Local News

Almost 2,000 New Covid-19 Cases in KY and 40 New Deaths...

 

Monday, January 18, 2021 COVID-19 Report.....

 

 

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TJ HEALTH COLUMBIA COVID-19 VACCINE UPDATE....

 

While we are still waiting to receive the vaccine for those 70 and older, we have plans in place to distribute it quickly and efficiently once it arrives in our hospitals in Glasgow and in Columbia. At this time, we are unsure when it will arrive.

 

In the meantime, beginning Monday, January 18th, seniors age 70 and older who are in Phase 1B of vaccine distribution may contact T.J. Regional Health to sign up for the vaccine waiting list. Please choose ONLY ONE of the following options to get on the list:

 

Fill out the online form at www.tjregionalhealth.org/vaccine OR call 270.659.1010.

 

PLEASE DO NOT SIGN UP BOTH WAYS – DUPLICATE ENTRIES WILL DELAY THE PROCESS ONCE WE BEGIN CALLING PATIENTS TO SCHEDULE APPOINTMENTS.

 

The online form is accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The phone line will be open Monday-Friday from 8am-4pmCT until further notice. There is tremendous demand and high volume, so please be patient.

 

At this time, the waiting listing is for Phase 1B - seniors age 70 and older.

 

Details for Phases 1C and beyond will be announced in the near future as more information becomes available.

 

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Theft of ID and Credit Cards results in Police Chase and Drug Charges...

 
In December, the Adair County Sheriff's Office initiated an investigation into the theft of personal identification information such as social security number and other forms of ID of an Adair county resident. Deputies were able to work with the credit card company and identify retailers where the card was used. Deputies then were able to get video footage from the retailers and identified the person using the card as 35-year-old Brandon Jones of Columbia, KY. A warrant was issued for his arrest, however Jones did not have a permanent residence and was staying multiple places and eluding arrest.
 
On Sunday, January 17, 2021 the Adair County Sheriff's Office received information where Brandon Jones may be and Deputies Brandon Hitch, Derek Padgett and Josh Durbin began searching an area 10 miles east of Columbia in the Sano community. Around 1:00amCT yesterday, deputies approached a residence off Marlo Campbell Road and as they pulled in, a vehicle fled from the residence and the pursuit ensued. Deputies were able to bring the pursuit to a safe stop on Free Union Road close to the Russell County line. The vehicle was occupied by Brandon Jones who was arrested on the warrants as well as multiple additional charges stemming from the chase. 
 
Jones was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail on the following charges:
 
  1. Theft of Identity 
  2. Fleeing and Evading Police 1st degree
  3. Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (methamphetamine) 
  4. Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
  5. Tampering with Physical Evidence
  6. Reckless Driving
  7. Wanton Endangerment 2nd 
  8. Disregarding Stop Sign
  9. Failure to Illuminate Headlights
  10. Criminal Littering

 

Sheriff Brockman assisted the deputies on scene. The investigation is continuing.

 

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RC Hospital Answers COVID-19 Vaccination Questions

 

Patrick Branco, CEO at Russell County Hospital states "we have been receiving a significant number of questions, requests and demands for information on when vaccines will be available to members of our community".  


In answer to these questions and concerns he has provided the following information for the Russell County community:


On December 30th we received our first shipment of 100 doses of the vaccine. We immediately distributed all those to the frontline workers in the healthcare system that were ready to take the initial doses. We immediately ordered an additional 100 doses for the following week but that order was delayed as the State made critical determinations about where the limited number of doses could be distributed statewide. On January 11th we received our next shipment of 100 doses and we again distributed those to the top priority individuals in priority 1a. Immediately upon receipt of our second 100 doses we ordered an additional 100 doses and we believed we would be in a position to be receiving about 100 doses every week or every other week and we could plan accordingly.


Unfortunately, there is a significant shortage of the vaccines across the State and at this time we will not be able to provide any vaccines until that supply improves. I have be assured that we will be provided with the 200 doses necessary to provide the booster to first 200 we vaccinated.


We are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases currently, as we are not aware of a timeline in which we might receive more vaccine. We will promptly notify the community when we receive assurance of new shipments of the vaccine and we will begin the process of compiling a waiting list for distribution based on priority 1b (>70 years old) and higher risk individuals.


At RCH we are deeply committed to helping rid this disease from our midst and committed to serving the needs of our community.  We ask that everyone please be patient with us and know that we are doing everything in our power to get the vaccine into the arms of our community!  

Branco stated "I have rarely seen a more dedicated health care team of nurses, technicians, providers and support staff than I have encountered here in Kentucky.  In addition to a solid partnership with the State, District, and Local Department of Health we have been united in our desire to serve quickly, competently, and compassionately. One day soon we will have this virus under good control and God willing return to our normal lives again".

