Local News

National Prescription Drug Take Back Day Successful...

 
The Adair County Sheriffs Office has collected approximately 87 lbs of prescription medication over the last year in partnership with the Drug Enforcement Agency.
 
The purpose of the program is to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of old prescription medicine while educating the public about the potential for abuse of medication.
 
This year, alongside Troopers from KSP Post 15, the Adair County Sheriffs Office collected approximately 205lbs of pills.  On Sunday, Oct. 25th at 10:00pmCT,  Sheriff Josh Brockman turned over the prescription meds to KSP POST 15 to be transported to a designated drop-off point for proper disposal.   
 
 
 

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COVID-19 Case Count Increases by 59 in Lake Cumb. District; Adair Has 10 More & Russell 8 More Cases....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.97%.

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 81 deaths resulting in a 1.94% mortality rate (about 1 in 52) among known cases. This compares with a 1.43% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.59% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 31 cases in the hospital. This is 2 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 35 on 10/20/2020. We have had a total of 326 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.8% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 6.97%. The latest state data shows that 69.02% of ICU beds and 27.61% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,181 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 2% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 63 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 6; Casey: 2; Clinton: 11; Cumberland: 2; Green: 3; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 17; Russell: 6; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 7. In all, we have released 86.2% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 4 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 496 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/24/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 505.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Family, and Places of Worship.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 59 today: Adair: 10; Casey: 5; Clinton: 9; Cumberland: 2; Green: 2; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 11; Russell: 8; Taylor: 7; and, Wayne: 4. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 44.79 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/22/2020 when we added 80 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 71-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 77-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Clinton: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 6-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 7-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 71-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 53-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 61-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: An 89-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 45-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: An 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 63-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 40-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 55-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 47-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

A close review of the data will appear to be off by 1 tonight. This is because 1 case from yesterday was removed as not being a case.

 

We are happy we released 4 more cases today than we added new one. However, our hospitalizations went up by 2.

 

7 of our counties remain in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. The other 3 are in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread, Casey, McCreary, and Pulaski.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,181 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 99,881 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 99,637 statewide plus 244 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

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RUSSELL SPRINGS MAN ARRESTED FOR CRIMINAL MISCHIEF & OTHER CHARGES...

 

Gabriel Eden, 41, was taken into custody by Officer Antle with the Russell Springs Police Department Tuesday evening. Eden was charged with Criminal Mischief 2nd degree, Terroristic Threatening, 3rd degree and Menacing. He was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 10-28-20

 

Russell County reported 8 new cases Tuesday. We had 6 cases released from isolation. We now have 57 active cases with 53 on self-isolation and 4 cases hospitalized, all in Somerset. The new cases are females ages 45, 51,54,62,89 and males ages 44, 46, 61.

 

Adair County reported 10 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday. We released 6 cases. We have 79 active cases with 75 in home isolation and 4 in area hospitals.

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18 New COVID-19 Deaths & 1786 New Cases; Kentuckians in Red Zones Asked to Prepare Weekly Reduction Plan

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 27, 2020) – On Tuesday, the Governor said that community, long-term care and school leaders and administrators, as well as Kentucky families in red zone counties, should prepare a weekly COVID-19 reduction plan based on each Thursday’s incidence rate map.

 

Thursday’s red zone map, published on kycovid19.ky.gov, provides communities and families time to plan and accommodate the new red zone reduction recommendations and other existing guidance, including for schools, the following week (Monday through Sunday).

 

The Governor said schools already follow the Thursday map for when a county enters the red zone.

 

“If you’re in a red county, anything you don’t need to do, don’t. Stay home as much as possible,” Gov. Beshear said. “Schools shouldn’t be the only ones that are taking these steps. When you coordinate these two responses, the schools and the community together, we can get the best result.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Tuesday, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,786
  • New deaths today: 18
  • Positivity rate: 5.97%
  • Total deaths: 1,428
  • Currently hospitalized: 913
  • Currently in ICU: 233
  • Currently on ventilator: 115

 

The top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Kenton, Hardin and Pike. A list of today’s red counties can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 99-year-old woman from Christian County; a 79-year-old woman from Henderson County; a 70-year-old woman from Hopkins County; three women, ages 79, 82 and 86, and five men, ages 62, 62, 70, 88 and 93, from Jefferson County; two men, ages 96 and 97, from Jessamine County; a 76-year-old man from Nicholas County; a 72-year-old man from Ohio County; two women, ages 77 and 91, from Scott County; and a 72-year-old woman from Wayne County.

 

Gov. Beshear reminds Kentuckians to light their homes and businesses up green to show compassion for those lost to COVID-19.

 

Louisville Firefighter’s COVID-19 Battle Shows Importance of Masks
Today, Kelly Alexander, the Kentucky Department for Public Health’s chief of staff, spoke about her 40-year-old husband Josh’s harrowing battle with COVID-19. Prior to COVID-19, Josh was extremely healthy and loved hiking and the outdoors. With COVID-19, he couldn’t even talk without being short of breath or suffering from a coughing attack. Thankfully, Josh is now out of the hospital and at home, but he is not out of the woods yet. He still is fighting pneumonia in both lungs. 

 

“The coronavirus affects everyone differently. But one thing is certain. This is not something you want to spread to others and it is not something you want to watch your loved ones suffer from,” said Alexander. “These are not just numbers. These are people. These are husbands, mothers, fathers, family, friends, and neighbors.”

