week

 

FRANKFORT -- Due to concerns about travel safety during this week's winter storm, the Kentucky Senate and House will not convene this week.

 

To make up for this week's cancellation, the chambers are now scheduled to convene on Feb. 22, March 1, and March 12 in addition to previously scheduled legislative days.

 

The last day to file bills in the Senate and House has been moved back to Feb. 23.

 

The final day of the General Assembly's 2021 Regular Session is still scheduled to be March 30, the last day allowed by the state constitution.

 

The General Assembly’s 2021 Regular Session calendar can be viewed online at https://legislature.ky.gov/Documents/21RS_Calendar.pdf.

 

 

 

Gov. Beshear Provides Update on Winter Storm Safety

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 17, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear said road crews are continuing to work around the clock to clear roads as the state prepares for its third winter storm in eight days, expected to start this evening.

 

“We have now made it through two winter storms, with a third on the way. I’m happy to be able to say we had a relatively quiet night, but let me stress that – even with a bit of a break in the weather – it’s still important to limit travel,” said Gov. Beshear. “If you must travel, it’s still important to be very careful. Slow down, watch out for snow plows, salt trucks and other emergency vehicles.”

 

The Governor said the State Emergency Operations Center is currently activated at Level 3, supporting the power outage response and the winter storm recovery. As of Wednesday morning, 44 counties and 24 cities have declared states of emergency.

 

The Governor said tomorrow, regional vaccination centers will stay open. If it’s too difficult or dangerous for Kentuckians to reach their appointments, Gov. Beshear encouraged them to reschedule using the link in their appointment confirmation email.

                                                                                          

Weather Update

  • Multiple rounds of wintry weather are likely to impact the region starting Wednesday afternoon through early Friday morning.
  • Snow, sleet, freezing rain and a cold rain will be possible across the region.
  • The best potential for snow accumulations is expected to be across Central and Eastern Kentucky. Ice accumulations under a quarter inch will be possible across Southern and Eastern Kentucky.
  • Frostbite and hypothermia can occur if people are outdoors for extended periods of time, especially in single-digit temperatures.
  • Winter storm warnings and advisories have been issued for Kentucky. To learn more, click here.
  • Click here to view the National Weather Service forecast provided at 11 a.m. EST.

 

Power Outages

  • There are widespread outages across Eastern and Southeastern Kentucky. As of 8 a.m. EST, there are approximately 96,000 Kentucky customers without power, with numerous counties reporting downed trees.
  • Power has been restored to approximately 58,000 customers after outages peaked at more than 154,000.
  • Work crews in Eastern Kentucky – especially the Jackson and Pikeville highway districts – are still dealing with falling trees and downed power lines.
  • Department of Highways maintenance facilities are still without power in five counties – Boyd, Floyd, Lawrence, Magoffin and Martin.
  • One consequence of power outages is that gas pumps can’t operate. Yesterday, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) began hauling motor fuel into the area so crews can refuel equipment, and those efforts will continue today.
  • Power outages have also impacted traffic signals. Treat any dark signals as a four-way stop.
  • Clearing downed trees will be a major task today in impacted areas. Division of Forestry crews are out in high impact areas. Kentucky National Guard teams are on standby to assist the Forestry crews to remove cut debris. 
  • Kentuckians experiencing a downed power line or power outage should contact their local utility company. If possible, use an alternate source of heat but be aware of the dangers of alternate heat sources and carbon monoxide poisoning. Generators, camp stoves or charcoal grills always should be used outdoors and at least 20 feet away from windows. Never use a gas stovetop or oven to heat your home. Visit http://www.cdc.gov/co/guidelines.htm for more information.

 

“During this event, the weather created physical damage to the infrastructure that transmits and delivers the electricity to households. Electric companies must respond safely, swiftly and efficiently to restore service to large numbers of affected customers,” said Kentucky Division of Emergency Management Director Michael Dossett.

 

Director Dossett said there are four steps necessary to restore power:

  • Assess the extent, locations and severity of damage to the electricity system;
  • Provide the physical and human resources required for repairs;
  • Prioritize sites/components for repair based on factors including the criticality of the load and the availability of resources to complete the needed repairs; 
  • Implement the needed repairs and reassess system state.

 

“As such, households may experience times of intermittent or extended outages as the electric utilities create a safe environment for work to move through the phases of restoration,” said Director Dossett. “Electric utilities are implementing their mutual aid agreements to ensure everyone is working together to have the resources. Utilities are cooperating and some aid is coming from out of state.”

 

Road Conditions

  • KYTC crews are treating and plowing statewide and report most highly traveled priority A routes are passable. Plows are making headway on secondary, lower-volume routes.
  • Several areas are severely affected, especially eastern and northeastern counties.
  • At this time, Kentucky State Police (KSP) reports no interstate closures. However, the situation is fluid and KSP may have to close an interstate in the event of a collision or additional winter weather that is expected to arrive later this evening.
  • All 16 KSP posts located throughout the commonwealth continue to report slick and hazardous road conditions. Beginning Monday evening and into this morning, KSP has responded to multiple vehicle collisions throughout the state with several resulting in fatalities. The hazardous, icy roadway conditions are believed to be a contributing factor.
  • Kentuckians should refrain from traveling if at all possible. Please stay home and allow emergency responders to do their work during this winter storm.
  • Kentuckians are urged to tune in to local media for information on weather, and visit snowky.ky.gov for snow and ice resources and goky.ky.gov to check road conditions.

 

“Our front-line snow-fighters are still out there: from Lyon to Lawrence, Paducah to Pikeville, Hickman to Harlan, Clinton to Campbell and all parts in between. More than 2,000 employee team members plus contractors across the commonwealth are working hard to keep our people safe,” said KYTC Secretary Jim Gray. “I also want to commend the state Division of Forestry, which has provided chainsaw crews to help us clear downed trees in a number of eastern counties. They’ve been a tremendous help. Please limit your travel, drive very carefully and allow extra time to get where you’re going.”

 

Wellness Support
Kentucky National Guardsmen are currently providing assistance in Boyd, Carter, Crittenden, Elliott, Floyd, Greenup, Jackson, Laurel, Lawrence, Leslie, Magoffin, Menifee, Owsley and Rockcastle counties.

 

Guardsmen are assisting with wellness checks, transporting those in need to warming stations and shelters, providing crews to transport medical staff and providing debris removal teams to assist the Kentucky Division of Forestry.

 

There are currently 23 warming centers open, with another 16 on standby. There are six emergency shelters open, with one on standby.

 

KSP troopers are also responding to wellness checks and helping Kentuckians as needed. If you need help, please contact a KSP post directly. KSP is requesting Kentuckians only utilize 911 for emergencies.

 

For additional information on this week’s news updates from Gov. Beshear click here.

 

Columbia Man Arrested on Drug & Alcohol Charges Following Traffic Stop

 

James Corbin, 50, of Columbia, KY was arrested on Tuesday evening by KSP and charged with Possession of Marijuana, Possession of a Handgun by a convicted Felon, DUI 2nd offense (Aggravating Circumstances), Driving on a DUI Suspended License, No Registration Plates, No Registration Receipt, and Failure of Non-Owner to Maintain Required Insurance. He was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

 

Metcalfe Co. Man Arrested at KSP Post 15 after Attempting to Light an Unknown Object in his Vehicle

 
Columbia Police responded to a suspicious vehicle at Kentucky State Police Post 15 on Tuesday night, February 16, 2021. The call originated after a KSP Post Dispatcher contacted Adair 911 stating a male subject was in a truck in the parking lot attempting to light an unknown object on fire. Columbia Police responded as on duty Troopers were out of the county on an unrelated traffic incident in Russell Springs.
 
Upon arrival, officers made contact with a male subject, 32-year-old Ryan Pilling of Edmonton, KY, who clearly had thick smoke coming from the interior of his truck cab. Officers advised Pilling to exit the vehicle, but he refused. Pilling then became agitated at officers and when told again to exit, he again refused and stated he was armed. Ryan Pilling was then forced out of the vehicle. He began to fight with officers while being placed into custody. While Pilling was actively resisting, officers did locate a firearm on him which was quickly secured. Pilling was taken into custody without further incident.
 
Pilling is facing numerous charges including Public Intoxication, Menacing, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Criminal mischief, Resisting Arrest and Assault 3rd degree (a class D felony). He was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.
 
CPD Officer Adam Cravens made the arrest. He was assisted on scene by Officer Drew Conn and Adair County Deputies Justin Cross and Chandler Staten.
 

KSP Investigates 2-Vehicle Injury Collison In Metcalfe County


Edmonton, KY (February 16, 2021) On Sunday, February 14th, 2021 Troopers from Kentucky State Police Post 15 responded to a 2-vehicle injury collision that occurred on Summer Shade Rd. at approximately 8:30 PM
 

Deziarhea Wright, age 27 of Scottsville, KY was operating a 2004 Chevy Malibu west bound on Summer Shade Rd. when she lost control and entered the east bound lane, crossing into the path of another vehicle. Stephen Riddle, 59, of Burkesville, KY was operating a 2020 Kenworth east bound and was unable to avoid the collision.
 

Wright and 3 passengers: Hunter Reibold, 24, of Columbus, IN, John Haas, 33, of Indianapolis, IN, and a 9-month-old juvenile were all belted and transported by Barren/Metcalfe EMS to T.J. Sampson hospital for non-life threatening injuries. Riddle was not injured.
 

This collision remains under investigation by Tpr. Allen Shirley and Tpr. Jacob Smith. 
 

KSP Arrest Man For Theft Of Motor Vehicle


Campbellsville, KY (February 16, 2021) On February 12th, 2021 Kentucky State Police Post 15 responded to Burdick School Rd in reference to a vehicle that was stolen from a driveway. Upon arrival, Trooper Weston Sullivan was informed by the owner of the vehicle he had started his 2005 Cadillac to let it warm up and shortly after the car was gone. A couple hours later, the vehicle was located in the Kroger parking lot on Broadway by off duty Trooper Billy Begley.  Julian Underwood, age 35 of Louisville, KY was operating the vehicle. Tpr. Sullivan responded to the location arresting and charging Underwood with TBUT auto- $500 or more but U/$10,000, criminal trespassing – 3rd degree, operating on a suspended or revoked license and DUI 1st offense. Underwood was lodged in the Taylor County Detention Center. 

 

SHERIFF POLSTON RELEASES STATEMENT ON DOMESTIC SITUATION THAT LED TO ARREST

A call came in to Russell County Dispatch at 6:30 Tuesday evening, in reference to  domestic situation involving a family member being shot at. Upon arrival by authorities the suspect along with other family members were still inside the residence. Authorities gained entry to the residense and got the other family
members out of the residence to safety. Authorities were able to also talk to the suspect, Darian Carrol  of Scott’s Chapel Road in Jamestown. Authorities took him into custody after a few hours of a Standoff Situation and was transported to the Russell County Hospital for Treatment.  The suspect was charged with Wanton Endangerment 1st degree and Unlawful Imprisonment 1st degree as well. The suspect will also undergo  a further medical examination as well. The case remains under investigation by the Russell County Sheriffs Office and the Ky State Police. Deputy Kenny Perkins is the investigating Deputy. The Sheriffs office were assisted by the KY State Police, Jamestown Police Department members of the Russell Springs Police Department and Russell County EMS.

WAVE POLAR REPORT (CANCELLATIONS) - THURSDAY, FEB. 18TH


Sponsored by: Jack and Jack Insurance in Jamestown, Barger Insurance in Columbia, and Napa Auto Parts in Russell Springs, Columbia and Campbellsville... 

 

  • Adair & Russell County schools - VIRTUAL on Thursday 
  • No classes tomorrow at the Russell Springs and Jamestown Head Start Centers
  • Russell County Judicial Center - Closed
  • Russell County Court House  - Closed
  • Adair County Annex - Closed
  • Adair Annex basement is open as a "warming location". No provisions; you must bring your own requirements (food, water, meds, etc.). If assistance is needed getting to this location, please contact Adair E-911 at 270-384-6464.
  • Family Practice Associates - Closed
  • Primary Care Associates - Closed
  • Surgical Associates - Closed 
  • Kerr's Garbage will not run Thursday & Friday. They'll resume their regular schedule next week.
  • Campbellsville University (main campus) will be closed Thursday & Friday. All classes will remain virtual for the rest of the week
  • Russell County Baptist Clothing Center - Closed  (Will reopen Satuday10am-2pm) 
  • Jones Garbage will not run on Thursday or Friday 
  • The Russell County Hospital Board meeting for Thursday, February 18th has been canceled and rescheduled for February 25th at 5:00pmCT.
  • Barn Lot Bingo 0797 in Edmonton, KY will be canceled Thursday (2/18) and Friday (2/19) 

  • Burton’s Garbage will not be running on Thursday 

  • The Regular Monthly Adair County School Board Meeting has been postponed to Monday, February 22, 2021 due to uncertain weather conditions. There will be a working session beginning at 5:15 PM Monday evening prior to the Special Called Board Meeting and doors will open to the public at 5:45 PM with the Special Called Meeting starting at 6 PM. The meeting will be  open to the public with social distancing guidelines in place.

  • Little Peoples Daycare - Closed

  • Burton’s Garbage will not be running on Thursday

  • Russell Springs Active Day - Closed

  • Little Laker Daycare - Closed 

  • Common Ground Coffee and Yoga - Closed

  • Russell County Health Department  - Closed

  • Tarter closed for 1st shift, 2nd to be determined later this morning

  • Morgan Sanitation will not be running today. The office and transfer station will be closed 

  • Russell County Library - Closed 

  • First and Farmers National Bank will open 10:00 am CT, Thursday February 18th. With the exception of the Burkesville St Drive it will be closed .

  • Grider Insurance Agency and Sheldon Stephens CPA - Closed

  • Genesis Family Medical - Closed

  • Russell and Adair County Senior Centers will not be open today or delivering meals 

  • The Adair County Cooperative Extension Office - Closed 

           (New afternoon cancellations below)

  • Tarter 2nd Shift will be working regular schedule tonight

 

 

 

Rep. Josh Branscum: Halfway point of 2021 Session approaches

 
We are almost halfway through the 2021 Legislative Session and though considered a short session, there is no shortage of legislative work left to accomplish. With the threat of an ice storm and more winter weather on the way, legislators spent the majority of last week filing legislation and meeting with committees to consider bills and resolutions. As I write this, over 500 bills have already been filed this year. There will be more by the time our filing deadline ends.
 
Our committee process is important to the work we do in Frankfort. I do not talk enough about how crucial committee meetings are. They are a chance to hear from real people and how proposed legislation might affect them. They let us discuss bills and iron out any details necessary before sending it to the House floor for its final passage. This week was no different and I am proud to serve on the following committees: Small Business and Information Technology Committee, Transportation Committee, and the Tourism and Outdoor Recreation Committee.
 
We passed several pieces of legislation last week as well and I want to highlight a few of those new bills.

HB 7, which I was proud to co-sponsor, creates an advisory council which will create a Recovery Ready Certification for Kentucky communities.  The council will be tasked with coming up with standards for communities looking to help those recovering from substance abuse, as well as providing guidance to communities in developing a recovery ready ecosystem. By putting this council in place, state and local governments can work together to get the most out of every resource invested into recovery. 
 
HB 188 passed the House and is a bill that I was proud to sponsor. HB 188 changes the name of the “Louie B. Nunn Cumberland Parkway” to the “Louie B. Nunn Cumberland Expressway”. While this appears to be a simple name change, it is actually much larger than that. This change is part of a broader effort to eventually upgrade the Cumberland Parkway to interstate standards. This change has the potential to have a direct economic impact on the citizens and industry that call the 83rd District home.
 
We passed a bill that would allow local law enforcement to communicate with the Department of Transportation to place missing persons information on highway information signs. Under current law, highway message boards are being used only in the case of an Amber Alert. HB 105 would allow local law enforcement to use any additional resources, including the Amber Alert system, law enforcement communication system, Integrated Public Alert, and Warning System in their search of a missing person. The measure would also require the agency searching for a missing person to contact appropriate agencies within four hours of receiving the report.
 
Legislation was passed this week that helps to ensure that Medicaid recipients have continued access to preventative cancer screenings. HB 108 codifies current Medicaid coverage to include preventive screenings, examinations and genetic testing for colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is a disease that often goes undetected because it has no symptoms, making it imperative for people to get tested regularly. It is important to keep coverage of approved screening tests so that people can proactively monitor their health.
 
I continue to be proud of the legislation we pass to make Kentucky one of the most veteran friendly states in the country. HB 109, known as the Uniform Deployed Parents Custody and Visitation Act, would allow custodial responsibility to be granted to the non-custodial parent during the deployment period. This bill ensures that deployed service members who have custody of children do not lose custody due to their deployment.
 
House Bill 273, otherwise known as the Bailey Holt-Preston Cope Privacy Act, would protect photographs and videos of a person’s death, killing, rape, or assault used in court proceedings from being available to the public after their use in court. Named in honor of two 15-year-old victims of the tragic shooting at Marshall County High School in 2018, HB 273 would protect the privacy of the family members and victims of both the Marshall County tragedy and other traumatic events. This bill is critical to protecting the innocent victims of crimes from being victimized further. It is disheartening that we need legislation like this, but clearly we do and I was proud to vote for this measure.
 
We have 16 legislative days left in this year’s session. And we are going to make each and every one of them count so that your voice is heard. Over the next few weeks I will continue to update you on our progress. In the meantime, I can be reached here at home anytime, or through the toll-free message line in Frankfort at 1-800-372-7181.
 
 

Gov. Beshear Provides Update on State's Preparations, Response to Winter Storms

 

Today, Gov. Andy Beshear said the state is taking necessary steps to clear roads and respond to the state of emergency brought on by winter storms.

 

“Front-line emergency responders continue to work hard to clear roads, trees and branches and support communities across the commonwealth as needed – including Kentucky National Guard soldiers and Kentucky State Police troopers providing wellness checks in counties suffering power outages,” Gov. Beshear said. “We remind Kentuckians to please stay off the roads if possible. They are slick and dangerous.”


The Governor said the State Emergency Operations Center is currently activated at Level 3.                                                                                         


Weather Update 

  • Wednesday morning low temperatures are expected to be in the single digits over a large portion of the area. If there are clearing skies, temperatures could drop to below zero degrees in spots.
  • Frostbite and hypothermia can occur if people are outdoors for extended periods of time.
  • There is a potentially significant storm system arriving late Wednesday and lasting through early Friday morning.
  • Snow, sleet, freezing rain and rain are possible across the entire region Wednesday and Thursday night.
  • A Winter Storm Watch could be issued later today.
  • Click here to view the National Weather Service forecast provided at 5 a.m. EST.

 

Power Outages

  • As of 12 p.m. EST, there are approximately 145,000 Kentucky customers without power, with numerous counties reporting downed trees.
  • There are widespread power outages across the Flemingsburg, Jackson and Pikeville highway districts. Multiple Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) maintenance facilities in Eastern Kentucky are also without power. Arrangements are being made to transport fuel for crew vehicles that have lost access to pumping stations. Power outages have also impacted traffic signals. Treat any dark signals as a four-way stop.
  • Clearing downed trees will be a major task today in impacted areas. KYTC crews are being supplemented with state Division of Forestry employees and other support. Kentucky National Guard teams are on standby to clear-cut branches and brush.
  • Kentuckians experiencing a downed power line or power outage should contact their local utility company. If possible, use an alternate source of heat but be aware of the dangers of alternate heat sources and carbon monoxide poisoning. Generators, camp stoves or charcoal grills always should be used outdoors and at least 20 feet away from windows. Never use a gas stovetop or oven to heat your home. Visit http://www.cdc.gov/co/guidelines.htm for more information.