 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-18-21

Adair County 1 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 7 cases. We have had 1,445 total cases with 1,357 of those released and 47 deaths. We have 41 active cases with 41 of those in home isolation. We have no active cases in the hospital at this time.

 

Russell County NO new cases Sunday. We had 13 cases released from isolation. We now have 54 active cases which 49 cases are on self-isolation and 5 cases are hospitalized, 1 case at Eastern State, 1 case at TJ Sampson in Glasgow, 1 case at UK and 2 cases at Somerset.

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114 New Coronavirus Cases in Lake Cumb. District; No New Deaths...

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 11.74%.

 

Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 295 deaths resulting in a 1.81% mortality rate (about 1 in 55) among known cases. This compares with a 0.95% mortality rate at the state level, and a 1.67% mortality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 74 cases in the hospital. This is 6 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 916 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.62% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.7%. The latest data shows that 88.89% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 35.09% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 16,300 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 7.8% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 134 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 5; Casey: 4; Clinton: 10; Cumberland: 10; Green: 6; McCreary: 6; Pulaski: 49; Russell: 8; Taylor: 15; and, Wayne: 21. In all, we have released 92.7% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: Taking into account deaths and releases, our active cases decreased by 20 more than the new cases we added today. This leaves us with 890 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,340.

 

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Family, and Long-term Care/Residential Facilities. We have had 65 cases tied to Christmas gaterings, 43 tied to Thanksgiving gatherings, and 15 tied to New Year’s events. Of our active cases, 15% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 114 today: Adair: 13; Casey: 13; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 5; Green: 4; McCreary: 17; Pulaski: 22; Russell: 12; Taylor: 18; and, Wayne: 9. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.008. This means our total case count is projected to double every 82.66 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 65-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, Unknown;
Adair: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, Unknown;
Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 60-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Clinton: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 59-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Cumberland: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Green: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Green: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 87-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 27-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, Asymptomatic;
Pulaski: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 56-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 69-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Russell: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 60-year-old male who is hospitalized, Asymptomatic;
Taylor: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 26-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 42-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, Lost to follow up;
Taylor: A 17-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 8-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 58-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 82-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

We are happy to report no new COVID-19 related deaths today, though we did experience 12 deaths this week. Our hospitalizations are still high. We have 74 cases hospitalized today compared to 69 last week. We are glad that our cases trended down this week at the state and local level. Lake Cumberland added 929 new cases this week compared to 1,492 last week. We have 890 cases today compared to 1,102 last week.

 

Until the vaccine is widely available, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 16,300 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 324,972 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 324,325 statewide plus 647 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up with positive cases when ready to be released.

 

Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

 

COVID-19 Vaccination Status

Here is an article we recently published: COVID-19 Vaccine, Patience is Needed.

The Lake Cumberland area remains largely in Phase 1a of our COVID-19 response. This includes vaccines for healthcare workers and first responders. Let us also not forget about the federal contract with Walgreens and CVS pharmacies to vaccinate the long-term care facilities and personal care homes — residents and staff.

 

We are not pre-registering for future vaccination phases currently, as vaccines are not readily available at the local health departments.

 

According to the Governor, the next big push of the COVID-19 vaccine will be to vaccinate school faculty and staff. While the Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital will still, at least for the near future, be receiving 500 doses per week as a regional COVID-19 Center, much of the remaining supply of vaccine over the next few weeks will likely be tied up with the effort to vaccinate school personnel.

 

As we learn more, we will post it.

 

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Adair County Man Arrested on Felony Drug Charges After Early Morning Traffic Stop....

 
On Thursday, January 14, 2021 the Adair County Sheriffs Office arrested 58-year-old Joseph Turner of Columbia. Turner was arrested after K-9 Deputy Josh Durbin initiated a traffic stop on a 1999 Dodge truck at 5:02amCT in the Coburg community, 10 miles north of Columbia. Following a search of the vehicle, methamphetamine, marijuana, and drug paraphernalia was located. Turner was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail on charges of Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (Methamphetamine), Possession of Marijuana, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. 
 
The case remains under investigation by the Adair County Sheriffs Office. 
 

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Columbia Man Arrested for Alcohol Intoxication and Falsely Reporting an Incident


Columbia Police responded to Harper Valley Trailer Court off Tutt Street on Friday night, January 15, 2021 after a male subject called and reported a stolen handgun. Upon making contact with the caller, identified as 49-year-old Bradley West of Columbia, KY he was found to be intoxicated but continued to insist a neighbor had stolen his gun but would not give officers the neighbors name. 
 

While officers were on the scene, Mr. West went to his vehicle and retrieved a shotgun shouting he was going to get his property himself before police were able to quickly subdue West without incident. 