 

Due to work schedules, Alexander was not exposed and has been away from her home since early in October.

 

Corrections Update
J. Michael Brown, secretary of the Executive Cabinet, reminded Kentuckians that from the outset of the pandemic, all correctional facilities enhanced sanitation and hygiene, suspended visitation to keep staff and inmates safe and initiated staff screening for COVID-19 symptoms every day upon entry. Inmates were provided with additional free phone calls and emails to keep them connected to family and friends. He also shared that cloth masks for inmates and staff were provided in early April and have been supplemented to ensure the inmates have a fresh one available at all times. When a positive staff or inmate case has occurred, the correctional facility has worked with the Kentucky Department for Public Health to conduct contact tracing, run additional tests and separate the prison population into distinct housing units if necessary.

 

Currently, there are 263 active inmate cases and 20 active staff cases in state prisons. There have been 1,164 total inmate cases and 194 total staff cases; sadly, 13 inmates and two staffers have died of COVID-19.

 

Remembrance
Today, Gov. Beshear recognized Bobby Rorer, a husband, father, grandfather and Kentucky World War II veteran tragically lost to COVID-19. Bobby was one of the residents at the Thomson-Hood Veterans Center in Wilmore, where he passed away separated from his family.

 

“Bobby was a hero to our people, joining the army at just 16 years old after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. He never met a stranger. He loved getting out, meeting new people and sharing stories. So much so that after retiring from a long career in government and volunteerism, Bobby could often be found at Walmart daily where he would go to just sit and talk to people. They even offered him a greeter position,” said Gov. Beshear. “Most of all, he will be missed by his wife Dana, whose name he called during his final days. Dana, we are praying for your entire family.”

 

Fast 4
Today, Rocky Adkins, senior advisor to Gov. Beshear, highlighted $6.6 million in Appalachian Regional Commission grants for 13 projects in central and eastern Kentucky communities that will update infrastructure, bolster education, spur economic development and diversification, improve workforce training, improve health care and build a better Kentucky.

Adkins also celebrated nearly $13 million in funding from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet to 14 cities and 29 county fiscal courts. The awards will fund 196 projects repairing and improving streets and roads across the commonwealth. To learn more about these two funding announcements, see the full releases here and here.

 

Next, Adkins shared that AgriTech company AppHarvest has begun construction on its third high-tech greenhouse in Central Appalachia, this time in Berea. The project will create 60-full time jobs. He also noted that UPS is re-opening its facility in Harlan County, which will bring back 20 jobs that left the county in 2016.

 

Finally, Adkins implored Kentuckians to wear masks around people from outside their household, including while they vote. Masks are more crucial than ever as the weather gets colder and families spend more time indoors. Wearing a mask is the number one thing people can do to save lives and to get their counties out of the red zone.

 

“It’s your time to have your voice. It’s your time to play your part by voting,” said Adkins. “And put your mask on while doing it. Let’s whip this terrible virus.”

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Fatal Collision Claims Life of Marion Co. Man....

 
Springfield, KY (October 27, 2020) - On Monday, October 26th, 2020 at approximately 5:28 AM, Kentucky State Police Post 15 received a call from Washington County Dispatch requesting assistance on a single vehicle collision that had resulted in a fatality. Preliminary investigations indicate that Timothy Jones, age 54 of Lebanon, KY was operating a north bound 2007 Honda Civic on Makers Mark Rd, when he lost control and the vehicle caught on fire. Jones was pronounced deceased by the Washington County Coroner. This collision remains under investigation by Trooper Weston Sullivan.
 

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1 New COVID-19 Death in Lake Cumberland District; 55 More Cases....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.84%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today. We have experienced a total of 81 deaths resulting in a 1.97% mortality rate (about 1 in 51) among known cases. This compares with a 1.44% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.6% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 29 cases in the hospital. This is 3 less than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 35 on 10/20/2020. We have had a total of 323 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.84% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.05%. The latest state data shows that 70.05% of ICU beds and 27.73% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,122 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.97% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 58 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 11; Casey: 3; Clinton: 10; Cumberland: 5; Green: 3; McCreary: 3; Russell: 7; Taylor: 10; and, Wayne: 6. In all, we have released 85.9% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 4 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 500 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/24/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 505.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Places of Worship, and Family.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 55 today: Adair: 13; Casey: 3; Clinton: 6; Cumberland: 6; Green: 3; McCreary: 3; Pulaski: 7; Russell: 2; Taylor: 5; and, Wayne: 7. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 44.67 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/22/2020 when we added 80 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 71-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 70-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 42-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 52-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 33-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: An 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 47-year-old male who is released, unknown
  • Cumberland: An 18-year-old male who is released, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 49-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 32-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • McCreary: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 59-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 49-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 39-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 48-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: An 84-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 48-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: An 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 32-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 74-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we report today is a 72-year-old female from Wayne who had been hospitalized. Our local mortality rate remains high compared to the statewide mortality rate.

 

Today some new recommendations came out from the Governor’s Office for counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread. These include:

  • Employers allow employees to work from home when possible
  • Non-critical government offices to operate virtually
  • Reduce in-person shopping; order online or curbside pickup
  • Order take-out; avoid dining in restaurants or bars
  • Prioritize businesses that follow and enforce mask mandate and other guidelines
  • Reschedule, postpone, or cancel public and private events
  • Do not host or attend gatherings of any size
  • Avoid non-essential activities outside your home
  • Reduce overall activity and contracts, and follow existing guidance, including 10 steps to defeat COVID-19.