Road Conditions 

  • Kentucky Transportation Cabinet crews are treating and plowing statewide. Several eastern and northeastern counties are severely affected including: Boyd, Carter, Elliott, Johnson, Lawrence, Magoffin, Menifee, Morgan and Wolfe. Major routes in those areas are passable including Interstate Highway 64, the Mountain Parkway, U.S. Highway 23, AA Highway and the main routes in urban areas, but anything else likely is blocked and still hazardous.
  • All 16 Kentucky State Police posts located throughout the commonwealth are reporting slick and hazardous road conditions. Beginning Monday evening into this morning, KSP has responded to multiple vehicle collisions throughout the state with several resulting in fatalities. The hazardous, icy roadway conditions are believed to be a contributing factor. 
  • Interstate Highway 65 northbound in Hart County at mile marker 58 is currently closed due to multiple vehicle collisions resulting in injuries to troopers. One collision has resulted in a fatality. The driver of a semi-truck lost control striking two KSP troopers. The driver was pronounced dead at the scene and the troopers sustained minor injuries. KSP’s Commercial Vehicle Enforcement is investigating the crash and the interstate will remain closed until further notice.
  • Kentuckians should refrain from traveling. Please stay home and allow emergency responders to do their work during this winter storm.
  • Kentuckians are urged to tune in to local media for information on weather, and visit snowky.ky.gov for snow and ice resources and goky.ky.govto check road conditions.

 

Wellness Support 
Kentucky guardsmen are providing ongoing support in a variety of counties and are on standby to support others throughout the commonwealth. Currently guardsmen also are assisting with wellness checks and transporting those in need to warming stations and shelters.

 

KSP troopers are also responding to wellness checks and helping Kentuckians as needed.

 

State Office Buildings
The Governor closed state office buildings today,

 

Tuesday, Feb. 16, due to icy and dangerous road conditions. Employees able to telecommute and essential employees designated for mandatory operations should continue to report to work as directed by agency management. State employees with questions regarding this closure should contact either their agency’s management or human resources office.


For additional information on this week’s news updates from Gov. Beshear click here.

 

Downed Trees and Below Freezing Temperatures Hinder Efforts to Clear Roads


SOMERSET, Ky. (Feb. 16, 2021) – Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) District 8 crews efforts to clear roadways are being hindered by downed trees and below freezing temperatures following the winter storm system that continues to move through the region today. Roads remain slick and hazardous. Travel is not advised.

 

Crews worked throughout the day yesterday treating and plowing routes focusing primarily on priority A routes. While some crews were able to begin addressing B and C routes yesterday afternoon downed trees and power lines created hazardous conditions, prompting District officials have crews focus only on priority A routes through the overnight hours for the safety of crew members. 
 

Crews will remain out in force today, plowing and treating roads and removing downed trees. However, due to the large amount of downed trees needing to be cleared and low temperatures making roadways harder to plow it will be some time before all roads are clear.

 

For a complete county-by-county snow and ice priority list please go to: https://transportation.ky.gov/Maintenance/Pages/Snow-and-Ice-Maps.aspx.   
 

For real-time traffic information or to keep up with state snowfighters in your county, visit http://GoKY.ky.gov. Follow District 8 updates on Twitter and Facebook at http://twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8  or http://facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8.

 

KYTC District 8 is responsible for maintaining state highways in Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Lincoln, McCreary, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Russell and Wayne counties.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-16-21

 

 

Russell County, reporting another death Monday. We now have 39 deaths in Russell County. We had 3 new cases yesterday. We had 17 cases released from isolation. We now have 121 active cases of which 117 cases are self-isolated and 4 cases are hospitalized, 1 each at Bowling Green, Somerset, UK and Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County, 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 11 cases. We have had 1,613 total cases with 1,529 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 35 active cases with 33 of those in home isolation. We have 2 case in the hospital at this time.

JAMESTOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT RESPONDED TO A CAR FIRE LAST EVENING

Jamestown Fire Dispatched just before 7 last evening, to the report of a car fire at 4170 Highway 92 in the Esto community.

 

Units on scene found a car fully involved sitting behind a house. blaze was extinguished quickly with no damage to the house. Cause of the fire is under investigation firefighters were on scene just over an hour.

KENTUCKY TRANSPORTATION DIST 8 UPDATE

 

The second wave of the winter storm system moved into the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) District 8 region earlier this afternoon and moderate winter precipitation continues across much of the district.

 

Crews worked throughout the day treating and plowing routes following the first wave of the winter system, but road conditions quickly deteriorated this afternoon. Roadways are slick and hazardous and motorists should avoid traveling if possible.

 

KY 696 in Clinton County is currently blocked due to a semi across the road and is unable to be moved due to the weather and road conditions. K.S.P. is advising that the roadway will be closed until sometime tomorrow morning. Several crews are also beginning to report trees down across the district.

 

Crews will continue to work to clear the roads throughout the night remaining focused on priority A routes until precipitation slows and will follow with B and C routes. For a complete county-by-county snow and ice priority list please go to: https://transportation.ky.gov/Maintenance/Pages/Snow-and-Ice-Maps.aspx.   

 

For real-time traffic information or to keep up with state snowfighters in your county, visit http://GoKY.ky.gov. Follow District 8 updates on Twitter and Facebook at http://twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8  or http://facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8.

 

KYTC District 8 is responsible for maintaining state highways in Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Lincoln, McCreary, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Russell and Wayne counties.

 

Gov. Beshear Provides Update on COVID-19, Dangerous Winter Storm

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2021) – On Monday, Gov. Andy Beshear updated Kentuckians on COVID-19 vaccine progress and announced child care workers now will be included in phase 1B. They can sign up anywhere in the commonwealth currently offering vaccinations.

 

The Governor said the state has had five weeks of declining cases for the first time since the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Kentucky, on March 6, 2020.

 

“We are seeing some of the best COVID-19 news that’s been out there since we began this fight. These positive COVID-19 trends may be from the cold weather keeping people from going places that they would otherwise, but I think it’s more than that. I think we’ve reached a point in the pandemic where we all know multiple people that we’ve lost, and we realize how effective wearing a mask is, we see the light at the end of the tunnel and we want to protect one another as we get there,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Adam Mather, Cabinet for Health and Family Services inspector general, also updated Kentuckians on COVID-19 vaccinations in long-term care facilities.

 

“We are seeing really positive trends, not only in Kentucky as a whole, but specifically in long-term care which was hit very hard by COVID-19,” Mather said. “We’re seeing decreasing numbers of positive cases, hospitalizations and deaths. Today is the first day that we’ve reported no facility in the state of Kentucky has 15 or more active cases. We are expanding the federal vaccination program for long-term care into other residential spaces, including low-income, elderly congregate housing, Supports for Community Living residences and more.”

 

Finally, the Governor emphasized the importance of continuing to improve vaccine equity, as some racial and ethnic groups remain underrepresented among vaccine recipients.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 15, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 723
New deaths today: 9
Positivity rate: 6.57%
Total deaths: 4,291
Currently hospitalized: 969
Currently in ICU: 268
Currently on ventilator: 132

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Madison, Boone and Pike. Each county reported at least 25 new cases.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Winter Storm Update
Gov. Beshear, Transportation Secretary Jim Gray and Kentucky Division of Emergency Management Director Michael Dossett said the next wave of wintry weather has begun in the state, bringing varying road conditions to counties. Heavy snow is reported in Western Kentucky, sleet in parts of Central Kentucky and freezing rain and ice in Eastern and Southeastern Kentucky.

 

“The conditions on our roads are deteriorating very quickly. Parts of Kentucky are getting significant snow, sleet and freezing rain or an ice storm. We’re one of the only states getting all three in a very significant way,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’ve come too far in the last 11 months protecting one another to lose people in an event like this.”

 

“Make no mistake: Our highway crews are working as hard as they can. We’re not letting up, but we’re going to be contending with heavy snow that’s hard to keep up with,” said Secretary Gray. “Clearing roadways of ice and snow can be treacherous for the people operating those plows. Our employees are very skilled but not immune to ice. We ask every Kentuckian to be patient and to help us by keeping travel to a minimum, and don’t travel at all if it can be avoided. Fewer vehicles on the roadways make it easier for our plow crews to do their job.”

 

“Every single county in Kentucky is under a winter storm watch or a warning. This second wave of wintry weather will produce much more snow and ice accumulation than the first,” said Director Dossett. “Travel will become difficult to impossible this afternoon and tonight. Power outages are possible due to snow and previous ice accumulations on trees and power lines. It’s an extremely dangerous time – please be careful.”

 

For snow and ice updates and resources, visit snowky.ky.gov. For updates on roadway conditions, visit goky.ky.gov.

 

If Kentuckians lose power, they should call their utility company. If a household uses a generator, charcoal grill or another appliance to heat their home, they should never pull it inside the home because carbon monoxide poisoning could hurt or kill them. They should keep those heating devices at least 20 feet away from the home at all times.

 

T. Marzetti Co. Expansion Grows by 80 Jobs in Hart County to 220
As Kentucky rebuilds its economy stronger than ever, Gov. Beshear today highlighted T. Marzetti Co.’s additional growth plans, which will increase the company’s expansion project announced a year ago from 140 to 220 full-time jobs and represents the company’s largest-ever investment of $133 million, up from $93 million. The T. Marzetti operation in Horse Cave manufactures salad dressings, sauces and other foods for retail and foodservice markets. It currently employs over 500 people. To learn more, see the full release.

 

Applications for $264 Million Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund Open Today
Last week, in partnership with the Kentucky Housing Corporation, Gov. Beshear relaunched the Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund with an additional $264 million to keep Kentuckians safe and housed throughout the pandemic.

 

Starting today, tenants who qualify can apply here for rent and utility assistance to cover their past-due and future bills. If approved, lump sum, direct payments will be made to landlords and utility providers. To learn more, see the full release.

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, information on testing locationsvaccinescontact tracingschool reports and guidanceguidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

WAVE POLAR REPORT (CANCELLATIONS) - TUESDAY, FEB. 16TH

 

Sponsored by: Jack and Jack Insurance in Jamestown, Barger Insurance in Columbia, and Napa Auto Parts in Russell Springs, Columbia and Campbellsville... 

 

  • Russell County Court House - Closed
  • Adair County Annex Building - Closed
  • Russell Springs City Hall - Closed
  • Russell County Schools will be all VIRTUAL 
  • Adair County schools will be all VIRTUAL this week until further notice
  • Adair County Board of Education Central Office - Closed 
  • No classes tomorrow (Tuesday) for Russell Springs  and Jamestown Head Start
  • Russell County Health Department - Closed
  • Russell County Library - Closed 
  • Dr Charles Giles and Associates - Closed
  • Family First Healthcare - Closed
  • Crossroads Family Medicine - Closed
  • Russell and Adair County Judicial Centers - Closed (Court Dates will be Rescheduled) 
  • Genesis Family Medical Center in Columbia - Closed
  • Campbellsville University Main Campus Office will be closed and all classes will be remote 
  • Little Lakers Daycare - Closed 
  • Another Tots Landing Daycare - Closed 
  • Russell Springs Active Day - Closed
  • Russell County Chamber of Commerce Meeting - Canceled 
  • Family Practice Associates of Russell County - Closed
  • Primary Care Associates of Russell County - Closed
  • Springs Diner - Closed 
  • Burton’s Garbage will not be running on Tuesday and will pick up for both weeks next Tuesday.
  • The girls game with Taylor County and the boys game with Barren County have been canceled for Tuesday, Feb 16th
  • The Taylor County girls game has been rescheduled for Thursday, February 18th at 6pm (varsity game only)
  • Bank of Jamestown will open at 10am on Tuesday, Feb. 16th
  • Columbia Walmart will be closing at 7pm this evening and will open at 7am on Tuesday.
  • Little People's Daycare in Russell Springs - closed Tuesday
  • Russell County Physical Therapy - Closed 
  • Green County Primary Care - Closed 
  • All Tarter 1st and 2nd Shift Shut Down Today
  • Grant Chiropractic Center - Closed
  • Common Grounds Coffee & Yoga  - Closed
  • Duo will be closing lobbies, drive thru and normal hours of operation will be done over the phone and web chats as an option for service during normal business hours 
  • Surgical Associates of Russell County - Closed
  • All SKRECC Offices - Closed 
  • Russell County Stock Yard will not be having a sale on Wednesday, no animals accepted today
  • Dr Ronald Rogers Chiropractic - Closed
  • Jones Garbage will not run today 
  • Jamestown Healthcare - Closed
  • Adair County Senior Center - Closed (No meals due to road conditions)
  • Downey's Gun and Pawn will have propane avalible at 9 a.m., 12 noon and 3 p.m. for anyone needing propane. 
  • There is NO 2nd shift this evening for Stephens Pipe & Steel

 

Traffic Advisory from Adair County Sheriffs Office


Adair County Sheriff’s Office passes along traffic advisory....

Everyone please be careful this morning.  If you don’t have to be on the roads, try to stay in. If you do, make sure allow yourself plenty of time for travel and take your time.   
   

The State Highway Dept, Adair County Road Dept. and the City of Columbia Street Dept. are all out and have been since late last night. They are doing an outstanding job, but with temperatures so low it is refreezing pretty quickly in places. We are expecting more snow and possibly ice later today that will compound on what conditions we have already. Please be cautious and safe!

 

Sheriff Josh Brockman

 

Gov. Beshear Urges Caution with Multiple Winter Storms Reaching Kentucky

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2021) – With several inches of snow expected to fall today and into the night throughout much of the commonwealth, Gov. Andy Beshear said Kentuckians should avoid travel unless absolutely necessary.

 

The Governor said the Kentucky National Guard has been activated to go door to door to check on residents in Ashland and transport people to warming stations if necessary. The National Guard is on alert with more soldiers standing by with equipment ready to assist if necessary.

 

Gov. Beshear said with three winter storms with snow, ice and freezing temperatures reaching the commonwealth in less than a week, Kentuckians should be extremely cautious and make plans to keep their families safe and warm.

 

The Governor said two Kentuckians were lost to winter weather during last week’s storm and possibly another overnight.

 

“We don’t want to lose anybody else. We have been through too much. We have sacrificed too much,” Gov. Beshear said. “We have the ability to work virtually and stay off the roads more than ever before, so take care of one another.”

 

The first wave of the storm hit much of Kentucky overnight, with the heaviest snow expected today during the afternoon rush hour.

 

The greatest potential for significant snow accumulations includes much of Central Kentucky, with some areas projected to receive up to eight inches of snow. The heaviest snowfall will take place in a period between 3 p.m. EST today through 1 a.m. EST Tuesday.

 

Following the Governor’s media briefing, the Personnel Cabinet notified state employees that Executive Branch buildings will be closed beginning at 1 p.m. EST, except for employees who provide essential service operations to the commonwealth. Executive Branch agencies will continue to provide services to the citizens of the commonwealth remotely. State employees with questions regarding this closure should contact either their agency’s management or human resources office.

 

Another system, beginning Wednesday night into Thursday night, will bring an additional wintry mix across Kentucky.

 

Maps from the National Weather Service’s 5:30 a.m. EST briefing are linked here.

 

The Kroger vaccination site in Frankfort will be closed on Tuesday. Those with appointments are being rescheduled for next Tuesday, Feb. 23.

 

The Governor said a decision would be made later in the day on other vaccination sites.

 

“This weather is going to slow our vaccinations some, but we believe we will be able to pick right back up,” Gov. Beshear said.

 

Kentucky Emergency Management Director Michael Dossett said Kentucky is experiencing an extremely unusual dynamic for severe weather in the state with three severe weather events in very close proximity.

 

“Demonstrating the resilience of Kentuckians, we navigated the most recent severe storm event last week with your continued awareness of surroundings and diligence in checking the safety of your friends and neighbors,” said Director Dossett. “Let’s redouble our efforts in this next challenge, with special attention for all of our state and local emergency responders who will be assisting in this dangerous storm event.”

 

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet crews have been out in force to proactively pretreat roads where conditions allow and respond to snow and ice’s damaging effects on roadways.

 

Transportation Secretary Jim Gray said travel could become difficult to impossible.

 

“What we’re facing is three winter storms in eight days,” said Secretary Gray. “This next round of winter weather will bring varying conditions across the state, but what remains constant is our crew’s commitment to maintaining mobility along critical routes and our plea to the public to avoid unnecessary travel.”

 

Crews are out plowing and treating routes across the state. Snowfall rates are expected to exceed one inch per hour causing roadways to be blanketed with snow shortly after being plowed. In Western Kentucky, light, powdering snow has been blowing into roadways. 

 

Yesterday evening began with some freezing fog in Southern and Southeast Kentucky. Roadway conditions quickly worsened, resulting in several crashes along the Interstate 75 corridor in Rockcastle and Laurel counties. This morning, a crash shut down the westbound lanes of Interstate 64 in Carter County, which reopened to traffic several hours later.

 

Ice on roadways and bridges remains the greatest challenge as frigid temperatures create slick road surfaces, and ice can cause more downed trees and power lines for crews to remove. Ice accumulations of more than half an inch are still expected in Southern Kentucky. This will significantly impact the I-75 corridor in Madison, Rockcastle, Laurel and Whitley counties.

Crews add calcium chloride to salt to help melt snow faster when temperatures are below the freezing point. While the solution is helpful, it is less effective after dark and when traffic volumes are reduced. 

 

The National Weather Service warns travel will become difficult this afternoon into tonight. Transportation officials urge Kentuckians to avoid being on the roads as much as possible. Ice poses hazards to all vehicle types, and drivers must slow down and exercise extreme caution. Traffic signals may become dark due to power outages and should be treated as a four-way stop by motorists. 

 

Snow and ice resources, including traffic information, priority route maps and highway district news updates, are available at snowky.ky.gov.

 

If you experience a downed power line or power outage, please contact your local utility company. If possible, prepare for the need to use an alternate source of heat. Be aware of the dangers of alternate heat sources and carbon monoxide poisoning.

 

Generators, camp stoves or charcoal grills should always be used outdoors and at least 20 feet away from windows. Never use a gas stovetop or oven to heat your home. Visit http://www.cdc.gov/co/guidelines.htm for more information.

 

Last Wednesday, the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management activated its State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) to monitor earlier storm systems and coordinate with critical Emergency Support Function partners in transportation, law enforcement, power and utilities. The SEOC is currently activated at Level 4, but will transition to Level 3 at noon today.

 

Last Thursday, Gov. Beshear closed state offices due to dangerous road conditions and issued a State of Emergency, which remains in effect, as an initial winter storm blanketed much of the commonwealth in a wintry mix of snow and ice. Since Thursday, freezing temperatures and ice have remained throughout much of the commonwealth.

 

UPDATE FROM DIST. 8 TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) District 8 highway crews continue to clear icy roadways ahead of second wave of precipitation expected to bring more ice and heavy snowfall to the area later today.

Roadways across the district remain partly to mostly covered and slick. While crews have remained focused primarily on priority A snow routes- which include interstates, parkways, U.S. highways, and some other 4-lane routes, some crews are beginning to treat priority B routes. For a complete county-by-county snow and ice priority list please go to: https://transportation.ky.gov/Maintenance/Pages/Snow-and-Ice-Maps.aspx.  

Crews will continue to plow and treat roadways throughout the day to get them in the best shape possible before heavier precipitation arrives later today.

Motorists strongly advised to avoid travel if possible.  

For real-time traffic information or to keep up with state snowfighters in your county, visit http://GoKY.ky.gov. Follow District 8 updates on Twitter and Facebook at http://twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8  or http://facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8.