Bradley West has been charged with alcohol intoxication, falsely reporting an incident, and wanton endangerment of police offiicers. After West was placed into custody, a search of his residence was conducted and officers located the handgun in the exact spot West had stated the gun was stolen from.


Officer Trevor Foster made the arrest. He was assisted on scene by Officer Evan Burton and Adair County Deputy Josh Durbin.

 

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COLUMBIA MAN ARRESTED ON METH CHARGES....


Columbia Police were called to assist Adair EMS on a possible drug overdose on Mitchell Street in Columbia on Saturday morning, January 16, 2021.


Upon arrival, a male resident at the home was found to be in possession of 26 grams of suspected methamphetamine as well as various drug paraphernalia, including baggies and scales. 

Joshua Akin, 31, was taken into custody and charged with Trafficking in a Controlled Substance (Methamphetamine) over 2 grams and Resisting Arrest. 
Akin was lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

Officer Gary Roy made the arrest. He was assisted on scene by Officer Ethan Pike and Adair EMS.
 

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HEAD-ON COLLISION SENDS BOTH DRIVERS TO THE HOSPITAL

 

The Columbia Police Department responded to a two vehicle collision with injuries on Thursday morning, January 14, 2021 at the intersection of Edmonton Road and Burksville Street. Prior to the collision, Adair 911 had been receiving multiple calls from West 80 Edmonton Road concerning a reckless driver operating a late model white Buick. 

The operator of the Buick, Constantine Consequences, 34, of Edmonton, KY struck a white Ford Ranger head-on which was operated by Ronnie Wray, 66, of Columbia. Both subjects were transported by Adair EMS to TJ Health Columbia where Consequences was later taken to UK in Lexington for further treatment. 

Constantine Consequences has also been charged with DUI, no out of state registration, no insurance, and possession of marijuana. 

Officer Ethan Pike investigated the collision. He was assisted on scene by additional Columbia Police Units, Fish and Wildlife, as well as Breeding Fire Department.

 

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3955 New Coronavirus Cases in KY; 19 New Deaths...

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear updated Kentuckians about COVID-19 case information and vaccines, as well as security measures at the State Capitol this weekend.

 

“These case numbers are still far too high, but there is hopeful news today, too. We are on track as we ramp up to meet our goal of administering 90% of all vaccine received within seven days of arrival,” said Gov. Beshear. “In fact, last week we administered more doses of vaccine than we received.”

 

The Governor said 325,625 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been received in Kentucky and 190,547 doses have been administered. Of those doses, 31,158 have been administered to long-term care facility residents and staff.

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Friday, Jan. 15, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 3,955
New deaths today: 19

Positivity rate: 12.09%
Total deaths: 3,061
Currently hospitalized: 1,644
Currently in ICU: 392
Currently on ventilator: 203

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Oldham, Fayette, Kenton and Boone. Each of these counties reported 160 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 584.

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Security at Capitol Increased for Next Several Days
Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced heightened security measures around the Kentucky State Capitol grounds in Frankfort following the Jan. 6 attack by domestic terrorists on the U.S. Capitol.

 

To learn more, see the full release and this video.

 

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AREA ARRESTS 01/15/21

 

  • Michael Foster, 35, of Russell Springs was arrested Friday afternoon by KSP for Rape 1st degree and Incest (with someone incapable of consent and/or physically helpless, under 18 years of age). Foster was also charged with 1st degree Strangulation.
  • Billy Wayne Shearer, 40, of Jamestown, KY was arrested Friday by the RCSO for 4th degree Assault (Domestic Violence) with Minor Injuries.
 
Lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.
 
  • Daniel Cappiello, 49, of Columbia, KY was arrested early this morning by Burkesville Police for Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Possession of Marijuana, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.
  • Amye McFall, 21, of Columbia, KY was arrested today by CPD for Trafficking in methamphetamine and Possession of Marijuana.
 
Lodged in the Adair County Regional Jail.

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WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY 6PM THIS EVENING THRU 12PM ON SATURDAY....

 
 
...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY NOW IN EFFECT FROM 7 PM EST /6 PM CST/
THIS EVENING TO 1 PM EST /NOON CST/ SATURDAY...
 
* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations up to one inch.
  Localized amounts near 2 inches possible for some.
 
* WHERE...Portions of east central and south central Kentucky.
 
* WHEN...From 7 PM EST /6 PM CST/ this evening to 1 PM EST /noon
  CST/ Saturday.
 
* IMPACTS...Locally poor visibility and quick accumulations on
  pavement possible this evening. Plan on slippery conditions for
  untreated roads.
 
PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...
 
Slow down and use caution while traveling.
 
The latest road conditions for the state you are calling from can
be obtained by calling 5 1 1.
 