 

Seven of our counties are in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Russell, Taylor, & Wayne. The other 3 are in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread, Casey, McCreary, & Pulaski. We are happy we released 4 more cases today than we added new one. We are also pleased our hospitalizations dropped by 3.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,122 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 98,079 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 97,866 statewide plus 213 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

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RED ZONE COUNTY RECOMMENDATIONS....

 
The following counties in the 10-county Lake Cumberland District are in the Red Zone: Russell, Adair, Green, Metcalfe, Taylor and Clinton counties. Red zone counties are those with 25 or more average daily cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 residents.  
 
Governor Andy Beshear's Red Zone Reduction Recommendations:
 
  • Employers should allow employees to work from home when possible
  • Government offices that do not provide critical services need to operate virtually
  • Reduce in-person shopping; order online or pickup curbside as much as possible
  • Order take-out; avoid dining in restaurants or bars
  • Prioritize businesses that follow and enforce the mask mandate and other guidelines
  • Reschedule, postpone or cancel public events
  • Do not host or attend gatherings of any size
  • Avoid non-essential activities outside your home 
  • Reduce overall activity and contacts, and follow existing guidance, including the 10 Steps to Defeat COVID-19.

 

The Governor said when a county turns red, we are already asking schools to go virtual, we ask for sports to pause and we restrict visitation in long-term care facilities.
 

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LOCALCORONA VIRUS UPDATE 10-27-20

 

Adair County 13 new COVID19 cases to report yesterday. We released 11 cases. We have75 active cases with 71 of those in home isolation and 4 in area hospitals.

 

Russell County 7 cases released from isolation Monday. We now have 55 active cases which 51 are on self-isolation and 4 cases are hospitalized. All 4 cases hospitalized are at Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital. The new cases are 48 and 84 year old males who are self-isolated.

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Gov. Beshear: Kentuckians, Communities Urged to Follow New Red Zone Reduction Recommendations to Stop COVID Spread, Protect One Another

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 26, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear reported 953 COVID-19 cases in Kentucky and issued new red zone reduction recommendations to stop COVID-19 spread and protect Kentuckians in the 55 counties currently in the red zone.

 

The Governor said today marked the highest number of new cases ever reported on a Monday as cases are at an all-time high across the country and in the commonwealth. Hospitalizations and deaths are also increasing nationally and in Kentucky. New red zone recommendations provide direction on how communities can come together to defeat COVID-19.

 

“Every Kentuckian in a red zone county needs to work together to protect one another by following these recommendations,” Gov. Beshear said. “Now is not the time to give up – this is a time when more people are going to be at risk. It is a time when we need everyone to do better.”

 

Red zone counties are those with 25 or more average daily cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 residents. Red zone counties are updated daily on the incidence rate map on kycovid19.ky.gov. The Governor said when a county turns red, we are already asking schools to go virtual, we ask for sports to pause and we restrict visitation in long-term care facilities.

 

Red Zone Reduction Recommendations:

  • Employers should allow employees to work from home when possible
  • Government offices that do not provide critical services need to operate virtually
  • Reduce in-person shopping; order online or pickup curbside as much as possible
  • Order take-out; avoid dining in restaurants or bars
  • Prioritize businesses that follow and enforce the mask mandate and other guidelines
  • Reschedule, postpone or cancel public events
  • Do not host or attend gatherings of any size
  • Avoid non-essential activities outside your home
  • Reduce overall activity and contacts, and follow existing guidance, including the 10 Steps to Defeat COVID-19

 

“This isn’t too much to ask to keep your neighbors and your loved ones alive,” said Gov. Beshear.

 

“It is not a good time to be out in public. This is the most dangerous it has been in eight months,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “The risk of you getting infected in the state of Kentucky has never been higher.”

 

The Governor reminded Kentuckians of existing actions and guidance his administration has taken to protect Kentuckians, including: a mask mandate; Healthy at Work requirements for bars and restaurants, businesses and retail, health care, employers, childcare and indoor and outdoor arenas; a travel advisory and an order limiting private gatherings to 10 people or less. The administration has also implemented guidance to help long-term care facilities, correctional institutions, colleges and universities, K-12 schools, sports groups and published the 10 Steps to Defeat COVID-19.

 

Case Information – Monday, Oct. 26
As of 3:00pmCT on Monday, Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 953
  • New deaths today: 3
  • Positivity rate: 5.84%
  • Total deaths: 1,410
  • Currently hospitalized: 858
  • Currently in ICU: 253
  • Currently on ventilator: 112

 

The top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton and Floyd. A list of the red counties can be found here.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 75-year-old man from Garrard County; a 73-year-old woman from Graves County; and a 54-year-old man from Lewis County.

 

Gov. Beshear reminds Kentuckians to light their homes and businesses up green to show compassion for those lost to COVID-19.

 

The Governor said unfortunately there have been eight total COVID-19 deaths from the Thomas-Hood Veterans Center in Wilmore. Ten patients from the facility are currently in the hospital, 51 still have symptoms and four have recovered. There have been 49 total staff cases at the facility, and 26 of those staffers have recovered.

 

Case Information – Sunday, Oct. 25
Due to limited reporting on the weekends, some updated information is now available from Sunday, Oct. 25. As of Sunday, the positivity rate was 5.81%.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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Gov. Beshear Announces more than $3.6 Million in Grants for Eastern Kentucky Communities; Russell County Awarded Over $539,000........