KYTC District 8 is responsible for maintaining state highways in Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Lincoln, McCreary, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Russell and Wayne counties.

CANCELLATIONS - MONDAY, FEB. 15TH

 

Sponsored by Jack and Jack Insurance in Jamestown, Barger Insurance in Columbia, and Napa Auto Parts in Russell Springs, Columbia and Campbellsville... 

 

Russell County Search & Rescue is now manned and prepared to assist in any way we can. Until the Snow/Ice Emergency is over. If you have any questions feel free to contact our NON-Emergency number at 270-866-6980

 

Little People Child Care in Russell Springs - Closed

 

Laker Daycare - Closed

 

Update for Tarter 2/15/21: 

At this time, if you can make it in safely, Tarter plants are on regular schedule. La compañia esta trabajando horario normal esta mañana. Tengan cuidado.

 

The Russell County Judicial Center will be closed today - All court has been canceled 

 

The Russell County Court House - Judges Office Open until 2 p.m. this afternoon 

 

The Russell County Health Department - Closed

 

Primary Care Associates of Russell County and Family Practice Associates of Russell County - Closed

 

Russell Springs City Hall will open on a delay schedule at 10 a.m. 

 

Hubbards Building Supply opening on a delay at 9 a.m. 

 

Family First Healthcare on a 2 hour delay opening at 10 a.m.

 

The Russell County Public Library - Closed

 

Russell Springs Active Day - Closed 

 

Cooper Chiropractic - Closed 

 

Jamestown Family Medical - Closed

 

Dr Charles Giles and Associates will be closing at 12:30 

 

No Pick Up for Jones Garbage today (Monday)

 

Russell County Hospital Physical Therapy - Closed 

 

Adair Family Medical - Closed

 

Genesis Family Medical Center in Columbia will be closed today

 

Dr. Ronald P. Rogers - Closed 

 

Crossroads Family Medicine - Closed 

 

The Adair County Annex Building - Closed

 

Adair County Senior Citizen Center will be closed today, and no curbside and food delivery today 

 

Burton Garbage Service will not be running today 

 

Due to weather conditions, the Adair County Extension Office will open on a two-hour delay today. The delayed opening is subject to change due to road conditions.

 

Adair County Jail Committee Meeting for this morning has been cancelled and will be rescheduled at a later date 

 

Common Grounds Coffee and Yoga in Russell Springs - Closed 

 

Cash Express Columbia - Closed

 

Adair County Schools Central Office - Closed 

 

Russell County Clerks Office - Closed 

 

Happy Now Cafe - Closed 

 

Bennett Insurance Group in Adair County - Closed 

 

Russell County Sheriff's Office - Closed 

 

Russell County County Judges Office will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

 

The Adair County Board of Education Central Office will be closed today, February 15, 2021.

 

Stephens Pipe and Steel will not be running 2nd shift today

 

Tarter update:

No 2nd Shift 2/15/21

No hay segundo turno hoy 2/15/2021

 

Family First Healthcare (Columbia) Closed the remainder of the day and Tuesday 

 

Wade's Martial Arts - No Classes Tonight

 

Russell Springs City Hall will be Closing at 2 p.m. 

 

Russell County Farm Store will be Closed for the remainder of the day 

 

 

 

Post will update with new closings and cancellations...

JAMESTOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT RESPONDED TO A STRUCTURE FIRE EARLY SUNDAY MORNING

Jamestown Fire Department dispatched about 1:30 Sunday morning to the report of a structure fire at 1215 West Highway 92, just off the bypass in Jamestown.

 

Units on scene found a shop and garage fully involved.  Fire was quickly knocked down with light damage to the rear of the house. Shop, garage and contents were a total loss. 

 

Jamestown assisted by the Russell County Sheriffs Office, and due to cold temperatures the department of transportation were dispatched to the scene for ice on the road way. Firefighters on scene just over an hour.

ADAIR CO. SCHOOL BOARD MEETING AGENDA 02/18/21

 

 

 

BOARD AGENDA

FEBRUARY 18, 2021 AT 6:00PM

REGULAR SCHOOL BOARD MEETING

ADAIR COUNTY BOARD CONFERENCE ROOM

 

Meeting called to order

Pledge of Allegiance

Prayer

Swearing in of 2 Board Members

 

  1. APPROVAL OF AGENDA
  2. APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDA

CONSENT AGENDA

  1. APPROVAL OF MINUTES
  2. APPROVAL OF TREASURER’S REPORT
  1. APPROVAL OF PAYMENT OF BILLS
  2. DISCUSS APPROVAL OF PAY APP #4 FOR JENKINS-ESSEX CONSTRUCTION FOR THE ADAIR COUNTY PRIMARY CENTER PRESCHOOL ADDITION PROJECT IN THE AMOUNT OF $20,399.00
  3. DISCUSS APPROVAL OF PAY APP #1 FOR JENKINS-ESSEX CONSTRUCTION FOR THE ADAIR COUNTY SOFTBALL/BASEBALL ADDITION PROJECT IN THE AMOUNT OF $21,286.00
  4. APPROVAL OF SCHOOL SAFETY PROJECTS THROUGH SCHOOL SECURITY FUNDS GRANT
  5. APPROVAL TO DECLARE TECHNOLOGY ITEMS AS JUNK FOR DISPOSAL OR RECYCLING
  6. APPROVAL OF 2021-2022 SBDM ALLOCATIONS
  7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF PERSONNEL ACTION

REGULAR AGENDA

  1. SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT
  2. PUBLIC COMMENTS
  3. APPROVAL OF MONTHLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - Renae Smith
  4. BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS UPDATE - Steve Burton
     
  5. GAP REPORT PRESENTED BY EACH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL:
  • ADAIR COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
  • ADAIR COUNTY MIDDLE SCHOOL
  • ADAIR COUNTY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
  • ADAIR COUNTY PRIMARY CENTER
     
  1. APPROVAL OF 2021-2022 SCHOOL CALENDAR - Robbie Harmon
  2. APPROVAL OF STUDENT TEACHER AGREEMENT WITH CAMPBELLSVILLE UNIVERSITY
  3. ADJOURNMENT

 

The meeting will be open to the public with social distancing guidelines in place. 

 

There will be a working session at 5:15 PM on Thursday prior to the Regular Board Meeting. The doors will not be open to the public until 5:45 PM in order to prepare for the meeting.

 

COLUMBIA POLICE DEPT. HAS NEW K-9 UNIT "CALLY"

 
The Columbia Police Department would like to formally introduce the cities newest K9 Unit, "Cally"
 
After losing the previous K9 "Gunner" due to illness, Columbia Police were left without a K9 for road duty. Last year funds were secured by donation for a new animal, and in September of last year K9 handler Officer Trevor Foster was sent to Milan, Tennessee where he received Cally from trainer Jay Morris and the United States Police Canine Association. 
 
Cally is a 2-year-old yellow Lab specifically trained in drug detection. She, along with Officer Foster, have already aided in several arrests and investigations in Columbia and have been instrumental in aiding other agencies in Adair and surrounding counties when a K9 Unit has been requested. 
 
Columbia Police say they're looking forward to many years of using Cally as she serves the city of Columbia and law enforcement.
 
 

1 New Coronavirus Death in Lake Cumb. District; 92 New Cases...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 6.87%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today. We have experienced a total of 342 deaths resulting in a 1.75% mortality rate (about 1 in 57) among known cases. This compares with a 1.1% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.75% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 50 cases in the hospital. This is equal to what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 1,078 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.53% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.64%. The latest data shows that 93.33% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 33.33% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 19,495 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 9.33% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 112 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 5; Casey: 7; Clinton: 4; Green: 9; McCreary: 23; Pulaski: 30; Russell: 9; Taylor: 19; and, Wayne: 6. In all, we have released 94.6% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 21 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 712 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,342.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Schools, and Jail/Prison Related. Of our active cases, 9% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 92 today: Adair: 7; Casey: 6; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 1; Green: 7; McCreary: 7; Pulaski: 25; Russell: 18; Taylor: 12; and, Wayne: 8. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.005. This means our total case count is projected to double every 129.77 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 83-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 79-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 1-year-old female who is released, 2/12/21;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is released, 2/12/21;
Taylor: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

 

The death we report today is a 78-year-old female from Pulaski who had been hospitalized. We experienced 5 deaths this past week.

 

Overall, it has been a pretty positive week as far as our COVID-19 numbers. We added 715 new cases this week compared to 829 last week. We have 712 active cases today compared to 812 last Saturday. We do have 50 listed hospitalized cases, however, compared to 43 last week. Our district’s 7-day average incidence rate (average new cases per day per 100,000) is 48.8 today compared to 56.6 last Saturday. We have 1 county in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread, Cumberland. Our other 9 counties are in the “red-critical” range. For the third week in a row, Lake Cumberland’s new case rate is higher than the new case rate for the state.

 

Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 19,495 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 387,843 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 387,090 statewide plus 753 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the COVID-19 guidance. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

COVID-19 Vaccination Status

Regional Hubs

The Governor recently announced additional sites where vaccines for Phase 1a and 1b, including 70 and older, have opened. More sites, including more Lake Cumberland area sites, will be opening in the weeks to come. You may call 1-855-598-2246, or visit vaccine.ky.gov to find out if you are eligible and where you can receive the vaccine. Remember, supplies are still limited, it may take several weeks to secure an appointment.

 

  • Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital: Five hundred prime/1st dose vaccines are coming into the Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital each week for folks in the 1a and 1b group, including those 70 and older. Their COVID-19 hotline phone number is 1-844-675-3390.
  • TJ Health Columbia: Some prime/1st dose vaccines will be coming to TJ Health Columbia each week for folks in the 1a and 1b group, including those 70 and older. Their COVID-19 hotline phone number is 1-270-659-1010.

Nursing and Personal Care Homes

Locally, through a contract with the federal government, Walgreens and CVS pharmacies continue to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff.

Health Department

Right now, all of our appointment slots are filled. Please do not leave your information on our answering machines or voice mails. We are not keeping any sort of waiting list. We have hope that we will start getting a consistent allocation of vaccine soon. Watch our Daily Brief and social media for updates.

Pharmacies

The following local pharmacies will soon begin/has already begun receiving a limited supply of vaccine.

 

Pharmacy Name Location County Location Address Location City
Adair Drug Adair 510 Burkesville Street Suite 1 Columbia
Green River Pharmacy Casey 50 Dillon Street Liberty
Walgreens Pharmacy Green 603 Columbia Highway Greensburg
Walgreens Pharmacy Mccreary 500 North Highway 27 Whitley City
Jay’S Pharmacy Inc Pulaski 400 South Highway 27 Somerset
Walgreens Pharmacy Pulaski 600 South Highway 27 Somerset
Hometown Pharmacy Taylor 325 East Broadway Street Campbellsville
Kroger Taylor 399 Campbellsville Bypass Campbellsville
Wal-mart Taylor 725 Campbellsville Bypass Campbellsville

School Clinics

All 1st dose/prime dose clinics have been completed for all areas schools, public and private/Christian, that requested vaccine. Thanks to Taylor Regional Hospital, Cumberland Family Medical, Lake Cumberland Medical Associates, and Kroger; along with everyone at the schools who made this effort a success.

 

There will be no Daily Brief on Sunday.

 

 

Gov. Beshear Asks Kentuckians to Prepare for more Snow, Ice

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 14, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear said Kentuckians must prepare now for more rounds of winter storms from Sunday night through Thursday night, with the heaviest snow most likely Monday during the afternoon rush hour.

 

The greatest potential for significant snow accumulations includes much of Central Kentucky, with some areas projected to receive up to eight inches of snow. The heaviest snowfall will take place in a period between 3 p.m. EST Monday through 1 a.m. EST Tuesday. Snowfall rates may exceed 1 inch per hour.

 

The greatest potential for significant ice accumulations, from 0.01 to 0.50 inches, also will occur tonight through Tuesday and is expected south and east of a line from Tompkinsville to Richmond.

 

Another system, beginning Wednesday night into Thursday night, will bring an additional wintry mix across Kentucky.

“We need Kentuckians to prepare for another two rounds of storms bringing more snow, ice and freezing temperatures,”

 

Gov. Beshear said. “As these storms arrive, we need Kentuckians to make a plan for their families to stay safe, warm and, if possible, off the roads.”

 

Maps from the National Weather Service’s 11:30 a.m. briefing are linked here.

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet crews plan to concentrate on maintaining mobility on interstates, parkways and highly traveled routes.

 

The potential for more downed trees and power lines adds to the hurdles crews will navigate as they assist with tree clearing operations to remove debris from roads. Northeastern crews continue to work on tree removal and road clearing activities following last week’s storm.

 

“We took advantage of the break in the weather this weekend to replenish salt inventories in our highway district maintenance facilities,” said Transportation Secretary Jim Gray. “Our crews will be working tirelessly to clear roads of snow, but ice poses serious challenges and risks to highway safety; so I continue to urge Kentuckians to restrict travel as much as possible.”

 

The Transportation Cabinet also reminds Kentuckians if you must be on the roads this week, to treat a dark traffic signal as a four-way stop, reduce driving speeds and wear your seatbelt. 

 

These winter storms may cause additional downed power lines and power outages. If you experience a downed power line or power outage, please contact your local utility company. If possible, prepare for the need to use an alternate source of heat. Be aware of the dangers of alternate heat sources and carbon monoxide poisoning. Generators, camp stoves or charcoal grills should always be used outdoors and at least 20 feet away from windows. Never use a gas stovetop or oven to heat your home. Visit http://www.cdc.gov/co/guidelines.htm for more information.

 

Last Wednesday, the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management activated its State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) to monitor earlier storm systems and coordinate with critical Emergency Support Function partners in transportation, law enforcement, power and utilities. The SEOC is currently activated at Level 4, but will transition to Level 3 at noon Monday, Feb. 15.

 

Last Thursday, Gov. Beshear closed state offices due to dangerous road conditions and issued a State of Emergency as an initial winter storm blanketed much of the commonwealth in a wintry mix of snow and ice. Since Thursday, freezing temperatures and ice have remained throughout much of the commonwealth.

 

Snow and ice resources including traffic information, priority route maps and highway district news updates are available at snowky.ky.gov.

 

The Governor will provide a virtual media briefing on the pending winter storm and the state’s response at 9:30 a.m. EST Monday, Feb. 15.

More Funds Available Through Eviction Relief Fund....

 

By TOM LATEK, Kentucky Today

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. – With more cold weather in the forecast, a new fund becomes available next week to provide utility and rent assistance to tenants and landlords affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.


In partnership with the Kentucky Housing Corporation, or KHC, Gov. Andy Beshear relaunched the Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund, with an additional $264 million to keep Kentuckians safe and housed throughout the pandemic.


“With more Kentuckians rolling up their sleeves and receiving these safe and effective vaccines, we see the light at the end of the tunnel growing brighter by the day,” said Gov. Beshear. "But it will take months before everyone can receive their shot of hope, and until then, we need to ensure our people can stay healthy at home as much as possible.”


Starting Feb. 15, tenants who qualify can apply for rent and utility assistance to cover their past-due and future bills. If approved, lump sum, direct payments will be made to landlords and utility providers.


“Nearly a year into the pandemic, Kentuckians are still grappling with the economic effects of COVID-19,” said Winston Miller, KHC executive director. “This assistance will help keep renters housed, allow landlords to get substantial payments for back rent and reduce the number of evictions in Kentucky courts.” 


The U.S. Treasury Department recently allocated $297 million in federal Coronavirus Relief Funds to the state of Kentucky, Lexington-Fayette County Urban County Government and Louisville-Jefferson County Metro Government to help renters impacted economically by COVID-19. The money will be distributed as three separate programs:


--To apply in Jefferson County, go to stopmyeviction.org.


--To apply in Fayette County, go to covid19renterhelp.org.


--In Kentucky’s 118 other counties, go to teamkyhherf.ky.gov.


The Team Kentucky Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund (representing 118 counties) will receive $264 million of the $297 million allocated for the state.


The funds will offer the same benefits to approved applicants: 100% of past-due rent, dating back to April 2020, and up to three months of future payments.


Those applying through the Team Kentucky portal also can receive help with past-due and future utility bills.


“Throughout the pandemic, many households have struggled with expenses,” said Wendy Smith, KHC’s deputy director of housing programs. “This essential eviction relief can help renters get caught up on rent and utilities.”


The Beshear administration offered a similar plan between September and December of 2020, which helped 4,135 households avoid eviction with nearly $15 million in assistance. The new fund’s structure and requirements are similar to that program.


Click on one of the above links to find out more.  

 

WINTER STORM WARNING....

 
...WINTER STORM WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 7 PM EST /6 PM CST/ THIS EVENING TO 1 PM EST /NOON CST/ TUESDAY...
 
* WHAT...Heavy mixed precipitation expected. Total snow and sleet
  accumulations of 3 to 7 inches and ice accumulations between a
  light glaze and a quarter of an inch.
 
* WHERE...Portions of central Kentucky south of the Bluegrass and
  Western Kentucky Parkways.
 
* WHEN...From 7 PM EST /6 PM CST/ this evening to 1 PM EST /noon
  CST/ Tuesday.
 
* IMPACTS...Travel could be very difficult to impossible. The
  hazardous conditions could impact the morning or evening
  commute.
 
PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...
 
If you must travel, keep an extra flashlight, food, and water in
your vehicle in case of an emergency.
 
For Kentucky road conditions please visit https://goky.ky.gov
 

SENATOR MAX WISE'S LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

 

Through icy road conditions and frigid temperatures, the Kentucky General Assembly completed another 3-days of legislative business in Frankfort. I hope you have remained safe during the winter weather that’s rolled into the bluegrass recently. Join me in taking a moment to thank the fantastic folks who have braved it to keep our lights on and our roads clear.

 

Amid ongoing budget discussions, key legislation to address challenges facing our state continues through the legislative process here in Frankfort. Several priority measures have already passed this session, including Senate Bills (SB) 1 and 2, and House Bills (HB) 1, 2, 3, and 5.

 

Another priority bill came one step closer to join that list this week after it cleared a Senate committee with approval.

 

Senate Bill 5 aims to reassure many sectors of our society as they continue to navigate in the era of COVID-19. It would provide liability protection for everyone who owns, leases, or controls premises that the public enters to obtain goods or services or to conduct activities. If passed, public and private schools, churches, entertainment/sports venues, government agencies, homeowners, and more would be provided liability protection. SB 5, however, would not protect any business or other organization that acts grossly, negligently, or with malice regarding safety requirements.

 

The bill outlines services that may prove essential during a given state of emergency. We have all gained a greater appreciation for the various sectors in our society that are essential, even if only to an individual reliant on them. Parents have struggled to balance the need for childcare and work to provide for their families. Students have felt the negative impacts of virtual learning compared to their full in-person learning experience at school. Business owners and employees have experienced the stresses of meeting safety guidelines while still earning enough to keep doors open and bills paid. Under SB 5, those individuals and businesses providing services would be protected from liability during a formal state of emergency and for a year after the emergency is declared.

 

Additional legislation receiving passage in the Senate included:

 

Senate Bill 12 preserves the nonprofit nature of eye tissue donation by prohibiting for-profit entities from procuring any eye, cornea, eye tissue, or corneal tissue. It ensures that a person may not, for valuable consideration, knowingly purchase, sell, transfer, or offer to buy, sell, or transfer any human organ for transplantation or therapy.

 

Senate Bill 16 updates the Colon Cancer Screening Program with its fund and advisory committee to include "and Prevention" in the title. It requires funds from the sale of special cancer prevention license plates to be directed to the program fund and used solely for colon cancer screening and prevention. The bill also updates the membership of the program's advisory committee. It requires the Department for Medicaid Services to present statistics on cancer services related to colorectal cancer annually and upon request.