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State Transportation Crews Deploy Ahead of New Snow Front

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2021) – Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) snowfighters deployed in various sections of the commonwealth today to get a jump on an approaching weather front bringing snow.

 

Forecasters warned of a squall-like system moving into western Kentucky early today and spreading eastward, beginning with rain and a few light snow showers but turning increasingly to snow toward evening with less than 1 inch accumulation over most of the state.

 

KYTC crews mainly were spot treating bridges and known slick spots. They also pretreated surfaces so that snow and ice would be easier to clear later.

 

“Keeping roadways as safe as possible is one of the most important roles of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, and that is never more important than in snow and ice season,” said Gov. Andy Beshear.

 

“Part of the task is to get a jump on the weather whenever possible,” Transportation Secretary Jim Gray said. “Our crews are experienced. They know the usual trouble spots, and we monitor weather forecasts constantly.”

 

KYTC can call on nearly 2,000 frontline crews to maintain safe travel on state routes – a mission complicated by the ongoing novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

 

KYTC snowfighters spend several months every year training, stocking up on salt and road treatment supplies and making sure the cabinet’s 1,024 plow trucks are serviced and ready. This year, the cabinet’s proactive planning had to take into account the COVID-19 pandemic, which to date has killed more than 3,000 Kentuckians and has the potential for sidelining entire work crews.

 

“Snow and ice preparations begin long before the winter months and this year has been unique with a health crisis in play,” Secretary Gray said. “We’ve done our best to see around the corner by planning how to keep our work crews as protected as possible from COVID, and also how to adapt plans to cover for crews that suddenly have to be taken out of rotation because of COVID.

 

“We ask Kentuckians to partner with us by paying attention to weather advisories, limiting trips during poor weather conditions, and showing our crews grace as we make necessary adjustments brought on by the pandemic. This is uncharted territory and we will get through this together,” Secretary Gray said. 

 

KYTC uses a three-tier system to prioritize treatment and snow clearing on state-maintained routes. Route designations are based on factors such as traffic volume and connectivity to hospitals and other critical servicess. During routine snow and ice events, crews operate using snow and ice priority route maps for maximum efficiency of equipment and materials usage. For severe winter storm events, the Cabinet has established a snow emergency plan to deploy resources within each county as needed to cover highest priority routes.

 

Crews will follow healthy at work guidelines and maintenance facilities are closed to the public to minimize exposure. KYTC maintains the majority of roads, streets and bridges that are part of the State Highway System. Examples include interstates, parkways and U.S. route designations.

 

Keep Kentucky Moving Safely

Safe roadways are a shared responsibility, especially during inclement weather when risks increase. KYTC encourages motorists to prepare for winter and remain safe by following these tips:
 

  • Travel only as necessary during major snow events. Stock vehicles with ice scrapers, jumper cables, blankets, a flashlight, cell phone charger, non-perishable snacks and first aid kit should you get stranded on the road.
  • Winterize vehicles. Have your car battery, tire pressure and brakes checked. Make sure your heater, defroster, headlights and windshield wipers are working properly.
  • When snow and/or ice are on roadways, drive slowly no matter what type of vehicle you’re in. It takes more time and distance to stop your vehicle in poor weather conditions, so brake early and slowly.
  • Pay attention to weather advisories and allow more time to travel for routine commutes.
  • Slow down when approaching intersections, off-ramps, bridges or shaded areas. These are all candidates for developing black ice—a thin coating of clear ice that can form on the pavement surface that may be difficult to see.
  • Maintain a safe distance from snowplows and other heavy highway equipment and do not pass snowplows on the shoulder.
  • Know before you go. Download the free WAZE app or visit goky.ky.gov to check traffic conditions before you travel. The map also offers access to select traffic cameras on interstates and parkways.
  • Eliminate distractions while driving (e.g. using phone and eating).
  • Throughout the winter season, KYTC will be highlighting the men and women across the state who serve on the frontlines and behind the scenes of the Cabinet’s snow and ice removal efforts. Follow @KYTC and like us on facebook.com/kytc120. Follow your local KYTC Department of Highways district office on Twitter and Facebook for regional transportation updates. The Cabinet’s snow and ice information website, snowky.ky.gov, provides details about priority routes, helpful winter weather tips, fact sheets and videos on salt application and snow removal.

 

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Gov. Beshear: Security at Capitol Increased for Next Several Days

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced heightened security measures around the Kentucky State Capitol grounds in Frankfort following the Jan. 6 attack by domestic terrorists on the U.S. Capitol.