 

Russell County's Grant total is $510,000. See below for list of roads to be resurfaced.

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 26, 2020) – Today, Gov. Andy Beshear announced $3,690,902 million in Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) grants for seven projects in Eastern Kentucky communities that will update infrastructure, bolster education, spur economic development, improve health care and build a better Kentucky.

 

The Department for Local Government (DLG) administers the grant funding. Communities receiving funds are Booneville, Hazard, Morehead, Mount Vernon and Somerset.

 

Gov. Beshear also announced nearly $4 million in funding from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) to a dozen communities for improvement of local streets and roads.

 

“These projects will improve the lives of people in Eastern Kentucky. They also further illustrate my administration’s commitment to the region and our promise to protect the commonwealth’s economy despite the challenges posed by COVID-19,” said Gov. Beshear. “We are grateful for the leaders who made these projects possible and for ARC’s continued commitment to Kentucky.”

 

“These seven projects are invaluable for Eastern Kentucky,” said Department for Local Government (DLG) Commissioner and Gov. Beshear’s ARC Representative Dennis Keene. “They will provide critical improvements and important investments while we work to provide real opportunity in every community across the commonwealth.”

 

Booneville
Booneville will use $1,000,000 in ARC funds to replace 1,160 water meters throughout the city. These upgrades will allow officials to provide more accurate, remote readings that will prevent revenue and water loss.

 

“I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for helping us set these goals and giving us funds to make it better here for the citizens of Owsley County,” said Booneville Mayor Nelson Bobrowski.

 

Hazard
The Challenger Learning Center of Kentucky, located in Hazard, will use $800,000 in ARC funding for the Moon, Mars and Beyond Gateway to Tomorrow project, which will generate excitement about STEM careers and NASA’s “Return to the Moon by 2024” missions. The project includes an interactive science center, an outreach program in schools for students who cannot travel to the center, virtual programs and the establishment of a Moon, Mars and Beyond Facilitation Team. Upon completion, the project will create two jobs and will include 1,875 students.

 

“On behalf of the Challenger Learning Center of Kentucky Board of Directors and staff, I would like to thank Gov. Beshear and the Appalachian Regional Commission for this grant award, which is an investment in the future of the Challenger Learning Center,” said Challenger Learning Center Executive Director Tom Cravens. “ARC was the Challenger Learning Center’s first investor when the Center originally opened in 1999, and we appreciate this grant, which will kick off the third decade of this innovative STEM learning Center.”

 

Teach for America Appalachia, located in Hazard, will use $500,000 to recruit, train and retain K-12 teachers for underserved areas in eastern Kentucky by offering new training opportunities and incentives. The project will recruit 290 teachers and plans to retain at least 250 past their initial two-year contract. This project would serve 15 school districts within 12 Appalachian counties.

 

“Because of the Appalachian Regional Commission and this administration’s profound belief in our students and communities, we are so grateful to be the recipients of this Appalachian Regional Commission grant,” said Teach for America Appalachia Executive Director Stephanie Devine. “The grant will allow us to launch bold initiatives that will change the face of education in Appalachian Eastern Kentucky.”

 

Morehead
Morehead State University (MSU) will use $622,902 in ARC funding to improve research capabilities and academic instruction in space systems engineering and astrophysics. MSU will use the funding to install a 12-meter satellite-tracing antenna for research, student training and to support NASA missions. It also will make them one of only four Deep Space Network (DSN) stations worldwide as a part of NASA’s DSN. They will also replace the “Star Theater,” which is the most important asset for science education, outreach and training at the MSU Space Science Center. Upon completion, this project will ensure MSU can attract and train students at all grade levels for STEM careers and will cement its legacy of graduating qualified, workforce-ready engineers and physicists.

 

“Morehead State University is pleased to have the support the ARC and the Governor in furthering the development of our Space Science Center, as well as the development of STEM-based education in Kentucky,” said MSU President Dr. Jay Morgan.

 

Mount Vernon
Rockcastle Regional Hospital and Respiratory Care Center Inc. will use $360,000 in ARC funding for the Tech Ready Apprentices for Careers in Kentucky (TRACK) Apprenticeship Program, which was developed by the Kentucky Department of Education’s Office of Career and Technical Education and the Kentucky Labor Cabinet. The program will train 36 apprentices, 12 per year over a three-year period. Participants include high school students who are interested in becoming State Registered Nurse Aides (SRNA). These students will work in the hospital’s ventilator care unit and receive training about caring for ventilator-dependent patients.

 

“The ARC’s support of our apprenticeship program will give new nursing assistants an experienced mentor right from the start of their career,” said Rockcastle Regional Hospital CEO Stephen Estes. “It will allow us to foster a new generation of nurses for the benefit of our patients now and in the future.”

 

Somerset
The Southeast Kentucky Economic Development Corporation (SKED), located in Somerset, will use $108,000 in ARC funding for the Eastern Kentucky Economic Development Branding Initiative. The program will fund the development of new branding, stock photo production and websites for Rockcastle, Rowan, Whitley and Boyd counties. Upon completion, this program will help create 50 jobs and leverage $10 million in new private investment.

 

“We would like to thank Gov. Andy Beshear and DLG Commissioner Dennis Keene for supporting SKED’s application for $108,000 in ARC funds for our economic development branding initiative,” said SKED Executive Director Brett Traver. “Through this project we will work to reposition these communities’ images to help them attract new business and industry to the region.”