 

Kentucky has done an excellent job in recent years on the cancer screening and prevention front. We were once ranked 49th in this area and have reached a ranking as high as 17th. We currently rank about 22nd. More work is left to do in our ongoing fight against cancer, but I am pleased that we are re-strategizing our efforts through improved legislation such as this. 

 

Senate Bill 29 provides Kentucky's Attorney General, Commonwealth Attorneys, and County Attorneys security against financial liability resulting from their sworn duties' performance to prosecute state law. Losses would be compensated by funds appropriated to the Finance & Administration Cabinet.

 

Senate Bill 36 removes the automatic transfer of a child from a district court to a circuit court to be tried as an adult in cases involving the use of firearms. The bill brings juvenile cases involving a gun in alignment with the standards applied to any other juvenile case. It would require the district court to consider whether or not the child has a severe intellectual disability, as well.

 

Senate Bill 73 extends the timeline for action for the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights in cases before them. Currently, the commission is struggling with caseloads that staffing levels are not fully able to manage.

 

Senate Bill 74 renames the current Office on Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders to the Office of Dementia Services. The bill serves to elevate dementia-related services within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS). Additionally, it updates the membership and duties of the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Advisory Council. SB 74 establishes a Dementia Coordinator position that will help refresh the state health plan every four years to improve diagnosis and treatment of dementia and help apply for federal grants that can be used to treat dementia.

 

Senate Bill 80 strengthens oversight of peace officers who conduct themselves in a criminal or unprofessional way by easing a council’s ability to revoke certification. The bill also puts in place hiring procedures that will help ensure an officer avoids consequences by leaving one agency to work for another.

 

Senate Bill 84 provides women in state correctional facilities who are pregnant with an understanding of the community-based resources available to them by connecting them with social workers to help in the child's placement. This bill ends placing pregnant inmates, or those within six weeks of delivery of the child, in solitary confinement. I consider this a pro-life measure. We must keep the best interest of an innocent child in mind.

 

SB 120 allows for the continuation of historical horse racing gambling following a Supreme Court of Kentucky ruling that this gaming was incompatible with the definition of pari-mutuel wagering. I voted "no" on this bill for two significant reasons. First, I think this process is wrong. According to Section 226 of our state constitution, only the lottery and charitable gaming are permitted in Kentucky. The appropriate approach to achieving this bill's goal is to amend the Constitution of Kentucky. That would have to occur by placing an amendment on voters' next general election ballot to decide. The Kentucky Lottery was established in this manner back in 1988. It is only appropriate we apply that standard to other forms of gambling. The only way this issue finally gets settled is when the people of Kentucky get to voice their opinion.

 

As you can see, the General Assembly is hard at work. I am hopeful that inclement weather will not slow down our efforts. If the weather should remain as brutal as it has been, please be safe and mindful when you’re out.

 

I look forward to keeping you updated through the remainder of the session. God Bless!

 

If you have any questions or comments about these issues or any other public policy issue, please call me toll-free at 1-800-372-7181 or email me Max.Wise@LRC.ky.gov.

 

LCDHD COVID-19 UPDATE - THURSDAY, FEB. 11, 2021

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 7.08%.

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 337 deaths resulting in a 1.75% mortality rate (about 1 in 57) among known cases. This compares with a 1.09% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.73% mortality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 55 cases in the hospital. This is 14 less than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 1,074 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.57% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.63%. The latest data shows that 97.78% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 41.67% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 19,291 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 9.24% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 151 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 7; Casey: 11; Clinton: 12; Cumberland: 1; Green: 9; McCreary: 15; Pulaski: 42; Russell: 25; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 12. In all, we have released 94.3% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 54 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 759 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,341.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Family, Schools, and Medical Facilities. Of our active cases, 9% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 97 today: Adair: 5; Casey: 3; Clinton: 6; Cumberland: 1; Green: 2; McCreary: 14; Pulaski: 16; Russell: 20; and, Taylor: 30. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.006. This means our total case count is projected to double every 119.2 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 87-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 8-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 3-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 13-year-old male who is released, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 2months-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 65-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 17-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 7 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 91-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 84-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 72-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 48-year-old male who is released, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 85-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close look at our data may appear that Pulaski and Wayne’s numbers are off today. This is because we moved 1 case from Wayne to Pulaski.

 

We added fewer cases today than last Thursday, so our 7-day average incidence rate lowered slightly. Cumberland remains our only county in the “orange-critical” range of community-spread. The remaining 9 counties are in the “red-critical” range of community spread.

 

As I listened to the Governor’s update today, I noted at least 3 new vaccination sites for our area: TJ Health Columbia as a regional hub; Campbellsville Kroger as a pharmacy site; and Campbellsville Wal-mart as a pharmacy site. I am in the process of verifying this, along with the contact information and the weekly supply. I’ll update the “vaccine” section of our Daily Brief once all of the needed information is obtained.

 

Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 19,291 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 385,559 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 384,903 statewide plus 656 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the COVID-19 guidance. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

COVID-19 Vaccination Status

Regional Hubs

The Governor recently announced additional sites where vaccines for Phase 1a and 1b, including 70 and older, have opened. More sites, including more Lake Cumberland area sites, will be opening in the weeks to come. You may call 1-855-598-2246, or visit vaccine.ky.gov to find out if you are eligible and where you can receive the vaccine. Remember, supplies are still limited, it may take several weeks to secure an appointment.

  • Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital: Five hundred prime/1st dose vaccines are coming into the Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital each week for folks in the 1a and 1b group, including those 70 and older. Their COVID-19 hotline phone number 1-844-675-3390.
  • TJ Columbia: Some prime/1st dose vaccines will be coming into the TJ Columbia each week for folks in the 1a and 1b group, including those 70 and older. Their COVID-19 hotline phone number 1-270-659-1010.

Nursing and Personal Care Homes

Locally, through a contract with the federal government, Walgreens and CVS pharmacies continue to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff.

Health Department

Right now, all our our appointment slots are filled. Please do not leave your information on our answering machines or voice mails. We are not keeping any sort of waiting list. We have hope that we will start getting a consistent allocation of vaccine soon. Watch our Daily Brief and social media for updates.

Pharmacies

The following local pharmacies will soon begin/has already begun receiving a limited supply of vaccine.
 

Pharmacy Name Location County Location Address Location City
Adair Drug Adair 510 Burkesville Street Suite 1 Columbia
Green River Pharmacy Casey 50 Dillon Street Liberty
Walgreens Pharmacy Green 603 Columbia Highway Greensburg
Walgreens Pharmacy Mccreary 500 North Highway 27 Whitley City
Jay’S Pharmacy Inc Pulaski 400 South Highway 27 Somerset
Walgreens Pharmacy Pulaski 600 South Highway 27 Somerset
Hometown Pharmacy Taylor 325 East Broadway Street Campbellsville
Kroger Taylor 399 Campbellsville Bypass Campbellsville
Wal-mart Taylor 725 Campbellsville Bypass Campbellsville

School Clinics

All 1st dose/prime dose clinics have been completed for all areas schools, public and private/Christian, that requested vaccine. Thanks to Taylor Regional Hospital, Cumberland Family Medical, Lake Cumberland Medical Associates, and Kroger; along with everyone at the schools who made this effort a success.

 

1440 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY AND 42 NEW DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 12, 2021) – On Friday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state’s positivity rate declined again to 6.95%, the lowest rate since Nov. 6.

 

“It looks like we’re going to have fewer cases than last week which would give us five straight weeks of declining cases. The positivity rate also continues to decline,” said Gov. Beshear. “This says you’re doing the right things and we’re headed in the right direction. But even if you’ve been vaccinated, we have to continue to wear masks and social distance until we can defeat this thing once and for all.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 12, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,440
New deaths today: 42
Positivity rate: 6.95%
Total deaths: 4,253
Currently hospitalized: 1,063
Currently in ICU: 277
Currently on ventilator: 154

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Kenton, Boone and Fayette. Each county reported at least 80 new cases.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Also today, Gov. Beshear visited the Louisville Regional Vaccination Site at Broadbent Arena for LouVax International Community Day (photo here) and the Lexington Vaccine Public Awareness Campaign (photos here and here) at the Consolidated Baptist Church on Russell Cave Road. Both events sought to promote equitable access of the vaccine and encouraged all Kentucky communities to roll up their sleeves for the shot of hope.

 

In Louisville, the Governor said, “Being in this building, seeing what is behind us, is a moving experience. It’s hard to put it into words. You see compassion; you see hope; you even see victory. This is a special place, filled with special people who are coming together to get us to the other side of the greatest challenge that we have faced in our lifetimes. Just being here lifts you up, helps you breathe in, gets you ready to fight that next day, and lets us absolutely know that we are going to get through this, we’re going to make it to the other side, and we’re going to defeat COVID-19.”

 

In Lexington, the Governor thanked faith leaders saying, “From the start of this pandemic, our faith leaders have stepped up to protect their congregations and their communities. So often, you lead by example in so many parts of our lives, and your efforts to keep our people safe during this time are inspiring.”

 

The Governor added, “I am determined to do what I can – now – to make sure historical wrongs like an unequal access to health care do not carry forward. Health care is a basic human right and this principle is one of the basic guiding values of this administration.”

 

The administration continues to listen and work to address vaccine equity. Thursday, Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman announced new community partnerships that aim to help remove vaccine barriers.

 

Week in Review
For more information on this week’s updates, including those on Wieland North America planning a headquarters in Louisville, the Team Kentucky fund donating $380,000 to mission-aligned local nonprofitsthe state’s focus on equitable vaccine accessAppHarvest’s high-tech indoor farm in MoreheadKentucky Fresh Harvest opening the first high-tech vegetable greenhouse in the Bluegrasslong-term care access to the COVID-19 vaccineKentucky's broadband speed test initiativethe relaunch of the Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fundmore than 150 vaccination sites announced,  unemployment insurance and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

2 ADAIR CO. MEN ARRESTED ON DRUG CHARGES...

 

The Columbia Police Department responded to a vandalism complaint on West Frazier Avenue, Thursday afternoon, February 11. While on scene, Officers observed a vehicle parked in the area which had a very strong odor of marijuana emanating from the vehicle.

 
After making contact with two males, they were both found to be in possession narcotics and paraphernalia, with one male additionally in possession of a large sum of cash and scales resulting in trafficking charges.

 
William Miller, 29, of Columbia has been charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance, Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Trafficking in a Controlled Substance (Methamphetamine). 

 

A second male, Jimmy Pyles, 27, also of Columbia has been charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.

 
Officer Evan Burton made the arrests. He was assisted on scene by Officer Gary Roy and Sgt Jr Murphy.

 

RUSSELL SPRINGS CITY COUNCIL MEETING RECAP 02/11/21

 

The Russell Springs City Council met Thursday evening for the regular monthly meeting. Mayor Eddie Thomas shares with WAVE listeners what took place....

 

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-12-21

 

 

Russell County, 20 new cases Thursday. We had 25 cases released from isolation. We now have 125 active cases of which 120 cases are self-isolated and 5 cases are hospitalized, 1 each at Bowling Green, Danville, Somerset, UK and Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County, 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 7 cases. We have had 1,594 total cases with 1,507 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 38 active cases with 35 of those in home isolation. We have 3 case in the hospital at this time.

Gov. Beshear Launches $264 Million Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 11, 2021) – In partnership with the Kentucky Housing Corporation (KHC), Gov. Andy Beshear relaunched the Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund today with an additional $264 million to keep Kentuckians safe and housed throughout the pandemic.

 

“The Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund follows earlier, similar efforts to help our people stay in their homes, while also providing relief to landlords and utility companies,” said Gov. Beshear. “This is so important. With more Kentuckians rolling up their sleeves and receiving these safe and effective vaccines, we see the light at the end of the tunnel growing brighter by the day. But it will take months before everyone can receive their shot of hope, and until then, we need to ensure our people can stay healthy at home as much as possible.”

 

Starting Feb. 15, tenants who qualify can apply for rent and utility assistance to cover their past-due and future bills. If approved, lump sum, direct payments will be made to landlords and utility providers.

 

“Nearly a year into the pandemic, Kentuckians are still grappling with the economic effects of COVID-19,” said Winston Miller, KHC executive director. “This assistance will help keep renters housed, allow landlords to get substantial payments for back rent and reduce the number of evictions in Kentucky courts.” 

 

The U.S. Treasury Department recently allocated $297 million in federal Coronavirus Relief Funds to the state of Kentucky, Lexington-Fayette County Urban County Government and Louisville-Jefferson County Metro Government to help renters impacted economically by COVID-19. The money will be distributed as three separate programs:

 

The Team Kentucky Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund (representing 118 counties) will receive $264 million of the $297 million allocated for the state.

 

All of the funds will offer the same benefits to approved applicants – 100% of past-due rent, dating back to April 2020 – and up to three months of future payments.

 

Those applying through the Team Kentucky portal also can receive help with past-due and future utility bills.

“Throughout the pandemic, many households have struggled with expenses,” said Wendy Smith, KHC’s deputy director of housing programs. “This essential eviction relief can help renters get caught up on rent and utilities.”

 

The Beshear administration offered a similar plan last year – from September to December, the state helped 4,135 households avoid eviction with nearly $15 million in assistance. The new fund’s structure and requirements are similar to those of the original Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund:

 

  • Renters in the 118 counties covered by the state program must have at least one household member who experienced one of the following during the pandemic: qualified for unemployment benefits; experienced a reduction in income; or experienced other financial hardship.
  • Renters must be at risk of eviction as evidenced by a pending court eviction, or a past-due notice.
  • Tenants must meet certain income guidelines. An income calculator is available at teamkyhherf.ky.gov.
    • Household income must not exceed 80% of Area Median Income, adjusted by county and for household size.
    • Income determination will be based on the documents the tenant submits with their application.
    • Tenants can submit either their 2020 IRS tax return or documentation of income for the past 60 days (paystubs/unemployment insurance statements, etc.). They should submit whichever demonstrates that they fall under the program income limits.
  • To qualify, both the landlord and tenant should apply at teamkyhherf.ky.gov. Applications are processed more quickly when both the landlord and the tenant apply online.
  • Maximum rent relief: 100% of past-due rent since April 1, 2020, and three months future rent.
  • Maximum utility relief: 100% of past-due utilities since April 1, 2020, and three months of future utilities. Assistance can cover gas, electric, water, sewer and/or wastewater bills.
  • If approved, lump sum, direct payments will be made to landlords and utility providers.
  • Landlords must forgive any late fees, penalties and interest related to non-payment of rent. 
  • Landlords must also agree to not begin eviction proceedings until at least 45 days after the period covered by assistance.
  • Tenants/landlords may reapply subject to funding availability.

 

The Governor asked landlords and utility companies to please exercise patience with low-income tenants who are behind on payments.

 

“If a tenant is evicted, this fund cannot cover past-due bills. If the utility gets shut off, we won’t be able to get a prompt direct payment to the utility,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Finally, he announced that a third party can help tenants apply if a tenant does not have access to a smart phone or computer, or if they are elderly or disabled.  This could be family, a friend, fellow church member, caseworker, community organization staff member and so on. The helper will be able identify themselves as someone helping the applicant and can provide contact information in case we need to gather more information.

 

A detailed description of the program can be found at teamkyhherf.ky.gov.

 

LCDHD COVID-19 REPORT - WEDNESDAY, FEB. 10TH

 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 7.5%.
 
Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 337 deaths resulting in a 1.76% mortality rate (about 1 in 57) among known cases. This compares with a 1.09% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.73% mortality rate at the national level.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 69 cases in the hospital. This is 5 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 1,071 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.58% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.62%. The latest data shows that 97.78% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 40% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 19,194 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 9.19% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 101 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 6; Casey: 5; Clinton: 6; Cumberland: 3; Green: 4; McCreary: 14; Pulaski: 35; Russell: 12; Taylor: 13; and, Wayne: 3. In all, we have released 94% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 51 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 813 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,341.
 
Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Medical Facilities. We have had 67 cases tied to Christmas gaterings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 15 tied to New Year’s events. Of our active cases, 8% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 152 today: Adair: 9; Casey: 13; Clinton: 12; Green: 4; McCreary: 13; Pulaski: 41; Russell: 24; Taylor: 21; and, Wayne: 15. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.006. This means our total case count is projected to double every 114.34 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases. 
 
Today’s new cases include:
Adair: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 84-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 82-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 64-year-old female who is released, Resolved;
Casey: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 72-year-old male who is released, Resolved;
Casey: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Casey: A 66-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Clinton: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 10-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 10-year-old male who is released, Resolved;
McCreary: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 1-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 53-year-old female who is hospitalized, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 5-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old male who is released, Resolved;
Taylor: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
 
We are glad for no new deaths today. Our district’s ICU capacity, though, is experiencing over 97% utilization and the ventilator capacity or our area hospitals is at 40% usage. We added more new case today than last Wednesday. Thus, our 7-day average incidence rate went up slightly. We are glad to see Cumberland drop into the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread. All our other 9 counties remain in the “red-critical” range of community-spread.
 
Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 19,194 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 383,752 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 383,032 statewide plus 720 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the COVID-19 guidance. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.
 
For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.
 
COVID-19 Vaccination Status
 
Regional Hubs
The Governor recently announced additional sites where vaccines for Phase 1a and 1b, including 70 and older, have opened. More sites, including more Lake Cumberland area sites, will be opening in the weeks to come. You may call 1-855-598-2246, or visit vaccine.ky.gov to find out if you are eligible and where you can receive the vaccine. Remember, supplies are still limited, it may take several weeks to secure an appointment.
 
Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital: Five hundred prime/1st dose vaccines are coming into the Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital each week for folks in the 1a and 1b group, including those 70 and older. Their COVID-19 hotline phone number 1-844-675-3390.
 
Nursing and Personal Care Homes
Locally, through a contract with the federal government, Walgreens and CVS pharmacies continue to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff.
 
Health Department
Right now, all our our appointment slots are filled. Please do not leave your information on our answering machines or voice mails. We are not keeping any sort of waiting list. We have hope that we will start getting a consistent allocation of vaccine soon. Watch our Daily Brief and social media for updates.
 
Pharmacies
The following local pharmacies will soon (some reported receiving some today) begin receiving a limited supply of vaccine.
 
Pharmacy Name                        Address                           City
Adair Drug Adair                510 Burkesville Street            Columbia
Green River Pharmacy      50 Dillon Street                        Liberty
Walgreens Pharmacy        603 Columbia Highway          Greensburg
Walgreens Pharmacy        500 North Highway 27            Whitley City
Jay’s Pharmacy Inc           400 South Highway 27            Somerset
Walgreens Pharmacy        600 South Highway 27            Somerset
Hometown Pharmacy      325 East Broadway Street       Campbellsville
 
School Clinics
All 1st dose/prime dose clinics have been completed for all areas schools, public and private/Christian, that requested vaccine. Thanks to Taylor Regional Hospital, Cumberland Family Medical, Lake Cumberland Medical Associates, and Kroger; along with everyone at the schools who made this effort a success.

CLOSINGS & CANCELLATIONS

 

 

  • There will be no In-Person Instruction due to Inclement weather on Friday, Feb 12th.  Also as a reminder, Monday is a no-school day because of Presidents Day.

 

  • Russell County In-person classes for Thursday and Friday (2/11 and 2/12) have been canceled. All students will log in, join their Meets, and complete their work virtually in Google Classroom.  
     
  • Bruss North America Inc. 2nd & 3rd shifts will not report today.

 

  • All Adair County government offices are closed today (Thursday).  Road crews were out all night pre-treating roads. Temperatures are now starting to drop and road conditions are expected to deteriorate as the day goes on.
     