 

“There have been domestic terror threats against state capitols all over the United States. Our commitment is that what happened at the U.S. Capitol will not happen here,” the Governor said. “We have the commitment and participation of the Kentucky State Police, Frankfort Police and the Kentucky National Guard to ensure the safety of everyone in this area. There have been no requests for permits for gatherings at the Capitol in the coming days, so there are no gatherings or rallies that can or should be happening.”

 

Gov. Beshear said that in addition to an increased law enforcement presence, areas near the Kentucky State Capitol will be closed on Sunday.

 

“To further ensure the safety of everyone – both on or around the grounds and in the neighborhoods surrounding the Capitol in Frankfort – we will be closing the Capitol grounds entirely on Sunday,” he said.

 

The Governor acknowledge that the measure would inconvenience some in the area.

 

“We appreciate everyone’s understanding and your patriotism,” he said. “Domestic terror is never OK. We must stop it every time we see it, and we cannot let what we saw at the U.S. Capitol become a new normal for this country.”

 

Brig. Gen. Haldane (Hal) B. Lamberton, Adjutant General of the Kentucky National Guard, said Guard soldiers’ involvement in the security effort has been approved.

 

“Gov. Andy Beshear has authorized the Kentucky National Guard to support the safety and security of the state Capitol grounds and surrounding area over the coming days,” he said.

 

Acting Commissioner Lt. Col. Phillip Burnett Jr. of the Kentucky State Police said the measures were necessary to protect both the public and state buildings.


“In order to protect all citizens, the Kentucky State Police provides security at the state Capitol. KSP has not received any requests or notifications of a rally.

However, precautions have been put in place to ensure the safety of both the public and state buildings, and will be adjusted as needed,” Lt. Col. Burnett said. “In an effort to minimize the potential of an extreme event, Capitol grounds will be closed on Sunday.”

 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATE 1-15-21

 

Russell County 3 new cases Thursday. We had 7 cases released from isolation. We now have 69 active cases which 65 cases are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized,1 at Eastern State, 1 at T J Sampson and 2 at Somerset.

 

Adair County 11 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 10 cases. We have had 1,422 total cases with 1,334 of those released and 47 deaths. We have 41 active cases with 41 of those in home isolation. For the first time in a long time, we have no active cases in the hospital at this time.

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RUSSELL SPRINGS CITY COUNCIL MEETING RECAP

 

The regular monthly meeting for the Russell Springs City Council was held last evening. Mayor Eddie Thomas shares with WAVE listeners what took place... 

 

 

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Gov. Beshear: Kroger Regional Vaccination Sites Will Open Feb. 1 for Phase 1A, 1B and 1C

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear, state officials and Kroger leadership announced a new partnership to significantly increase the speed of COVID-19 vaccinations across the commonwealth.

 

The first Kroger regional, drive-through vaccination sites will open the week of Feb. 1 for Kentuckians in Phase 1A, 1B and 1C. For more details on who is included in each phase, click here. On Jan. 28, the Governor said more details would be announced on site locations and how to sign up.

 

“Last year, when we were wondering when anybody who wanted a COVID-19 test would be able to get one, Kroger made that a reality. That testing partnership created the national model for surge testing,” said Gov. Beshear. “These drive-through vaccination sites are fantastic news all Kentuckians, and we’re grateful to the entire Kroger team for making it possible. Your help in this effort will save countless lives.”

 

The Governor announced that Transportation Secretary Jim Gray has also been named Director of the Vaccine Distribution Project.

 

“This is all about Team Kentucky delivering on an ambitious, life-saving project,” said Secretary Gray. “This regional system will grow over time to reach even more Kentuckians. As we speak, we are working to get sites evaluated and secured. We are committed to ensuring equitable distribution of the vaccine and everyone will have their turn.”

 

“We are proud to partner with the state on efforts to make sure all Kentuckians have access to the COVID-19 vaccine as quickly as possible,” said Meggen Brown, Chief Nursing Officer and National Clinical Director at Kroger Health. “Kroger Health’s vision is to help people live healthier lives, and that has never been more important.”

 

Vaccinations have already begun for K-12 school personnel through individual school districts and will continue to ramp up over the next few weeks. The Governor said the state expects to finish administering initial vaccination doses for K-12 educators and support staff the week of Feb. 1.

 

“The great news is, we expect to finish first dose vaccinations for school staff the week we said we would start,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

The Governor urged Kentuckians to be patient as vaccine allocations from the federal government are still far too small to cover everyone in Phase 1A, 1B and 1C who wants to be vaccinated. However, it is critically important that the state gets vaccines into arms quickly. That means in some cases, vaccine providers will need to vaccinate Kentuckians out of the phase sequence in order to meet the state’s goal of administering 90% of vaccines within one week of their arrival at a distribution site.

 

The Governor and the Kentucky Department for Public Health outlined these phases to help providers distribute vaccines in the most equitable order they can while still vaccinating people as fast as possible. To learn more, see the Jan. 4 release.