 

The Center for Rural Development, located in Somerset, will use $300,000 in ARC funding for the Coal Impacted Skills Training (CIST) Program, which will provide training opportunities to displaced, unemployed and underemployed workers in 35 counties impacted by the decline of the coal industry and COVID-19. Training opportunities will include essential work skills, help desk customer service and specialized workforce training in high-growth industries like allied health, commercial trucking and additive manufacturing. The program is expected to train 260 workers and provide a more ready workforce in growing industries.

 

“On behalf of our board and staff, we would like to thank the Appalachian Regional Commission, Commissioner Keene and the Department for Local Government for the Coal Impacted Skills Training award the center just received,” said Center for Rural Development President and CEO Lonnie Lawson. “This award will allow us to increase education, knowledge, skills and the health of our residents, enabling them to work and succeed in Appalachia.”

 

Transportation Awards
Also today, Gov. Beshear announced nearly $4 million in funding from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) to a dozen communities for improvement of local streets and roads.

 

“One way we make a better Kentucky is by empowering our local governments to improve and maintain the local traffic routes their citizens use every day,” Gov. Beshear said. “Smoother pavement, repaired road beds, improved drainage – simple things by themselves but highly important to the people who use them every day.”

 

The funding – $3,963,809 – will reimburse 10 counties (including Russell County) and 3 cities for work such as pavement repair, resurfacing and drainage ditching on roadways that were rated in poor condition. The projects were submitted for funding consideration from local officials. In each case, KYTC district engineers assessed road conditions to determine the most critical needs based on factors such as safety, economic impact and traffic volumes. A list of the awards is here.

 

Russell County has been awarded over $500,000 to resurface the following roads:

  • Resurface Withers Rd CR 1439 0.166 - $16,600.00
  • Resurface Puncheon Camp Rd CR 1041 1.473 - $74,700.00
  • Resurface Ray Mann Rd Sect. 1 CR 1250 0.785 - $53,950.00
  • Resurface Riverview Dr CR 1822 0.597 - $62,250.00
  • Resurface Little Indian Dr CR 1824 1.020 - $95,450.00
  • Resurface Kauffman Rd CR 1252 0.382 - $39,425.00
  • Resurface Phelps Acres CR 1317 0.980 - $66,400.00
  • Resurface Selby Branch Rd CR 1304 1.292 - $85,075.00
  • Resurface HemlocK Dr CR 1445A 0.545 - $45,650.00


TOTAL MILES: 7.240
GRANT AWARDED: $539,500.00

 

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7 Counties in Lake Cumb. District in Red Critical COVID-19 Range....


Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.63%.

 

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 80 deaths resulting in a 1.97% mortality rate (about 1 in 51) among known cases. This compares with a 1.45% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.61% morality rate at the national level.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 32 cases in the hospital. This is 1 more than yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 318 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.82% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.08%. The latest state data shows that 70.05% of ICU beds and 27.73% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,067 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.95% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

 

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 36 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 4; Casey: 3; Clinton: 5; Cumberland: 2; Green: 1; McCreary: 2; Pulaski: 2; Russell: 5; Taylor: 4; and, Wayne: 8. In all, we have released 85.6% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We released 1 more cases today than we added new cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 504 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/24/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 505.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Places of Worship, and Family.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 35 today: Casey: 1; Clinton: 1; Cumberland: 2; McCreary: 4; Pulaski: 9; Russell: 2; Taylor: 13; and, Wayne: 3. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 42.45 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/22/2020 when we added 80 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Casey: A 14-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Cumberland: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, unknown
  • McCreary: A 31-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 3-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 25-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 4-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 13-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 76-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 68-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 38-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Pulaski: A 69-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 13-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 66-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 57-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 47-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 54-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, unknown
  • Taylor: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 35-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 72-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 11-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

Pulaski went back into the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread, joining Casey and McCreary. All other counties in our district are in the “red-critical” range: Adair, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne. One little bit of good news is that we released 1 more case than we added new cases. Let’s hope that the last 6 weeks of acceleration drops off this week.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,067 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 97,143 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 96,942 statewide plus 201 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

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BURKESVILLE CITY HALL FIRE SUNDAY MORNING....


Burkesville City hall was damaged by fire Sunday morning.

 

The City of Burkeville suffered fire damage to the city building in the early morning hours yesterday. According to Neal Poindexter with WKYR, an alarm sounded at 5:45 a.m. at Burkesville City Hall.

 

Arson is suspected in the blaze. Investigators were on scene Sunday morning and will be retuning today.

 

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LOCAL CORONAVIRUS UPDATE 10-26-20


Russell County 2 new cases Sunday. We had 5 cases released from isolation. We now have 60 active cases which 57 are on self-isolation and 3 cases are hospitalized at Somerset. The new cases today are a 21 year old male and a 37 year old female who are both self-isolated.

 

Adair County NO NEW COVID19 CASES TO REPORT SUNDAY! We released 4 cases. We have 73 active cases with 66 in home isolation and 7 in area hospitals.

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KY Sets Record for Highest Number of COVID-19 Cases in a Week Since Pandemic Began.....

 

FRANKFORT, KY (Oct. 25, 2020) – On Sunday, Gov. Andy Beshear said Kentucky unfortunately has set a new record for the highest number of new COVID-19 cases in a week since the pandemic began, with 9,335 positive cases this week.