  • The Lindsey Wilson men’s and women’s basketball games against Cumberlands (Ky.) that were scheduled for tonight in Williamsburg, Kentucky have been canceled. The cancelation was due to inclement weather. The game will not be made up due to the regular season ending next Saturday. Lindsey Wilson is now scheduled to return to action on the road in Pikeville (Ky.) on Saturday. The women’s team will begin play at 12:30 p.m. CT while the men will follow at 3 p.m. CT.

 

  • Due to inclement weather, the Columbia Planning and Zoning public hearing scheduled for tonight (Thursday) has been rescheduled for next Thursday, February 18, 2021 at 6:00pmCT. The purpose of the meeting is for a request for a zone change from R1 (Residential) to C2 (Commercial) for property located at 614 Fairground Street owned by Easton Bryant. The hearing is open to the public. 

 

  • Coffey's Vet Center is closed today (Thursday)

 

  • Adair Family Medical closing at 3pm today (Thursday).

 

  • Best Financial in Col. & R.S. closed today.

 

  • Russell Co. Priary Care Associates will close at 3pm today (Thursday).

 

  • Genesis Family Healthcare closed today. Open Friday at 9am.

 

  • Cooks Transmission closed today

 

  • Adair Co. Extension Office closed today

 

  • Lindsey Wilson College will be doing remote instruction on Thursday and only essential staff should report to work.

 

  • The City of Columbia garbage pickup will start early due to pending icy weather conditions. Pickup will begin at 7:30pmCT on Wednesday evening. If you normally have your trash picked up on Thursday, please have it out on Wednesday evening.

 

  • Burton's Garbage and Jones Garbage are not running Thursday.

 

  • Family First Healhcare in Columbia will be closed on Thursday.

 

  • Campbellsville Univ. classes will be virtual on Thursday.

 

  • No Headstart classes in Russell Springs or Jamestown on Thursday.

 

  • New Path Medical Center in Columbia will be closed on Thursday.

 

  • The Lake Cumberland District Health Department will be rescheduling COVID 19 Vaccination Clinics scheduled for this week. The vaccination clinic scheduled for Thursday, February 11th and Friday, February 12th are being rescheduled due to pending inclement weather. All patient appointments will be rescheduled for the same time as the original appointment. Patients will receive notification by phone or text by the health department.
     
  • Adanta TR Programs will be closed on Thursday

 

  • The Russell County Health Department will be rescheduling the COVID 19 Vaccination Clinic scheduled for Friday, February 12, 2021. The clinic is rescheduled for Friday, February 19, 2021. All patient appointments will be at the same time. Patients will receive notification by phone or text.

 

  • The Adair County Fiscal Court Jail Committee will be rescheduling the Jail Committee meeting from Thursday, February 11, 2021 to Monday, February 15, 2021 at 8:00 A.M. CT due to the chance of inclement weather. The meeting will still be held in the basement of the Adair Annex. The public is invited to attend. Face masks will be mandatory and all COVID restrictions set by the Governor will be enforced.  

 

 

District 8 Crews Work Overnight Patrolling and Treating Routes

 

SOMERSET, Ky. (Feb. 11, 2021) – Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) District 8 highway crews reported for snow and ice duty overnight patrolling and treating routes as necessary.

 

Roadways across the district are mainly wet, with crews in Clinton, Lincoln and Rockcastle Counties reporting some areas of icy spots, mainly on higher elevations. Air temperatures remain near or below freezing and are expected to continue to fall which could cause conditions to deteriorate.

 

Crews will continue monitoring road conditions and treating routes as needed throughout the day.

 

For real-time traffic information or to keep up with state snowfighters in your county, visit http://GoKY.ky.gov. Follow District 8 updates on Twitter and Facebook at http://twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8  or http://facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8.

 

KYTC District 8 is responsible for maintaining state highways in Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Lincoln, McCreary, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Russell and Wayne counties.

 

Gov. Beshear Issues State of Emergency in Response to Dangerous Winter Storm

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 11, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear issued a State of Emergency as a dangerous winter storm blanketed much of the commonwealth in a wintry mix of snow and ice amid plunging temperatures.

 

“This winter storm already is causing some very dangerous conditions across much of the state, with iced-over roadways and downed power lines putting our people at risk,” the Governor said. “This declaration will free up funding and boost coordination across agencies as we respond to this weather crisis and work to keep all Kentuckians safe.”

 

The State of Emergency directs the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management (KYEM) and the Department of Military Affairs to execute the Kentucky Emergency Operations Plan and coordinate the response across state agencies and private relief groups.

 

It also directs the Finance and Administration Cabinet to provide funding for the response and authorizes the Division of Emergency Management to request additional resources.

 

As of about 10 a.m. EST Thursday, KYEM was aware of about 70,500 Kentucky customers with power outages.

 

Multiple crashes and intermittent closures on interstates, parkways and major routes across the state have occurred since last night into this morning due to icy roads, and downed trees and power lines.

 

Transportation crews aggressively treated roads throughout the night as breaks in the weather allowed. Widespread reports of downed trees and limbs have been reported, with the most impact in Central and Eastern Kentucky. Partners, including the Kentucky Division of Forestry, are helping with tree removal.

 

“Our crews worked overnight and are out in full force treating and plowing to maintain mobility along critical routes,” said Transportation Secretary Jim Gray. “The damaging effects of fallen debris and frigid temperatures create additional challenges and delays. It’s going to take days to recover from this event. We plead for the patience of the public and ask for their help by staying off the roads if possible.”

 

As of 10 a.m. today, the westbound lanes of Interstate Highway 24 in Christian County were closed at mile marker 81. Kentuckians are encouraged to visit snowky.ky.gov for travel information and links to follow social media pages for transportation updates.

 

Earlier Thursday morning, Gov. Beshear closed all state offices for the day to reduce traffic on perilous roadways.

 

Yesterday, the Governor said the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management activated its State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) to monitor the storm system and coordinate with critical Emergency Support Function partners in transportation, law enforcement, power and utilities. The SEOC remains activated at Level 3.

 

Also on Wednesday, Gov. Beshear updated Kentuckians about preparations being made by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet; plans to address postponed vaccination supplies; and safety information on the use of alternative heat sources. See the full news release here.

 

T.J. Health Columbia Celebrates 5th Anniversary

 

T.J. Regional Health is proud to be celebrating its 5th year in Columbia. On February 11, 2016, T.J. Regional Health acquired Westlake Regional Health to become T.J. Health Columbia.  Along with the acquisition came three clinics located in Columbia, Edmonton and Russell Springs.  
 

To date, T.J. Health Columbia has expanded services to include 24/7 Emergency Care, Inpatient Hospital Care, MRI, Laboratory, Pulmonology, Cardiology, OB/GYN, Pediatric Care, Sleep Medicine, Rehabilitation Services and Primary Care.

 

T.J. Regional Health currently employs over 1,300 people including 50 primary and specialty care physicians and providers. 
 

T.J. Regional Health would like to thank the members of these communities for their continued support and we look forward to continue to provide high quality health care.

 

A.C. Solid Waste Coordinator Saddened the Recycling Center is Closing

 
The Adair County Recycling Center will be closed effective immediately as voted on by the Adair County Fiscal Court at Tuesday night’s meeting. It saddens me the County has to do this since we have so many within the county that utilize these services. But, after hearing the public’s comments and suggestions, it was decided in lieu of adding an additional tax burden on the community to make cuts within. The Recycling Center has always been a service to make Adair County better, not a profit-making or self-sustaining operation. I want to personally thank all of the dedicated citizens who have kept tons of garbage out of our dumps by recycling and strive to make Adair County a clean and beautiful place to live.
 

Bridget Compton
Adair County Fiscal Court Clerk,
Solid Waste Coordinator

 

Gov. Beshear, State Officials Provide Update on Winter Storm

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 10, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear updated Kentuckians on a hazardous winter storm system that will impact communities across the state starting today.

 

The Governor was joined by Transportation Secretary and Vaccine Distribution Project Director Jim Gray and Kentucky Division of Emergency Management (KYEM) Director Michael Dossett, who are leading efforts to keep Kentucky families safe and vaccine doses secure during the storm.

 

“Protecting our Kentucky families is the main mission of my administration. So earlier today, KYEM activated its State Emergency Operations Center (EOC) at 7 a.m. EST at Level 4 operations,” said Gov. Beshear. “We urge all Kentuckians to stay tuned to their local media for information on weather, visit snowky.ky.gov for snow and ice resources and goky.ky.gov to check road conditions. 

 

“We know that road conditions are starting to worsen and rush hour is expected to be dangerous. So I am closing all state offices beginning at 2:30 p.m. EST today. State employees able to telecommute and essential employees designated for mandatory operations should continue to report to work as directed by agency management. Employees should direct questions regarding this closure to their management or human resources departments.

 

“Thank you to every worker out on the roads today keeping our people safe. We’ve gotten really good at taking care of each other – let’s make sure that’s not reserved for the pandemic, but during this storm and any other emergency.”

“The EOC will support our city and county emergency services partners in law enforcement, transportation, power and utilities. The center will be staffed continuously until this severe weather event ends,” said Director Dossett. “The heaviest precipitation will occur at 5 p.m. today through 3 a.m. Thursday morning. The greatest area of impact will be along the Blue Grass Parkway and Western Kentucky Parkway.

 

“Snow showers are expected on Saturday and another weather system is expected Monday into Tuesday. We’re asking that non-essential travel be postponed due to the extraordinarily dangerous driving conditions. Our Kentucky State Police and KYTC partners will be out in force to assist Kentuckians in need.

 

“This is the time to review your safety plan for an unexpected power outage and to check on your extended family and neighbors.”

 

Ahead of the statewide snow event, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) crews have been monitoring the weather conditions, preparing equipment, restocking supplies and treating roads. Currently, crews are out across most of the state treating routes with salt mixed with calcium chloride and paying particular attention to areas prone to freezing, like bridges and overpasses. But Secretary Gray reminded Kentuckians road treatments may not be sufficient.

 

“When you’re dealing with extremely low temperatures, more salt is not the answer. It’s not as effective,” Secretary Gray said. “That’s why we really need Kentuckians to be good neighbors and avoid driving if you don’t have to. It’s better to be stranded at home instead of on a roadway. If you have to be out, be sure to reduce your speed, give crews space, have an emergency kit in your vehicle and don’t drive on shoulders.”

 

Vaccination Appointments Postponed
The Governor also reminded Kentuckians that vaccination appointments for Thursday, Feb. 11, at Kroger regional vaccine sites will be rescheduled for the following Thursday, Feb. 18, for the same time to ensure the safety of all staff, volunteers and those being vaccinated.

 

“Like I said yesterday, for all of you who have waited a really long time to get this appointment and now have to wait an extra week, I am really sorry. But I also don’t want to put you out on the roads with thick ice. It’s just not safe,” said Gov. Beshear. “Wear your mask, be careful over this next week and we will get you vaccinated.”

 

The Kroger Health sites are the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, the Northern Kentucky Convention Center in Covington and the Greenwood Mall in Bowling Green.

 

“Other vaccination sites across the state may reschedule appointments if needed. If you have an appointment scheduled for this afternoon, Thursday, or even Friday, keep a close eye on your email and voicemail box so you get any important notifications from your provider,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

Safe Vaccine Storage
“Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines have cold temperature requirements for storage. Every site should have a plan for ensuring safe storage of their vaccine supply so that no doses are lost or wasted,” added Gov. Beshear. “In some cases, that means transferring the supply to another location for temporary storage. In others, sites have reliable back-up generators. Every site also has been notified of resources available to them for assistance.”

 

Power Outage, Alternative Heat Source Safety
Icing is projected with this storm, which could cause downed power lines and power outages. If you experience a downed power line or power outage, please contact your local utility company.

 

If possible, prepare for the need to use an alternate source of heat. Be aware of the dangers of alternate heat sources and carbon monoxide poisoning. Generators, camp stoves or charcoal grills should always be used outdoors and at least 20 feet away from windows. Never use a gas stovetop or oven to heat your home. Visit http://www.cdc.gov/co/guidelines.htm for more information.

                            

Earlier today, the Governor issued a news release about the State Emergency Operations Center being activated. To read the release, click here.

 

Campbellsville Woman Charged with Burglary at Walmart

 
On Tuesday, February 9, 2021 at 1:40pmET, Campbellsville Police received a call of a female in Walmart who had previously been trespassed from Walmart. Officer Aaron Fields responded and as he arrived on scene, the female in question, 40 year old Ashley Allen of Campbellsville, pushed a full cart of merchandise out the door without paying for it. As she was approached by Walmart Asset Protection, Ms. Allen ran into the parking lot where Officer Fields took her into custody.  Ms. Allen was arrested and charged with Burglary 3rd degree and lodged in the Taylor County Dentention Center. 

1914 COVID-19 CASES & 49 NEW DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 10, 2021) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state’s positivity rate has decreased again to 7.5%.

 

“We are still seeing far too many deaths, but this decreased positivity rate is a really hopeful leading indicator,” said Gov. Beshear. “We have come so far in our fight against this virus – now, we need to hang on until we reach the finish line.”

 

This afternoon, Gov. Beshear updated Kentuckians on a hazardous winter storm system that is affecting communities across the state and will make travel dangerous today and Thursday. To learn more see the full release.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 10, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,914
New deaths today: 49
Positivity rate: 7.5%
Total deaths: 4,175
Currently hospitalized: 1,191
Currently in ICU: 336
Currently on ventilator: 169

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette and Kenton. Each of these counties reported 74 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 244. To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-10-21

 

 

Russell County, 18 new cases Tuesday. We had 11 cases released from isolation. We now have 118 active cases of which 113 cases are self-isolated and 5 cases are hospitalized,1 at Bowling Green,1 at Danville,1 at Somerset,1 at UK and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County, 9 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 6 cases. We have had 1,580 total cases with 1,494 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 37 active cases with 35 of those in home isolation. We have 2 case in the hospital at this time.

KSP Provides Winter Weather Driving Update

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2021)  The Kentucky State Police has received several media requests for interviews regarding the impending winter weather storm expected to arrive in Kentucky later this evening. For that reason, and in an effort to assist all media outlets across the state, KSP is providing a taped video interview with KSP Spokesman Sergeant Billy Gregory for media dissemination. This taped interview contains commentary regarding winter weather driving with a focus on black ice, which is expected to be a significant factor with this winter storm.

 

To access the taped video interview with Sgt. Gregory please visit https://we.tl/t-R4ZLDGdfxk

 

Additional winter driving resources: http://kentuckystatepolice.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Roadway-Reminders-Winter-Weather-DSE.pdf

 

District 8 Crews Prepared for Significant Winter Storm

 

SOMERSET, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2021) – The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) District 8 highway crews are ready to respond to the forecasted winter storm expected to impact the region with freezing rain, snow and ice.

 

Weather forecasts call for the system arriving in the District 8 region Wednesday lasting through early Friday. The system is expected to being as rain changing over to a wintry mix with the potential of ice accumulations of a half-inch or more for much of our area.

 

Damage to trees and power lines is likely – a condition that poses its own dangers to KYTC crews and can delay road response work. The potential for single-digit cold temperatures impacts the effectiveness of road salt which works best when temperatures are above the freezing point. Motorists are strongly advised to avoid any unnecessary travel over the next several days.

 

KYTC District 8 crews have spent today loading salt, sharpening chainsaws, and preparing equipment for an extended winter weather response.  

 

During the storm, Kentucky Department of Highways crews will work 12-hour shifts, focusing on keeping high-priority state routes, such as interstates and parkways, passable. Crews then concentrate on heavily traveled state routes before turning to lower-volume routes. With the expected ice and arctic temperatures, Kentuckians should be prepared for several days of snow-covered roads.

 

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has established a snow emergency plan to deploy resources within each county, as needed, to cover routes based on priorities such as high traffic volume and connectivity to hospitals and other critical services. Snow priority maps for each county can be viewed online at http://SnowKY.ky.gov.

 

For real-time traffic information or to keep up with state snowfighters in your county, visit http://GoKY.ky.gov. Follow District 8 updates on Twitter and Facebook at http://twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8  or http://facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8.

 

KYTC District 8 is responsible for maintaining state highways in Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Lincoln, McCreary, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Russell and Wayne counties.

 

Gov. Beshear Announces 6% Increase in State's Vaccine Supply

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2021) – On Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the federal government increased Kentucky’s vaccine supply for the third time in three weeks, this time by six percent, for a total increase of 28%.

 

“The White House announced that we are going to get six percent more next week – that is on top of the previous increases and will have us up 28% over what we were previously getting three weeks ago,” said Gov. Beshear. “It’s not enough, but it’s great.”

 

The Governor also warned Kentuckians about significant snow and ice accumulation from late tonight until late Thursday night. For more details on the current forecast, click here, and visit the National Weather Service’s website or your local news outlet for live updates.

 

“The commonwealth is facing a significant ice and snow event starting tomorrow that will last until Thursday night. The storm is going to effect the entire state. The National Weather Service has a high confidence level of ice and snow accumulation during this period,” said Gov. Beshear. “We can expect some scattered power outages throughout the impacted areas. The winter storm will not have the far-reaching effects of the 2009 ice storm – thank goodness – but this is a dangerous weather system and we urge you to make a safety plan with family and check on your neighbors and friends. We need to be prepared.”

 

Vaccination appointments for Wednesday and Thursday at Kroger regional vaccine sites will be rescheduled to ensure the safety of all staff, volunteers and vaccine recipients.

 

“If you have waited a long time to get this appointment, I am really sorry. But I also don’t want to put you out on the roads with thick ice,” said Gov. Beshear. “Wear your mask, be careful over this next week and we will get you vaccinated.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 9, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,339
New deaths today: 35
Positivity rate: 7.66%
Total deaths: 4,126
Currently hospitalized: 1,204
Currently in ICU: 282
Currently on ventilator: 148

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Boone and Madison. Each of these counties reported 80 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 396. To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Long-Term Care Update
Cabinet for Health and Family Services Inspector General Adam Mather announced that CVS Health vaccinations are 88% complete in the state’s long-term care facilities and 79% complete in the state’s assisted living facilities. Walgreens vaccinations are 100% complete in long-term care facilities and 90% complete in assisted living facilities. CVS Health and Walgreens contracted with the federal government to provide long-term care and assisted living staff and resident vaccinations nationwide.

 

Mather also announced that vaccinations have begun for Supports for Community Living (SCL) residents. SCL provides assistance to individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability to help them live in the community as independently as possible.  

 

“There are a total of 137 SCL residential providers in the commonwealth and 103 counties have at least one SCL residential location,” Mather said. “We’ve already immunized 1,110 SCL residents out of 3,524 with the help of Walgreens, local health departments and community leaders. Within two weeks, each facility will at least have appointments scheduled. We’re very appreciative of Walgreens and their efforts.

 

“We’re currently working on an additional program with local health departments to reach out to our senior/elderly, lower-income congregate living spaces in order to get clinics set up for them. That really speaks to the equity challenges that we’re working so hard to address in the commonwealth.”

 

Kentucky Broadband Initiative
Today, Rocky Adkins, senior advisor to Gov. Beshear, updated Kentuckians on the state’s broadband speed test, which he said is a necessary step toward providing broadband internet connectivity to every Kentuckian.

 

“Closing the digital divide is critical for economic development, education and creating the jobs of the future right here in Kentucky,” said Adkins. “Three weeks into the speed test, I am happy to report that 52,803 households have participated so far. The counties with the highest participation rates so far are Caldwell, Scott, Harlan and Hancock counties. On the opposite end of the spectrum – we need you to help us spread the word in Jefferson, McCreary, Boone and Meade counties. We need everyone – no matter where you are from – to participate. It takes 30 seconds and is completely anonymous.”