 

“I know people are understandably anxious and want to get the vaccine as soon as they can, especially those who are high-risk. We want to do our very best to put those people in the front of the line, but we also need to move quickly so vaccines don’t just sit in a freezer, helping no one,” said Gov. Beshear. “The faster we increase our vaccination numbers, the safer we all will be, because we will get closer to herd immunity as a state more quickly. That’s the overarching goal, so we ask Kentuckians to bear with us if they have to wait a little while in order to get an appointment.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 14, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 4,084
New deaths today: 51

Positivity rate: 12.34%
Total deaths: 3,042
Currently hospitalized: 1,661
Currently in ICU: 409
Currently on ventilator: 196

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Kenton, Boone, Oldham and Fayette. Each of these counties reported 170 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 642.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

Vaccine Update
The Governor said 324,650 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been received in Kentucky and 172,537 doses have been administered. Of the doses administered, 28,977 have been given to long-term care facility residents and staff.

 

More than 67,000 doses were administered from Jan. 3 to 9, about 30,000 more doses than were administered the week prior. Since Jan. 10, more than 45,000 additional doses have been administered.

 

Walgreens and CVS have a contract with the federal government to administer vaccines to residents and staff at long-term care facilities.

 

Adam Mather, inspector general at the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, announced that during the week of Jan. 4 to 10, Walgreens completed vaccinations at 72 long-term care facilities, with 3,512 residents and 2,059 staff receiving doses.

 

That week, CVS completed vaccinations at 75 long-term care facilities, with 2,973 residents and 2,432 staff receiving doses.

 

Unemployment Insurance Update
Today, Amy Cubbage, general counsel for Gov. Beshear, updated Kentuckians on virtual appointment scheduling, federal Continued Assistance Act implementation and the number of Kentuckians who have now received unemployment insurance (UI) payments.

 

“The virtual appointment schedule is an 18-calendar day rolling schedule,” Cubbage said.  “For instance, day 1 is today, Jan. 14. Day 18 is Jan. 31. Appointments for Feb. 1 should be on the website tomorrow for claimants to schedule. Appointment hours are 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. daily. There are currently 16 staff working 125 appointments a day.”

 

The system allows claimants to schedule, reschedule and cancel appointments as well as add the appointment information to their calendars. If a claimant forgets their appointment information, they can go to the website, enter their email address and the system will resend the appointment information. The system is also set to send reminders to claimants with appointments the day before their scheduled appointment.

 

“The programming for the federal Continuing Assistance Act is largely finishedAdditional $300 per week payments should start going out next week,” Cubbage said. “Additional PUA/PEUC weeks should be ready to claim without opening a new claim, even if you had exhausted your full number of weeks previously.”

 

Cubbage added, “We are changing the way we report numbers to give a more accurate context for the work done by the Office of Unemployment Insurance since the beginning of the pandemic.

 

The total numbers from the beginning of the pandemic to the end of November are as follows:

  • Total Claims[1]: 1,539,784
  • Total Claims Paid/Payable: 547,836
  • Total Claims Denied: 27,552
  • Total Pending with Fraud/Identity Issues: 90,144
  • Total Pending with No Fraud/Identity Issues: 23,236
  • Total Amount Paid: $5,450,709,280 

 

Kentucky National Guard Members to Assist with Presidential Inauguration
Today, Gov. Beshear announced that the Kentucky National Guard will send approximately 270 personnel to the Washington, D.C. region who will be on duty through the presidential inauguration Jan. 20.

 

The peaceful transfer of power is a bedrock of our democracy. Historically, the Kentucky National Guard has assisted in and around Washington, D.C., during presidential inaugurations. Given the attack of Jan. 6 on our U.S. Capitol and on lawmakers, more of our soldiers and airmen will be traveling to the region to ensure safety and security. They will assist civilian law enforcement with security operations, including protecting property, for the Wednesday inauguration,” said Gov. Beshear. “These brave men and women will once again proudly serve the commonwealth and the country during this historic moment when our new president is sworn in.”

 

Hitachi Creating 200 Jobs in Berea
As Kentucky rebuilds its economy and puts new emphasis on attracting well-paying jobs and industries of the future, Hitachi Automotive Electric Motor Systems America Inc. is establishing a new, 200-job operation in Berea to manufacture motors for electric vehicles. For more information, see the full release.

 

Memorial

“Today we share the loss of Lewis Bass, known to many in Louisville and throughout Kentucky as Sonny. He was 99 years old. He was a beloved community leader who was always ready to jump in and help others. His granddaughter Anna said his true loves were his family, the University of Louisville and giving back to his community.