 

The previous highest week of COVID-19 cases was Oct. 5-11, when the commonwealth reported 7,675 new cases. Today also marks the highest number of new cases ever reported on a Sunday, with 1,462 cases.

 

“Since March 6, Kentuckians have been fighting COVID-19, yet we are facing the highest number of cases ever reported on a Sunday, and the highest week of new cases. We must do better,” Gov. Beshear said. “We all know the steps we need to take to stop the spread of this virus – wear a facial covering, wash your hands, stay 6 feet apart and limit gatherings and travel – let’s all do these simple things to protect each other.”

 

Yesterday, the Governor said he will be talking Monday about new recommendations to counties that are in the red zone, those with 25 or more average daily cases per 100,000 residents. The Governor plans to hold 4 p.m. briefings Monday through Thursday this week to update Kentuckians on COVID-19 and necessary next steps.

 

Case Information
Due to limited reporting* on Sundays, some information will be delayed until Monday. As of 1:30pmCT on Sunday, Oct. 25th, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,462
  • New deaths today: 3
  • Positivity rate: Reported Monday*
  • Total deaths: 1,407
  • Currently hospitalized: 841
  • Currently in ICU: 231
  • Currently on ventilator: 106

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are Jefferson, Elliott, Kenton, Fayette, Warren, Bullitt and Shelby.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include an 87-year-old woman from Fayette County; a 74-year-old woman from Grayson County and an 83-year-old man from Spencer County.

 

Gov. Beshear reminds Kentuckians to light their homes and businesses up green to show compassion for those lost to COVID-19.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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PUBLIC NOTICE: ADAIR CO. POLL WORKER TESTS POSITIVE FOR COVID-19

 
The following is a Publc Notice received from the Adair County Judge Exec.'s Office last Tuesday, Oct. 20th:
 
Adair County Clerk Lisa Greer was notified on Tuesday, Oct. 20th of an Election Poll Worker that tested positive for COVID-19. We have said from the beginning that we would be transparent and up front with the citizens of our community. This worker was NOT in the Adair Annex building on Tuesday, Oct. 20th and the building is cleaned every morning before opening and every evening after closing, as well as during the day.  Any workers who were in direct contact with this poll worker has been sent for testing and must have a negative test result before returning to work.  
 
This is the reason we take the steps we do, to hopefully stop the spread to others if or when someone is exposed. Poll workers are wearing the KN95 masks and are behind a plexiglass shield. Disinfecting spray and bleach water are used multiple times a day to sanitize and hand sanitizer is on sight for anyone to use.
 
Close contact to a positive person is considered to be within 6 feet for more than 15 minutes. If anyone was in close contact with a positive patient, you will be contacted by the Lake Cumberland District Health Department. 
 

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WEEKEND ARRESTS 10/25/20

 

Jakob Jones, 25, of Somerset was arrested on Saturday afternoon by KSP for Possession of Methamphetamine and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Fleeing or Evading Police (on foot), Resisting Arrest, and Failure to Appear.

 

Lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

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3 COVID-19 Deaths Last Week in Lake Cumberland District; At Peak Number of Cases....

 
Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.63%.
 
Deaths: We are pleased to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 80 deaths resulting in a 1.98% mortality rate (about 1 in 51) among known cases. This compares with a 1.82% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.62% morality rate at the national level.
 
Hospitalizations: We presently have 31 cases in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 317 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.86% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 13) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.19%. The latest state data shows that 70.05% of ICU beds and 27.73% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.
 
Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 4,032 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.93% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.
 
Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 49 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 2; Casey: 7; Clinton: 5; Green: 2; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 9; Taylor: 5; and, Wayne: 10. In all, we have released 85.5% of our total cases.
 
Active (Current) Cases: We added 5 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 505 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/24/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 505.
 
Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Schools, Businesses, Places of Worship, and Family.
 
New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 54 today: Adair: 5; Casey: 3; Clinton: 3; Cumberland: 3; Green: 5; Pulaski: 10; Russell: 3; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 5. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.017. This means our total case count is projected to double every 41.97 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/22/2020 when we added 80 cases.
 
Today’s new cases include:
  • Adair: A 78-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 55-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 62-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 72-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 7-year-old female who is released, 10/12/20
  • Clinton: A 3-year-old female who is released, 10/12/20
  • Cumberland: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 82-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 14-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 40-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 55-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 58-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 50-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 44-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 54-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 77-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 34-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 56-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

This has been a very challenging week. After 5 weeks of having a slower growth rate of new cases, our district average once again exceeds that of the state average. Today, we are at our peak number of active cases, 505. At 31, we are 2 away from equaling our record number of hospitalized cases. Remember, the last time we were setting records like this, we were experiencing 3 nursing home clusters. Our present situation is community-spread. Also, we had 3 deaths this week. Obviously, with more cases comes more death and more hospitalizations.
 
At both the state (8,788) and local level (440), this was the highest week of new cases since the onset of the outbreak. Also, we have 83 more active cases today at 505 that we did last week. We continue to have 7 of our 10 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread.
 
We saw a lot of cases this week tied to school sports, church related events, and social events like weddings.
 
We can save lives and hospitalizations if, while we await a vaccine, we follow the guidance. Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.
 
The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 4,032 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 95,682 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 95,480 statewide plus 202 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.
 
For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.
 
 

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Drug Trafficking Search Warrant Results in Arrest of 5 Russell Co. Residents....