 

Kentuckians can visit speedtest.ky.gov to take the test.

 

Gov. Beshear Visits Eastern Kentucky
On Tuesday, Gov. Beshear and Adkins toured AppHarvest’s flagship high-tech indoor farm in Morehead for the first time and spoke about the company’s success as it transforms Kentucky’s economy while creating good-paying jobs and providing fresh, sustainable produce to the Eastern United States. To learn more, see the full release.

 

“This is a part of Kentucky that is really making a difference, bringing innovation and vision, creating jobs of the future,” said Adkins.

 

“Gov. Beshear also visited Rajant, a wireless communications company that has been in Morehead for a few years, hiring the graduates coming out of the Space Science Center at Morehead State University and building bright futures in Eastern Kentucky as well,” Adkins added. “If you watched the Super Bowl the other night, on the NFL sidelines, the actual radio communications device coaches used were Rajant devices built by Morehead State graduates.”

 

Gov. Beshear today also visited the Kentucky Fresh Harvest (KFH) facility in Lincoln County. In October 2020, KFH officially opened the first high-tech vegetable greenhouse in the Bluegrass. To learn more, see the full release.

 

Memorial
“Today, we honor Marianne Lee Snowden from Walton, Kentucky, who passed away Thursday, Jan. 14 at St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Florence from complications due to COVID-19. Marianne was only 29 years old,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

“Marianne’s parents, Sherry and Herb Snowden, described her life as an epitome of love that radiated into everything she did.

 

“She had quite the knack for remembering birthdays; calling each of her friends and family members to sing happy birthday and make their day extra special. She was actively involved in NorthKey Community Care in Williamstown where she loved working in the greenhouse as a florist.

 

“Marianne was also very active in the Special Olympics where she loved cheerleading, running track, bowling and playing softball. She loved anything Disney and was a huge Cincinnati Bengals and Miami Dolphins fan.

 

“Marianne was sick for 11 days before she passed, begging to go home every day. Her mom stressed, ‘If you don’t think COVID is bad, it’s worse than you think. My daughter passed away from it. Gone almost four weeks and I don’t know what to do with myself. Send prayers, wear your masks and keep your distance.’ We are certainly praying for this family, and let’s mask up in Marianne’s honor.”

 

Transportation Crews Preparing for Significant Winter Storm Threatening Prolonged Icy Road Conditions

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2021) – Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) highway snowfighters today are preparing for a major winter storm packing damaging ice ahead of snow and possibly bitter cold that will impact road conditions across the state.

 

“Keeping roadways as safe as possible is one of the most important roles of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, and that is never more important than in snow and ice season,” said Gov. Andy Beshear. “The potential hazardous road conditions brought on by winter weather are another good reason Kentuckians are encouraged to stay healthy and safe at home.”

 

“This is forecast to be the kind of severe winter weather that presents us with multiple challenges – a prolonged storm with freezing rain, bringing a buildup of ice that not only makes for slick roads but also can bring down tree limbs and power lines,” Transportation Secretary Jim Gray said. “The ice will be followed by snow and possibly single-digit temperatures.”

 

Weather forecasts call for a mix of rain, freezing rain, sleet and snow beginning tonight, moving west to east. Ice accumulation of a half-inch or more, combined with 1 to 3 inches of snow, is possible over a broad area. Damage to trees and power lines is likely – a condition that poses its own dangers to KYTC crews and can delay road response work. The potential for single-digit cold temperatures impacts the effectiveness of road salt which works best when temperatures are above the freezing point. Motorists are strongly advised to avoid any unnecessary travel over the next several days.

 

The KYTC’s 12 highway district crews will pretreat routes, where appropriate, and monitor evolving weather and road conditions. Once a storm has begun, the focus is on keeping high-priority state routes, such as interstates and parkways, passable. Crews then concentrate on heavily traveled state routes before turning to lower-volume routes. Kentuckians should expect delays in road clearing efforts. The Cabinet has established a snow emergency plan to deploy resources within each county, as needed, to cover highest priority routes. Route designations are based on factors such as traffic volume and connectivity to hospitals and other critical services. Snow priority maps for each county can be viewed here.

 

KYTC has nearly 2,000 frontline employees, supplemented by contracted crews, to maintain safe travel on state routes – a mission complicated by the ongoing novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

 

KYTC snowfighters spend several months every year training, stocking up on salt and road treatment supplies and making sure the cabinet’s 1,024 plow trucks are serviced and ready. This year, the cabinet’s proactive planning had to take into account the COVID-19 pandemic, which to date has killed more than 4,000 Kentuckians and has the potential for sidelining entire work crews.

 

“We ask Kentuckians to partner with us by paying attention to weather advisories, limiting trips during poor weather conditions, and showing our crews grace as we make necessary adjustments brought on by the pandemic. This is uncharted territory and we will get through this together,” Secretary Gray said.

 

The public can partner by following these tips:

  • Reduce speed.
  • Give KYTC road crews space on the roads to work.
  • Have an emergency kit in the vehicle should you be stranded.
  • Stay in traffic lanes. Don’t drive on shoulders and emergency lanes.
  • If you encounter a traffic signal that isn’t working, treat it as a four-way stop.
  • Be patient. Remember that cleanup work is part of the job for KYTC crews.

 

Crews will follow healthy at work guidelines and maintenance facilities are closed to the public to minimize exposure. KYTC maintains the majority of roadways and bridges that are part of the State Highway System. Examples include interstates, parkways and U.S. route designations.

 

4 COVID-19 Deaths in Lake Cumberland District


Over the next 3 weeks, we will receive 4,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccine to spread across our district’s 10 counties. While we scheduled approximately 3,113 of those 4,000 appointments today, we still have appointment slots open in most counties and will continue making appointments on Tuesday, February 9th starting at 9:00 a.m. EST/8:00 a.m. CST. These are for people in Phase 1a or 1b including those 70 and older. Do not call early. Do not leave your information on our answering machine. We are not keeping waiting lists. We plan to have 20 phone lines open and 10 to 15 operators. However, we know the demand will be greater than the supply. We had over 300,000 attempted dial-ins today for our 4,000 slots. We apologize in advance for not being able to accommodate everyone.

 

When our scheduling call center goes live on Tuesday morning, these are the numbers to dial:

 


Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 7.78%

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 4 new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 336 deaths resulting in a 1.78% mortality rate (about 1 in 56) among known cases. This compares with a 1.08% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.72% mortality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 60 cases in the hospital. This is 4 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 1,062 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.62% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.6%. The latest data shows that 80% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 20.69% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 18,887 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 9.04% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 226 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 10; Casey: 15; Clinton: 19; Cumberland: 7; Green: 11; McCreary: 31; Pulaski: 54; Russell: 20; Taylor: 44; and, Wayne: 15. In all, we have released 94.5% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 123 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 694 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,341.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Medical Facilities. We have had 67 cases tied to Christmas gatherings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 15 tied to New Year’s events. Of our active cases, 9% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 107 today: Adair: 12; Casey: 4; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 2; Green: 9; Pulaski: 25; Russell: 20; Taylor: 24; and, Wayne: 6. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.006. This means our total case count is projected to double every 116.97 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases. 

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Cumberland: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 9-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 48-year-old male who is released, Resolved;
Green: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 82-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 69-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 55-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Russell: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 85-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 87-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 4-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is released, Resolved;
Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 5m -year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is released, Resolved;
Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 70-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The deaths we report today are: an 80-year-old individual from McCreary who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious but later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness; a 71-year-old individual from Pulaski who had been released from public health observation as no longer contagious but later succumbed to lasting complications from the illness; and an 82-year-old individual from Wayne who had been hospitalized. We had 1 additional death we are still trying to determine the primary cause of death.

 

If we combine Sunday and Monday together (since we didn’t work yesterday), we are starting this week off with fewer new cases than last. However, for the moment, all 10 of our district’s 10 counties are in the “red-critical” range of community-spread.

 

Please, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding touching our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 18,887 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 379,558 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 378,793 statewide plus 765 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released. 

 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the COVID-19 guidance. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-9-21

 

Russell County, 20 new cases reported Monday. We had 20 cases released from isolation. We now have 111 active cases of which 106 cases are self-isolated and 5 cases are hospitalized, 1 each at Danville, Bowling Green, Somerset, UK and Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County, 12 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 10 cases Monday.  We have had 1,571 total cases with 1,488 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 34 active cases with 32 of those in home isolation. We have 2 case in the hospital at this time.

RUSSELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT MET MONDAY NIGHT

 

 

Russell County Judge Executive Gary Robertson spoke with WAVE NEWS following Monday nights Fiscal Court Meeting and shared details of what took place... 

 

Local Real Estate Company Wins 3 Awards at State Convention

 

The Kentucky Auctioneer’s Association Convention was held this past weekend in Louisville and a local real estate company came home with 3 awards. 
 
Golden Rule Wilson Real Estate & Auction Company (with offices in Columbia and Russell Springs) won the following awards:
  • Best Facebook Marketing 
  • Best Newspaper Real Estate & Personal Property Ad (Blace & White) and 
  • Best Color Magazine Advertising 

 

Company owner Chris Wilson says: "these marketing awards represent the efforts of their entire auction team and staff". He went on to say: "we strive to market and promote each asset professionally and effectively, and Golden Rule takes great care in handling your property from start to finish".  
 
Also congratulations to Alex Popplewell of Russell Springs, KY on becoming one of the newest board members of the Kentucky Auctioneer’s Association.
 
 

ADAIR CO. FISCAL COURT SPECIAL CALLED MEETING FEB. 8TH

 
The Adair County Fiscal Court will meet in special called session Tuesday, February 9, 2021 at 6:00pmCT at 901 Hudson Street, Columbia, KY. This meeting will be open to the public. Face masks will be mandatory and all COVID restrictions set by the Governor will be enforced. 
                       
ACTION ITEMS ON THE AGENDA INCLUDE:
  • AMENDMENT TO 911 POLICY & PROCEDURES DISPATCHER QUALIFICATIONS. 
  • 911 PT-NEW HIRES 
  • JUDICIAL CENTER HVAC/BOILER BIDS DISCUSSION AND AWARDING
  • SOLID WASTE AND RECYCLING CENTER DISCUSISONS
  • FISCAL COURT TIME/VENUE CHANGES
  • REVENUE OPTIONS DISCUSSION WITH PUBLIC COMMENTS

   

                                                                          

Gov. Beshear: As New COVID-19 Cases Decline, State Focuses on Equitable Vaccine Access

 

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2021) – On Monday, as new cases continue to decline, Gov. Beshear said the state is working to address equitable vaccine access.

 

The Governor updated Kentuckians on the demographics of those vaccinated.

 

“One thing to note when you look at the vaccine demographic data: we have more individuals in long-term care under 70 than I had ever imagined,” said Gov. Beshear. “With that said, we need to continue to prioritize those 70 and older.

 

“Right now, more women than men have been vaccinated, but we suspect that reflects the health care and education sectors that have been in earlier phases. I think this will even out more when we get to Phase 1C.

 

“Black and African American Kentuckians, to date, have received about 4.3% of vaccinations where we know the person’s race. That is unacceptable. It needs to be closer to 8%, at least. About 1.1% of vaccines where ethnicity is known have gone to our Hispanic population – also too low.

 

“We’re going to produce this data every week so we can track our progress and be held accountable.”

 

The Governor said addressing equity in vaccine distribution requires looking at three root causes: programmatic causes, as the state needs to take additional, intentional steps to make vaccination programs more equitable; societal causes, because minority Kentuckians are not equally represented in medicine and education, so they were underrepresented among the first to be vaccinated; and historic causes of vaccine hesitancy among minority Kentuckians.

 

“Our underserved and minority populations haven’t been treated right in the past when it comes to vaccines, or even experimentation,” said Gov. Beshear. “From the beginning, we knew Black and Latinx people were more hesitant to get the COVID-19 vaccination. We’re committed to addressing these concerns.”

 

“We look forward to expanding our network of partners in this effort and working to reach people who need access to this vaccine and need a little extra assistance in getting it, so they can have the same benefit as everyone else,” said public health Commissioner Dr. Steven Stack.

 

The Governor also announced the state’s positivity rate has decreased to the lowest it has been since Nov. 10 and Kentucky has now had four straight weeks of declining test positivity and weekly cases.

 

“The trends are all moving in the right direction, but that only happens from your hard work. We must keep this up because we do not want to lose this progress,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The Governor said for the fifth straight week, the state has distributed more vaccines than it received in first doses from the federal government. Of all the first doses the state has received, 91% are already in a Kentuckians’ arms.

 

Kentucky has received 490,975 COVID-19 initial vaccine doses and 444,930 Kentuckians have received their first vaccine dose.

 

The state’s vaccination program has received 410,050 first doses and administered 375,728.

 

The federal long-term care vaccination program run through CVS and Walgreens has sent 80,925 first doses to Kentucky and the program has administered 69,202.

 

The federal government has vaccinated 17,186 Kentuckians as well, in the Bureau of Prisons, the Veterans Administration and in the Department of Defense.

 

The new federal pharmacy vaccination program will also start at the end of this week. It has two major partners in the state: a number of Walgreens locations and a large group of independent pharmacies.

 

“Walgreens is a great partner, but it didn’t have sufficient coverage in rural Kentucky, so we advocated for the program to include independent pharmacies, too,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

For more information on who is currently eligible for the vaccine in Kentucky, visit vaccine.ky.gov, or call 855-598-2246. Deaf or hard of hearing Kentuckians can call TTY 855-326-4654.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 8, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 1,003
New deaths today: 40
Positivity rate: 7.78%
Total deaths: 4,091
Currently hospitalized: 1,163
Currently in ICU: 274
Currently on ventilator: 142

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren and Campbell. Each of these counties reported 30 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 205. To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

COVID-19 Death Determinations
Today, Dr. Stack updated Kentuckians on the state’s COVID-19 death determinations process.

 

“COVID-19 has become the third-leading cause of death in the United States. The process for determining which deaths were caused by COVID-19 is well-defined. It has been done this way for other diseases for a very long time,” said Dr. Stack. “The death must be reported to appropriate authorities. Then you have to have a death certificate signed – that can take days or even weeks, or in unusual cases, longer – that all has to get reported to the local health department.

 

“The local health department then has to review those materials and make sure things are in order. At that point, they may feel like they’ve reached a conclusion on cause of death, and then they report that up to the state. The state has to take that information and then independently verify certain additional data points, making sure there was a positive COVID-19 test and clinical evidence that COVID-19 was related. For less than 10% of cases, there’s something that requires verification. So then the state has to request records. When they get that information, sometimes that’s all that’s necessary. Some cases, however, are less clear cut. My deputy clinical commissioner and her highly-qualified team of professionals then make an informed determination based on all of the information obtained. This is all a very methodical process.

 

“The historical record is always accurate based on the person’s date of death, as opposed to the date we are able to report the death, which can be days or weeks later.”

 

Team Kentucky Fund Donates $380,000 to Mission-Aligned Local Nonprofits
On Monday, Gov. Beshear announced a $380,000 donation from the Team Kentucky Fund to 19 qualified nonprofit organizations in equal shares of $20,000. Each nonprofit serves Kentuckians by preventing homelessness and/or assisting families impacted by the opioid epidemic.

 

Each recipient had to be a qualified nonprofit organization under the emergency regulation governing the Team Kentucky Fund, 800 KAR 1:010E(10). To learn more and view the list of organizations, see the full release.

 

With New Louisville HQ, Wieland North America to Create 75 Positions
Wieland North America Inc., a producer of copper and copper alloy products, plans a new North American headquarters in Louisville, a project expected to bring 75 jobs with an $8.8 million investment as it advances Gov. Beshear’s goal to create quality careers for Kentuckians. To read more, see the full release.

 

Price-Gouging
Today, Gov. Beshear signed an executive order renewing the state’s prohibition on price-gouging. To report price-gouging, visit the attorney general’s website.

 

Memorial
“Today we are honoring Roy Holladay, known by many as Doc. He was 73 when he passed away Friday at Baptist Health in Paducah after battling COVID-19. Doc moved to Paducah from Tennessee in 1967, beginning a long career with Union Carbide,” said Gov. Beshear. “He was a master electrician and served in Germany with the Air Force as a maintenance trainer for aircraft during Vietnam.

 

“Doc loved the outdoors. Lake Barkley was his heaven on earth. He shared his passion for fishing, camping and hunting with anyone who would listen. He was an amateur crappie tournament winner several times over, but his real triumph was teaching his daughter, grandchildren, nieces, nephews and friends to fish.

 

“His grandkids were, by far, the light of his life. Ali is fourteen, and Colin is thirteen, and he relished his time supporting them or showing them love.

 

“Doc served his church, Twelve Oaks Baptist, as both a leader and humble servant. He was a Deacon, bus driver, maintenance man, greeter and self-proclaimed master popcorn maker for basketball games and events. You name it, Doc did it.

 

“Doc is survived by his wife of 52 years, Martha Holladay; his daughter, Heather and her husband Jim, and his two grandchildren. Please join me in praying for this family, and every family grieving because of this virus.”

 

Adair County Accident Sends Two People to the Hospital....

 

On Saturday, February 6, 2021 at 1:53amCT,  Adair County 911 received a call from a motorist advising there was a single vehicle collision on KY 55 south approximately 4 miles from Columbia. K-9 Deputy Josh Durbin and Deputy Derek Padgett were dispatched and upon arrival located a pickup truck that had left the road and overturned. The preliminary investigation shows that Nikolas Heino of Texas was operating a 2008 Ford truck traveling toward Columbia on KY 55 south, when he lost control of his vehicle, left the roadway and overturned on the right side of the highway.  

 

Heino and his passenger, Laura Holland, were treated on scene by Adair EMS and transferred to TJ Health Columbia. Heino was later transferred to the University of Louisville Hospital for further treatment.

 

Deputy Durbin is continuing the investigation and criminal charges  are pending as alcohol is believed to be a contributing factor. The Sheriffs Office was assisted by Adair EMS and the Columbia-Adair County Fire Department.

 

 

 

WINTER STORM WATCH IN EFFECT FROM 12AM ON 02/10/21 TILL 12PM ON 02/11/21

 
 
...WINTER STORM WATCH IN EFFECT FROM LATE TUESDAY NIGHT THROUGH
THURSDAY AFTERNOON...
 
* WHAT...Heavy mixed precipitation possible. Total icing
  accumulations of one tenth to one half inch are likely and
  locally higher amounts will be possible. The heaviest icing is
  expected in a zone parallel to the Western Kentucky and
  Bluegrass Parkways.
 
* WHERE...Portions of east central, north central, northwest and
  south central Kentucky.
 
* WHEN...From late Tuesday night through Thursday afternoon.
 
* IMPACTS...Power outages and tree damage are likely due to the
  ice. Travel could be nearly impossible. The hazardous
  conditions could impact the morning or evening commute.
 
PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...
 
Monitor the latest forecasts for updates on this situation.
 

Reminder - KYTC Seeking Input on U.S. 127 Improvement Study in Russell County


SOMERSET, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2021) –The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) is reminding everyone that public input is needed to help identify transportation concerns along the U.S. 127 corridor in Russell County between the Jamestown Bypass and KY 379.

 

KYTC along with the Lake Cumberland Area Development District and Stantec Consulting Services has been working to analyze existing conditions and wants to hear from you regarding your safety and traffic concerns within the study area.