 

“Sonny was born in the West End of Louisville and dedicated his life to helping the entire city succeed. He was a three-year football letterman and a two-year letterman in basketball at the University of Louisville, before serving his country during World War II. When he returned to Louisville, Sonny took the first step in his many business ventures, which included co-founding what is now known as Humana. Sonny was a gifted tennis player and played competitively into his golden years.

 

“But his greatest achievement was meeting Gladys, his wife of 74 years, and beginning the family he loved so much. Gladys, Sonny and many other family members were infected with COVID, but unfortunately, it hit Sonny the hardest.

 

Despite the efforts of those at Baptist East Hospital he passed away on Dec. 11. Gladys is recovering, and thankfully her family was able to locate caregivers to help with her recovery despite the challenges of the virus.

 

“Sonny was special. Not only did he accomplish so much professionally and within the community, he also made everyone who came in contact with him smile. He lived by the motto, ‘It only takes a minute to give a little joy and see a smile.’ Anyone who knew Sonny can’t help but smile when they think of him – he was an all-around great man. 

 

“Today we lift Gladys and their entire family in prayer. This is a huge loss for them, and the entire community of Louisville. Today we mask up for Sonny.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily reportincidence rate map, information on testing locationsvaccinescontact tracingschool reports and guidanceguidance for health care providers and the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and more, visit kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

1] This still includes duplicate claims for total claims. The number of unique claims from March to November 2020 is approximately 665,000. A number of pending claims have been resolved since the end of November. Kentucky’s unemployment rate has consistently been lower than the national average through the pandemic, except for one month, where it was only slightly above. Many months have been significantly lower.

 

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ARRESTS 01/14/21

 
  • Nicole Hicks, 36, of Russell Springs was arrested today (Thursday) by the RCSO for Operating on a Suspended or Revoked Operators License, No Registration Plates, No Registration Receipt, and a Communications Device Violation.
  • William Scottie Phelps, 39, of Liberty, KY was arrested today for Trafficking in Methamphetamine, Cultivating Marijuana (less than 5 plants), Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Parole Violation (for a Felony Offense).
 
Lodged in the Russell Co. Detention Center.

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KYTC Seeking Input on U.S. 127 Improvement Study in Russell County

 

SOMERSET, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2021) – Public input is needed to help the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) identify transportation concerns along the U.S. 127 corridor in Russell County between the Jamestown Bypass and KY 379.

 

KYTC along with the Lake Cumberland Area Development District and Stantec Consulting Services has been working to analyze existing conditions and wants to hear from you regarding your safety and traffic concerns within the study area. Your input is essential to identify the needs of roadway users on a local and regional level. Please take a moment to help the team identify needs along the highway, by completing a short survey available at https://transportation.ky.gov/DistrictEight/Pages/US-127-Russell-Springs-Improvement-Study.aspx. The site also includes a story map which summarizes existing conditions in the study area and an opportunity for you to place points on an online mapping portal to enter location-specific data about existing traffic and safety concerns.

 

The study team will use engineering, traffic data (current and projected to 2045), and public input to help develop possible short- and long-term highway improvements. Another round of public involvement in late Spring 2021 will collect your input on any proposed improvements. Further funding will be necessary to advance any improvement concept identified as part of this study.

 

Please complete the survey by February 15, 2021. For additional project information or special assistance, please contact the KYTC Project Manager, Jeff Dick at JeffD.Dick@ky.gov or call 606-677-3507.

 

Updates can also be found at www.facebook.com/KYTCDistrict8 or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/KYTCDistrict8.  

 

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WINTER PREPAREDNESS

 

(Info. from the Lake Cumberland District Health Dept.)

 

Prepare for extremely cold weather every winter—it’s always a possibility. There are steps you can take in advance for greater wintertime safety in your home.

 

Listen to weather forecasts regularly and check your emergency supplies whenever a period of extreme cold is predicted. Although periods of extreme cold cannot always be predicted far in advance, weather forecasts can sometimes provide you with several days notice.

 

If you plan to use a fireplace or wood stove for emergency heating, have your chimney or flue inspected each year. Ask your local fire department to recommend an inspector or find one online.

 

If you’ll be using a fireplace, wood stove, or kerosene heater, install a smoke detector and a battery-operated carbon monoxide detector near the area to be heated. Test them monthly and replace batteries twice a year. All fuel-burning equipment should be vented to the outside. Each winter season have your furnace system and vent checked by a qualified technician to ensure they are functioning properly.

 

If you are over 65 years old, place an easy-to-read thermometer in an indoor location where you will see it frequently. Your ability to feel a change in temperature decreases with age. Older adults are more susceptible to health problems caused by cold. Check the temperature of your home often during the winter months.