 

According to Russell County Sheriff Derek Polston, the warrant was issued at 6:30pmCT on Saturday night at 1771 Jericho Road where there have been numerous complaints involving drugs and and large amounts of traffic in that area of the county.

 

 

  1. Zachary Meece, 26, of - Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st degree (Drug Unspecified) and Possession of a Controlled Substance Not in Proper Container
  2. Sarah Elizabeth Cox, 40, of Russell Springs - Possession of Methamphetamine and Drug Paraphernalia
  3. Zachary Antle, 25, of  - Possession of Marijuana
  4. Rebecca Bennett, 57, of Russell Springs - Possession of Methamphetamine & Marijuana, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia
  5. Brandon Estes, 40, of Russell Springs - Assault 4th Degree (Domestic Violence with No Visible injuries)

 

The arrests are the result of the ongoing battle to stop the sale of illegal drugs in Russell County by the RCSO. Deputy Kenny Perkins is the investigating officer. He was assisted at the scene by Chief Deputy Jerry Melton, Deputies Clint Pace and Ron Golden, K-9 “Yogi”, and Constable Jenny Luttrell. The investigation is continuing and the case will be presented to a Russell County Grand Jury.
 

Sheriff Polston reminds all Russell County residents that if you suspect illegal drug activity in your neighborhood, please contact the Drug/Wanted Persons Tip-Line at 270-343-8116. All callers will remain anonymous.

 

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1738 New COVID-19 Cases in KY; 8 More Deaths....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear said Saturday he is excited to be out of quarantine, but today’s COVID-19 report is, “in a word, frightening.” The Governor said this is Kentucky’s highest day of newly reported cases by a significant amount, except for the one day when a backlog of cases from Fayette County was added.

 

“This is exploding all over the country. Yesterday was the highest amount of cases ever reported in a single day in the United States,” Gov. Beshear said. “We've got to do better, and on Monday we'll be talking about new recommendations to counties that are in the red. We've got to tamp down these cases. The more cases, the more people that end up in the hospital and the more people die.”

 

Case Information
As of 2:00pmCT on Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,738
  • New deaths today: 8
  • Positivity rate: 5.63%
  • Total deaths: 1,404
  • Currently hospitalized: 840
  • Currently in ICU: 208
  • Currently on ventilator: 107

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Elliott, Shelby and Kenton.

 

Unfortunately, Gov. Beshear reported eight new deaths Saturday, bringing the total number of Kentuckians now lost to the virus is 1,404.

 

“That’s eight additional families who are suffering during this time,” said Gov. Beshear. “Do what it takes to protect your neighbor, to protect their life. That's what we're fighting for now – life and death.”

 

The deaths reported Saturday include a 69-year-old woman from Lee County; a 70-year-old man from Lincoln County; a 71-year-old man from Jessamine County; a 89-year-old man from Jessamine County; an 86-year-old man from Greenup County; an 89-year-old man from Henderson County; a 71-year-old man from Jefferson County and a 79-year-old man from Harlan.

 

“We’re all tired of COVID-19 and the problems it has brought,” said Dr. Steven Stack, commissioner of the Department for Public Health. “People are hurting, whether from the virus itself or the impact it has had on the rest of our lives. It’s all worse, though, when we don’t do simple things like wearing masks and socially distancing. As October comes to a close, please be kind to each other and remember that we help each other, and ourselves, when we focus on defeating the virus rather than arguing with each other.”

 

For additional information, including up-to-date lists of positive cases and deaths, as well as breakdowns of coronavirus infections by county, race and ethnicity, click here. To see all recent daily reports, click here.

 

Information about COVID-19 and schools is also being made available. To view the reports, click here for K-12 and here for colleges and universities.

 

More Information
Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and daily summaries of the Governor’s news conference at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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ADAIR CO. BOIL WATER ADVISORY LIFTED 10/23/20

 
As of 2:35 p.m. on Friday, October 23, 2020 the Adair County boil water advisory for customers from 610 Campbellsville Road to 1125 Campbellsville Road and all side roads in between has been lifted by the Division of Water. This means your water is safe for human consumption. You no longer have to boil your water.
 

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1457 New Cases; 16 More Deaths; Masks Crucial As Cases Rise Across KY....

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Oct. 23, 2020) – Gov. Andy Beshear on Friday said Kentuckians must wear masks to prevent further spread of the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) as cases rise across Kentucky and the rest of the United States.

 

“This week has been a tough week, with three out of the five highest days for new COVID-19 cases,” said Gov. Beshear. “This virus is everywhere. It is in your community. We need every community doing what it takes to defeat it.”

 

The Governor will finish his two-week quarantine tomorrow morning. The First Family has recently tested negative for the virus four times. 

 

“Wear a mask. It saves lives. I’ve now tested negative four straight times after sitting in the passenger seat next to someone driving who was infectious with COVID,” said Gov. Beshear. “I was wearing a mask. He was wearing a mask. That shows you that it works.”

 

Case Information
As of 3:00pmCT on Friday, Oct. 23, 2020 Gov. Beshear reported the following COVID-19 numbers:

  • New cases today: 1,457
  • New deaths today: 16
  • Positivity rate: 5.34%
  • Total deaths: 1,396
  • Currently hospitalized: 819
  • Currently in ICU: 205
  • Currently on ventilator: 97

 

Top counties with the most positive cases today are: Jefferson, Fayette, Warren, Hardin and Barren.