 

Your input is essential to identify the needs of roadway users on a local and regional level. Please take a moment to help the team identify needs along the highway, by completing a short survey available at https://transportation.ky.gov/DistrictEight/Pages/US-127-Russell-Springs-Improvement-Study.aspx. The site also includes a story map which summarizes existing conditions in the study area and an opportunity for you to place points on an online mapping portal to enter location-specific data about existing traffic and safety concerns.

 

The study team will use engineering, traffic data (current and projected to 2045), and public input to help develop possible short- and long-term highway improvements. Another round of public involvement in late Spring 2021 will collect your input on any proposed improvements. Further funding will be necessary to advance any improvement concept identified as part of this study.

 

Please complete the survey by February 15, 2021. For additional project information or special assistance, please contact the KYTC Project Manager, Jeff Dick at JeffD.Dick@ky.gov or call 606-677-3507.

 

Updates can also be found at www.facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8 or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8.  
 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-8-21

There was no update yesterday from the Lake Cumberland District Health Department…

 

Russell County, Thru Saturday Russell County has a total of 1545 cases. 1396 cases have recovered and we have 38 deaths. 22 of the new cases Saturday were residents of Russell County Detention Center. We still have 111 active cases.4 of those are hospitalized.

 

Adair County have had 1,559 total cases with 1,478 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 32 active cases with 30 of those in home isolation. We have 2 case in the hospital at this time.

LCDHD COVID-19 VACCINATION APPOINTMENTS TAKEN STARTING MONDAY....

 
The Lake Cumberland District Health Dept. has been notified that the district will receive 4,000 doses of 1st/prime dose COVID-19 vaccine spread out over the next 3 weeks for administration by our local health departments. This will be for people in Phase 1a or 1b including those 70 and older. Appointments will be taken by phone beginning Monday, February 8th, 2021 at 9:00amET/8:00amCT. Do NOT call early! Do NOT leave your information on the answering machine. They are NOT keeping waiting lists. They do expect to fill all 4,000 apointment slots within the first few hours. The LCDHD plans to have 30 phone lines open and 15-20 operators. However, they know the demand will be greater than the supply. They apologize in advance for not being able to accommodate everyone.
 
When the scheduling call center goes live on Monday morning, these are the numbers to dial:
  • Adair:  270-384-2286
  • Casey:  606-787-6911
  • Clinton: 606-387-5711
  • Cumberland: 270-864-2206
  • Green:  270-932-4341
  • McCreary:  606-376-2412
  • Pulaski:  606-679-4416
  • Russell:  270-343-2181
  • Taylor:  270-465-4191
  • Wayne:  606-348-9349

 

Transportation Cabinet Issues Text Message Scam Alert

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 6, 2021) - The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet warns recipients of a text phishing attempt reported today impersonating a state agency. The text message includes a link and the sender is listed as "KYDOT". The text message is not from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and recipients are warned not to click the link that asks for personal information. The Cabinet does not send text messages that solicit personal information. 

 

Victims who have submitted any personal information are advised to visit the Kentucky Office of the Attorney General website, ag.ky.gov, to follow their guidance concerning potential identity theft.  

 

A screenshot of the fraudulent text is available here

 

Russell County Man Arrested on Drug Charges in Adair County....


Columbia Police Officers responded to a 2-vehicle accident near the intersection of Burksville Street and Hudson Street on Friday evening, February 5, 2021 shortly before 7:00pmCT. On scene, one vehicle operator was found to be in possession of multiple narcotics and paraphernalia. 

Brandon Burton, 30, of Russell Springs, Ky is currently facing multiple drug and traffic charges including trafficking in a controlled substance, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, and trafficking in a controlled substance methamphetamine. Burton was found to have approximately 2 grams of methamphetamine, as well as paraphernalia and cash. 

Officer Evan Burton was the arresting Officer. He was assisted on scene by Officers Gary Roy and Trevor Foster.

 

Upgraded Roadway Lighting with LEDs Coming to District 8

 

SOMERSET, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2021) –An important upgrade of highway lighting with energy-saving LED fixtures will get underway Tuesday, Feb. 8, in District 8.

 

It’s part of a project to replace thousands of lower-efficiency roadway fixtures across the commonwealth by early 2022.

 

Crews will begin lighting upgrades next week in Pulaski County at Exit 86 and Exit 88 of the Cumberland Parkway and at the intersection of KY 80 and KY 914. Motorists may see temporary partial ramp, single lane, and/or shoulder closures while work progresses.

 

Work is expected to be completed in these locations in one week. The starting date and duration may be adjusted for inclement weather or other unforeseeable delays.

 

The highway lighting upgrades in District 8, which are expected to be completed in March, will take place in various locations in Adair, Pulaski, Rockcastle and Russell counties. Altogether, KYTC plans to replace more than 18,000 lights with new LEDs (light emitting diodes), which last longer and require less energy, yet provide greater visibility. That means greater driving safety with less maintenance.

 

Traffic information for the District 8 counties is also available at www.facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8 or by following us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8.  
 

KSP Tackle Traffic Enforcement on Super Bowl Sunday

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (February 5, 2021) - Kentucky State Police are preparing for the big game by participating in Operation C.A.R.E (Crash Awareness Reduction Effort) on Super Bowl Sunday. KSP, along with law enforcement across the country, will have increased visibility on interstates and highways to keep drivers safe.

 

KSP troopers and officers will put a high emphasis on all traffic enforcement violations, including speeding, failure to wear seat belts, impaired and distracted driving. During this one-day nationwide blitz, troopers across the country will have the same team goal in mind – keeping motorists safe.

 

“One crash is too many and its important Kentuckians stay safe while they are traveling. We urge people to celebrate at home in lieu of going out on the roads. If you should host a Super Bowl party, have a game plan and designate a sober driver for your guests,” said KSP Spokesperson Sergeant Billy Gregory.

 

The Kentucky Office of Highway Safety reported that impaired drivers caused 22 crashes that resulted in one death and eight injuries on Super Bowl Sunday last year.

 

KSP offers drivers the following tips to increase safety awareness on the roads on Super Bowl Sunday:

  • Slow Down – Be aware of weather conditions, construction areas, heavy traffic and unfamiliar locations.
  • Buckle Up – Ensure everyone in the vehicle is properly wearing their seat belt. It is the law.
  • Move Over for First Responders - Kentucky passed a law in 2003 requiring motorists to move to the adjacent lane when approaching an emergency or public safety vehicle. If it is impossible or unsafe to change lanes, motorists must slow down and use caution. Failure to comply can result in fines, jail time or both.
  • Eliminate Distractions While Driving – Motorists need to stay alert, put the phone away and monitor weather and road conditions wherever you are traveling.

 

During Super Bowl Sunday, KSP plans to remind the public to make smart choices when traveling by sharing infographics on the KSP Facebook, Instagram and Twitter platforms.

 

In concordance with Operation C.A.R.E, if you see a troublesome driver or any suspicious road conditions, please contact your local KSP Post or law enforcement agency. Don’t know your post location in Kentucky? Visit http://kentuckystatepolice.org/post-locations/ to find your local KSP Post.

 

2 RUSSELL CO. ARRESTS 02-05-21

 
  • Perry Justice, 43, of Russell Springs was arrested this Friday afternoon by the RSPD and charged with TBUT (firearm). 
  • Anthony Loy, 51, of Russell Springs was arrested on Friday afternoon by the RSPD for Improper Registration Plate, Operating a Vehicle With Expired Operators License, No Registration Plates, No Registration Receipt, Failure to Produce Insurance Card, Failure of Owner to Maintain Required Insurance, DUI, and Possession of an Open Alcoholic Beverage Container in Motor Vehicle.
 
Lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
 

TJ REGIONAL HEALTH COVID-19 VACCINATIONS

 

T.J. Regional Health has been approved as a regional vaccine site for those aged 70 and older in Phase 1B. We will be receiving 500 vaccines in the coming days. We will begin calling the first 500 of those who have signed up on the waiting list to schedule appointments. We will continue to call 500 people per week to schedule their vaccine appointments to align with our vaccine allocations. You must have an appointment to get a vaccination.
 
If you have already signed up on the waiting list via our hotline or online form, please know that we have your information and there is no need to call to sign up again. We will call you to schedule your appointment as soon as possible. If you are Phase 1A (Healthcare Workers) or Phase 1B (70+, K-12 Personnel, or First Responders) and have not signed up for the waiting list, you may go online to tjregionalhealth.org/vaccine to sign up at any time.
 
“We are grateful to be selected as a regional vaccine distribution location and fulfill our commitment to offer the vaccine to the communities we serve. We have a process in place and will schedule appointments starting next week. We also want to extend our sincere appreciation to our leaders at the state for communicating and coordinating this historic process.” - TJRH CEO, Neil Thornbury
 
Details for future phases will be announced in the near future as more information becomes available.
 

OVER 2,200 NEW COVID-19 CASES IN KY & 50 DEATHS...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2021) – On Friday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the lowest positivity rate since Dec. 28 and reminded Kentuckians to keep gatherings small and safe this Super Bowl weekend.

 

“No matter who you’re rooting for on Sunday, let’s make sure we hold on to our progress against this virus as Team Kentucky,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’ve already vaccinated 10% of our population and every day we get closer to the finish line we’ve all been waiting for. Hang in there and do what it takes to protect each other a little bit longer.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 5, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,261
New deaths today: 50

Positivity rate: 8.16%
Total deaths: 3,971
Currently hospitalized: 1,318
Currently in ICU: 330
Currently on ventilator: 167

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Boone and Kenton. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 394.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-5-21

Russell County, report another death Thursday. Our county has now had 38 deaths. We have 13 new cases Thursday. We had 9 cases released from isolation. We now have 76 active cases of which 72 cases are self-isolated and 4 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Danville,1 at Bowling Green,1 at Norton’s and 1 at UK.

 

Adair County, 4 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 5 cases yesterday. We have had 1,558 total cases with 1,464 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 45 active cases with 43 of those in home isolation. We have 2 case in the hospital at this time.

KSP Charge Casey County Man With Child Sexual Exploitation Offenses

 

Liberty, KY. (February 4, 2021)  The Kentucky State Police Electronic Crime Branch arrested Kaleb P. Hatfield, 23, on charges related to child sexual abuse material.

 

Hatfield was arrested as the result of an undercover Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) investigation. The KSP Electronic Crime Branch began the investigation after discovering the suspect uploading images of child sexual exploitation online.

 

The investigation resulted in the execution of a search warrant at a residence in Liberty on February 4, 2021. Equipment used to facilitate the crime was seized and taken to KSP’s digital forensic laboratory for examination. The investigation is ongoing.

 

Hatfield is currently charged with 20 counts of distribution of matter portraying a sexual performance by a minor, a class D felony.

 

The Kentucky Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force is comprised of more than twenty-six local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. The mission of the ICAC Task Force, created by the United States Department of Justice and administrated by the Kentucky State Police, is to assist state and local law enforcement agencies in developing a response to cyber enticement and child sexual abuse material investigations. This support encompasses forensic and investigative components, training and technical assistance, victim services, prevention and community education. The ICAC program was developed in response to the increasing number of children and teenagers using the internet, the proliferation of child sexual abuse material, and the heightened online activity of predators searching for unsupervised contact with underage victims.

 

Gov. Beshear Announces Four New Regional COVID-19 Vaccination Sites

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 4, 2021) – On Thursday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced four new regional COVID-19 vaccination sites, in Bowling Green, Covington, Glasgow and Murray.

 

Public health Commissioner Dr. Steven Stack also said district and county health departments will receive more doses based on population served.

 

“This is part of our continued commitment to make sure you don’t have to drive more than one county away to get your vaccine,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’re not fully there yet, but if you look through the progression of where we were a week ago compared to where we are now, you see how this is coming together.”

 

The new regional vaccine sites are:

  • Northern Kentucky Convention Center (Kroger Health site)
    • 1 W. Rivercenter Blvd., Covington, KY 41011 
  • Greenwood Mall, former Sears location (Kroger Health site)
    • Scottsville Road, Bowling Green, KY 42104 


Both Kroger Health sites are open 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. local time on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Rolling, seven-day appointments went live tonight after the Governor’s announcement. Visit Kroger.com/covidvaccine or call 866-211-5320 to sign-up.

 

  • Murray State University CFSB Center
    • 1401 State Route 121 North, Murray, KY 42701
      • Feb. 10, 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.
      • Feb. 17, 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.
      • Kentuckians in this region can visit callowayhealth.org or call 270-753-3381 to sign up for appointments.

 

Murray State University partners include: Calloway County Health Department; Murray-Calloway County Hospital; Dr. Bob Hughes, Chief Medical Officer of Murray State University/Chief Medical Officer of VillageMD Kentucky; The City of Murray; and Calloway County.

 

  • TJ Regional Health, T.J. Health Pavilion
    • 301 North L Rogers Blvd., Glasgow KY 42141
      • Dates and hours are still being determined at this time
      • Kentuckians in this region will be able to sign up at tjregionalhealth.org, or by calling 270-659-1010.

 

“At Kroger Health we are committed to helping people live healthier lives and we’re happy to be able to provide an easy solution to those Kentuckians seeking a vaccine,” said Pheli Roberts, health leader for Kroger Louisville division. “Our team at Kroger Health stands with you to keep Kentucky and the surrounding communities healthy and safe.”

 

“Murray State University (MSU) is very pleased to assist the commonwealth and Gov. Beshear as a regional COVID-19 vaccination site,” said Dr. Bob Jackson, president of MSU. “We have excellent facilities, dedicated people and an important duty to help with delivering vaccinations to this region in partnership with the Calloway County Health Department, MSU Health Services, Murray Calloway County Hospital and many others in the Jackson Purchase as we work to end this pandemic.”

 

Neil Thornbury, chief executive officer, T.J. Regional Health, said, “We have a process in place and will schedule appointments starting next week. Also, we want to extend our sincere appreciation to our leaders at the state for communicating and coordinating this historic process.”

 

“I am confident that when you include Kentuckians immunized through federal agencies, like the Veterans Administration, we’ve vaccinated more than 10% of all Kentuckians, and these new sites will help us expand that number even more,” said Dr. Stack. “While we still have a long way to go, to have vaccinated 10% of the state not even 11 months after we announced our first case of COVID-19 – that is really nothing short of a modern medical miracle.”

 

Vaccine Allocation for District and County Health Departments
Dr. Stack announced for the next three weeks, every district health department and county health department will receive a vaccine allocation equivalent to 1% of the population of each county they serve, rounded to the nearest 100, with a minimum allocation of 100 doses per county.

 

“All 120 counties will now be serviced through their local health departments,” said Dr. Stack. “The quantities are insufficient. The vaccine quantities, overall, are not enough for the task, but this is still incremental progress.”

 

Doses will be provided on Feb. 8, Feb. 15 and Feb. 22, and second doses will arrive four weeks later. Ninety percent of doses must be administered within the week. Doses should be used to vaccinate the 70+ age group. 

 

Federal Pharmacy Program
The federal government will ship out one million vaccine doses nationwide to Walgreens branches and independent, local pharmacies. Dr. Stack said Kentucky will receive approximately 13,000 doses for approximately 80 to 100 Walgreens stores and 40 to 50 local pharmacies. This new allotment is in addition to the state and long-term care allocations previously announced.

 

“As soon as next Thursday, these pharmacies may be able to start operating through this program,” said Dr. Stack. “We think they’ll have about 100 doses per pharmacy and these will be much closer in your community. The focus continues to be on people 70 and over.”

 

Faith Leaders Encourage Communities, Congregations to Take COVID-19 Vaccine
Gov. Beshear thanked leaders of different faiths and denominations from throughout Kentucky who are taking the vaccine against COVID-19 and encouraging those in their congregations and communities to take the vaccine when they have the opportunity. With concerns in the commonwealth and across the country about distributing vaccines equitably, Gov. Beshear is partnering with faith leaders to educate communities and address vaccine hesitancy on the front end. To learn more, see the full release.

 

Stay Safe this Super Bowl Weekend
The Governor and Dr. Stack reminded Kentuckians to stay safe this Super Bowl weekend, keeping gatherings to no more than eight people, social distancing, wearing masks, staying home if you are sick and washing your hands frequently. To learn more, see the full release.

 

“I hope you enjoy the game, but before you go out, please remember, the current recommendations are eight people and two different households, maximum,” said Dr. Stack.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 4, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,500
New deaths today: 58
Positivity rate: 8.37%
Total deaths: 3,921
Currently hospitalized: 1,340
Currently in ICU: 368
Currently on ventilator: 171

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Boone and Madison. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 400.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Discover Kentucky Initiative
Gov. Andy Beshear and the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce announced a new partnership – the Discover Kentucky Initiative – to introduce Chamber members to European companies interested in the U.S. market, lay groundwork for partnerships and build long-term relationships aimed at creating new investments, jobs and economic strength. To learn more, see the full release.

 

Unemployment Insurance Update
Today, Amy Cubbage, general counsel for Gov. Beshear, provided updates on unemployment insurance (UI).

Some claimants saw an incorrect year while making their benefit requests; fortunately, corrections have already been made and staff are working with claimants to make sure their accounts were not negatively impacted.

 

“Staff are backdating Pandemic Unemployment Assistance claims as necessary and pay order cards are being sent, so please watch your emails or your method of communication,” said Cubbage. “Claimants should watch the summary page to see when the back-date has occurred.”

 

Claimants that did not change their method of payment from debit card to direct deposit in their UI account were automatically moved Feb. 1 to receive their benefits by paper checks that will arrive in the mail. If claimants still have UI debit cards, the funds must be spent off the cards no later than Feb. 28.

 

“If you have funds on the debit card after Feb. 28, Bank of America will return those funds to the state and then our staff will process them back out to you with a paper check,” Cubbage said.

 

Last week, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released a statement about claimants reporting their 1099-G wages.

 

“If you need a corrected 1099-G and it’s not received by the filing deadline, report your correct amount, not the amount on the incorrect 1099-G,” said Cubbage. “The IRS statement is located on the KCC website under the Identity Theft Tips section. We know thousands of you have never been on UI before 2020, and these are new documents that you are not used to receiving to prepare your taxes. We also have FAQs that should help you with 1099-G forms on the homepage of the KCC website under Important UI Messages.”

 

Finally, Cubbage said an email message went out to over 68,000 claimants on Tuesday letting them know they will be receiving a notice of determination in the mail due to failed identification.

 

“If you get this and you are a claimant who would still like to pursue your claim, please pay close attention to the appeal deadline in the notice of determination,” said Cubbage.

 

Memorial
“Today we honor the life of Kentuckian Tommie Speagle of Waco, Kentucky, age 96. She passed away on Saturday after battling COVID-19. We received a touching tribute from her daughter – her caregiver in her later years – sharing how Tommie was the most wonderful mother, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend,” said Gov. Beshear. “She lived a life full of adventure, living across the country with family members until she met her first husband, Newel Edward Bridewell, who passed from cancer in 1981. Following that loss, she found love again with John Speagle. She overcame challenges in life such as a speech impediment that halted her education, yet went on to have a great career and was an avid reader and poem writer. She was also very active in her church, Rice Station Christian in Irvine.

 

“Our prayers are with her daughter, Beverly Morefield, her two sons, Paul Bridewell and William Bridewell, her stepdaughter, Sandy Curl, her stepson, J.C. Speagle, six grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren.”