 

Insulate any water lines that run along exterior walls so your water supply will be less likely to freeze. To the extent possible, weatherproof your home by adding weather-stripping, insulation, insulated doors, and storm windows or thermal-pane windows.

 

If you have pets, bring them indoors. If you cannot bring them inside, provide adequate shelter to keep them warm and make sure they have access to unfrozen water.

 

On a separate note, it is important to point out that Kentucky is one of the unhealthiest states in our nation; but, a few healthy lifestyle choices could change this. First, eating normally proportioned helpings of nutritious foods including at least five fruits and vegetables a day can lower weight and reduce heart disease and diabetes. Second, exercising about 30 minutes per day can lower blood pressure. Third, avoiding the use of tobacco products can reduce several types of cancer. Finally, making sure you get your needed preventive screenings can detect diseases early and greatly increase your chances for a positive health outcomes, while receiving your recommended vaccinations can prevent acquiring disease in the first place.

 

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LOCAL CORONA VIRUS UPDATED 1-14-21

Russell County 11 new cases Wednesday. We had 14 cases released from isolation. We now have 73 active cases which 67 cases are on self-isolation and 6 cases are hospitalized, 1 at Eastern State, 1 at VA in Lexington. 1 at Norton’s, 2 at Somerset and 1 at Russell County Hospital.

 

Adair County 2 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 14 cases. Adair also reported a death Wednesday. We have had 1,411 total cases with 1,324 of those released and 47 deaths. We have 40 active cases with 38 of those in home isolation and 2 in area hospitals.

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McConnell Statement on Senate Schedule

 

WASHINGTON, D.C.U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) issued the following statement today regarding the Senate schedule:

 

“The House of Representatives has voted to impeach the President. The Senate process will now begin at our first regular meeting following receipt of the article from the House.

 

“Given the rules, procedures, and Senate precedents that govern presidential impeachment trials, there is simply no chance that a fair or serious trial could conclude before President-elect Biden is sworn in next week. The Senate has held three presidential impeachment trials. They have lasted 83 days, 37 days, and 21 days respectively.

 

“Even if the Senate process were to begin this week and move promptly, no final verdict would be reached until after President Trump had left office. This is not a decision I am making; it is a fact. The President-elect himself stated last week that his inauguration on January 20 is the ‘quickest’ path for any change in the occupant of the presidency.

 

“In light of this reality, I believe it will best serve our nation if Congress and the executive branch spend the next seven days completely focused on facilitating a safe inauguration and an orderly transfer of power to the incoming Biden Administration. I am grateful to the offices and institutions within the Capitol that are working around the clock, alongside federal and local law enforcement, to prepare for a safe and successful inauguration at the Capitol next Wednesday.”

 

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47 New COVID-19 Deaths in KY & Over 4500 New Cases....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 13, 2021) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced the state’s fourth-highest report of new COVID-19 cases and third-highest report of new COVID-19 deaths.

 

“We’re going to pass 3,000 COVID-19 deaths in the commonwealth,” said Gov. Beshear. “That is tragic. We can stop this. We need to wear masks. We need to follow the rules and restrictions, and now is not the time to pull away the authority that keeps us safe. That allows us to be fluid and flexible with a virus that appears to be mutating and spreading more aggressively.”

 

Case Information
As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 13, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

New cases today: 4,560
New deaths today: 47

Positivity rate: 12.29%
Total deaths: 2,991
Currently hospitalized: 1,702
Currently in ICU: 403
Currently on ventilator: 225

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Oldham, Kenton, Fayette, Daviess and Boone. Each of these counties reported 160 or more new cases; Jefferson County alone reported 664.

 

To see a list of those reported lost to the virus today, click here.

 

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SENATOR MAX WISE ANNOUNCES COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP FOR 2021 REGULAR SESSION

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (January 13, 2021) – The Senate Majority Caucus has announced the committee assignments for the 2021 Regular Session of the Kentucky General Assembly. Senator Max Wise (R-Campbellsville) will serve as the chairman of the Senate Standing Committee on Education. He will also serve as the co-chairman of the Education Assessment & Accountability Review Subcommittee.

 

Additionally, Senator Wise will serve as a member on the Senate Standing Committees on Agriculture; Health & Welfare; and Transportation. He is also a liaison member on the Budget Review Subcommittee on Education

 

“I am honored to have been appointed to these committees, as both a member and a leader,” said Senator Wise. “This session will be unlike any other as we address issues regarding the pandemic and the annual state budget. I am eager to get to work with fellow lawmakers and stakeholders to address these issues and many others.”

 

Senate committee memberships are confirmed during the first of the session by the Senate Committee on Committees.

 

To learn more about the 2021 Kentucky General Assembly and other legislative matters, please visit www.legislature.ky.gov.

 

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