 

Those reported lost to the virus today include a 69-year-old woman from Boyd County; two women, ages 77 and 84, from Daviess County; a 71-year-old woman from Fayette County; three women, ages 84, 101 and 102, and three men, ages 73, 76 and 84, from Jefferson County; a 64-year-old man from Knott County; an 87-year-old woman from Lee County; an 84-year-old woman from Leslie County; a 75-year-old woman from Logan County; an 86-year-old woman from Marshall County; and an 80-year-old man from Todd County.

 

Week in Review
This week the Governor announced the Healthy at Home Utility Relief Fund, highlighted how the state is preparing for a surge in COVID-19 cases, shared that the White House is saying Kentuckians in red or orange counties shouldn’t have gatherings at all beyond their immediate families and encouraged families to plan for a safe Halloween. For more on this week’s updates, visit governor.ky.gov/news.

 

More Information
To view the full daily report, incidence rate map, testing locations, long term-care and other congregate facilities update, school reports, the White House Coronavirus Task Force reports for Kentucky and other key guidance visit, kycovid19.ky.gov.

 

Kentuckians can also access translated COVID-19 information and summaries of the Governor’s news conferences at teamkentuckytranslations.com.

 

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57-Year-Old Adair County Woman Dies From COVID-19; 80 New Cases in Lake Cumb. District....

 

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 5.3%.

 

Deaths: We are sad to report 1 new death today from Adair. We have experienced a total of 80 deaths resulting in a 2.05% mortality rate among known cases. This compares with a 1.5% mortality rate at the state level, and a 2.66% morality rate at the national level. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families and friends who have lost loved ones.

 

Hospitalizations: We presently have 26 cases in the hospital. This is equal to yesterday. The most hospitalizations we have had at any one time was 33 on 09/02/2020. We have had a total of 308 hospitalizations resulting in a 7.88% hospitalization rate among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 7.33%. The latest state data shows that 69.95% of ICU beds and 28.89% of ventilator capacity are being utilized.

 

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 3,908 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 1.87% of our total population have been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested.

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 39 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Adair: 8; McCreary: 1; Pulaski: 4; Russell: 6; Taylor: 14; and, Wayne: 6. In all, we have released 85.2% of our total cases.

 

Active (Current) Cases: We added 40 more cases today than we released historic cases. Taking all things into account, this leaves us with 498 active cases in our district across all 10 of our district’s 10 counties. On 10/22/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 498.

 

Where are Cases Tied to: The most common areas to where we are seeing cases tied are (in descending order): Businesses, Schools, Places of Worship, and Medical Facilities.

 

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 80 today: Adair: 15; Casey: 1; Clinton: 4; Cumberland: 6; Green: 3; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 8; Russell: 12; Taylor: 17; and, Wayne: 6. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.016. This means our total case count is projected to double every 43.75 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 10/22/2020 when we added 80 cases.

 

Today’s new cases include:

  • Adair: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 15-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 7-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 44-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 43-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 17-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 52-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Adair: A 75-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Adair: A 77-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Casey: A 60-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 24-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 81-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Clinton: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 16-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 62-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 92-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 30-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Cumberland: A 12-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 59-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Green: A 67-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 39-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 5-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 9-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 2-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 41-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • McCreary: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 46-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 27-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 35-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 25-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 33-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 26-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Pulaski: A 73-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 69-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 7 months-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 15-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Russell: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 86-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 28-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Russell: A 76-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 70-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 20-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 19-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 41-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 64-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 51-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 21-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Taylor: A 22-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 70-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Taylor: A 38-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 63-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 36-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 43-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 22-year-old male who is self-isolated, asymptomatic
  • Wayne: A 45-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic
  • Wayne: A 34-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic

 

The death we report today is a 57-year-old female from Adair County. We are saddened by this death and the large number of hospitalizations we currently have in our district, 26.

 

Unfortunately, for the second day in a row, we broke our all-time single-day new case record. Today we are reporting 80 new cases. We still have 7 counties in the “red-critical” range of community-spread. We are also at the highest number of active cases in our district since the on-set of the outbreak, 498.

 

Please, let’s all continue to do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

 

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 3,908 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 92,491 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 92,299 statewide plus 192 recently reported cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow-up daily with positive cases. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow-up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the Governor’s Executive Orders. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response.

 

For more statistics and local data go to LCDHD COVID-19 Information.

 

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AREA ARRESTS 10-23-20

 

A Columbia man was arrested on several charges yesterday in Russell County by KSP including Escape charges…

 

Brandon Frausto, 26, was taken into custody by KSP Trooper Harper last evening. He was charged with Escape 2nd Degree, Escape 3rd Degree, Assault 2nd Degree (Police Officer), Operating on a Suspended or Revoked License and Possession of Marijuana. Frausto was lodged in the Russell County Detention Center.

 

Jerry Pitcock, 57, of Burkesville, KY was arrested by Deputy Walters with the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office yesterday afternoon. Pitcock was charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance 1st Degree, 1st Offense (Meth), Operating a Motor Vehicle under the Influence Substance, Operating a Vehicle with Expired Operators License and Failure to Produce Insurance Card.

 

 

 

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ADAIR COUNTY INDICTMENTS - 10/22/20

 

An Adair County Grand Jury has returned several indictments. To read them, click on following link:  https://ridingthewave.com/assets/files/ADAIR-COUNTY-INDICTMENTS-OCT-2020.pdf

 

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