 

ADAIR CO. SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT ACTIVITY REPORT FOR JANUARY, 2021

 

 

  23    WARRANTS OF ARREST SERVED

    8    CRIMINAL CASES OPENED

    0    CALL RESPONSE REPORTS WRITTEN

    6    DOMESTIC ABUSE CASES WORKED

  12    NON-INJURY ACCIDENTS WORKED

   0     INJURY ACCIDENTS WORKED

  12    OUT OF COUNTY TRANSPORTS

  22    CITATIONS WRITTEN FOR CRIMINAL ACTIVITY

  26    CIVIL PROCESS PAPERS SERVED

   0     CRIMINAL SUMMONSES SERVED

  55    SUBPOENAS SERVED

197    HOURS OF COURT SECURITY PROVIDED

513    VEHICLE INSPECTIONS DONE

  15    ANIMAL COMPLAINTS

    7    MOTOR ASSISTS

581    911 CALLS

  13    ALCOHOL/ DRUG RELATED

               

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-4-21

Russell County, 17 new cases yesterday. We had 13 cases released from isolation Wednesday. We now have 73 active cases of which 69 cases are self-isolated and 4 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Bowling Green,1 at Danville,1 at Norton’s and 1 at UK.

 

Adair County, 12 new COVID19 cases to report Wednesday. We released 3 cases. We have had 1,554 total cases with 1,459 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 46 active cases with 45 of those in home isolation. We have 1 case in the hospital at this time.

2 New Basketball Courts & a Pickleball Court at Jim Blair Center....

 
The Adair County Fiscal Court is pleased to announce the addition of 2 full sized outdoor basketball courts and a pickleball court to the Jim Blair Recreation Center and Park. We do not have a net up yet for the pickleball court but you are welcome to bring your portable net until we get one installed. This is something I have been eager to get done since I became Judge Executive. We want everyone to be able to use our park and are always looking for ideas or ways to improve the park. Within the last 2 years we have improved the softball field (which is still ongoing), made improvements to the track, added lighting to the track, put a new floor in the gym (thanks goes to the City of Columbia for paying for half of this expense), and now the addition of 2 basketball courts and a pickleball court.
 
Special thanks to JAG Fabrication and Central Kentucky Lawn Care & Sealcoating for the work on the courts.
 
 
 

KY on Track to be First State to Vaccinate Educators; 51 COVID-19 Deaths Today...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 3, 2021) – On Wednesday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced Kentucky is on track to become the first state to vaccinate educators.

 

“Our vaccination efforts right now are exciting to see. You walk into one of our vaccination centers and you see a workforce that is inspired,” said Gov. Beshear. “It is moving. You see people clearly walking around with purpose. You see faith in action. And you see people who have worked long shifts who are still smiling when that next person sits down.”

The Governor said reopening schools is a top priority, but density control, masking, proper ventilation and community mitigation must be in place.

 

Gov. Beshear said he is working with the Kentucky Department of Education to create a plan where all schools can reopen for some form of in-person learning March 1. But, he noted that through the end of this school year, all schools will need to have a virtual option for parents who choose it.

 

Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Public Health, updated Kentuckians on the state’s vaccine rollout reporting.

 

“We will begin reporting and updating daily how many unique people have been vaccinated in Kentucky. That, we will show next to the total number of first doses of vaccine allocated to the state and then you’ll also see a utilization percentage,” said Dr. Stack. “We’re committed to giving the second dose to everyone who gets the first dose, so the most important metric is who has started this vaccine series.”

 

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine, if approved, will only require one dose, so the state can easily merge data on all three vaccinations using this new system focused on first doses.

 

The Governor added, “I will remind everyone that we get these doses late Monday or early Tuesday. So Tuesday and Wednesday, there’s always going to be the biggest difference between our supply and how many people we’ve vaccinated. But by the time we get to that next Monday, you’ll see we’ve administered as many vaccinations as we received that week, or even more.”

 

Dr. Stack also encouraged Kentuckians to stay safe this weekend during the Super Bowl.

 

“This is just like any other holiday or social event. You have to practice social distancing and stay home or keep gatherings very small. Wear your masks – please,” said Dr. Stack. “We can’t afford to have the disease spread now. With these mutations and these variants, it gives the virus the opportunity to learn how to defeat the antibodies that are forming to protect us after these vaccines.”

 

Corrections Update
On Wednesday, Executive Cabinet Secretary J. Michael Brown updated Kentuckians on COVID-19 in the state’s correctional facilities.

 

Currently, seven of the state’s 14 prisons have zero active inmate cases. There has been a marked reduction in active cases for both inmates and staff in the last two weeks. On Jan. 20, we had 2,227 active inmate cases and 169 active staff cases; today that number is 271 active inmate cases and 55 active staff cases.

 

“We have tragically lost 43 inmates; the largest number from the Kentucky State Reformatory (KSR). Of the 43 deaths, 28 were from KSR,” said Secretary Brown. “We have also lost five DOC employees as a result of complications from COVID-19. In late fall, we initiated the rapid testing of all prison staff on a weekly basis that will soon be twice a week. To date, we’ve administered over 28,500 rapid tests to people entering a prison, including staff and contractors.

 

“When an outbreak does occur, the prison is divided based on the inmate test results: positive cases, negative but exposed and negative. Medical staff check on each inmate individually.”

 

Kentucky Worker Injury Rate Hits Record Low
The state’s recordable, nonfatal occupational injury and illness rate has fallen to the lowest point on record, the Kentucky Labor Cabinet announced today. To learn more, see the full release.

 

More than $2 Million in Grants Awarded to Fight Violence Against Women
Gov. Beshear and Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet Secretary Mary Noble announced today that $2,116,636 has been awarded in grant funding from the federal Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Services, Training, Officers, Prosecution (STOP) Formula Grant Program to 28 agencies across Kentucky. To learn more, see the full release.

 

Kentucky State Police Angel Initiative Responds to Drug Epidemic Amidst Pandemic
Today, the Kentucky State Police (KSP) is pleased to announce that the doors have reopened to assist in the fight against the drug epidemic, with CDC guidelines in place to help mitigate the spread of the virus amongst the public and KSP dispatchers and troopers. The KSP Angel Initiative is a proactive program designed to help people battle addiction. The program, available at all 16 KSP post locations, temporarily paused in April while the agency developed safety protocols in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. To learn more, see the full release.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 3, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,592
New deaths today: 51

Positivity rate: 8.53%
Total deaths: 3,863
Currently hospitalized: 1,340
Currently in ICU: 368
Currently on ventilator: 171

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Boone and Daviess. Each of these counties reported 100 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 424.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

“Everyone tune in tomorrow, where we’ll be announcing additional regional centers across Kentucky, building out our map,” said Gov. Beshear. “We’re also going to talk about local health departments which are all going to be getting a consistent supply for the next three weeks.”

 

On Tuesday, Gov. Beshear announced the federal COVID-19 team will increase Kentucky’s vaccine supply by an additional 5%. In total, the state’s supply will increase by 22% the week of Feb. 8 compared with the week of Jan. 25. To learn more, see the full release.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Comer Questions Army Corps of Engineers' Inconsistent Fees Charged to Marina Businesses

 
WASHINGTON - House Committee on Oversight and Reform Ranking Member James Comer (R-KY) today wrote the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers regarding the lack of transparency and uniformity of fees charged to marina owners and businesses. Ranking Member Comer is requesting documents from the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers regarding their fees to ensure marina businesses are not unfairly charged and burdened by an unruly and inconsistent process. 
 
“Every small business in America is hurting because of this pandemic, and to make matters worse, the Army Corps of Engineers is overcharging marina businesses and getting away with it. In Kentucky, tourism is crucial to our state economy, especially lake related tourism. To have these small businesses suffer due to hazy bureaucratic process is not only unfair, it could potentially destroy a business, kill jobs, and severely damage an industry. We must have transparency to rein in this process and ensure our businesses aren’t being damaged by government overreach,” said Ranking Member Comer. 
 
 
The full letter is available below......
 
 
February 2, 2021
 
Lieutenant General Scott A. Spellmon 
Commanding General and Chief of Engineers
Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
441 G Street NW 
Washington, D.C. 20314
 
Dear Lieutenant General Spellmon, 
 
Committee Republicans are conducting oversight of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) use of administrative fees to collect money from marina owners. As such, we request documents and information about the process used by USACE to determine the amount of administrative fees marina owners are charged, including why there appears to be a lack of transparency and uniformity for these fees. 
   
According to information reviewed by Committee Republicans, administrative fees are apparently charged to marina businesses that are not referenced in or authorized by the lease agreements USACE has with these businesses. While these administrative fees are often levied as real property transactions, it is unclear what connection many of these fees have with real property. In fact, 10 U.S.C. § 2695 provides a list of covered real estate transactions but USACE appears to often exceed that authority. For example, USACE apparently charged $20,000 to review a marina development and in another instance charged a marina $500 just to host an event. Additionally, USACE regularly charges $500 for approval letters that do not seem related to any real property transactions. Not only do these administrative fees appear to exceed the statutory authority of a covered real estate transaction found in 10 U.S.C. § 2695, but also raise questions about whether marina owners are unnecessarily paying excessive administrative fees while often operating small family businesses.
 
 The administrative fees charged as real property transactions also appear to lack uniformity across regions of USACE. Identical transactions often cost more in some regions and less in others leading to fees disproportionally impacting business owners in some parts of the country. Just as concerning, there appears to be a lack of transparency about the amount of fees charged and when fees should be applied. If true, this lack of transparency makes it difficult for business owners to operate marinas when they are unexpectedly charged fees. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many small businesses throughout the country are already struggling to survive, and an arbitrary fee charged to a small business during this time may be enough to permanently end that business.  
 
In order for Committee Republicans to better understand USACE’s use of administrative fees for marinas, please provide the following documents and information as soon as possible but no later than February 16, 2021.
 
(1) All documents and communications between USACE’s headquarters and regional offices regarding the process USACE uses to determine if an administrative fee is treated as a real property transaction.
 
(2) All documents and communications between USACE’s headquarters and regional offices regarding how the amount of administrative fees for marinas are determined in each region.
 
(3) All documents and communications between USACE’s headquarters and regional offices with marina owner/operators regarding the revoking of lease agreements before a lease term has expired. 
 
(4) A copy of any fee schedules for administrative fees used in each region of USACE.
 
(5) All documents and communications relating to any effort to make administrative fees uniform across regions.
 
Additionally, please make arrangements to schedule a briefing with Committee staff on this matter. Please make arrangements to schedule the briefing no later than February 9, 2021. To schedule the briefing or ask any follow-up or related questions, please contact Committee on Oversight and Reform staff at (202) 225-5074. 
 
The Committee on Oversight and Reform is the principal oversight committee of the U.S. House of Representatives and has broad authority to investigate “any matter” at “any time” under House Rule X. Thank you in advance for your cooperation with this inquiry.
 
Sincerely,
 
James Comer 
Ranking Member 
Committee on Oversight and Reform
 
 
cc: The Honorable Carolyn B. Maloney, Chairwoman
Committee on Oversight and Reform
 

JAMESTOWN FD WAS CALLED OUT TO A FIRE THIS MORNING AT STEPHENS PIPE AND STEEL ON 127

Jamestown Fire Department was dispatched at 7:20 this morning to the report of the fire at Stephan Pipe and Steel at the old Fruit of the Loom building.

 

When on scene firefighters found a fire in the clear coat section where an oven and the ventilation system had caught fire. Fire was contained to this area. Units were on scene for about an hour and a half they were assisted by Russell Springs FD,Russell County EMS Jamestown Police Department. 

 

No injuries were reported

ADAIR COUNTY ACCIDENT SENDS DRIVER TO THE HOSPITAL


Deputy Derek Padgett responded to the junction of Tom Roy Road and Liberty Road. Upon arrival, Deputy Padgett located a vehicle in a field. A Preliminary investigation determined that a 2013 Jeep, operated by 28-year-old Alec Beard of Columbia, KY was eastbound when he struck a patch of black ice and lost control of his vehicle. Beard's vehicle overturned and landed in field a short distance off the roadway.

 

Adair County EMS transported Beard to T.J Health Columbia and later transferred him to The University of Louisville Hospital for treatment of his injuries. 
 

Roadway conditions was the determining factor in the crash.

 

The Adair County Sheriff's Office was assisted on scene by Adair County EMS.

 

Single Vehicle Accident Sends Adair County Man to the Hospital


On Tuesday, February 2, 2021 Adair County Deputy Derek Padgett responded to a single vehicle accident at 5439 Fairplay Road. A preliminary investigation determined that a 2014 Scion, operated by 19-year-old Timothy Woodcox of Campbellsville, KY was southbound when he failed to navigate a left curve and overcorrected. The vehicle traveled approximately 189 feet while overturning numerous times. The vehicle came to a stop after striking a residence. Woodcox was transported by Adair EMS to T.J. Health Columbia for treatment of his injuries.

The Adair County Sheriff's Office was assisted on scene by Adair County EMS, the Columbia-Adair County Fire Dept., Columbia Police, and Kentucky State Police.

 

LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 2-3-21

Russell County 13 new cases Tuesday. We had 6 cases released from isolation. We now have 69 active cases of which 65 cases are self-isolated and 4 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Bowling Green, 1 at Danville, 1 at UK and 1 at Norton’s Hospital.

 

Adair County 6 new COVID19 cases to report. We released 5 cases yesterday. We have had 1,542 total cases with 1,456 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 37 active cases with 37 of those in home isolation. We have 0 case in the hospital at this time.

Gov. Beshear: Kentucky's Vaccine Supply to Increase by Additional 5%

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2021) – On Tuesday, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the federal COVID-19 team will increase Kentucky’s vaccine supply by an additional 5%. In total, the state’s supply will increase by 22% the week of Feb. 8 compared with the week of Jan. 25.

 

The Governor also noted Tuesday was the fifth day in a row that the state’s COVID-19 positivity rate has stayed under 9%.

 

“Here in Kentucky and across the county we are seeing case numbers declining and we want to continue to see that trend,” said Gov. Beshear. “Unfortunately, we also continue to see far more deaths than we’d like to. There are 13 individuals in this report who were only in their 50s and 60s when they passed away from this virus.

 

“But there is really good news today, too,” said Gov. Beshear. “The president announced that his administration is increasing our supply another 5%. Again, our challenge is supply, supply, supply. Remember, we will get a vaccine to everybody, it’s just going to take some time.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 2, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 2,443
New deaths today: 32
Positivity rate: 8.83%
Total deaths: 3,812
Currently hospitalized: 1,335
Currently in ICU: 373
Currently on ventilator: 172

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Boone, Fayette, Kenton and Madison. Each of these counties reported 80 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 349.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Executive Order on Pharmaceuticals
Today, the Governor signed an executive order that extends previous orders allowing pharmacists to dispense 30-day refills.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, information on testing locations, vaccines, contact tracing, school reports and guidance, guidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY 02/02/21

 
Date Issued:  2/2/2021
Time Issued: 9:30 A.M.
 
 
A BOIL WATER ADVISORY is in effect for consumers of Columbia Adair Utilities District for customers from 7540 Liberty Road to 7936 Liberty Road, Lether Burton Road, Burt-Co Pike Road, Terr Matt Road, Little Cake Road and all sides roads.  The advisory has been issued due to main line leak. Following such an event, the potential exists for bacteriological contamination of the water supply therefore this Boil Water Advisory has been issued as a precautionary measure. Until further notice, boil all water used for drinking and cooking, bringing the water to a rolling boil for 3 minutes before using. For more information concerning the Boil Water Advisory, contact Lennon Stone at Columbia Adair Utilities District, 270-384-2181.
 

KSP POST 15 MONTHLY ACTIVITY REPORT


Columbia, KY - During the month of January 2021, there were 14 traffic accidents investigated by the State Police working in the Post 15 area in the 11 counties of Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Marion, Metcalfe, Monroe, Russell, Taylor and Washington.

 

There was one fatal collision during the month of January in the Post 15 area.


Debra Brown, 62, of Clinton County was killed on 01/09/2021 in Clinton County, KY.

 

This brings our yearly fatality count to 1 compared with 0 through this same period in 2020.


Statewide fatality count stands at 39 compared with 45 through this same period in 2020.

 

During the month of January 2021, there were 1024 citations written, 184 courtesy notices written, 455 complaints answered, 123 motorists assisted, 70 criminal cases opened and 273 criminal arrests made.

 

KSP POST 15 Investigates Fatal Collision In Clinton County


Albany, KY (February 2, 2021) On February 1st, 2021 at approximately 10:36 PM Troopers from Kentucky State Police Post 15 responded to a 2-vehicle collision on KY 90 that had resulted in a fatality.


Preliminary investigations indicate Michael Stevens, age 50 of Burkesville, was traveling west on KY 90 in a 2000 Toyota truck when he lost control due to slick road conditions. Stevens vehicle entered the east bound lane striking a 2008 Dodge Nitro being operated by Jessie Bell, age 61 of Monticello.
 

Bell was wearing his seatbelt and was transported by EMS to the Wayne County Hospital. Stevens was not wearing a seatbelt and was pronounced deceased by the Clinton County Coroner.
 

This incident remains under investigation by Trooper Jason Warinner. Clinton Sheriff’s Department, Clinton County EMS, Albany Fire Department, and Emergency Management. 

 

FATAL COLLISION ON CUMBERLAND PARKWAY THIS MORNING...

 
Columbia, KY (February 2, 2021) Kentucky State Police Post 15 received a call from Adair County dispatch this morning at approximately 12:45amCT in regards to a fatal collision that had occurred 7 miles east of Columbia on the Louie B. Nunn Cumberland Parkway at the 56 mile marker.


Preliminary investigations indicate that Abel Vargas, 21, of Russell Springs, KY was operating a 2003 Nissan pickup westbound on the Parkway when he lost control due to slick road conditions. Vargas’ vehicle travelled through the median and overturned in the middle of the eastbound lane. Howard Carpenter, 47, of Russell Springs, KY was operating a 2017 Nissan Rogue east bound and was unable to avoid the collision and struck the overturned Nissan pickup. A passenger in Vargas’s vehicle, Alejandro Diaz, 20, of Middleburg, KY was able to exit the vehicle and was standing in the roadway when a 2021 freightliner semi, operated by Allen McDaniel, 49, of Mclean, TX approached the scene and was unable to stop, striking Diaz and the Nissan Rogue.
 

Carpenter was airlifted to the University of Louisville Hospital with serious injuries. Diaz was pronounced deceased at the scene by the Adair county Coroner. McDaniel and his passenger, Vallerie McDaniel, 48, were not injured.
 

This incident remains under investigation by Sergeant Adam Likins. Other KSP personnel, Adair County Sheriff’s Department, Adair County EMS, Adair County Coroner’s office and Air Evac Lifeteam assisted at the scene. 

 

LATEST VACCINE INFO FROM TJ HEALTH


At this time, T.J. Regional Health is still waiting to find out when we will receive vaccine doses for those in Phase 1B who are age 70 and older. We have a plan in place and ready to implement very quickly when we have the vaccine for Phase 1B. When that happens, we will begin calling those who have signed up on the waiting list to schedule appointments.

 

If you have already signed up on the waiting list via our hotline or online form, please know that we have your information and there is no need to call to sign up again. If you are Phase 1A (Healthcare Workers) or Phase 1B (70+, K-12 Personnel, or First Responders) and have not signed up for the waiting list, you may go online to tjregionalhealth.org/vaccine to sign up at any time. 
 

Details for future phases will be announced in the near future as more information becomes available.
 

LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 2-1-21


Russell County, 4 new cases Monday. We had 12 cases released from isolation. We now have 53 active cases of which 46 cases are self-isolated and 7 cases are hospitalized, 3 at Russell County Hospital, 1 at Bowling Green, 1 at UK, 1 at Somerset, 1 at Norton’s Hospital. The new cases are females ages 4, 10, 57 and a male age 54.

 

Adair County, 5 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 3 cases. We have had 1,535 total cases with 1,443 of those released and 49 deaths. We have 43 active cases with 43 of those in home isolation. We have 0 case in the hospital at this time.

 

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